• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Albums: 1969 - 2016

• Gene Watson
• Love in the Hot Afternoon
• Because You Believed in Me
• Paper Rosie
• Beautiful Country
• The Best of Gene Watson
• Reflections
• Should I Come Home
• No One Will Ever Know
• The Best of Gene Watson, Volume 2
• Between This Time and The Next Time
• Old Loves Never Die
• Greatest Hits - 1982
• This Dream's On Me
• Sometimes I Get Lucky
• Heartaches, Love & Stuff
• Little by Little
• Texas Saturday Night
• Memories To Burn
• Greatest Hits - 1985
• Starting New Memories
• Honky Tonk Crazy
• Back in the Fire
• Greatest Hits - 1990
• At Last
• In Other Words
• Uncharted Mind
• Best of Gene Watson
• The Good Ole Days
• Jesus is All I Need
• A Way to Survive
• Eighteen Greatest Hits
• From The Heart
• Ultimate Collection
• Love in the Hot Afternoon & Paper Rosie
• Gene Watson Sings
• The Gospel Side of Gene Watson
• Gene Watson: Then & Now
• Because You Believed in Me & Beautiful Country
• Love in the Hot Afternoon (compilation)
• Gene Watson: At His Best
• Gene Watson: Gospel At Its Best
• In a Perfect World
• 14 Carat Mind
• Matters of the Heart
• Reflections & Should I Come Home
• A Taste of the Truth
• 22 Golden Country Greats
• 16 Super Hits
• 40 Greatest Hits
• Memories to Burn & Starting New Memories
• Gene Watson & Rhonda Vincent: Your Money & My Good Looks
• Best of the Best: 25 Greatest Hits
• My Heroes Have Always Been Country
Best of The Capitol Years
Barrooms & Bedrooms: The Capitol & MCA Years
 Real.Country.Music
• Back in the Fire & At Last
• My Gospel Roots



Gene Watson's 'Barrooms & Bedrooms: The Capitol & MCA Years'

Hump Head Country (2016)

Gene Watson's 'Barrooms & Bedrooms: The Capitol & MCA Years' (Hump Head Country, 2016) was officially released on Friday 4 March 2016.

Gene Watson's 'Barrooms & Bedrooms: The Capitol & MCA Years' (Hump Head Country, 2016) discography information is presented on the Gene Watson Fan Site for educational purposes only and no infringement of copyright is intended.

About Gene Watson's 'Barrooms & Bedrooms: The Capitol & MCA Years' (Hump Head Country, 2016)



Liner Notes by Alan Cackett
Gene Watson is sort of a litmus test of country fan-dom.  To younger or casual fans, he is - at most - an old guy who used to have some hit records.

Longtime hardcore country fans, however, revere Watson as one of the genre's truly golden voices, perhaps the best of Lefty Frizzell's many disciples.

The man who enriched country music with such timeless classics as 'Paper Rosie', 'Nothing Sure Looked Good on You', 'Fourteen Carat Mind', 'The Old Man & His Horn' and 'Farewell Party', has always had one of the warmest, most accessible voices in the country field.

The one-time motor repairman, has been making music for close on 50 years, with an impressive 50 country chart hits to his credit, including 20 that have made the Top 10.  He still tours regularly across America and occasionally returns to the UK, where he is held in high esteem.

This collection covers the period from 1975 to 1985 when he recorded for the Capitol and MCA Record labels, producing some of the most impeccable hard-country albums that are easily the equal of anything George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) or Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) released.

'Barrooms & Bedrooms' is a smooth blend of intimate love ballads, break-up songs and pained heartbreakers delivered with fitting and understated polish, Gene Watson’s voice masterfully piercing the music with a strong effect, ranging from redneck rawness to sensuous sensitivity.  The depth of material, coupled with Gene’s aching barroom voice proves to be a perfect match.

A fully-fledged Texan, Gary Gene Watson was born in Palestine, Texas on October 11, 1943, one of seven children of a sawmill worker and crop picker.  He was raised in Paris, Texas in a musical family and played his first professional gig at the age of 13.  He quit school in the 9th grade to help support his family.

In 1963, he moved to Houston, where he found daytime employment in car engine and bodywork repairs.

During the evenings, his vocal style, with its slight nasal sound in the best country tradition, made him a very popular honky-tonk singer around the local clubs. He recorded for several small indie labels throughout the 1960s and early 1970, working alongside Russ Reeder, his manager and producer, in an association that saw them produce an excellent album for Wide World and numerous singles for the Stoneway and Resco label, including 'Bad Water', his first national country hit in 1975.

They then released 'Love in the Hot Afternoon', also on the Resco label. It had previously been recorded (but not released) by Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002) in 1971 and turned down by several other country singers.

Despite this, with exposure on Houston radio stations, it became a sizeable local hit, leading eventually to Capitol Records picking up Gene Watson’s contract and re-releasing the record.

Written by Vince Matthews (1940 - Saturday 22 November 2003) and Kent Westberry, 'Love in the Hot Afternoon' ingrained the Watson philosophy perfectly and became a Top 5 country hit in the summer of 1975.

It was a descriptive ballad that painted a picture of a southern town and two lovers, beautifully produced with Buddy Spicher's fiddle work heightening the drama and Watson’s so casual, almost lazy vocal style creating the perfect atmosphere.

For the follow-up Gene turned to the songwriting talents of Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016), a writer who was to provide the Texas balladeer with many more songs in the next few years. 'Where Love Begins' was another sensual love song with simple, uncluttered piano work leading to some fine steel work from Lloyd Green as the singer almost talks his way to the first chorus, and it was this chorus that ensured the single's great success.

A trio of hits was established with 'You Could Know as Much about a Stranger', a song about the futility of marriage after the partners have grown apart rather than closer together. It's a theme that you will find in many songs that Gene Watson has recorded and one that everyday people can easily relate with.



This led to the release of his first Capitol album, 'Love in the Hot Afternoon' (Capitol Records, 1975) towards the end of 1975.  This was a handy collection of songs that included the three singles already mentioned, plus Vince Matthews' 'This is My Year for Mexico' and the mid-tempo Dallas Frazier song, 'This Just Ain’t No Good Day for Leaving'.  It worked in every department and gave a healthy shove to a career that was already rattling along.



With the release of his second Capitol album, 'Because You Believed in Me' (Capitol Records, 1976), a year later, Gene's legions of fans just kept growing.

That album contained two more hits, the title song and 'Her Body Couldn’t Keep You (off my mind)'.  This latter song was a gutsy Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016) number rendered convincingly by Watson who reached a new level of excellence and sensitivity.

Laid back production, a steady background beat and a dash of steel added to an exceptional record.

Gene Watson was one of those country singers, well-equipped vocally, who had found it a long and difficult task to win any real recognition in America.  The climb to the top had been a hard one and thus he was not a man to be thrown off balance by the recurrence of his name on the charts.

The quiet Texan had built a track record of quality hard-core country hits, yet he had been singing on a semi-professionally basis for fifteen years before he even made it to a major level.  By this time he had decided to turn his part-time singing career into a full-time involvement in country music.

This was not an easy decision for a family man in his mid-thirties to make, but the previous three years had proved conclusively that it was the right choice.  Trying to combine a day-time job as a car mechanic and body repair man with a blossoming and eventually, highly successful singing career, had not been easy, but Gene Watson had stuck doggedly to it.

Unlike so many singers who had made it big in Nashville, Gene Watson resisted all efforts to make him sweeten his records.

Throughout his Capitol albums you'll hear steel guitar from Lloyd Green, the fiddle work of Buddy Spicher and Tommy Williams, excellent lead work either by Dale Sellers, the late Jimmy Colvard (1943 - 1977) or Harold Bradley, and then there's the unobtrusive keyboard work of 'Pig' Robbins.

Production had continued in the capable hands of Russ Reeder, who’d started working with Gene on his early independent releases.  The quality of those early recordings, in terms of musicianship, singing and production, are the equal of the later Capitol Records, and it’s quite mystifying why it took so long for Gene Watson to establish himself on the American country scene.  His choice of material from the very beginning could never be faulted.

Several of those recordings, including a gospel-flavoured rendition of Jackie DeShannon’s 'Bad Water'; a rare Waylon Jennings' song, 'John’s Back in Town', the slightly humorous tale of the wife of a singer's illicit love affair; and a definitive reading of Little Jimmy Dickens' 'If I’m a Fool for Leaving', which he sings with great feeling and affection, are included on this collection - Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 - Friday 2 January 2015).

Gene spoke highly of his former producer and manager on his first UK tour in 1978: 'I owe a lot of my success to the faith and dedication that Russ Reeder has shown in my career. he helped me when no one else wanted to know and he is still there guiding my career and producing the records'.

Once he had joined the major label merry-go-round, the honky-tonk-inspired traditionalist proved to be a quiet, but consistent hit-maker.  He scored Top 10 hits with such classics as 'I Don’t Need a Thing at All', 'Pick the Wildwood Flower', 'Cowboys Don’t Get Lucky All The Time', 'Nothing Sure Looked Good on You', and a revival of 'Farewell Party' (his signature tune and the name of his road band).



It was in the spring of 1977 that Gene Watson first came to the notice of British record buyers.  His third album for Capitol, 'Paper Rosie' (Capitol Records, 1977), gained a British release and brought forth glowing reviews and the all important thumbs-up from British country fans.

The title song, written by Canadian Dallas Harms, deservedly took Gene Watson back into the country Top 10, reaching No.3 in 1977, and established Dallas Harms as one of the top new writers in country music.

It is a superb tear-jerker story with a simple chorus and lyrics that get right to the heart of the listener.  More mellow and convincing than ever, Watson produced an excellent album that effectively displayed his country style.  The smooth production from Russ Reeder utilised more delicate instrumentation and vocalising than on his previous LPs.

The blend resulted in a strong record that really established Watson as one of the best true country singers around.

The guitar work - almost casual - embraces and smoothes Watson’s hard country voice.  Virtually every song is about broken romance, happy memories of the past, leaving or some other depressing subject.

Just give a listen to Gene's interpretation of Ray Griff's 'If The Shoe Fits, Wear It' to sample his great artistry - Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016).

It's significant that Watson can take songs like that, plus the emotive Marty Robbins' speciality 'You Gave Me a Mountain' and claim them as his own.  That's presumably because his style is so strong with his singing, so individual, that it transcends all other versions of the same song.

Another great example of his interpretative powers is his version of 'Most of All Why', an obscure Dolly Parton song also included on the 'Paper Rosie' (Capitol Records, 1977) album.  Most singers of Gene's vintage are unlikely to remember a song that was just tucked away in the middle of an album.  Even some of the younger acts of today can only recall the hit singles.

So, I was amazed when chatting to Gene in 2011, that he not only remembered the song, but even recalled the recording session of more than thirty-five years ago.

'That’s always been one of my favourite songs', he said.  'Dolly was there when I was actually recording that song and she loved the song and loved the way I was singing it.

It really hasn't crossed my mind that much anymore, but I think you’re right - I think that song could be part of the scene today.  It's really a great song'.

Great songs have played an integral role in the Gene Watson career.

Both he, and producer Russ Reeder, have always had an uncanny knack for finding hidden gems that the singer has taken and made his very own.

Joe Allen, who was Gene’s first choice bass player on his recordings, wrote 'One Sided Conversation', a Top 10 hit from 1978, that is devastating in its simplicity of a relationship breakdown.  'He was great and in fact he played for Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) when he came over there to the UK', Gene enthused.

'He played bass guitar for Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) when he was on the road - he was a fantastic bass player, and a fantastic acoustic guitar player.  He's been really very inspirational to my career and especially in the early stages…he wrote a lot of fantastic songs for me.

Another one from back then was
Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004).  Dave was a fantastic songwriter and he also played on a lot of my recording sessions.  Of course, back then, Joe and Dave wrote a lot together.

So, yeah, I think there was one album where I had five Dave Kirby songs with Joe Allen all writing together'.

The songs that writers like Joe Allen and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) wrote were classic country songs.  Though some made it as hit singles, many more were hidden away on albums, but all are well worth listening to again and again.

Some of their best creations would have to include 'I Don’t Need a Thing at All', the mid-tempo honky-tonker 'Should I Come Home (or should I go crazy)', a Top 3 hit in 1979, the sensual 'Bedroom Ballad' from 1980 and the oh-so-simple 'Circle Driveway'.  The by-word of all those songs were meaningful lyrics that got to the very heart and soul of human emotions and relationship issues.

'They’re the kind of songs I love, but of course, you have to keep with the times.

Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004), he passed away.

Joe Allen can write a top song, so there are some out there - then again that’s sort of old school.  I always did love a song that people could relate to, that I could tell them and it had happened to them or tell their life story, or the life story of someone they knew.  Something they could relate to.

I felt that, if I could catch that and do it in that way, then people would enjoy the song.  To have a song that really meant something'.

Underrated songwriter Johnny Russell (Tuesday 23 January 1940 - Tuesday 3 July 2001) is responsible for 'Got No Reason Now for Going Home', a Top 10 hit from 1984 - Watson’s warm baritone wraps around the lyric and brings the song to life with the authority of a man who has been there.

You’ll also find a few story-songs and none are better than Canadian Dallas Harms' 'The Old Man & His Horn'.

It's been quite some time since I'd really listened to this song and it really hits home firstly how well-written this lesser-known gem is, creating such great images, all brought to life by Watson's superb interpretative powers.

Lola Jean Dillon's 'I Know What It’s Like in Her Arms' is another classic country tearjerker.  Then there's the classic country of 'Nothing Sure Looked Good on You', a great version of Hank Williams' 'I Can’t Help It (if I’m still in love with you)' and the honky-tonking 'The Beer at Dorsey’s Bar'.  I hate to have to say it, but it's true, they just don't make country music like that anymore.

In 1981, Gene Watson departed from Capitol Records and signed with MCA Records, but still retained Russ Reeder as his producer.  It was business as usual, with his first single for his new label, 'Between This Time & The Next Time', an excellent Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016) ballad, making the country Top 20.

His third MCA single, 'Fourteen Carat Mind', became his first Billboard No.1 hit at the end of 1981.  He continued to score Top 10 hits with 'Speak Softly (you’re talking to my heart)', 'This Dream’s on Me', 'What She Don't Know Won't Hurt Her', 'You're Out Here Doing What I'm Here Doing Without' and 'Sometimes I Get Lucky & Forget', all hardcore, classic honkytonk country music, right in the midst of the pop-country crossovers of Kenny Rogers, Dolly Parton and Eddie Rabbitt (Thursday 27 November 1941 - Thursday 7 May 1998).

But Gene Watson has survived enough fads to know not to follow them.

'Oh, man, I've come through everything - the pop country thing, the rhinestone cowboys, the Outlaw movement', he declared.  'But I never altered my style.  I just sing good country music and try to give fans their money's worth'.

With that philosophy, he has continued recording and touring on a regular basis.

He moved to Epic Records in 1985, gaining a No.5 hit with 'Memories to Burn', but changed to Warner Brothers Records in 1988, where he immediately repeated the success with 'Don’t Waste it on the Blues'.  Although he charted regularly throughout the 1980s, he failed to find another No.1.



In 1987, he recorded 'Tempted' (written by Alan Turney) with Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998), which appears on her 'Higher Ground' album.



A few years ago, he was slowed down somewhat when he was diagnosed with colon cancer.  He was still reeling from chemotherapy treatment at the time he was recording tracks for his 'From The Heart' (RMG Records, 2001) album in 2001.



In 2007, he recorded 'In a Perfect World' (Shanachie Records, 2007), a duet album that many considered one of the finest releases of the year, with such classic country singers as Connie Smith, Rhonda Vincent, Lee Ann Womack, Vince Gill, Mark Chesnutt and Joe Nichols.



Two years later came the excellent 'A Taste of The Truth' (Shanachie Records, 2009), showing that the Watson man had lost none of his great vocal skills.



Then, in 2014, he recorded 'My Heroes Have Always Been Country' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2014), which had him paying tribute to classic country singers, including Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982), Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016), George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975).

Gene Watson is a veteran country singer who has defiantly refused to give up on his passion for music; a sense of purpose that has formed his entire life.  A somewhat, quiet, unassuming family man, Gene Watson never had aspirations to be a superstar.  He says it’s a status 'that applies if you accept it as that.  I'm one of those guys who stay and sign autographs after the show'.  Those are the words of a genuine superstar - a man who thinks more of meeting his fans than employing the heavies to keep them away from him.

He is a very humble southern gentleman who deserves to be in the Country Music Hall of Fame and is genuinely taken aback by the accolades heaped upon him over the years.  He's never played the Nashville game, preferring to live in his beloved Texas, away from all the music business shenanigans.  'People told me that wouldn't work - I’d never make it', Gene once recalled, and still lives near Houston.  'But when I’m not recording or performing, I want to get away from the music business'.

As a hobby Gene continues to work on cars in his own garage, The Toy Shop, that has been featured on TNN, The Nashville Network.  But it is still his singing career that he cherishes most.  'I never did go looking for country music', he says, 'music found me.  I have a lot to be thankful for.  I always wanted to have a good, consistent career - and I think I've achieved that'.

Liner Notes by Alan Cackett
Visit alancackett.com



Gene Watson's 'Barrooms & Bedrooms: The Capitol & MCA Years'
Hump Head Country (2016)

CD1

1 'Fourteen Carat Mind', which was written by Dallas Frazier & Larry Lee Favorite (Saturday 6 January 1940 - Saturday 26 May 2001)



Gene Watson recorded 'Fourteen Carat Mind', which was written by Dallas Frazier & Larry Lee Favorite (Saturday 6 January 1940 - Saturday 26 May 2001) and included the track on 'Old Loves Never Die' (MCA Records, 1981); the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in January 1982.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Fourteen Carat Mind', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Larry Lee (Saturday 6 January 1940 - Saturday 26 May 2001), and included the track on 'A Way to Survive' (Step One Records, 1997).



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Fourteen Carat Mind', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Larry Lee (Saturday 6 January 1940 - Saturday 26 May 2001), and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

2 'Paper Rosie' (written by Dallas Harms)



Gene Watson recorded 'Paper Rosie' (written by Dallas Harms) and included the track on 'Paper Rosie' (Capitol Records, 1977); the track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1977, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1977.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Paper Rosie' (written by Dallas Harms) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

3 'Nothing Sure Looked Good on You' (written by Jim Rushing)



Gene Watson recorded 'Nothing Sure Looked Good on You' (written by Jim Rushing) and included the track on 'Should I Come Home' (Capitol Records, 1979); the track reached No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1980, and No.3 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1980.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Nothing Sure Looked Good on You' (written by Jim Rushing) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

4 'Love in the Hot Afternoon', which was written by Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 - Saturday 22 November 2003) and Kent Westberry



Gene Watson recorded 'Love in the Hot Afternoon', which was written by Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 - Saturday 22 November 2003) and Kent Westberry, and included the track on 'Love in the Hot Afternoon' (Capitol Records, 1975); the track reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1975.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Love in the Hot Afternoon', which was written by Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 - Saturday 22 November 2003) and Kent Westberry, and included the track on 'The Good Ole Days' (Step One Records, 1996).



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Love in the Hot Afternoon', which was written by Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 - Saturday 22 November 2003) and Kent Westberry, and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

5 'You’re Out Doing What I’m Here Doing Without' (written by Bo Roberts and Allen Frizzell)



Gene Watson recorded 'You’re Out Doing What I’m Here Doing Without' (written by Bo Roberts and Allen Frizzell) and included the track on 'Sometimes I Get Lucky' (MCA Records, 1983); the track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1983, and No.5 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1983.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'You’re Out Doing What I’m Here Doing Without' (written by Bo Roberts and Allen Frizzell) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

6 'Where Love Begins', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016)



Gene Watson recorded 'Where Love Begins', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016), and included the track on 'Love in the Hot Afternoon' (Capitol Records, 1975); the track reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1975, and No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1975.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Where Love Begins', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016), and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

7 'You Could Know as Much About a Stranger' (written by Nadine Bryant)



Gene Watson recorded 'You Could Know as Much About a Stranger' (written by Nadine Bryant) and included the track on 'Love in the Hot Afternoon' (Capitol Records, 1975); the track reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1976, and No.42 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1976.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'You Could Know as Much About a Stranger' (written by Nadine Bryant) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Then & Now' (Koch Records Nashville, 2005).



Gene Watson & Rhonda Vincent recorded 'You Could Know as Much about a Stranger' (written by Nadine Bryant) and included the track on 'Your Money & My Good Looks' (Upper Management Music, 2011).



Gene Watson re-recorded 'You Could Know as Much about a Stranger' (written by Nadine Bryant) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

8 'Because You Believed in Me', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999), Shorty Hall and Gene Vowell

Gene Watson recorded 'Because You Believed in Me', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999), Shorty Hall and Gene Vowell, and included the track on 'Because You Believed in Me' (Capitol Records, 1976); the track reached No.20 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1976.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Because You Believed in Me', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999), Shorty Hall and Gene Vowell, and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

9 'Her Body Couldn't Keep You (Off My Mind)', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016)



Gene Watson recorded 'Her Body Couldn't Keep You (Off My Mind)', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016), and included the track on 'Because You Believed in Me' (Capitol Records, 1976); the track reached No. on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1976.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Her Body Couldn't Keep You (Off My Mind)', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016), and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

10 'I Don't Need a Thing at All' (written by Joe Allen)



Gene Watson recorded 'I Don't Need a Thing at All' (written by Joe Allen) and included the track on 'Beautiful Country' (Capitol Records, 1977); the track reached No.8 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978, and No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1978.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'I Don't Need a Thing at All' (written by Joe Allen) and included the track on 'The Good Ole Days' (Step One Records, 1996).



Gene Watson re-recorded 'I Don't Need a Thing at All' (written by Joe Allen) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

11 'Til You Can Make it on Your Own', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) and Johnny McRae (1929 - Wednesday 3 July 2013)



Gene Watson recorded 'Til You Can Make it on Your Own', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) and Johnny McRae (1929 - Wednesday 3 July 2013), and included the track on 'Paper Rosie' (Capitol Records, 1977).

12 'One Sided Conversation' (written by Joe Allen)



Gene Watson recorded 'One Sided Conversation' (written by Joe Allen) and included the track on 'Reflections' (Capitol Records, 1978); the track reached No.8 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978, and No.6 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1978.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'One Sided Conversation' (written by Joe Allen) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

13 'What She Don’t Know Won’t Hurt Her' (written by Dave Lindsey and Ernie Rowell)



Gene Watson recorded 'What She Don’t Know Won’t Hurt Her' (written by Dave Lindsey and Ernie Rowell) and included the track on 'This Dream's on Me' (MCA Records, 1982); the track reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1983, and No.3 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1983.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'What She Don’t Know Won’t Hurt Her' (written by Dave Lindsey and Ernie Rowell) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

14 'John’s Back in Town', which was written by Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002) and Bill Mack



'John's Back in Town', which was written by Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002) and Bill Mack, was included on a Gene Watson album for the first time with the release of 'The Best of Gene Watson' (Capitol Records, 1978) in 1978.

The track had previously been released, as a 45rpm vinyl single in 1969, as the 'b' side of 'Florence Jean' (written by Country Johnny Mathis), on Uni Records.

15 'Down & Out This Way Again' (written by Joe Allen)



Gene Watson recorded 'Down & Out This Way Again' (written by Joe Allen) and included the track on 'No One Will Ever Know' (Capitol Records, 1980).

16 'Missing You Just Started Hittin’ Home' (written by Warren D. Robb and Shirl Milete)



Gene Watson recorded 'Missing You Just Started Hittin’ Home' (written by Warren D. Robb and Shirl Milete) and included the track on 'Old Loves Never Die' (MCA Records, 1981).

17 'If The Shoe Fits, Wear It', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016)

Gene Watson recorded 'If The Shoe Fits, Wear It', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016), and included the track on 'Paper Rosie' (Capitol Records, 1977).

18 'Bedroom Ballad' (written by Joe Allen)



Gene Watson recorded 'Bedroom Ballad' (written by Joe Allen) and included the track on 'Should I Come Home' (Capitol Records, 1979); the track reached No.18 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1980, and No.43 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1980.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Bedroom Ballad' (written by Joe Allen) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

19 'Speak Softly (You’re Talking to My Heart)' (written by J.D. Mendenhall and Steve Spurgin)



Gene Watson recorded 'Speak Softly (You’re Talking to My Heart)' (written by J.D. Mendenhall and Steve Spurgin) and included the track on 'Old Loves Never Die' (MCA Records, 1981); the track reached No.9 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1982, and No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1982.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Speak Softly (You’re Talking to My Heart)' (written by J.D. Mendenhall and Steve Spurgin) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

20 'No One Will Ever Know', which was written by Mel Foree (Tuesday 25 July 1911 - Sunday 28 October 1990) and Fred Rose (24 August 1898 - Wednesday 1 December 1954)



Gene Watson recorded 'No One Will Ever Know', which was written by Mel Foree (Tuesday 25 July 1911 - Sunday 28 October 1990) and Fred Rose (24 August 1898 - Wednesday 1 December 1954), and included the track on 'No One Will Ever Know' (Capitol Records, 1980); the track reached No.13 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1980, and No.22 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1980.

21 'Between This Time & The Next Time', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016)



Gene Watson recorded 'Between This Time & The Next Time', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016), and included the track on 'Between This Time & The Next Time' (MCA Records, 1981); the track reached No.17 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1981, and No.8 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1981.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Between This Time & The Next Time', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016), and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

22 'Maybe I Should Have Been Listening' (written by Buzz Rabin)



Gene Watson recorded 'Maybe I Should Have Been Listening' (written by Buzz Rabin) and included the track on 'Between This Time & The Next Time' (MCA Records, 1981); the track reached No.23 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1981, and No.12 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1981.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Maybe I Should Have Been Listening' (written by Buzz Rabin) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

23 'Cowboys Don’t Get Lucky All The Time' (album version) (written by Dallas Harms)



Gene Watson recorded 'Cowboys Don’t Get Lucky All The Time' (written by Dallas Harms) and included the track on 'Beautiful Country' (Capitol Records, 1977); the track reached No.11 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978, and No.14 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1978.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Cowboys Don’t Get Lucky All The Time' (written by Dallas Harms) and included the track on 'The Good Ole Days' (Step One Records, 1996).



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Cowboys Don’t Get Lucky All The Time' (written by Dallas Harms) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

24 'Pick The Wildwood Flower' (written by Joe Allen)



Gene Watson recorded 'Pick The Wildwood Flower' (written by Joe Allen) and included the track on 'Reflections' (Capitol Records, 1978); the track reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1979, and No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1979.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Pick The Wildwood Flower' (written by Joe Allen) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

25 'Raisin’ Cane in Texas' (written by D. Lay and Joe Allen)



Gene Watson recorded 'Raisin’ Cane in Texas' (written by D. Lay and Joe Allen) and included the track on 'No One Will Ever Know' (Capitol Records, 1980); the track reached No.15 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1980, and No.53 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1980.



Gene Watson's 'Barrooms & Bedrooms: The Capitol & MCA Years'
Hump Head Country (2016)

CD2
1 'Drinkin’ My Way Back Home', which was written by Don Scaife, Ronny Scaife (1947 - Wednesday 3 November 2010) and Phil Thomas



Gene Watson recorded 'Drinkin’ My Way Back Home', which was written by Don Scaife, Ronny Scaife (1947 - Wednesday 3 November 2010) and Phil Thomas, and included the track on 'Little by Little' (MCA Records, 1984); the track reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1983, and No.8 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1983.



'Drinkin' My Way Back Home', which was written by Don Scaife, Ronny Scaife (1947 - Wednesday 3 November 2010) and Phil Thomas, was also included on Gene Watson's 'Texas Saturday Night' (MCA Records / Curb Records, 1985).



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Drinkin' My Way Back Home', which was written by Don Scaife, Ronny Scaife (1947 - Wednesday 3 November 2010) and Phil Thomas), and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

2 'Sometimes I Get Lucky & Forget', which was written by Bobby Lee House (Friday 11 February 1949 - Thursday 25 November 2004) and Ernie Rowell



Gene Watson recorded 'Sometimes I Get Lucky & Forget', which was written by Bobby Lee House (Friday 11 February 1949 - Thursday 25 November 2004) and Ernie Rowell, and included the track on 'Sometimes I Get Lucky' (MCA Records, 1983); the track reached No.9 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1983, and No.16 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1983.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Sometimes I Get Lucky & Forget', which was written by Bobby Lee House (Friday 11 February 1949 - Thursday 25 November 2004) and Ernie Rowell, and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Then & Now' (Koch Records Nashville, 2005).



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Sometimes I Get Lucky & Forget', which was written by Bobby Lee House (Friday 11 February 1949 - Thursday 25 November 2004) and Ernie Rowell, and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

3 'Farewell Party', which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 - Thursday 26 July 2007)



Gene Watson recorded 'Farewell Party', which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 - Thursday 26 July 2007), and included the track on 'Reflections' (Capitol Records, 1978); the track reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1979, and No.9 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1979.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Farewell Party', which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 - Thursday 26 July 2007), and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

4 'Forever Again', which was written by Warren D. Robb and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004)



Gene Watson recorded 'Forever Again', which was written by Warren D. Robb and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and included the track on 'Little by Little' (MCA Records, 1984 / MCA Records, 1990); the track reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1984, and No.18 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1984.

5 'Bad Water' (written by Jackie DeShannon, Jimmy Holiday and Randy Myers)



Gene Watson recorded 'Bad Water' (written by Jackie DeShannon, Jimmy Holiday and Randy Myers) and included the track on 'Love in the Hot Afternoon' (Capitol Records, 1975); the track reached No.87 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1975.

6 'This is My Year for Mexico', which was written by Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 - Saturday 22 November 2003)



Gene Watson recorded 'This is My Year for Mexico', which was written by Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 - Saturday 22 November 2003), and included the track on 'Love in the Hot Afternoon' (Capitol Records, 1975).

7 'This Dream’s on Me' (written by Fred Koller)



Gene Watson recorded 'This Dream’s on Me' (written by Fred Koller) and included the track on 'This Dream's on Me' (MCA Records, 1982); the track reached No.8 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1982, and No.11 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1982.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'This Dream’s on Me' (written by Fred Koller) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

8 'Should I Come Home (or should I go crazy)' (written by Joe Allen)



Gene Watson recorded 'Should I Come Home (or should I go crazy)' (written by Joe Allen) and included the track on 'Should I Come Home' (Capitol Records, 1979); the track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1979, and No.6 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1979.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Should I Come Home (or should I go crazy)' (written by Joe Allen) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

9 'Circle Driveway' (written by Joe Allen)



Gene Watson recorded 'Circle Driveway' (written by Joe Allen) and included the track on 'Should I Come Home' (Capitol Records, 1979).

10 'Little by Little', which was written by Danny Morrison (Sunday 22 April 1945 - Tuesday 14 February 2012) and Larry Keith



Gene Watson recorded 'Little by Little', which was written by Danny Morrison (Sunday 22 April 1945 - Tuesday 14 February 2012) and Larry Keith, and included the track on 'Little by Little' (MCA Records, 1984 / MCA Records, 1990); the track reached No.33 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1984, and No.21 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1984.

11 'This Just Ain’t No Good Day for Leavin' (written by Dallas Frazier and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer)



Gene Watson recorded 'This Just Ain’t No Good Day for Leavin' (written by Dallas Frazier and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer) and included the track on 'Love in the Hot Afternoon' (Capitol Records, 1975).

12 'Shadows on the Wall' (written by Thomas Beckett and Ricci Mareno)



'Shadows on the Wall' (written by Thomas Beckett and Ricci Mareno) was included on a Gene Watson album for the first time with the release of 'The Best of Gene Watson' (Capitol Records, 1978) in 1978; the track had previously been released, as a 45rpm vinyl single in 1972, as the 'b' side of 'I Told a Lie', on Resco Records.

13 'Got No Reason for Goin' Home', which was written by Johnny Russell (Tuesday 23 January 1940 - Tuesday 3 July 2001)



Gene Watson recorded 'Got No Reason for Goin' Home', which was written by Johnny Russell (Tuesday 23 January 1940 - Tuesday 3 July 2001), and included the track on 'Heartaches, Love & Stuff' (MCA Records, 1984); the track reached No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1984, and No.15 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1984.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'Got No Reason for Goin' Home', which was written by Johnny Russell (Tuesday 23 January 1940 - Tuesday 3 July 2001), and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

14 'I'd Settle for Just Crossing Her Mind' (written by Jollie Clifton Hollie)



Gene Watson recorded 'I'd Settle for Just Crossing Her Mind' (written by Jollie Clifton Hollie) and included the track on 'Paper Rosie' (Capitol Records, 1977).

15 'If I'm a Fool for Leaving', which was written by Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 - Friday 2 January 2015) and Skip Graves



Gene Watson recorded 'If I'm a Fool for Leaving', which was written by Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 - Friday 2 January 2015) and Skip Graves, and included the track on 'Gene Watson' (Wide World Records, 1969 & Stoneway Records, 1973).



Gene Watson recorded 'If I'm a Fool for Leaving', which was written by Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 - Friday 2 January 2015) and Skip Graves, and included the track on 'Because You Believed in Me' (Capitol Records, 1976).



Gene Watson re-recorded 'If I'm a Fool for Leaving', which was written by Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 - Friday 2 January 2015) and Skip Graves, and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Then & Now' (Koch Records Nashville, 2005).



Gene Watson re-recorded 'If I’m a Fool for Leaving', which was written by Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 - Friday 2 January 2015) and Skip Graves, and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

16 'Most of All Why' (written by Dolly Parton)



Gene Watson recorded 'Most of All Why' (written by Dolly Parton) and included the track on 'Paper Rosie' (Capitol Records, 1977).

17 'The Ballad of Richard Lindsey' (written by Bob O’Donnell and Billy Troy)



Gene Watson recorded 'The Ballad of Richard Lindsey' (written by Bob O’Donnell and Billy Troy) and included the track on 'Little by Little' (MCA Records, 1984 / MCA Records, 1990).

18 'You Gave Me a Mountain', which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982)



Gene Watson recorded 'You Gave Me a Mountain', which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) and included the track on 'Paper Rosie' (Capitol Records, 1977).



Gene Watson re-recorded 'You Gave Me A Mountain', which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982), and included the track on 'Uncharted Mind' (Step One Records, 1993).

19 'One Hell of a Heartache', which was written by Keith Palmer (Sunday 23 June 1957 - Thursday 13 June 1996) and Janet White Demmans



Gene Watson recorded 'One Hell of a Heartache', which was written by Keith Palmer (Sunday 23 June 1957 - Thursday 13 June 1996) and Janet White Demmans, and included the track on 'Heartaches, Love & Stuff' (MCA Records, 1984); the track reached No.43 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1985, and No.38 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1985.

20 'I Can’t Help It (if I’m still in love with you)', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)



Gene Watson recorded 'I Can’t Help It (if I’m still in love with you)', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953), and included the track on 'Should I Come Home' (Capitol Records, 1979).



Gene Watson's version of Hank Williams' 'I Can't Help It (if I'm still in love with you)' was included on the various artists compilation album, 'A Tribute to Hank Williams' (EMI Records, 1992), which was released in 1992.

Hank Williams' version of 'I Can't Help It (if I'm still in love with you)' reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1951.

21 'I Guess You Had to Be There' (written by Dave Lindsey, Matt Lindsey and Ernie Rowell)



Gene Watson recorded 'I Guess You Had to Be There' (written by Dave Lindsey, Matt Lindsey and Ernie Rowell) and included the track on 'Heartaches, Love & Stuff' (MCA Records, 1984).

22 'I Know What It’s Like in Her Arms' (written by Lola Jean Dillon)



Gene Watson recorded 'I Know What It’s Like in Her Arms' (written by Lola Jean Dillon) and included the track on 'Reflections' (Capitol Records, 1978).

23 'The Beer at Dorsey’s Bar', which was written by Danny Morrison (Sunday 22 April 1945 - Tuesday 14 February 2012) and Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 - Wednesday 1 July 2015)



Gene Watson recorded 'The Beer at Dorsey’s Bar', which was written by Danny Morrison (Sunday 22 April 1945 - Tuesday 14 February 2012) and Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 - Wednesday 1 July 2015), and included the track on 'Should I Come Home' (Capitol Records, 1979).

24 'The Old Man & His Horn' (written by Dallas Harms)



Gene Watson recorded 'The Old Man & His Horn' (written by Dallas Harms) and included the track on 'Beautiful Country' (Capitol Records, 1977); the track reached No.11 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1977, and No.9 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1977.



Gene Watson re-recorded 'The Old Man & His Horn' (written by Dallas Harms) and included the track on 'Gene Watson: Best of The Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

25 'Hey Barnum & Bailey' (written by Jerry Abbott, Charles Stewart and Kenneth Hagler)



Gene Watson recorded 'Hey Barnum & Bailey' (written by Jerry Abbott, Charles Stewart and Kenneth Hagler) and included the track on 'Beautiful Country' (Capitol Records, 1977).

Cover photo by Alan Mercer
Design by Alex Hutchinson at Free Barrabas



Gene Watson's 'Barrooms & Bedrooms: The Capitol & MCA Years'
Hump Head Country (2016)

Album Chart Positions



'Love In The Hot Afternoon'
(Capitol Records, 1975)
Billboard (USA): No.5, 1975




'Because You Believed In Me'
(Capitol Records, 1976)
Billboard (USA): No.24, 1976




'Paper Rosie'
(Capitol Records, 1977)
Billboard (USA): No.22, 1977




'Beautiful Country'
(Capitol Records, 1977)
Billboard (USA): No.32, 1977




'The Best of Gene Watson'
(Capitol Records, 1978)
Billboard (USA): No.29, 1978
Canada: No.12, 1978




'Reflections'
(Capitol Records, 1978)
Billboard (USA): No.23, 1978
Canada: No.14, 1978




'Should I Come Home'
(Capitol Records, 1979)
Billboard (USA): No.16, 1979




'No One Will Ever Know'
(Capitol Records, 1980)
Billboard (USA): No.45, 1980




'Between This Time & The Next Time'
(MCA Records, 1981)
Billboard (USA): No.38, 1981




'Old Loves Never Die'
(MCA Records, 1981)
Billboard (USA): No.57, 1981




'This Dream's On Me'
(MCA Records, 1982)
Billboard (USA): No.27, 1982




'Sometimes I Get Lucky'
(MCA Records, 1983)
Billboard (USA): No.16, 1983




'Little By Little'
(MCA Records, 1984)
Billboard (USA): No.34, 1984




'Heartaches, Love & Stuff'
(MCA Records, 1984)
Billboard (USA): No.21, 1984




'Memories To Burn'
(Epic Records, 1985)
Billboard (USA): No.35, 1985




'Starting New Memories'
(Epic Records, 1986)
Billboard (USA): No.49, 1986




'Honky Tonk Crazy'
(Epic Records, 1987)
Billboard (USA): No.54, 1987




'Back In The Fire'
(Warner Bros. Records, 1988)
Billboard (USA): No.42, 1988




'At Last'
(Warner Bros. Records, 1991)
Billboard (USA): No.74, 1991




'Your Money & My Good Looks'
(with Rhonda Vincent)
(Upper Management Music, 2011)
Billboard (USA): No.56, 2011




'Best of the Best: 25 Greatest Hits' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012)
Billboard (USA): No.64, 2012




'My Heroes Have Always Been Country' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2014)
Billboard (USA): No.48, 2014




'Real.Country.Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)
Billboard (USA): No.

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