• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Webster PR



Webster Public Relations
, PO Box 23015, Nashville, TN 37202

Contact Scott Adkins
Telephone 615-777-6995

Gene Watson Fan Site / Morello Records
Gene Watson Fan Site
Morello Records

Morello Records was launched in July 2012 and brings you the best in country music re-issues.

Many of the releases on Morello Records have never been available on CD before and, as a result, are proving to be welcome additions to music collectors.

Gene Watson on Morello Records

In 2016, Morello Records began to serve the music career of Gene Watson by releasing the first (in a hopeful series of releases) a '2-on-1' CD set.

Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records Records, 2016)

On Friday 11 November 2016, Morello Records released Gene Watson's 'Back in the Fire' (Warner Bros. Records, 1988) & 'At Last' (Warner Bros. Records, 2016) as a special '2-for-1' CD set (WMRLL 66).

Morello Records Releases: July 2012

George Jones: 'The Grand Tour & Alone Again' (Morello Records, 2012) (MRLL1) Released on Monday 23 July 2012

On Monday 23 July 2012, Morello Records released George Jones' (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) 'The Grand Tour & Alone Again' (Morello Records, 2012) as MRLL1.

When Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) was asked 'Who’s your favourite singer?', he responded 'you mean apart from George Jones?'

Here we have two great albums from the greatest voice in country music.

George Jones: 'The Grand Tour' (Epic Records, 1974)

'The Grand Tour' (Epic Records, 1974), which was released in 1974, featured two country music chart singles:

'The Grand Tour', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) (No.1 for one week in August / September 1974)
'Once You’ve Had The Best’, which was written by Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 - Wednesday 19 February 2003) (No.3, 1974)

Music critic Thom Jurek, in a retrospective review, rated it as one of the finest country albums of the 1970s.

George Jones: 'Alone Again' (Epic Records, 1976)

The other featured album, 'Alone Again' (Epic Records, 1976), was originally released in 1976 and includes the No.3 hit single 'Her Name is...' (written by Bobby Braddock).

Other titles reflect the demons George Jones was facing at the time with booze, pills and marital turmoil - 'A Drunk Can’t Be a Man' (written by George Jones and Earl Montgomery), 'Stand on My Own Two Knees' (written by Jan Crutchfield and Roger Bowling) and 'Right Now I’d Come Back & Melt in Her Arms' (written by Jodie Emerson).

Marty Robbins: 'My Woman, My Woman, My Wife & Marty After Midnight' (Morello Records, 2012)

On Monday 23 July 2012Morello Records released Marty Robbins' 
'My Woman My Woman, My Wife & Marty After Midnight' (Morello Records, 2012) as MRLL2.

Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) was one of the greatest talents in country music.

His versatility enabled him to have successful albums covering genres of music such as Western, Hawaiian, Mexican, Rockabilly, Gospel, Pop and Standards.

Marty Robbins: 'My Woman, My Woman, My Wife' (Columbia Records, 1970)

Marty Robbins' album, 'My Woman, My Woman, My Wife' (Columbia Records, 1970), appears here for the first time on CD.

Originally released in 1970, Marty Robbins won a Grammy Award ('Song of the Year') for the title track.  The album reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart and remained there for 35 weeks.

The single, 'My Woman, My Woman, My Wife’ (written by Marty Robbins) reached No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart (No.1 for one week in May 1970) in 1970, and reached No.42 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1970.

Marty Robbins: 'Marty After Midnight' (Columbia Records, 1962)

'Marty After Midnight' (Columbia Records, 1962) shows that he is up there with the best of them as a song stylist, interpreting the great songs from Tin Pan Alley, as well as contributing his own great song, 'Don’t Throw Me Away'.

Morello Records Releases: August 2012

George Jones: 'Bartender’s Blues & Shine On' (Morello Records, 2012)

On Monday 20 August 2012Morello Records released George Jones' (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) 'Bartender’s Blues & Shine On' (Morello Records, 2012) as MRLL3.

'Bartender’s Blues' (Epic Records, 1978) and 'Shine On' (Epic Records, 1983) are two more albums from the fertile back catalogue of country music’s greatest singer.

George Jones: 'Bartender’s Blues' (Epic Records, 1978)

Singer / songwriter James Taylor accompanies George Jones on the track 'Bartender’s Blues' (written by James Taylor); this was released as a single and reached No.6 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978.

The other single taken from the album was 'I’ll Just Take it Out in Love’ (written by Bob McDill), which reached No.11 in 1978.

George Jones: 'Shine On' (Epic Records, 1983)

The 'Shine On' (Epic Records, 1978) album peaked at No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart, but produced the following three smash hit singles:

'Shine On (Shine All Your Sweet Love on Me)', which was written by Bob Morrison and Johnny MacRae (1929 - Wednesday 3 July 2013) (No.3, 1983)
'I Always Get Lucky with You', which was written by Tex Whitson, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016), Freddy Powers (Tuesday 13 October 1931 - Tuesday 21 June 2016) and Gary Church (No.1 for one week in July / August 1983)
'Tennessee Whiskey', which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 - Sunday 24 October 2010) and Dean Dillon (No.2, 1983)

Both albums were produced by the legendary country producer Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015).

Lacy J. Dalton: 'Survivor & Lacy J.' (Morello Records, 2012)

On Monday 20 August 2012Morello Records released Lacy J. Dalton's 
'Survivor & Lacy J.' (Morello Records, 2012) as MRLL4.

Lacy J. Dalton is one of the most under-rated singers in country music.  With a voice closer to Bonnie Raitt than any other country vocalist, Lacy J. Dalton could be described as the female version of Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002).

Lacy J. Dalton: 'Survivor' (Universal Records, 1989)

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Survivor' (Universal Records, 1989), originally released in 1989, produced the following three hit singles:

'The Heart' (written by Kris Kristofferson) (No.13, 1989) / Lacy J. Dalton probably heard Kris Kristofferson's song 'The Heart' when they toured Europe together
'I'm a Survivor' (written by Mark Erwin and Bill Tinker) (No.57, 1989)
'Hard Luck Ace' (written by Aaron Anderson and Lacy J. Dalton) (No.38, 1989)

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Survivor' (Universal Records, 1989) also included the following tracks:

'Walking Wounded' (written by Lewis Anderson and Lacy J. Dalton)
'A Diamond All The Time' (written by Pat Bunch and Mary Ann Kennedy)
'Still Crazy After All These Years' (written by Paul Simon) / this track was the best-known song on the album
'Old Friends', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016), Susanna Clark (Saturday 11 March 1939 - Wednesday 27 June 2012) and Richard Dobson
'Turn to The One' (written by Austin Cunningham and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Me & These Arms' (written by Tony Colton)
'They Don't Make Them Like They Used To' (written by Lewis Anderson and Fred Koller)

Lacy J. Dalton: 'Lacy J.' (Capitol Records, 1990)

The 'Lacy J.' (Capitol Records, 1990) album from 1990 produced the following three singles:

'Black Coffee' (written by Hillary Kanter and Even Stevens)
(No.15 in June 1990) / this track became a line dance favourite
'Where Did We Go Right' / this track was released as a single in 1990, but it did not chart
'Lonesome (as The Night is Long)' / this track was released as a single in 1990, but it did not chart

The album features a duet with Glen Campbell on the track 'Shaky Ground'.

Amazingly, Lacy J. Dalton only won one major award (Academy of Country Music’s 'Top New Female Vocalist' in 1980), but awards mean nothing as those with ears know, here is one of the greatest, smoky-voiced honky tonk singers of all time.

Morello Records Releases: September 2012

Dan Seals: 'Rage On & Rebel Heart' (Morello Records, 2012)

On Monday 17 September 2012Morello Records released Dan Seals' 'Rage On & Rebel Heart' (Morello Records, 2012) as MRLL5.

Dan Seals: 'Rage On' (Capitol Records, 1988)

The 'Rage On' (Capitol Records, 1988) album is regarded by many as Dan Seals’ finest hour.  It includes two Billboard No.1 hit singles, along with a Billboard Top 5 single:

'Addicted' (written by the brilliant singer / songwriter Cheryl Wheeler) (No.1 for one week in September / October 1988)
'Big Wheels in The Moonlight', which was written by Bob McDill and Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009) (No.1 for one week in February 1989)
'They Rage On', which was written by Bob McDill and Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009)(No.5, 1989)

Dan Seals' 'Rage On' (Capitol Records, 1988) also included the following tracks:

'Five Generations of Rock County Wilsons' (written by John Scott Sherrill)
'Twenty-Four Hour Love', which was written by Mac McAnally and Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009)
'Factory Town', which was written by Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009)
'A Heartache Just Around The Bend', which was written by Paul Davis (Wednesday 21 April 1948 - Tuesday 22 April 2008) and Jennifer Kimball
'Maybe I'm Missing You Now' (written by Blackie Farrell and Jennifer Kimball)
'Fool Me Once, Fool Me Twice' (written by K.T. Oslin and William Soden)
'Long, Long Island Nights', which was written by Bob McDill and Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009)
'Those', which was written by Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009)

Personnel involved in the recording of Dan Seals' 'Rage On' (Capitol Records, 1988) included the following:

Baillie & The Boys (Kathie Baillie, Michael Bonagura and Alan LeBoeuf) (background vocals)
Eddie Bayers, Paul Leim and Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) (drums)
Mike Brignardello, David Hungate and Jack Williams (bass guitar)
Dennis Burnside (piano, electric piano)
Larry Byrom, Mark Casstevens and Don Potter (acoustic guitar)
Paul Franklin and Doyle Grisham (steel guitar)
Steve Gibson (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Jim Horn (recorder)
Shane Keister (piano, keyboards, synthesizer)
Mike Lawler (keyboards, drum machine)
Brent Mason (electric rhythm guitar)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (percussion)
Kenny Mims and Billy Walker (electric guitar, electric rhythm guitar)
Mark O'Connor (fiddle, mandolin)
Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009) (vocals, acoustic guitar)
Joe Stanley (electric guitar)

Dan Seals' 'Rage On' (Capitol Records, 1988) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988, and No.18 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1988.

Dan Seals: 'Rebel Heart' (Liberty Records, 1983)

'Rebel Heart' (Liberty Records, 1983) was Dan Seals' debut album for Capitol Records in 1983 and saw his first return to the charts since his success as England Dan with John Ford Coley.

Dan Seals' 'Rebel Heart' (Liberty Records, 1983) produced four chart singles:

'Everybody's Dream Girl', which was written by Van Stephenson (Wednesday 4 November 1953 - Sunday 8 April 2001), Dave Robbins and Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009) (No.18, 1983)
'After You' (written by Paul Battle, Bucky Jones and Chris Waters) (No.28, 1983)
'You Really Go For The Heart' (written by Charlie Black, Jerry Gillespie and Tommy Rocco) (No.37, 1983)
'God Must Be a Cowboy', which was written by Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009) (No.10, 1984)

Dan Seals' debut album, 'Rebel Heart' (Liberty Records, 1983), also included the following tracks:

'Down The Hall' (written by Troy Seals and Mike Reid)
'Up on a Hill', which was written by Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009)
'Candle in The Rain', which was written by Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009)
'On a Night Like This', which was written by Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009)
'The Banker, which was written by Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009)
'Nothin' Left to Do But Cry', which was written by Dave Loggins and Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009)

Dan Seals' debut album, 'Rebel Heart' (Liberty Records, 1983), reached  No.40 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.

Crystal Gayle: 'Crystal Gayle & Somebody Loves You' (Morello Records, 2012)

On Monday 17 September 2012Morello Records released Crystal Gayle's 
'Crystal Gayle & Somebody Loves You' (Morello Records, 2012) as MRLL6.

Crystal Gayle’s first two albums from 1975 set the standard for what would be the start of an internationally successful recording career.

Crystal Gayle: 'Crystal Gayle' (United Artists Records, 1975)

The debut album, 'Crystal Gayle' (United Artists Records, 1975) includes her first recording of 'When I Dream', which was written by Sandy Mason Theoret (Monday 18 December 1939 - Wednesday 1 April 2015), along with the following three chart singles:

'Wrong Road Again' (written by Allen Reynolds) (No.6, 1974)
'Beyond You' (written by Bill Gatzimos and Crystal Gayle) (No.27, 1975)
'This is My Year For Mexico', which was written by Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 - Saturday 22 November 2003) (No.21, 1975)

Crystal Gayle's debut album, 'Crystal Gayle' (United Artists Records, 1975), also included the following tracks:

'A Woman's Heart (is a Handy Place to Be)' (written by Marshall Chapman and Cort Casady)
'Gonna Lay Me Down Beside My Memories', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016)
'You' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Loving You So Long Now' (written by Allen Reynolds)
'Hands', which was written by Sandy Mason Theoret (Monday 18 December 1939 - Wednesday 1 April 2015) and Bill Backer
'Counterfeit Love (I Know You've Got It)', which was written by Paul Craft (Friday 12 August 1938 - Saturday 18 October 2014)

Crystal Gayle: 'Somebody Loves You' (United Artists Records, 1975)

Such was the impact made by 'Crystal Gayle' (United Artists Records, 1975) that the follow-up, 'Somebody Loves You' (United Artists Records, 1975) was rushed out just eight months later, in October 1975.  It made No.11 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart and produced the following two Billboard country music hit singles:

'Somebody Loves You' (written by Allen Reynolds) (No.8, 1975)
'I’ll Get Over You' (written by Richard Leigh) (No.1 for one week in June 1976) / this track gave Crystal Gayle her first Billboard country music No.1 hit single

Crystal Gayle's 'Somebody Loves You' (United Artists Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

'Before I'm Fool Enough (to Give it One More Try)' (written by Allen Reynolds)
'Sweet Baby on My Mind' (written by Jim Owen)
'I Want to Lose Me in You' (written by Jim Rushing and Marshall Chapman)
'High Time' (written by Bobby David)
'What You've Done For Me', which was written by Sandy Mason Theoret (Monday 18 December 1939 - Wednesday 1 April 2015)
'Coming Closer' (written by Crystal Gayle and Bill Gatzimos)
'Dreaming My Dreams with You' (written by Allen Reynolds)
'What I've Been Needin', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016)

Personnel involved in the recording of Crystal Gayle's 'Somebody Loves You' (United Artists Records, 1975) included the following:

Crystal Gayle (vocals)
Jimmy Colvard (1943 - 1977) (electric guitar, acoustic guitar)
Allen Reynolds (acoustic guitar, backing vocals)
Lloyd Green (steel guitar)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Joe Allen (bass)
Shane Keister (keyboards)
Charles Cochran (Saturday 29 February 1936 - Thursday 7 June 2007) (keyboards, string arrangements)
Kenny Malone (drums, percussion)
Garth Fundis and Janie Fricke (backing vocals)

Morello Records Releases: October 2012

Glen Campbell, Bobbie Gentry & Anne Murray: 'Bobbie Gentry & Glen Campbell and Anne Murray / Glen Campbell' (Morello Records, 2012)

On Monday 15 October 2012Morello Records released 'Bobbie Gentry & Glen Campbell and Anne Murray / Glen Campbell' (Morello Records, 2012) as MRLL7.

Bobbie Gentry & Glen Campbell: 'Bobbie Gentry & Glen Campbell' (Capitol Records, 1968)

Bobbie Gentry & Glen Campbell's 'Bobbie Gentry & Glen Campbell' (Capitol Records, 1968), which was released in 1968, produced a 'Gold' record for the duo, reaching No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart, and No.11 on the Billboard pop charts.

Two singles were released from the album, including the following:

'Less of Me' (written by Glen Campbell) (No.44, 1968)
'Let It Be Me' (written by Gilbert Bécaud, Mann Curtis and Pierre Delanoé) (No.14, 1969)

Bobbie Gentry & Glen Campbell's 'Bobbie Gentry & Glen Campbell' (Capitol Records, 1968) also included the following tracks:

'Little Green Apples' (written by Bob Russell)
'Gentle on My Mind', which was written by John Hartford (Thursday 30 December 1937 - Monday 4 June 2001)
'Heart to Heart Talk' (written by Lee Ross)
'My Elusive Dreams', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015)
'(It's Only Your) Imagination' (written by Glen Campbell)
'Mornin' Glory' (written by Bobbie Gentry)
'Terrible Tangled Web' (written by Billy Mize)
'Sunday Mornin' (written by Margo Guryan)
'Scarborough Fair / Canticle' (traditional; arranged by Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel)

'All I Have to Do is Dream', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) and Felice Bryant (Wednesday 7 August 1925 - Tuesday 22 April 2003) was recorded in 1970, so did not feature on the original album, but is included here as a bonus track.  It was a smash hit in the United Kingdom, reaching No.3 in the charts; in the United States, it fared less well, No.27 Pop and No.6 Country.

Musicians involved in the recording of Bobbie Gentry & Glen Campbell's 'Bobbie Gentry & Glen Campbell' (Capitol Records, 1968) included the following:

Glen Campbell (vocals, acoustic guitar)
Bobbie Gentry (vocals)
Dennis McCarthy (keyboards)
Al Casey (acoustic guitar)
Joe Osborn (bass guitar)
Hal Blaine (drums)

Anne Murray & Glen Campbell: 'Anne Murray / Glen Campbell' (Capitol Records, 1971)

'Anne Murray / Glen Campbell' (Capitol Records, 1971) was released in 1971 and included both new material and duet versions of songs that each artist had recorded individually.

The album reached No.4 on the country chart and the single 'I Say a Little Prayer' (written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David) / 'By The Time I Get to Phoenix' (written by Jimmy Webb) made the Top 40.

Anne Murray's recording career was barely a year old when this album was made.  She would, of course, go on to have a fantastic career and become a Canadian treasure.

Anne Murray & Glen Campbell's 'Anne Murray / Glen Campbell' (Capitol Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

'You're Easy to Love' (written by Dave Burgess)
'We All Pull The Load' (written by Bill Graham)
'Canadian Sunset' (written by Eddie Heywood and Norman Gimbel)
'Bring Back The Love' (written by Brent Titcomb and Richard Miller)
'United We Stand' (written by Tony Hiller and Peter Simons)
'Love Story (You & Me)' (written by Randy Newman)
'Ease Your Pain', which was written by Hoyt Axton (Friday 25 March 1938 - Tuesday 26 October 1999)
'Let Me Be The One' (written by Ed Penney Junior and John Domurad)
'My Ecstasy' (written by Dallas Frazier)

Personnel involved in the recording of Anne Murray & Glen Campbell's 'Anne Murray / Glen Campbell' (Capitol Records, 1971) included the following:

Glen Campbell (vocals, acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Anne Murray (vocals)
Bill Graham (bass guitar)

Morello Records Releases: November 2012

Jo-El Sonnier: 'Come On Joe & Have a Little Faith' (Morello Records, 2012)

On Monday 19 November 2012Morello Records released Jo-El Sonnier's 'Come On Joe & Have a Little Faith' (Morello Records, 2012) as MRLL9.

Singer / songwriter / accordionist Jo-El Sonnier’s two most successful albums from 1987 and 1989 on one CD.

Jo-El Sonnier: 'Come On Joe' (RCA Records, 1987)

In 1987, Jo-El Sonnier signed to RCA Records and saw the release of 'Come On Joe' (RCA Records, 1987), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Come On Joe'
 (No.39, 1987)
'No More One More Time', which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Troy Seals (No.7, 1988)
'Tear Stained Letter' (written by Richard Thompson) (No.9, 1988)
'Rainin' in My Heart' (No.35, 1989) / the organ solo on this track was provided by Steve Winwood

The Billboard country music hit singles 'Come On Joe' (No.39, 1987), 'No More One More Time' (No.7, 1988) and 'Tear Stained Letter' (No.9, 1988) thrust Jo-El Sonnier into the limelight and allowed him more creativity with his Cajun-based roots.

Jo-El Sonnier's 'Come On Joe' (RCA Records, 1987) reached No.17 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1987.

Jo-El Sonnier also played accordion on albums by Alan Jackson, Neil Diamond, Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003), Elvis Costello, Emmylou Harris, Hank Williams Junior, Bob Dylan and George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013).

In 1987, Jo-El Sonnier was named 'New Country Artist of the Year' by Performance Magazine.

Jo-El Sonnier wrote songs for Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003), George Strait, Mel McDaniel (Sunday 6 September 1942 - Thursday 31 March 2011), John Anderson and Jerry Lee Lewis.

Jo-El Sonnier: 'Have a Little Faith' (RCA Records, 1989)

In December 1989, Jo-El Sonnier saw the release of 'Have a Little Faith' (RCA Records, 1989), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'(Blue, Blue, Blue) Blue, Blue'
 (No.47, 1989)
'If Your Heart Should Ever Roll This Way Again' (No.24, 1990)
'The Scene of The Crime' (No.65, 1990)

People magazine voted Jo-El Sonnier's 'Come On Joe' (RCA Records, 1987) one of the ten best albums of 1987 and was the only Nashville-recorded album in the Top 10.

Jo-El Sonnier is one of the most sought after session musicians having worked with Neil Diamond, Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003), Elvis Costello, Mark Knopfler, Robert Cray, Alan Jackson, Hank Williams Junior, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Dolly Parton.

The King of Country / Cajun, Jo-El Sonnier, who was once known as 'The Cajun Valentino', was inducted into The Louisiana Hall of Fame in 2011.

Earl Thomas Conley: 'Greatest Hits & The Heart of It All' (Morello Records, 2012)

On Monday 19 November 2012
Morello Records released Earl Thomas Conley's 'Greatest Hits & The Heart of It All' (Morello Records, 2012) as MRLL10.

Earl Thomas Conley was one of the most successful country singers of the 1980s.

Earl Thomas Conley's eighteen Billboard No.1 country singles during the 1980s marked the largest number of No.1 hits by any artist in any genre during that decade.  This coupling features fifteen chart hits, fourteen of which reached No.1.

Earl Thomas Conley: 'Greatest Hits' (RCA Records, 1985)

Earl Thomas Conley's 'Greatest Hits' (RCA Records, 1985), his first compilation album, was released in September 1985, and included the following tracks:

'Nobody Falls Like a Fool' (written by Peter McCann and Mark Wright) (No.1 for one week in December 1985)
'Holding Her & Loving You' (written by Walt Aldridge and Tommy Brasfield) (No.1 for one week in November / December 1983)
'Somewhere Between Right & Wrong' (written by Earl Thomas Conley) (No.1 for one week in December 1982)
'Angel in Disguise' (written by Earl Thomas Conley and Randy Scruggs) (No.1 for one week in July / August 1984)
'Fire & Smoke' (written by Earl Thomas Conley) (No.1 for one week in July 1981)
'Once in a Blue Moon' (written by Tommy Brasfield and Robert Byrne) (No.1 for one week in April / May 1986)
'I Have Loved You Girl (But Not Like This Before)' (written by Earl Thomas Conley) (No.87, 1975 / No.2 in April 1983)
'Don't Make It Easy For Me' (written by Earl Thomas Conley and Randy Scruggs) (No.1 for one week in April 1984)
'Your Love's on The Line' (written by Earl Thomas Conley and Randy Scruggs) (No.1 for one week in August 1983)
'Silent Treatment' (written by Earl Thomas Conley) (No.7 in February 1981)

Earl Thomas Conley's 'Greatest Hits' (RCA Records, 1985) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.

Earl Thomas Conley: 'The Heart of It All' (RCA Records, 1988)

Earl Thomas Conley's 'The Heart of It All' (RCA Records, 1988) surprisingly only reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1986, but is considered to be undoubtedly one of the finest country albums ever.

Earl Thomas Conley's 'The Heart of It All' (RCA Records, 1988) included five tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'What She Is (is a Woman in Love)' (written by Bob McDill and Paul Harrison) (No.1 for one week in June 1988)
'We Believe in Happy Endings' (written by Bob McDill) (No.1 for one week in October 1988) / this track was a duet with Emmylou Harris
'What I'd Say' (written by Robert Byrne and Will Robinson) (No.1 for one week in February 1989)
'Love Out Loud' (written by Thom Schuyler) (No.1 for one week in June 1989)
'You Must Not Be Drinking Enough' (written by Danny Kortchmar) (No.26, 1989)

Earl Thomas Conley's 'The Heart of It All' (RCA Records, 1988) also included the following tracks:

'No Chance, No Dance'
'I Love the Way He Left You'
'Finally Friday'
'Too Far from The Heart of It All'
'Carol'

Throughout his career, Earl Thomas Conley's music has been referred to as 'thinking man's country'.  All I know is that country music really doesn't get any better than this!

Morello Records Releases: February 2013

Marty Robbins: 'The Legend & Come Back to Me' (Morello Records, 2013)

On Friday 19 February 2013Morello Records released Marty Robbins' 'The Legend & Come Back to Me' (Morello Records, 2013) as MRLL12.

Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) was one of the greatest talents in country music.  His versatility enabled him to have successful albums covering genres of music such as Western, Hawaiian, Mexican, Rockabilly, Gospel, Pop and Standards.

Marty Robbins: 'The Legend' (Columbia Records, 1981)

'The Legend' (Columbia Records, 1981) and 'Come Back to Me' (Columbia Records, 1982) were released in 1981 and 1982.  These were the last two completed studio albums Marty released before his untimely death on Wednesday 8 December 1982.

Marty Robbins: 'The Legend' (Columbia Records, 1981) Marty Robbins: 'Come Back to Me' (Columbia Records, 1982)

Marty Robbins' 'The Legend' (Columbia Records, 1981) was recorded at Marty Robbins' own studio, using his own band members, along with other top session musicians and also features The Jordanaires.  The album, which was released in September 1981 was produced by Marty Robbins and Eddy Fox.

Marty Robbins' 'The Legend' (Columbia Records, 1981) included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Jumper Cable Man' (No.83, 1981)
'Teardrops in My Heart' (No.45, 1981)

Marty Robbins: 'Come Back to Me' (Columbia Records, 1982)

Marty Robbins' 'Come Back to Me' (Columbia Records, 1982) included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Some Memories Just Won't Die' (written by Bobby Lee Springfield) (No.10, 1982) / On Monday 6 June 1983, at the 17th Annual Music City News Country Awards in Nashville, the song was named 'Single of the Year' for 1982, giving Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) a posthumous honour
'Tie Your Dream to Mine', which was written by Van Stephenson (Wednesday 4 November 1953 - Sunday 8 April 2001), Dave Robbins, Jeff Silbar and Sam Lorber (No.24, 1982)

Marty Robbins' 'Come Back to Me' (Columbia Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

'It's Not All Over'
'An American Dream' (written by Rodney Crowell)
'Here Your Memory Comes Again'
'First Song That Wasn't the Blues'
'Prayin' For Rain'
'That's All She Wrote'
'Tie Your Dreams to Mine'
'If Her Blue Eyes Don't Get You'
'Lover, Lover'

Marty Robbins' 'Come Back to Me' (Columbia Records, 1982)was produced by Bob Montgomery (Wednesday 12 May 1937 - Thursday 4 December 2014).

Marty Robbins' 'The Legend' (Columbia Records, 1981) and Marty Robbins' 'Come Back to Me' (Columbia Records, 1982) are available for the first time on CD.

Morello Records Releases: April 2013

George Jones: 'Jones Country & You've Still Got a Place in My Heart' (Morello Records, 2013)

On Monday 15 April 2013Morello Records released George Jones'Jones Country & You’ve Still Got a Place in My Heart' (Morello Records, 2013) as MRLL13.

Two original studio albums from the greatest voice in country music.

George Jones: 'Jones Country' (Epic Records, 1983)

George Jones' 'Jones Country' (Epic Records, 1983), which was released in 1983, was a fine album, but has the strange distinction of having the single 'Radio Lover', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016), Ron Hellard and Bucky Jones, released six years later (No.62, 1989).

Ray Charles: 'Friendship' (Columbia Records, 1984)

At the time of the release of George Jones' 'Jones Country' (Epic Records, 1983), his record company were just about to issue the smash hit duet with Ray Charles (Tuesday 23 September 1930 - Thursday 10 June 2004) & Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001), 'We Didn’t See a Thing' (No.6, 1984), from Ray Charles' 'Friendship' (Columbia Records, 1984) album.

This could have been the reason for no initial single releases from George Jones' 'Jones Country' (Epic Records, 1983).

The album's name was taken from an outdoor music park, operated and owned by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) in Texas, near his birthplace, between the years 1983 and 1988.

George Jones' 'Jones Country' (Epic Records, 1983) included the following tracks:

'Dream On' (written by Dennis Lambert and Brian Potter)
'Hello Trouble', which was written by Orville Couch (Thursday 21 February 1935 - Sunday 26 May 2002) and Eddie McDuff (Thursday 20 June 1935 - Friday 3 May 1968)
'Burning Bridges' (written by Walter Scott)
'Wino The Clown', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016), Ron Hellard and Bucky Jones
'You Must Have Walked Across My Mind Again', which was written by Wayne Kemp (Sunday 1 June 1941 - Monday 9 March 2015) and Warren D. Robb
'I'd Rather Die Young' (written by Beasley Smith, Billy Vaughn and Randy Wood)
'Girl at The End of The Bar', which was written by John Anderson and Lionel Alton Delmore (Tuesday 19 March 1940 - Monday 20 May 2002)
'One of These Days (But Not Tonight)' (written by Earl Montgomery)
'Famous Last Words', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016), Ron Hellard and Bucky Jones

George Jones' 'Jones Country' (Epic Records, 1983), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), reached No.27 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.

George Jones: 'You've Still Got a Place in My Heart' (Epic Records, 1984)

George Jones' 'You’ve Still Got a Place in My Heart' (Epic Records, 1984), which was released in 1984, included the following track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'You've Still Got a Place in My Heart', which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 - Thursday 11 September 1969) (No.3, 1984)

George Jones' 'You’ve Still Got a Place in My Heart' (Epic Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

'From Strangers, to Lovers, to Friends' (written by Hillman Hall and Glenn Ray)
'(What Love Can Do) The Second Time Around' (written by Joe Chambers and Larry Jenkins)
'Come Sundown' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Even The Bad Times Are Good', which was written by Carl Belew (Tuesday 21 April 1931 - Wednesday 31 October 1990) and Clyde Pitts
'I'm Ragged, But I'm Right', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013)
'Courtin' in The Rain', which was written by T. Texas Tyler (Tuesday 20 June 1916 - Friday 28 January 1972)
'Loveshine' (written by Harlan Sanders)
'Your Lying Blue Eyes' (written by Ken McDuffie)
'Learning to Do Without Me', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999), Dennis Knutson and Buck Moore

George Jones' 'You’ve Still Got a Place in My Heart' (Epic Records, 1984), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), reached No.17 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.

George Jones' 'Jones Country' (Epic Records, 1983) & 'You’ve Still Got a Place in My Heart' (Epic Records, 1984) were released for the first time on CD.

Marty Robbins: 'El Paso City & Adios Amigo' (Morello Records, 2013)

On Monday 15 April 2013Morello Records released Marty Robbins' 'El Paso City & Adios Amigo' (Morello Records, 2013) as MRLL11.

Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) was one of the greatest talents in country music.  His versatility enabled him to have successful albums covering genres of music such as Western, Hawaiian, Mexican, Rockabilly, Gospel, Pop and Standards.

Marty Robbins: 'El Paso City' (Columbia Records, 1976)

Marty Robbins' 'El Paso City' (Columbia Records, 1976), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), was originally released in August 1976, and reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart.

Two singles taken from Marty Robbins' 'El Paso City' (Columbia Records, 1976) also reached No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'El Paso City', which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) (No.1 for two weeks in June / July 1976)
'Among My Souvenirs' (written by Edgar Leslie and Horatio Nicholls) (No.1 for one week in October 1976)

Marty Robbins: 'Adios Amigo' (Columbia Records, 1977)

Marty Robbins' 'Adios Amigo' (Columbia Records, 1977), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982), was originally released in February 1977, and reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart.  Two singles were taken from the album and released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Adios Amigo' (No.4, 1977)
'I Don’t Know Why (I Just Do)', which was written by Frederick Emil Ahlert (19 September 1892 - Tuesday 20 October 1953) and Roy Kenneth Turk (20 September 1892 - Friday 30 November 1934) (No.10, 1977)

Marty Robbins' 'El Paso City' (Columbia Records, 1976) & 'Adios Amigo' (Columbia Records, 1977) were released for the first time on CD.

Morello Records Releases: May 2013

Charley pride: 'There's a Little Bit of Hank in Me and Burgers & Fries' (Morello Records, 2013)

On Monday 13 May 2013Morello Records released Charley Pride's 'There’s a Little Bit of Hank in Me and Burgers & Fries' (Morello Records, 2013) as MRLL14.

Charley Pride is one of the most successful country artists of all time, with 67 Billboard chart hit singles, including 21 No.1s.

Charley Pride was also voted the Country Music Association's 'Male Vocalist of the Year', as well as 'Entertainer of the Year in 1971.

Charley Pride: 'There’s a Little Bit of Hank in Me' (RCA Records, 1980)

Charley Pride's 'There’s a Little Bit of Hank in Me' (RCA Records, 1980) is a tribute to the great Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) and has always been a favourite album among Charley Pride fans.

Reviews of Charley Pride's 'There’s a Little Bit of Hank in Me' (RCA Records, 1980), when released in 1980, praised Charley Pride as being 'a great interpreter' of Hank's songs.

Reaching No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980, Charley Pride's 'There’s a Little Bit of Hank in Me' (RCA Records, 1980) also produced two No.1 singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Honky Tonk Blues', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) (No.1 for one week in April 1980)
'You Win Again', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) (No.1 for one week in July 1980)

Charley Pride's 'There’s a Little Bit of Hank in Me' (RCA Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

'There's a Little Bit of Hank in Me' (written by John Schweers)
'My Son Calls Another Man Daddy', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) and Jewell House)
'Moanin' The Blues', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'Mansion on The Hill', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) and Fred Rose (Floyd Jenkins) (24 August 1898 - Wednesday 1 December 1954)
'Mind Your Own Business', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'I Can't Help It (if I'm Still in Love with You)', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'Low Down Blues, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'I Could Never Be Ashamed of You', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'Why Don't You Love Me', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)

Charley Pride: 'Burgers & Fries' (RCA Records, 1978)

Charley Pride's 'Burgers & Fries' (RCA Records, 1978) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978, and produced three hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'When I Stop Leaving (I’ll Be Gone)', which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 - Saturday 27 December 1997) (No.3, 1978)
'Burgers & Fries', which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 - Wednesday 25 May 2005) (No.2, 1978)
'Where Do I Put Her Memory' (written by Jim Weatherly) (No.1 for one week in April / May 1979)

Charley Pride's 'Burgers & Fries' (RCA Records, 1978) was released for the first time on CD.

Paul Overstreet: 'Sowin' Love & Heroes' (Morello Records, 2013)

On Monday 13 May 2013Morello Records released Paul Overstreet's 'Sowin’ Love & Heroes' (Morello Records, 2013) as MRLL15.

Two fantastic albums originally released in 1989 and 1991 from the great singer / songwriter Paul Overstreet.

'Sowin' Love' (RCA Nashville Records, 1989) spent 62 weeks on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart, while 'Heroes' (RCA Nashville Records, 1991) spent 59 weeks on the chart.  The combination of these two albums features eight Billboard Top 10 singles.

Paul Overstreet: 'Sowin' Love' (RCA Nashville Records, 1989)

Paul Overstreet's 'Sowin' Love' (RCA Nashville Records, 1989) included five tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Love Helps Those' (written by Paul Overstreet) (No.3, 1988)
'Sowin' Love' (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz) (No.9, 1989)
'All The Fun' (written by Paul Overstreet and Taylor Dunn) (No.5, 1989)
'Seein' My Father in Me' (written by Paul Overstreet and Taylor Dunn) (No.2, 1990)
'Richest Man on Earth' (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz) (No.3, 1990)

Paul Overstreet's 'Sowin' Love' (RCA Nashville Records, 1989) also included the following tracks:

'Call The Preacher' (written by Paul Overstreet)
'Love Never Sleeps' (written by Paul Overstreet)
'Dig Another Well' (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
'What God Has Joined Together', which was written by Paul Overstreet and Paul Davis (Wednesday 21 April 1948 - Tuesday 22 April 2008)
'Homemaker' (written by Paul Overstreet and Eugene D. Tyler)
'Neath The Light of Your Love' (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)

Paul Overstreet's 'Sowin' Love' (RCA Nashville Records, 1989) reached No.13 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1989, and No.31 on the Billboard Top Christian Albums Chart in 1989.

Paul Overstreet: 'Heroes' (RCA Nashville Records, 1991)

Paul Overstreet's 'Heroes' (RCA Nashville Records, 1991) included five tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Daddy's Come Around' (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz) (No.1 for one week in February 1991)
'Heroes' (written by Paul Overstreet and Claire Cloninger) (No.4, 1991)
'Ball & Chain' (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz) (No.5, 1991)
'If I Could Bottle This Up' (written by Paul Overstreet and Dean Dillon) (No.30, 1991)
'Billy Can't Read' (written by Paul Overstreet and Jerry Michael) (No.57, 1992)

Paul Overstreet's 'Heroes' (RCA Nashville Records, 1991) also included the following tracks:

'Love Lives On' (written by Paul Overstreet and Taylor Dunn)
'I'm So Glad I was Dreaming' (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
'Straight & Narrow' (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
'She Supports Her Man' (written by Paul Overstreet)
'Til The Mountains Disappear' (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
'The Calm at The Center of My Storm' (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)

Personnel involved in the recording of Paul Overstreet's 'Heroes' (RCA Nashville Records, 1991) included the following:

Mike Brignardello and Bob Wray (bass guitar)
Paul Franklin (pedal steel guitar, lap steel guitar, pedabro)
Steve Gibson (acoustic guitar, mandolin)
Rob Hajacos and Mark O'Connor (fiddle)
Christopher Harris, Jana King, Janie Lambert, Chris Rodriguez, Lisa Silver, Pam Tillis, Bergen White and Trisha Yearwood (background vocals)
Shane Keister (keyboards)
Paul Leim (drums)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (percussion, harmonica, tambourine)
Jerry McPherson (electric guitar, tremolo guitar, E-bow, gut string guitar)
Paul Overstreet (lead vocals, background vocals)
Don Potter (acoustic guitar)
Reggie Young (electric guitar)

Paul Overstreet's 'Heroes' (RCA Nashville Records, 1991) reached No.17 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1991, and No.21 on the Billboard Top Christian Albums Chart in 1991.

Even though Paul Overstreet has had a successful recording career, it is his songwriting that has brought him the greatest success. Paul Overstreet has written 27 Billboard Top 10 singles with Grammy Awards given for 'Forever & Ever Amen' (recorded by Randy Travis) and 'Love Can Build a Bridge' (recorded by The Judds).

Other notable songs are 'When You Say Nothing at All', major hits for Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989), Alison Krauss and Ronan Keating, and 'On The Other Hand' (recorded by Randy Travis).

Paul Overstreet's breakthrough composition, 'Same Ole Me', was a big hit for George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) & The Oak Ridge Boys in 1982, reaching No.5.

BMI honoured Paul Overstreet as 'Songwriter of the Year' for five consecutive years from 1987 to 1991, an achievement that has not been reached before or since.  No-one writes songs about love and family better than Paul Overstreet.

Paul Overstreet was inducted into The Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2003.

Morello Records Releases: June 2013

Dean Dillon: 'Slick Nickel & I've Learned to Live' (Morello Records, 2013)

On Monday 17 June 2013Morello Records released Dean Dillon's 'Slick Nickel & I’ve Learned to Live' (Morello Records, 2013) as MRLL17.

The great singer / songwriter Dean Dillon was born in 1955 in Lake City, Tennessee.

Dean Dillon had 20 chart hits between 1979 and 1993, 17 of which were solo efforts, plus 3 duets with Gary Stewart ().

Dean Dillon: 'Slick Nickel' (Capitol Records, 1988) Dean Dillon: 'I’ve Learned to Live' (Capitol Records, 1989)

Dean Dillon's 'Slick Nickel' (Capitol Records, 1988) from 1988 and 'I’ve Learned to Live' (Capitol Records, 1989) from 1989 were the two albums that Dean recorded for Capitol Records.

Dean Dillon has had more than 50 songs recorded by George Strait; these include the following No.1 hit singles:

'The Chair', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010) and Dean Dillon (No.1 for one week in December 1985)
'Easy Come, Easy Go' (written by Aaron Barker and Dean Dillon) (No.1 for one week in October 1993)
'If I Know Me' (written by Pam Belford and Dean Dillon) (No.1 for one week in May 1991)
'Ocean Front Property', which was written by Dean Dillon, Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010) and Royce Porter (No.1 for one week in April 1987)
'Famous Last Words of a Fool' (written by Dean Dillon and Rex Huston) (No.1 for one week in April 1988)
'I’ve Come to Expect it From You' (written by Buddy Cannon and Dean Dillon) (No.1 for four weeks in December 1990 / January 1991)
'It Ain’t Cool to Be Crazy About You' (written by Dean Dillon and Royce Porter) (No.1 for one week in December 1986)
'The Best Day' (written by Dean Dillon and Carson Chamberlain) (No.1 for two weeks in April / May 2000)
'Nobody in His Right Mind Would Have Left Her' (written by Dean Dillon) (No.1 for one week in August 1986)

In 2002, Dean Dillon was inducted into The Nashville Songwriters’ Hall of Fame, along with Bob Dylan and Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 - Saturday 8 May 1999 / Sunday 9 May 1999).

Dean Dillon: 'Slick Nickel' (Capitol Records, 1988)

Dean Dillon's 'Slick Nickel' (Capitol Records, 1988) included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'The New Never Wore Off My Sweet Baby' (No.51, 1988)
'I Go to Pieces' (No.39, 1988)
'Hey Heart' (No.58, 1989)

Dean Dillon: 'I’ve Learned to Live' (Capitol Records, 1989)

Dean Dillon's 'I’ve Learned to Live' (Capitol Records, 1989) included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'It's Love That Makes You Sexy' (No.61, 1989)
'Back in The Swing of Things' (No.89, 1989)

George Jones & Johnny Paycheck's 'Double Trouble' and George Jones & Merle Haggard's 'A Taste of Yesterday's Wine' (Morello Records, 2013)

On Monday 17 June 2013Morello Records released George Jones & Johnny Paycheck's 'Double Trouble' and George Jones & Merle Haggard's 'A Taste of Yesterday's Wine' (Morello Records, 2013) as MRLL18.

George Jones & Johnny Paycheck: 'Double Trouble' (Epic Records, 1980)

In 1980, the two bad boys of country music, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 - Wednesday 19 February 2003), saw the release of 'Double Trouble' (Epic Records, 1980), an album comprising mainly rock and roll classics - no-one was going to have more fun in the studio than George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 - Wednesday 19 February 2003).

George Jones & Johnny Paycheck's 'Double Trouble' (Epic Records, 1980) included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Maybellene' (written by Chuck Berry) (No.7, 1978)
'You Can Have Her' (written by William S. Cook)
(No.14, 1979)
'When You're Ugly Like Us (You Just Naturally Got to Be Cool)' (written by Don Goodman and Rick Schulman) (No.31, 1980)
'You Better Move On', which was written by Arthur Alexander (Friday 10 May 1940 - Wednesday 9 June 1993) (No.18, 1980)

George Jones & Johnny Paycheck's 'Double Trouble' (Epic Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

'Along Came Jones', which was written by Jerry Leiber (Tuesday 25 April 1933 - Monday 22 August 2011) and Mike Stoller)
'Proud Mary' (written by John Fogerty)
'Smack Dab in The Middle' (written by Charles Calhoun)
'Roll Over Beethoven' (written by Chuck Berry)
'Kansas City', which was written by Jerry Leiber (Tuesday 25 April 1933 - Monday 22 August 2011) and Mike Stoller
'Tutti Frutti' (written by Richard Penniman and Dorothy LaBostrie)
'You Better Move On', which was written by Arthur Alexander (Friday 10 May 1940 - Wednesday 9 June 1993)

Personnel involved in the recording of George Jones & Johnny Paycheck's 'Double Trouble' (Epic Records, 1980) included the following:

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 - Wednesday 19 February 2003): (vocals)
Billy Sanford, Cliff Parker and Tommy Allsup (guitar)
Jim Murphy (pedal steel guitar)
Stephen R. Shaffer (bass guitar)
Jerry Kroon (drums)
Bobby Wood (piano)

Merle Haggard & George Jones: 'A Taste of Yesterday’s Wine' (Epic Records, 1982)

'A Taste of Yesterday’s Wine' (Epic Records, 1982), which was released in 1982, was Merle Haggard & George Jones' first album together, which reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart.  Two singles charted from the collection:

'Yesterday's Wine' (written by Willie Nelson) (No.1 for one week in October 1982)
'C.C. Waterback', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) (No.10, 1982)

Two songs were written as tributes to the singers, 'Silver Eagle' for Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) and 'No Show Jones' for George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013).

Merle Haggard's then wife Leona Williams is featured on backing vocals.

Both albums were produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015).

Merle Haggard & George Jones'A Taste of Yesterday’s Wine' (Epic Records, 1982) included the following tracks:

'Yesterday's Wine' (written by Willie Nelson) (No.1 for one week in October 1982)
'I Haven't Found Her Yet', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 - Wednesday 19 February 2003)
'I Think I've Found a Way', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'Silver Eagle', which was written by Gary Church and Freddy Powers (Tuesday 13 October 1931 - Tuesday 21 June 2016) / this track was written as a tribute to Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'Mobile Bay', which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016)
'C.C. Waterback', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'The Brothers', which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004)
'Must've Been Drunk', which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004) and Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009)
'After I Sing All My Songs' (written by Leona Williams)
'No Show Jones', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Glenn Martin / this track was written as a tribute to George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013)

Morello Records Releases: July 2013

Marty Robbins: 'By The Time I Get to Phoenix & Tonight Carmen' (Morello Records, 2016)

On Monday 15 July 2013Morello Records released Marty Robbins' 'By The Time I Get to Phoenix & Tonight Carmen' (Morello Records, 2013) as MRLL19.

Marty Robbins’ career was lengthy, even by country music standards; he released his first single in 1952 and performed right up to his death three decades later.

The two titles paired here were recorded in the 1960s, a period when Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) was one of the biggest names in country music.  He registered 31 hits, 13 of which crossed over to the Billboard pop music singles chart, and was declared 'Man of the Decade' by the Academy of Country Music (ACM).

Marty Robbins: 'By The Time I Get to Phoenix' (Columbia Records, 1968)

Released in 1968, Marty Robbins' 'By The Time I Get to Phoenix' (Columbia Records, 1968) featured some of Marty's favourite songs, plus four Robbins' compositions.  This album showcases his tremendous range and ability to cross musical genres.

Marty Robbins' 'By The Time I Get to Phoenix' (Columbia Records, 1968) included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Love is in The Air' (No.10, 1968)

Marty Robbins' 'By The Time I Get to Phoenix' (Columbia Records, 1968) also included the following tracks:

'Padre' (written by Alain Romans and Paul Francis Webster)
'That Old Feeling' (written by Lew Brown and Sammy Fain)
'To Be in Love with Her', which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982)
'Love is Blue' (written by Pierre Cour and André Popp)
'As Time Goes By' (written by Herman Hupfeld)
'Yesterday', which was written by John Lennon (Wednesday 9 October 1940 - Monday 8 December 1980) and Paul McCartney
'By the Time I Get to Phoenix' (written by Jimmy Webb)
'Virginia', which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982)
'Am I That Easy to Forget?', which was written by Carl Belew (Tuesday 21 April 1931 - Wednesday 31 October 1990) and W.S. Stevenson
'You Made Me Love You' (written by Joseph McCarthy and James V. Monaco)
'Until We Meet Again', which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982)

Marty Robbins' 'By The Time I Get to Phoenix' (Columbia Records, 1968) reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968, and spent 19 weeks on the chart.

Marty Robbins: 'Tonight Carmen' (Columbia Records, 1967)

In 1967, Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) saw the release of his Mexican-themed album, 'Tonight Carmen' (Columbia Records, 1967), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Tonight Carmen', which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) (No.1 for one week in July / August 1967)
'The Girl with Gardenias in Her Hair' (written by Joe Byers and Robert Tubert) (No.9, 1967)

Marty Robbins' Mexican-themed album, 'Tonight Carmen' (Columbia Records, 1967), also included the following tracks:

'Waiting in Reno', which was written by Jack Pruett (passed away on Saturday 3 December 2011)
'Is There Anything Left', which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982)
'Love's Gone Away' (written by Bob Binkley and Phoebe Binkley)
'Bound for Old Mexico' (written by Jack Lebsock)
'Don't Go Away, Senor' (written by Jimmy Sweeney)
'In The Valley of The Rio Grande'
'The Mission in Guadalajara' (written by Lee Emerson)
'Chapel Bells Chime' (written by Bob Binkley and Phoebe Binkley)
'Spanish Lullaby' (written by Bill Johnson)

Marty Robbins' Mexican-themed album, 'Tonight Carmen' (Columbia Records, 1967) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1967, and spent 25 weeks on the chart.

Marty Robbins' 'By The Time I Get to Phoenix' (Columbia Records, 1968) and 'Tonight Carmen' (Columbia Records, 1967) appear for the first time on CD.

George Jones: 'Too Wild Too Long & You Oughta Be Here with Me' (Morello Records, 2013)

On Monday 15 July 2013Morello Records released George Jones' 'Too Wild Too Long & You Oughta Be Here with Me' (Morello Records, 2013) as MRLL20.

Ironically for a man whose erratic behaviour won him the nickname ‘No-Show Jones’, country superstar George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) failed to complete his 2013 farewell tour.  His death in April 2013, in the middle of his live swansong, made headlines worldwide, for he had packed much incident and music into his 81 years.

George Jones: 'Too Wild Too Long' (Epic Records, 1987)

George Jones' 'Too Wild Too Long' (Epic Records, 1987), which was released on Tuesday 20 January 1987, included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'The Bird', which was written by Dennis Knutson and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) (No.26, 1987)
'I’m a Survivor' (written by Jim McBride and Keith Stegall)
(No.52, 1988)
'The Old Man No-One Loves' (written by Wyman Asbill) (No.63, 1988)

George Jones' 'Too Wild Too Long' (Epic Records, 1987) also included the following tracks:

'The Real McCoy' (written by Ken Martin and Curt Ryle)
'Too Wild Too Long' (written by Troy Seals and Eddie Setser)
'One Hell of a Song' (written  by Skip Ewing and Mark Sherrill)
'I'm a Long Gone Daddy', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'New Patches', which was written by Tommy Collins (Sunday 28 September 1930 - Tuesday 14 March 2000)
'Moments of Brilliance' (written by Ed Burt)
'The U.S.A. Today', which was written by Ron Hellard and Johnny MacRae (1929 - Wednesday 3 July 2013)

Personnel involved in the recording of George Jones' 'Too Wild Too Long' (Epic Records, 1987) included the following:

Dale Sellers, Billy Sanford, Jimmy Capps and Jerry Kennedy (guitar)
Lloyd Green and Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar on all tracks, except 'I'm a Survivor')
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 - Friday 29 July 1988) (steel guitar on 'I'm a Survivor')
Jerry Kroon and Kenny Malone (drums)
Robert Wray and Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) (bass guitar)
Hank Singer and Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Bobby Ogdin (keyboards)
Bobby Wood and Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Bergen White (strings)
Bergen White (backing vocals)
Louis Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012), Hurshel Wiginton, Doug Clements and Curtis Young (background vocals)

George Jones' 'Too Wild Too Long' (Epic Records, 1987) reached No.14 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1987.

George Jones: 'You Oughta Be Here with Me' (Epic Records, 1990)

George Jones' 'You Oughta Be Here with Me' (Epic Records, 1990), which was released on Monday 20 August, included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Hell Stays Open (All Night Long)', which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 - Tuesday 30 May 2006) / this track was released as a single in 1990, but it did not chart
'Six Foot Deep, Six Foot Down', which was written by Don Cook, Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Charles Rains / this track was released as a single in 1990, but it did not chart

George Jones' 'You Oughta Be Here with Me' (Epic Records, 1990) also included the following tracks:

'You Oughta Be Here with Me', which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 - Sunday 25 October 1992)
'Somebody Always Paints The Wall', which was written by Charles Browder, Elroy Kahanek, Nelson Larkin (1943 - Monday 18 November 2013) and Tommy Smith
'I Sleep Just Like a Baby', which was written by Jesse Chambers, Larry Jenkins and Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015)
'Someone That You Used to Know' (written by Jack Tempchin and Bobby Whitlock) / Bobby Whitlock was associated with Derek & The Dominos, while Jack Tempchin was involved with The Eagles and their early hit singles
'I Want to Grow Old with You' (written by Bobby Braddock)
'A Cold Day in December' (written by Bobby Braddock)
'If the World Don't End Tomorrow', which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015)
'Ol' Red' (written by Don Goodman, Bo Bohan and Mark Sherrill)

George Jones' 'You Oughta Be Here with Me' (Epic Records, 1990) reached No.35 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1990.

Morello Records Releases: August 2013

Suzy Bogguss: 'Give Me Some Wheels & Nobody Love, Nobody Gets Hurt' (Morello Records, 2013)

On Monday 12 August 2013Morello Records released Suzy Bogguss' 'Give Me Some Wheels & Nobody Love, Nobody Gets Hurt' (Morello Records, 2013) as MRLL22.

The road to fame for singer / songwriter Suzy Bogguss began in smalltown Aledo, Illinois where she was born in 1956.

She attracted the attention of a Capitol Records executive whilst she was employed as a singer at Dolly Parton's Dollywood Theme Park in the mid 1980s.

Suzy Bogguss: 'Something Between' (Capitol Records, 1989)

Suzy Bogguss' debut album, 'Something Between' (Capitol Records, 1989) was acclaimed in 1989 for blending the best of old and new country; the title track of the album was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016).

Suzy Bogguss won the Country Music Association's 'Horizon' Award in 1992 and was voted 'Top New Female Vocalist' in 1988 by the Academy of Country Music (ACM).

Here we have Suzy Bogguss' seventh and eighth albums for Capitol Records / Liberty Records from 1996 and 1998, both of which received rave reviews when released.

Suzy Bogguss: 'Give Me Some Wheels' (Liberty Records / Capitol Records, 1996)

Suzy Bogguss' 'Give Me Some Wheels' (Liberty Records / Capitol Records, 1996), which was released on Tuesday 23 July 1996, included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Give Me Some Wheels' (written by Matraca Berg, Suzy Bogguss and Gary Harrison) (No.60, 1996)
'No Way Out' (written by Marcus Hummon and Darrell Scott) (No.53, 1996)
'She Said, He Heard' (written by Suzy Bogguss and Don Schlitz) (No.57, 1997)

Suzy Bogguss' 'Give Me Some Wheels' (Liberty Records / Capitol Records, 1996) also included the following tracks:

'Feeling 'Bout You' (written by Angela Kaset and Don Schlitz)
'Let's Get Real' (written by Bob Regan and Billy Spencer)
'Traveling Light' (written by Tom Shapiro and George Teren)
'Live to Love Another Day' (written by Liz Hengber and Will Robinson)
'Fall' (written by Trey Bruce and Craig Wiseman)
'Saying Goodbye to a Friend' (written by Angela Kaset and Doug Gill)
'Far & Away' (written by Suzy Bogguss and Doug Crider)

Personnel involved in the recording of Suzy Bogguss' 'Give Me Some Wheels' (Liberty Records / Capitol Records, 1996) included the following:

Suzy Bogguss (lead vocals, backing vocals)
Deborah Allen, Gerald Boyd, Beth Nielsen Chapman, Lisa Greg, Steve Hornbeak, Marcus Hummon, Darrell Scott, Karen Staley and Harry Stinson (backing vocals)
David Campbell (string arrangements)
J.T. Corenflos (electric guitar, acoustic guitar)
Billy Crain (acoustic slide guitar)
Bill Cuomo (synthesizer)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Dann Huff and Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Anthony Lamarchina, Lee Larrison, Robert Mason, Pamela Sixfin, Kristin Wilkinson and Alan Umstead (strings)
Matt Rollings (piano)
Tom Roady (percussion)
Leland Sklar (bass guitar)
Michael Spriggs (acoustic guitar)
Lonnie Wilson (drums)
Reese Wynans (Hammond organ)
Jonathan Yudkin (mandolin, fiddle)

Suzy Bogguss' 'Give Me Some Wheels' (Liberty Records / Capitol Records, 1996) reached No.51 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1996.

Suzy Bogguss: 'Nobody Love, Nobody Gets Hurt' (Capitol Records, 1998)

Suzy Bogguss' 'Nobody Love, Nobody Gets Hurt' (Capitol Records, 1998), which was released on Tuesday 2 June 1998, included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Somebody to Love' (written by Suzy Bogguss, Matraca Berg and Doug Crider) (No.33, 1998) / this track featured backing vocals from Gerald Boyd, Harry Stinson and Denny Dadmun-Bixby
'Nobody Love, Nobody Gets Hurt' (written by Bobbie Cryner) (No.63, 1998)
'From Where I Stand' (written by Kim Richey and Tia Sillers) (No.67, 1998) / this track featured backing vocals from Howard Duck and Denny Dadmun-Bixby

Suzy Bogguss' 'Nobody Love, Nobody Gets Hurt' (Capitol Records, 1998) also included the following tracks:

'Just Enough Rope' (written by Michael Lunn and Michael Noble) / this track featured backing vocals from Suzy Bogguss, Gerald Boyd and Harry Stinson
'When I Run' (written by Skip Ewing) / this track featured backing vocals from Doug Crider and Kathy Mattea
'I Wish Hearts Would Break' (written by Tony Arata) / this track featured backing vocals from Darrell Scott
'Family Tree' (written by Doug Crider and Matt Rollings) / this track featured backing vocals from Gerald Boyd and Harry Stinson
'Moonlight & Roses' (written by Cheryl Wheeler)
'Take Me Back' (written by Julie Miller) / this track featured backing vocals from Garth Brooks
'I Surrender' (written by Suzy Bogguss and Doug Crider) / this track featured backing vocals from Gerald Boyd and Patty Loveless
'Train of Thought' (written by Cathy Majeski, Sunny Russ and Stephony Smith) / this track featured backing vocals from Trisha Yearwood and Alison Krauss

Personnel involved in the recording of Suzy Bogguss' 'Nobody Love, Nobody Gets Hurt' (Capitol Records, 1998) included the following:

Pat Bergeson (harmonica on 'Train of Thought')
Dan Dugmore (steel guitar, electric guitar on 'Take Me Back')
Howard Duck (Hammond B-3 organ)
Alison Krauss (viola on 'Moonlight & Roses')
Waldo LaTowsky (percussion)
Matt Rollings (piano, synthesizer)
Brent Rowan (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Darrell Scott (acoustic guitar, Weissenborn, Dobro, mandolin)
Hank Singer (fiddle on 'Just Enough Rope' and 'Take Me Back')
Leland Sklar (bass guitar)
Carlos Vega (drums, percussion)

Suzy Bogguss' 'Nobody Love, Nobody Gets Hurt' (Capitol Records, 1998) reached No.42 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1998.

Morello Records Releases: September 2013

Gary Stewart: 'Out of Hand & Your Place or Mine' (Morello Records, 2013)

On Monday 16 September 2013Morello Records released Gary Stewart's 'Out of Hand & Your Place or Mine' (Morello Records, 2013) as MRLL23.

Gary Stewart was born on Sunday 28 May 1944 and died on Tuesday 16 December 2003 from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.  These are, arguably, the greatest honky-tonk singer's best two albums on one CD.  With his distinctive vibrato voice, no-one sang drinking and cheating songs better than Gary Stewart.

Gary Stewart: 'Out of Hand' (RCA Records, 1975)

Gary Stewart's 'Out of Hand' (RCA Records, 1975), which was released in 1975, has since been critically acclaimed as one of the greatest country / rock albums of all time; it included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Drinkin' Thing', which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 - Monday 20 July 2015) (No.10, 1974)
'Out of Hand', which was written by Jeff Barry and Tom Jans (Monday 9 February 1948 - Sunday 25 March 1984) (No.4, 1974)
'She's Actin' Single (I'm Drinkin' Doubles)', which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 - Monday 20 July 2015) (No.1 for one week in May 1975)

Gary Stewart's 'Out of Hand' (RCA Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

'Honky Tonkin' (written by Troy Seals, Don Goodman, John Bettis and Dave Gillon)
'I See The Want to in Your Eyes', which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 - Monday 20 July 2015)
'This Old Heart Won't Let Go' (written by Jimmie Helms)
Draggin' Shackles', which was written by Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003) and Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988) / • Ann M. Stuckey submitted a 'Peer's Quote' about Gene Watson on Saturday 25 January 2014
'Backslider's Wine' (written by Michael Martin Murphey)
'Sweet Country Red' (written by Troy Seals and Don Goodman)
'Williamson County', which was written by Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003), Mary Lou Stewart (who passed away on Wednesday 26 November 2003) and Rick Durrett

Personnel involved in the recording of Gary Stewart's 'Out of Hand' (RCA Records, 1975) included the following:

Harold Bradley (guitar, bass guitar)
David Briggs, Hargus 'Pig' Robbins and Bobby Wood (piano)
Jerry Carrigan, Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) and Jim Isbell (drums)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 - Friday 29 July 1988), John Hughey (Wednesday 27 December 1933 - Sunday 18 November 2007) and Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Ray Edenton, Jerry Shook and Jerry Stembridge (guitar)
The Jordanaires and The Nashville Edition (vocals, backing vocals)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Bob Moore (double bass)
Dale Sellers and Reggie Young (electric guitar)
Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003) (guitar, piano, vocals)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) (bass)
Tommy Williams (fiddle)

Gary Stewart's 'Out of Hand' (RCA Records, 1975), which was a departure from prevalent country music styles at the time of its release, was a critical as well as a commercial success and has come to be regarded as a classic album in the honky tonk genre.

Gary Stewart's 'Out of Hand' (RCA Records, 1975) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

Gary Stewart: 'Your Place or Mine' (RCA Records, 1977)

Gary Stewart's 'Your Place or Mine' (RCA Records, 1977), which was released in 1977, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Your Place or Mine' (written by Carol Anderson and Rory Bourke) (No.11, 1976)
'Ten Years of This', which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 - Monday 20 July 2015) and Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003) (No.16, 1977) / this track was a personal favourite of Bob Dylan

Gary Stewart's 'Your Place or Mine' (RCA Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

'Rachel' (written by Rodney Crowell)
'Lea'
'Drinking Again'
'The Blue Ribbon Blues' (written by Wayland Holyfield)
'Pretend I Never Happened' (written by Willie Nelson)
'I Had to Get Drunk Last Night' (written by Rodney Crowell)
'I Ain't Living Long Like This' (written by Rodney Crowell)
'Broken Hearted People (Take Me to a Barroom)', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016)
'Dancing Eyes', which was written by Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003)

In addition to his own band, Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003) had some help from Emmylou Harris, Rodney Crowell, Nicolette Larson (Thursday 17 July 1952 - Tuesday 16 December 1997), Sue Richards, Jerry Wallace, and The Jordanaires on backing vocals.

Gary Stewart's 'Your Place or Mine' (RCA Records, 1977) reached No.17 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.

Morello Records Releases: October 2013

Moe Bandy: 'It’s a Cheating Situation & She’s Not Really Cheatin' (She's Just Gettin' Even)' (Morello Records, 2013)

On Monday 16 September 2013Morello Records released Moe Bandy's 'It’s a Cheating Situation & She’s Not Really Cheatin' (She's Just Gettin' Even)' (Morello Records, 2013) as MRLL26.

From his start, playing the honky tonks in and around San Antonio, Texas Moe Bandy was to become one of the most popular and exciting country singers of the 1970s and 1980s.

Along with Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003), Moe Bandy is one of the great exponents of drinking and cheating songs.

Moe Bandy: 'It’s a Cheating Situation' (Columbia Records, 1979)

Moe Bandy's 'It’s a Cheating Situation' (Columbia Records, 1979), which was released in March 1979 and was produced by Ray Baker, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'It’s a Cheating Situation', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Sonny Throckmorton (No.2, 1979) / this track, which featured guest vocals from Janie Fricke, won 'Song of the Year' in 1979 at the Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards
'Barstool Mountain', which was written by Donn Tankersley and Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 - Monday 20 July 2015) (No.9, 1979)

Moe Bandy's 'It’s a Cheating Situation' (Columbia Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

'Cheaters Never Win', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'Conscience Where were You (When I Needed You Last Night)' (written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer and Warren D. Robb)
'Try My Love on for Size', which was written by Herb McCollough (Thursday 18 May 1944 - Tuesday 5 May 2015)
'To Cheat or Not to Cheat' (written by Bobby P. Barker)
'She Stays in The Name of Love', which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004)
'It Just Helps to Keep The Hurt From Hurtin', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006)
'When My Working Girl Comes Home (& Works on Me)', which was written by Carl Belew (Tuesday 21 April 1931 - Wednesday 31 October 1990) and Van Givens
'They Haven't Made The Drink (That Can Get Me Over You)', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'It’s a Cheating Situation' (Columbia Records, 1979) included the following:

Bob Moore
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014)
Leo Jackson
Jerry Carrigan
Reggie Young
Charlie McCoy
Tommy Allsup
Jimmy Capps
Kenny Malone
Tommy Jackson
Ray Edenton
The Jordanaires
Janie Fricke

Moe Bandy's 'It’s a Cheating Situation' (Columbia Records, 1979) reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1979, and remained on the albums chart for 22 weeks.

Moe Bandy: 'She’s Not Really Cheatin' (She's Just Gettin' Even)' (Columbia Records, 1982)

Moe Bandy's 'She’s Not Really Cheatin' (She's Just Gettin' Even)' (Columbia Records, 1982), which was released in April 1982 and was produced by Ray Baker, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'She’s Not Really Cheatin' (She's Just Gettin' Even)' (written by Randy Shaffer) (No.4, 1982)
'Only if There is Another You' (written by Dan Mitchell) (No.12, 1982)

Moe Bandy's 'She’s Not Really Cheatin' (She's Just Gettin' Even)' (Columbia Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

'He's Taking My Place at Your Place' (written by J. Dickens)
'Can I Pick You Up' (written by J. Koonse)
'Hank & Lefty Raised My Country Soul', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'The All American Dream' (written by Dan Mitchell and Kent Blazy)
'Our Love Could Burn Atlanta Down Again' (written by Dan Mitchell)
'Your Memory is Showing All Over Me' (written by J. Dickens)
'An Angel Like You' (written by Rory Bourke and L. Anderson)
'Jesus in a Nashville Jail' (written by D. Crigger)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'She’s Not Really Cheatin' (She's Just Gettin' Even)' (Columbia Records, 1982) included the following:

David Briggs
Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992)
Leo Jackson
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014)
Pete Wade
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014)
Ray Edenton
Charlie McCoy
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins
Jerry Carrigan
Chip Young
Harold Rugg
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015)
Reggie Young
Buddy Spicher
The Jordanaires with Laverna Moore (Wednesday 9 February 1938 - Thursday 28 March 2013)

Moe Bandy's 'She’s Not Really Cheatin' (She's Just Gettin' Even)' (Columbia Records, 1982) reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982, and stayed on the albums chart for 23 weeks.

Morello Records Releases: November 2013

Hank Locklin: '1955 to 1967 & Irish Songs, Country Style' (Morello Records, 2013)


On Monday 11 November 2013Morello Records released Hank Locklin's '1955 to 1967 & Irish Songs, Country Style (expanded edition)' (Morello Records, 2013) as MRLL27D.

Hank Locklin: 'Irish Songs, Country Style' (RCA Victor Records, 1964)

This 50-track, 2-CD set contains the A & B sides of Hank Locklin's biggest hit singles, plus the best-selling album 'Irish Songs, Country Style' (RCA Victor Records, 1964).

When The New York Times published its obituary of Hank Locklin (Friday 15 February 1918 - Sunday 8 March 2009), whose 60-year career ended in 2009, it highlighted the fact that he was one of the first to travel the globe playing country music and is particularly credited with helping to popularise the genre in Ireland.

Key tracks on Hank Locklin's '1955 to 1967 & Irish Songs, Country Style (expanded edition)' (Morello Records, 2013) include the following:

'Please Help Me, I'm Falling', which was written by Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 - Monday 16 March 2015) and Hal Blair (No.1 for 14 weeks in May / June / July / August 1960 / No.8 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1960)
'Geisha Girl' (No.4, 1957)
'It's a Little More Like Heaven' (No.3, 1958)
'We’re Gonna Go Fishin' (No.14, 1962)
'The Country Hall of Fame' (No.8, 1967)
'Send Me The Pillow You Dream On', which was written by Hank Locklin (Friday 15 February 1918 - Sunday 8 March 2009) (No.5, 1958)

Vocal accompaniment on Hank Locklin's 'Irish Songs, Country Style' (RCA Victor Records, 1964) was provided by The Jordanaires.  Recordings produced by Steve Sholes, Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) or Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001).

Hank Locklin's '1955 to 1967 & Irish Songs, Country Style (expanded edition)' (Morello Records, 2013)
Disc One
'Why Baby Why'
'Love or Spite'
'Geisha Girl'
'Livin' Alone'
'Send Me The Pillow You Deam On', which was written by Hank Locklin (Friday 15 February 1918 - Sunday 8 March 2009)
'Why Don't You Haul Off & Love Me'
'It's a Little More Like Heaven'
'Blue Grass Skirt'
'Please Help Me, I'm Falling'
'My Old Home Town'
'One Step Ahead of My Past'
'Toujours Moi (Always Me)'
'From Here to There to You'
'This Song is Just For You'
'Happy Birthday to Me'
'You're The Reason'
'Happy Journey'
'I Need You Now'
'We're Gonna Go Fishin'
'Welcome Home, Mister Blues'
'Flyin' South'
'Behind The Footlights'
'Wooden Soldier'
'Kiss on The Door'
'Followed Closely by My Teardrops'
'You Never Want to Love Me'

Hank Locklin's '1955 to 1967 & Irish Songs, Country Style (expanded edition)' (Morello Records, 2013)
Disc Two
'Forty Nine, Fifty One'
'Faith & Truth'
'The Girls Get Prettier (Every Day)'
'To Him'
'Insurance'
'I Feel a Cry Coming On'
'The Best Part of Loving You'
'The Last Thing on My Mind'
'Hasta Luego'
'Wishing on a Star'
'The Country Hall of Fame'
'Evergreen'
'Irish Songs, Country Style' (RCA Victor Records, 1964)
'The Old Bog Road'
'Too-Ra-Loo-Ra-Loo-Ral (That's an Irish Lullaby)'
'Danny Dear'
'If We Only Had Old Ireland Over Here'
'I'll Take You Home Again, Kathleen'
'My Wild Irish Rose'
'Danny Boy'
'When Irish Eyes Are Smiling'
'A Little Bit of Heaven'
'Galway Bay'
'Kevin Barry'
'Forty Shades of Green', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)

Morello Records Releases: January 2014

David Frizzell: 'The Family’s Fine But This One’s All Mine! & On My Own Again' (Morello Records, 2013)

On Monday 13 January 2014Morello Records released David Frizzell's 'The Family’s Fine But This One’s All Mine! & On My Own Again' (Morello Records, 2013) as MRLL29.

It couldn't have been easy for David Frizzell being the younger brother of country legend Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975), but he achieved great chart success in the 1980s with his Warner / Viva label recordings, both as a solo artist and with his duet recordings with Shelly West.

David Frizzell: 'The Family’s Fine, But This One’s All Mine!' (Viva Records, 1982)

David Frizzell's 'The Family’s Fine, But This One’s All Mine!' (Viva Records, 1982), which was produced by Tommy 'Snuff' Garrett (Tuesday 5 July 1938 - Wednesday 16 December 2015) and Steve Dorff, and released in June 1982, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I’m Gonna Hire a Wino to Decorate Our Home' (written by Dewayne Blackwell) (No.1 for one week in August 1982) / this track was nominated by the Country Music Association (CMA) as 'Song of the Year'
'Lost My Baby Blues', which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 - Wednesday 25 May 2005) (No.5, 1982)

David Frizzell's 'The Family’s Fine, But This One’s All Mine!' (Viva Records, 1982) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982, and remained on the chart for 42 weeks.

David Frizzell: 'On My Own Again' (Viva Records, 1983)

David Frizzell's 'On My Own Again' (Viva Records, 1983), which was produced by Tommy 'Snuff' Garrett (Tuesday 5 July 1938 - Wednesday 16 December 2015) and Steve Dorff, and was released in June 1983, included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Where Are You Spending Your Nights These Days' (No.10, 1983)
'A Million Light Beers Ago' (No.39, 1983)
'Black & White' (No.64, 1984)

The track 'We Won’t Be Hearing 'Always Late' Anymore' featured the voices of all three Frizzell brothers, Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975), David Frizzell and Allen Frizzell.

David Frizzell's 'The Family’s Fine, But This One’s All Mine!' (Viva Records, 1982) and David Frizzell's 'On My Own Again' (Viva Records, 1983) appear for the first time on CD.

David Frizzell's 'The Family’s Fine But This One’s All Mine! & On My Own Again' (Morello Records, 2013)

Full Track Listing
'Lost My Baby Blues'
'As Soon As a Waltz Ain't ¾ Time'
'I’m Gonna Hire a Wino to Decorate Our Home' (written by Dewayne Blackwell) (No.1 for one week in August 1982)
'Maybe There's Love After You After All'
'Lone Star Lonesome'
'I Wish That I Could Hurt That Way Again'
'She's Up to All Her Old Tricks Again'
'Sweet, Sweet Sin'
'Single & Alone'
'Let's Have a Party'
'A Million Light Beers Ago' (No.39, 1983)
'Where Are You Spending Your Nights These Days' (No.10, 1983)
'She's Ready For Someone to Love Her'
'All The King's Memories'
'Survivor'
'She Wanted Me'
'Black & White' (No.64, 1984)
'We're Back in Love Again'
'She's Wants You to Love Her'
'We Won’t Be Hearing 'Always Late' Anymore'

Morello Records Releases: April 2014

Lacy J. Dalton: '16th Avenue & Takin’ It Easy' (Morello Records, 2014)

On Monday 28 April 2014Morello Records released Lacy J. Dalton's '16th Avenue & Takin’ It Easy' (Morello Records, 2014) as MRLL33.

Lacy J. Dalton is one of the most under-rated singers in country music.  With a voice closer to Bonnie Raitt than any other country vocalist, Lacy J. Dalton could be described as the female version of Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002).

Lacy J. Dalton: '16th Avenue' (Columbia Records, 1982)

Lacy J. Dalton's '16th Avenue' (Columbia Records, 1982), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), and was released in June 1982, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Slow Down', which was written by Lacy J. Dalton, Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Mark Sherrill (No.13, 1982)
'16th Avenue' (written by Thom Schuyler) (No.7, 1982) / this track has been hailed as one of the all-time great country music records and is the song most associated with Lacy J. Dalton

Lacy J. Dalton's '16th Avenue' (Columbia Records, 1982) reached No.23 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.

Lacy J. Dalton: 'Takin’ It Easy' (Columbia Records, 1981)

Lacy J. Dalton
's 'Takin’ It Easy' (Columbia Records, 1981), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), and was released in June 1981, included two tracks, which hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Takin’ It Easy', which was written by Lacy J. Dalton, Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Mark Sherrill reached (No.2, 1981)
'Everybody Makes Mistakes' (written by Lacy J. Dalton and Mark Sherrill)
 (No.5, 1981) / this track was a Double A side with 'Wild Turkey'

Lacy J. Dalton
's 'Takin’ It Easy' (Columbia Records, 1981) reached No.12 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1981 and remained on the chart for 39 weeks.

Amazingly, Lacy J. Dalton only won one major award, the (ACM) Academy of Country Music's 'Top New Female Vocalist' in 1980, but awards mean nothing as those with ears will know.  Here is one of the greatest, smoky-voiced honky tonk singers of all time.

Lacy J. Dalton's 
'16th Avenue & Takin’ It Easy' (Morello Records, 2014)

Track Listing
'16th Avenue'
'Rained On'
'Blue-Eyed Blues'
'You Can't Take The Texas Out of Me'
'One of The Unsatisfied'
'Jamaica'
'Heartbeat'
'Slow Down'
'Love It Away'
'Imagine That'
'Takin' It Easy'
'Everybody Makes Mistakes'
'Where Were You When I Needed You'
'Come to Me'
'Comes a Time'
'Wild Turkey'
'Golden Memories'
'Let Me in The Fast Lane'
'Feedin' The Fire'
'Somebody Killed Dewey Jones' Daughter'

Larry Gatlin: 'The Pilgrim & Rain Rainbow' (Morello Records, 2014)

On Monday 28 April 2014Morello Records released Larry Gatlin's 'The Pilgrim & Rain Rainbow' (Morello Records, 2014) as MRLL34.

Texan singer / songwriter Larry Gatlin’s first two solo albums, 'The Pilgrim' (Monument Records, 1973) and 'Rain Rainbow' (Monument Records, 1974) were released in 1973 and 1974 respectively.

Larry Gatlin found success as a solo artist, as well as with The Gatlin Brothers, becoming one of the most popular recording artists of the 1970s and 1980s.

It was whilst singing with The Imperials, a gospel group in Las Vegas, that he became friends with country singer Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991), who was also appearing on the same bill.  Impressed by his song-writing skills, Dottie West recorded two of Larry Gatlin's songs straight away and paid for his air fare to Nashville where he was employed as a staff writer for her new publishing company.

Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991) pitched Larry Gatlin's songs to Kris Kristofferson, who then sent them on to Fred Foster, owner of Monument Records, who immediately signed him to the label.

Larry Gatlin: 'The Pilgrim' (Monument Records, 1973)

Larry Gatlin
's 'The Pilgrim' (Monument Records, 1973) was produced by Fred Foster and was released in December 1973; the album included liner notes by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003).

Larry Gatlin
's 'The Pilgrim' (Monument Records, 1973), included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Sweet Becky Walker'
 (No.40, 1973)
'Bitter They Are, Harder They Fall' (written by Larry Gatlin) (No.45, 1974) / this track was also recorded by Elvis Presley (Tuesday 8 January 1935 - Tuesday 16 August 1977), who included the track on 'From Elvis Presley Boulevard, Memphis, Tennessee' (RCA Records, 1976), and by Gene Watson, who included the track on 'Because You Believed in Me' (Capitol Records, 1976)

Larry Gatlin: 'Rain Rainbow' (Monument Records, 1974)

Larry Gatlin's 'Rain Rainbow' (Monument Records, 1974), which was produced by Fred Foster and released in September 1974, included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Delta Dirt' (No.14, 1974)

Larry Gatlin's 'The Pilgrim' (Monument Records, 1973) & Larry Gatlin's 'Rain Rainbow'
 (Monument Records, 1974) appear for the first time on CD.

Larry Gatlin's 'The Pilgrim & Rain Rainbow'
 (Morello Records, 2014)
Track Listing
'Sweet Becky Walker' (No.40, 1973)
'My Mind's Gone to Memphis'
'Bitter They Are, Harder They Fall' (written by Larry Gatlin) (No.45, 1974)
'The Heart'
'Try to Win a Friend'
'It Must Have Rained in Heaven'
'To Make Me Wanna Stay Home'
'Light at The End of The Darkness'
'Dig a Little Deeper'
'Penny Annie'
'Rain'
'Found & Lost'
'Those Also Love'
'Healin' Sunshine'
'Help Me' (written by Larry Gatlin) / this track was also recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)
'Delta Dirt' (No.14, 1974)
'Jannie'
'Takin' My Chance on You'
'Love'
'Rainbow (Runnin' Through My Mind)'

Larry Gatlin's 'The Pilgrim & Rain Rainbow' (Morello Records, 2014) appear for the first time on CD.

Morello Records Releases: May 2014

The Everly Brothers: 'Pass The Chicken & Listen and Stories We Could Tell' (Morello Records, 2014)

On Monday 26 May 2014Morello Records released The Everly Brothers' 'Pass The Chicken & Listen and Stories We Could Tell' (Morello Records, 2014) as MRLL35.

The two superb country / rock albums that The Everly Brothers recorded for RCA Records in 1972 appear here on one disc.

The Everly Brothers: 'Stories We Could Tell' (RCA Records, 1972)

The Everly Brothers' 'Stories We Could Tell' (RCA Records, 1972), which was produced by Paul A. Rothchild (Thursday 18 April 1935 - Thursday 30 March 1995) and was released in March 1972, included the following tracks:

'All We Really Want to Do', which was written by Bonnie Bramlett and Delaney Bramlett (Saturday 1 July 1939 - Saturday 27 December 2008)
'Breakdown' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Green River', which was written by Don Everly and Phil Everly (Thursday 19 January 1939 - Friday 3 January 2014)
'Mandolin Wind' (written by Rod Stewart)
'Up in Mabel's Room', which was written by Phil Everly (Thursday 19 January 1939 - Friday 3 January 2014) and Terry Slater)
'Del Rio Dan' (written by Jeff Kent, Doug Lubahn and Holli Lynn Beckwith)
'Ridin' High', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006)
'Christmas Eve Can Kill You', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006)
'Three Armed, Poker-Playin' River Rat', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006)
'I'm Tired of Singing My Song in Las Vegas' (written by Don Everly)
'The Brand New Tennessee Waltz', which was written by Jesse Winchester (Wednesday 17 May 1944 - Friday 11 April 2014)
'Stories We Could Tell' (written by John Sebastian)

Personnel involved in the recording of The Everly Brothers' 'Stories We Could Tell' (RCA Records, 1972) included the following:

Don Everly, Phil Everly (Thursday 19 January 1939 - Friday 3 January 2014), Delaney Bramlett and Jeff Kent (guitar, vocals)
Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006) (guitar, keyboards)
Geoff Muldaur, Wayne Perkins, Waddy Wachtel, Danny Weis and Clarence White (guitar)
John Sebastian (guitar, harmonica, vocals)
Ry Cooder (electric bottleneck guitar on 'Green River' and 'Del Rio Dan')
Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 - Wednesday 29 July 2015) and Jerry McGee (slide guitar)
Barry Beckett, Michael Fonfara, Spooner Oldham and Warren Zevon (Friday 24 January 1947 - Sunday 7 September 2003) (keyboards)
Johnny Barbata, Jim Gordon and Russ Kunkel (drums)
George Bohanon and Tommy Johnson (brass)
Chris Ethridge (bass)
Jimmie Haskell (string arrangement)
David Crosby, Doug Lubahn and Graham Nash (vocals)

The Everly Brothers: 'Pass The Chicken & Listen' (RCA Records, 1972)

The Everly Brothers' 'Pass The Chicken & Listen' (RCA Records, 1972), which was produced by Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001), was the last studio recording The Everly Brothers made for over ten years; they broke up just after the album was completed.

The Everly Brothers' 'Pass The Chicken & Listen' (RCA Records, 1972) included the following tracks:

'Lay It Down' (written by Gene Thomas)
'Husbands & Wives', which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 - Sunday 25 October 1992)
'Woman, Don't You Try to Tie Me Down' (written by Joe Allen)
'Sweet Memories', which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 - Sunday 29 September 2002)
'Ladies Love Outlaws' (written by Lee Clayton)
'Not Fade Away', which was written by Buddy Holly (Monday 7 September 1936 - Tuesday 3 February 1959) and Norman Petty (Wednesday 25 May 1927 - Wednesday 15 August 1984)
'Watchin' It Go' (written by Gene Thomas)
'Paradise' (written by John Prine)
'Somebody Nobody Knows' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Good Hearted Woman', which was written by Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002) and Willie Nelson
'A Nickel for The Fiddler', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016)
'Rocky Top', which was written by Felice Bryant (Friday 7 August 1925 - Tuesday 22 April 2003) and Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987)

Personnel involved in the recording of The Everly Brothers' 'Pass The Chicken & Listen' (RCA Records, 1972) included the following:

Don Everly and Phil Everly (Thursday 19 January 1939 - Friday 3 January 2014) (guitar, vocals)
Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001), Pete Wade and Paul Yandell (guitar)
David Briggs (piano)
Ralph Gallant and Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle, mandolin)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) and Harold Rugg (pedal steel guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (organ, piano)
Steve Schaffer (bass)
Dale Sellers (guitar, Dobro)

Morello Records Releases: July 2014

Lacy J. Dalton: 'Highway Diner & Blue Eyed Blues' (Morello Records, 2014)


On Monday 28 July 2014Morello Records released Lacy J. Dalton's 'Highway Diner & Blue Eyed Blues' (Morello Records, 2014) as MRLL38.

Lacy J. Dalton is one of the most under-rated singers in country music.  With a voice closer to Bonnie Raitt than any other country vocalist, Lacy J. Dalton could be described as the female version of Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002).

Lacy J. Dalton: 'Highway Diner' (Columbia Records, 1986)

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Highway Diner' (Columbia Records, 1986) was released in July 1986 and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Working Class Man' (written by Jonathan Cain) (No.16, 1986)
'This Ol' Town' (No.33, 1986)

Lacy J. Dalton: 'Blue-Eyed Blues' (Columbia Records, 1987)

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Blue-Eyed Blues' (Columbia Records, 1987) was released in 1987 and included the following tracks, which were a mix of new recordings with career highlights:

'Have I Got a Heart For You'
'It's a Dirty Job' (No.30, 1983) / this track featured guest vocals from Bobby Bare
'Blue Eyed Blues'
'That's Good, That's Bad' / this track featured guest vocals from George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013)
'Gotta Serve Somebody' (written by Bob Dylan) / this track featured guest vocals from David Allan Coe
'I'll Love Them Whatever They Are'
'Hillbilly Girl with The Blues'
'16th Avenue'
'My Old Yellow Car'
'Love Gone Cold' / this track featured guest vocals from Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 - Wednesday 28 March 2012)

Amazingly, Lacy J. Dalton only won one major award, the Academy of Country Music's 'Top New Female Vocalist' in 1980, but awards mean nothing as those with ears will know.  Here is one of the greatest, smoky-voiced honky tonk singers of all time.

Lacy J. Dalton
's 'Highway Diner' (Columbia Records, 1986) and Lacy J. Dalton's 'Blue-Eyed Blues' (Columbia Records, 1987) appear on CD for the first time.

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Highway Diner & Blue Eyed Blues'
 (Morello Records, 2014)
Track Listing
'Working Class Man' (written by Jonathan Cain) (No.16, 1986)
'12:05'
'Changing All The Time'
'Taking it All in Stride'
'Can't See Me Without You'
'This Ol' Town' (No.33, 1986)
'Up with The Wind'
'Boomtown'
'Gone Again'
'Closing Time'
'Have I Got a Heart for You'
'It's a Dirty Job' (No.30, 1983) / this track featured guest vocals from Bobby Bare
'Blue-Eyed Blues'
'That's Good, That's Bad' / this track featured guest vocals from George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013)
'Gotta Serve Somebody' (written by Bob Dylan) / this track featured guest vocals from David Allan Coe
'I'll Love Them Wherever They Are'
'Hillbilly Girl with The Blues'
'16th Avenue'
'My Old Yellow Car'
'Love Gone Cold' / this track featured guest vocals from Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 - Wednesday 28 March 2012)

Morello Records Releases: March 2015

Slim Whitman: 'Mr. Songman & Angeline' (Morello Records, 2015)

On Monday 23 March 2015Morello Records released Slim Whitman's 'Mr. Songman & Angeline' (Morello Records, 2014) as MRLL39.

Slim Whitman (Saturday 20 January 1923 - Wednesday 19 June 2013) sold an estimated 100 million records in a career that spanned six decades and ended only with his death, aged 90, in June 2013.

Slim Whitman: 'Mr. Songman' (Epic Records, 1981)

Slim Whitman's 'Mr. Songman' (Epic Records, 1981), which was released in November 1981, included three tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Can't Help Falling in Love with You' (No.54, 1981)
'If I Had My Life to Live Over' / this track was released as a single in 1981, but it did not chart
'My Melody of Love' / this track was released as a single in 1982, but it did not chart

Slim Whitman's 'Mr. Songman' (Epic Records, 1981) was produced by legendary steel guitarist Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 - Friday 29 July 1988) and featured backing vocals by The Jordanaires.

Slim Whitman: 'Angeline' (Epic Records, 1984)

Slim Whitman's 'Angeline' (Epic Records, 1984), which was produced by Bob Montgomery (Wednesday 12 May 1937 - Thursday 4 December 2014) and was released in February 1984, included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Cry Baby Heart'
/ this track was released as a single in 1984, but it did not chart
'Angeline' / this track was released as a single in 1984, but it did not chart

Slim Whitman's 'Mr. Songman' (Epic Records, 1981) and Slim Whitman's 'Angeline' (Epic Records, 1984) are available for the first time on CD.

Slim Whitman's 'Mr. Songman & Angeline' (Morello Records, 2014)
Track Listing
'Destiny'
'Can't Help Falling in Love'
'Open Up Your Heart'
'Flowers'
'My Melody of Love'
'Mr. Songman'
'I Went to Your Wedding'
'Tonight is The Night (We Fell in Love)'
'Oh, My Darlin' (I Love You)'
'If I Had My Life to Live Over'
'Cry Baby Heart'
'But She Loves Me'
'Tryin' to Outrun The Wind'
'Angeline'
'Blue Memories'
'Dreamin'
'Scarley Ribbons'
'Blue Bayou'
'A Place in The Sun'
''Four Walls' / this track featured guest vocals from Byron Whitman

Morello Records Releases: April 2015

Charley Pride: 'She’s Just An Old Love Turned Memory & Someone Loves You Honey' (Morello Records, 2015)

On Monday 13 April 2015Morello Records released Charley Pride's 'She’s Just An Old Love Turned Memory & Someone Loves You Honey' (Morello Records, 2015) as MRLL40.

With sales of over 70 million records, Charley Pride is one of the most successful country music artists of all time.

Charley Pride's chart successes include 29 No.1 singles and 12 No.1 albums.

Charley Pride was voted Country Music Association's 'Male Vocalist of the Year' in 1971 and 1972, as well as 'Entertainer of the Year' in 1971.

Charley Pride: 'She’s Just An Old Love Turned Memory' (RCA Victor Records, 1977)

Charley Pride's 'She’s Just An Old Love Turned Memory' (RCA Victor Records, 1977), which was released in March 1977, included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'A Whole Lotta Things to Sing About', which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 - Wednesday 25 May 2005) (No.2, 1976)
'She’s Just An Old Love Turned Memory' (written by John Schweers) (No.1 for one week in March 1977)
'I’ll Be Leaving Alone' (written by Dickey Lee and Wayland Holyfield) (No.1 for one week in July 1977)

Charley Pride
's 'She’s Just An Old Love Turned Memory' (RCA Victor Records, 1977) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.

Charley Pride: 'Someone Loves You Honey' (RCA Victor Records, 1978)

Charley Pride's 'Someone Loves You Honey' (RCA Victor Records, 1978), which was released in February 1978, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'More to Me', which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 - Wednesday 25 May 2005)
 (No.1 for one week in November 1977)
'Someone Loves You Honey' (written by Dan Devaney) (No.1 for two weeks in April 1978)

Charley Pride
's 'Someone Loves You Honey' (RCA Victor Records, 1978) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.

Charley Pride
's 'She’s Just An Old Love Turned Memory' (RCA Victor Records, 1977) and Charley Pride's 'Someone Loves You Honey' (RCA Victor Records, 1978) are available for the first time on CD.

At the time of the release of Charley Pride's 'She’s Just An Old Love Turned Memory & Someone Loves You Honey' (Morello Records, 2015), on Monday 13 April 2015, Charley Pride was touring Ireland and the United Kingdom, a tour which took place in April and May 2015.

Morello Records Releases: June 2015

Tammy Wynette: 'The First Lady & We Sure Can Love Each Other' (Morello Records, 2015)

On Monday 22 June 2015Morello Records released Tammy Wynette's 'The First Lady & We Sure Can Love Each Other' (Morello Records, 2015) as MRLL42.

Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) was known as 'The First Lady of Country Music'.

When 'The First Lady' (Epic Records, 1970) and 'We Sure Can Love Each Other' (Epic Records, 1971) were released in 1970 and 1971 respectively, Tammy Wynette was the hottest property in country music, having won the Country Music Association's 'Female Vocalist of the Year' in 1968, 1969 and 1970.

Tammy Wynette: 'The First Lady' (Epic Records, 1970)

Tammy Wynette's 'The First Lady' (Epic Records, 1970), which was released in October 1970, included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Run, Woman, Run' (written by Dan Hoffman, Ann Booth and Duke Goff) (No.1 for two weeks in October / November 1970)

Tammy Wynette's 'The First Lady' (Epic Records, 1970) was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and featured background vocals by The Jordanaires.

Tammy Wynette: 'We Sure Can Love Each Other' (Epic Records, 1971)

Tammy Wynette's 'We Sure Can Love Each Other' (Epic Records, 1971), which was released in May 1971, included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'We Sure Can Love Each Other'
(No.2, 1971)

Tammy Wynette's 'We Sure Can Love Each Other' (Epic Records, 1971) was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and featured background vocals by The Jordanaires.

Tammy Wynette's 'The First Lady' (Epic Records, 1970) and Tammy Wynette's 'We Sure Can Love Each Other' (Epic Records, 1971) appear for the first time on CD.

In 1998, Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) was posthumously inducted into The Country Music Hall of Fame, having sold more than 30 million records, reached No.1 some twenty times and became the first female country artist to sell a million albums.

Morello Records Releases: July 2015

Vernon Oxford: 'By Public Demand & I Just Want to Be a Country Singer' (Morello Records, 2015)

On Friday 17 July 2015Morello Records released Vernon Oxford's 'By Public Demand & I Just Want to Be a Country Singer' (Morello Records, 2015) as MRLL43.

Vernon Oxford was born on Sunday 8 June 1941 in Larue, Arkansas and was raised in Wichita, Kansas.  A traditional country singer who was enormously popular in Europe in the 1970s, Vernon Oxford was unbelievably deemed to be 'too country' to get radio play in the United States.

This CD features two original albums from 1975 and 1976, plus nine bonus tracks; the set contains all of Vernon Oxford's Billboard country music hit singles.

Vernon Oxford was originally signed to RCA Records in 1965, but by the end of the decade, he had been dropped by the label.  A few years later, thousands of country music fans in the United Kingdom and Sweden had fallen in love with Vernon Oxford's music and signed a petition, which was sent to RCA Records in Nashville begging them to re-sign him.

Due to his successes touring the United Kingdom, which included appearances at the Wembley Festival, Vernon Oxford was signed again to RCA Records in 1974.

Vernon Oxford: 'By Public Demand' (RCA Victor Records, 1975)

Vernon Oxford's 'By Public Demand' (RCA Victor Records, 1975) was released in 1975 and included one track, which was released as a single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I Wish You Would Leave Me Alone' / this track was released as a single in 1975, but it did not chart

Vernon Oxford's 'By Public Demand' (RCA Victor Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

'How High Does The Cotton Grow, Mama'
'I've Got to Get Peter Off Your Mind'
'We Came Awfuly Close to Sin'
'Love & Pearls & Me'
'She's Always There'
'Woman, You've Got a Hold on Me'
'Soft & Warm'
'We Sure Danced Us Some Goodn's'
'Anymore'
'Surprise Birthday Party'

Vernon Oxford: 'I Just Want to Be a Country Singer' (RCA Victor Records, 1977)

Vernon Oxford's 'I Just Want to Be a Country Singer' (RCA Victor Records, 1977) was released in 1977, and included five tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Giving The Pill' / this track was released as a single in 1975, but it did not chart
'Shadows of My Mind' (No.54, 1975)
'Your Wanting Me is Gone' (No.83, 1976)
'Redneck (The Redneck National Anthem)' (No.17, 1976)
'Clean Your Own Tables' (No.60, 1976)

Vernon Oxford's 'I Just Want to Be a Country Singer' (RCA Victor Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

'Leave Me Alone with The Blues'
'Wait a Little Longer, Please Jesus'
'Country Singer'
'Don't Be Late'
'One More Night to Spare'

Vernon Oxford's 'By Public Demand & I Just Want to Be a Country Singer' (Morello Records, 2015)

Track Listing
'How High Does The Cotton Grow, Mama'
'I've Got to Get Peter Off Your Mind'
'We Came Awfully Close to Sin'
'Love & Pearls & Me'
'She's Always There'
'I Wish You Would Leave Me Alone'
'Woman, You've Got a Hold on Me'
'Soft & Warm'
'We Sure Danced Us Some Goodn's'
'Anymore'
'Surprise Birthday Party'
'Redneck (The Redneck National Anthem)' (No.17, 1976)
'Leave Me Alone with The Blues'
'Wait a Little Longer, Please Jesus'
'Clean Your Own Tables' (No.60, 1976)
'Your Wanting Me is Gone' (No.83, 1976)
'A Country Singer'
'Don't Be Late'
'Shadows of My Mind' (No.54, 1975)
'One More Night to Spare'
'Giving The Pill' / this track was released as a single in 1975, but it did not chart

Morello Records Releases: November 2015

Guy Clark: 'Boats to Build & Dublin Blues' (Morello Records, 2015)

On Friday 20 November 2015Morello Records released Guy Clark's 'Boats to Build & Dublin Blues' (Morello Records, 2015) as WMRLL49.

Texas-born Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) is one of the great singer / songwriters and was a major influence on the new breed of country music artists arriving in Nashville in the 1980s.  This coupling of two great albums, 'Boats to Build' (Elektra Records, 1992) and 'Dublin Blues' (Asylum Records, 1995) on one CD, is available for the first time.

Guy Clark's home was an open house for impromptu sessions and a place for testing new songs with such artists as Steve Earle, Rodney Crowell and Steve Young.

Within these albums, co-produced by Miles Wilkinson and Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) from 1992 and 1995 are twenty of the artist's finest recordings, an assessment agreed by both critics and Guy Clark enthusiasts alike.

Here, fine studio musicianship, perfectly accompanies, but never overcrowds, the vocals, perhaps hard to believe with such a strong ensemble on board, which also reveals the high esteem to which Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) is held.

Guy Clark: 'Boats to Build' (Elektra Records, 1992)

Guy Clark's 'Boats to Build' (Elektra Records, 1992) was released in November 1992 and included the following tracks:

'Baton Rouge', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) and J. C. Crowley
'Picasso's Mandolin', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016), Radney Foster and Bill Lloyd
'How'd You Get This Number', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) and Susanna Clark (Saturday 11 March 1939 - Wednesday 27 June 2012)
'Boats to Build', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) and Verlon Thompson
'Too Much', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) and Lee Roy Parnell
'Ramblin' Jack & Mahan', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) and Richard Leigh
'I Don't Love You Much Do I', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) and Richard Leigh
'Jack of All Trades', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) and Rodney Crowell
'Madonna with Child, ca. 1969', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016)
'Must Be My Baby', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016)

Personnel involved in the recording of Guy Clark's 'Boats to Build' (Elektra Records, 1992) included the following:

Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) (vocals, guitar)
Brian Ahern (guitar)
Sam Bush (mandolin)
Bill Caswell (jaw harp)
Travis Clark (bass)
Rodney Crowell, Radney Foster, Emmylou Harris and Suzy Ragsdale (daughter of Ray Stevens) (background vocals)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro, slide guitar)
Bill Lloyd and Verlon Thompson (guitar, background vocals)
Kenny Malone (drums, percussion, conga)
Lee Roy Parnell (slide guitar)
Marty Stuart (mandolin)

Guy Clark: 'Dublin Blues' (Asylum Records, 1995)

Guy Clark's 'Dublin Blues' (Asylum Records, 1995) was released on Tuesday 4 April 1995 and included the following tracks:

'Dublin Blues', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016)
'Black Diamond Strings', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016)
'Shut Up & Talk to Me', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016), Susanna Clark (Saturday 11 March 1939 - Wednesday 27 June 2012) and Keith Sykes
'Stuff That Works', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) and Rodney Crowell
'Hank Williams Said It Best', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016)
'The Cape', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016), Susanna Clark (Saturday 11 March 1939 - Wednesday 27 June 2012) and Jim Janosky
'Baby Took a Limo to Memphis', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016)
'Tryin' to Try', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) and Jimmie Fadden
'Hangin' Your Life on The Wall', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) and Verlon Thompson
'The Randall Knife', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016)

Personnel involved in the recording of Guy Clark's 'Dublin Blues' (Asylum Records, 1995) included the following:

Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) (vocals, guitar)
Sam Bush (mandolin)
Travis Clark (bass)
Donivan Cowart, Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Nanci Griffith, Emmylou Harris, Kathy Mattea and Suzy Ragsdale (daughter of Ray Stevens) (background vocals)
Rodney Crowell (guitar, background vocals)
Kirk Jelly Roll Johnson (harmonica)
Kenny Malone (drums, percussion, conga, tambourine, triangle, shaker, bell tree, Irish drum)
Darrell Scott (guitar, Dobro, mandolin, penny whistle, slide guitar)
Verlon Thompson (guitar, harmonica, background vocals)
Jonathan Yudkin (violin)

Guy Clark's 'Boats to Build' (Elektra Records, 1992) and Guy Clark's 'Dublin Blues' (Asylum Records, 1995), two great albums, on one CD, are available for the first time.

Morello Records Releases: January 2016

Chip Taylor: 'Last Chance & Some of Us' (Morello Records, 2016)

On Friday 22 January 2016Morello Records released Chip Taylor's 'Last Chance & Some of Us' (Morello Records, 2015) as WMRLL51.

Two classic Chip Taylor albums, 'Last Chance' (Warner Bros. Records, 1973) and 'Some of Us' (Warner Bros. Records, 1974), recorded for Warner Bros. Records in 1973 and 1974.

Chip Taylor straddles musical realms.  A citified singer / songwriter raised on country music and blues who composed iconic pop music hit singles, including 'Angel of The Morning' (recorded by Juice Newton and Merrilee Rush), 'Wild Thing' (recorded by The Troggs) and 'I Can't Let Go' (recorded by The Hollies).

Chip Taylor: 'Last Chance' (Warner Bros. Records, 1973)

Chip Taylor's 'Last Chance' (Warner Bros. Records, 1973) was hailed as a country / rock masterpiece by Rolling Stone Magazine and it was voted one of the best albums of 1973.  The album was a forerunner to the outlaw cowboy movement.

Chip Taylor: 'Some of Us' (Warner Bros. Records, 1974)

Chip Taylor's 'Some of Us' (Warner Bros. Records, 1974) was more mellow and with less critical observations, but nevertheless continued to reflect on his upbringing with the title track perfectly showing off the singer / songwriter's talents as producer and arranger.

Chip Taylor's 'Last Chance' (Warner Bros. Records, 1973) and Chip Taylor's 'Some of Us' (Warner Bros. Records, 1974) received high critical acclaim at the time of their release and, over the years, have become much sought after collectors' items.

Chip Taylor's 'Some of Us' (Warner Bros. Records, 1974) appears for the first time on CD.

Chip Taylor Trivia
Born James Wesley Voight
Brother of Jon Voight, award-winning actor
Brother of Barry Voight, world-renowned geologist
Uncle of actress Angelina Jolie

Chip Taylor's 'Last Chance & Some of Us' (Morello Records, 2015)

Track Listing
'(I Want) The Real Thing' (written by Chip Taylor)
'Son of a Rotten Gambler' (written by Chip Taylor)
'I Read it in Rolling Stones' (written by Chip Taylor)
'(The Coal Fields of) Shikshinny' (written by Chip Taylor)
'I Wasn't Born in Tennessee', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'(The Likes of) Louise' (written by Chip Taylor)
'It's Still The Same' (written by Chip Taylor)
'101 in Cashbox' (written by Chip Taylor)
'Family of One' (written by Chip Taylor)
'Clean Your Own Tables' (written by Chip Taylor)
'Last Chance' (written by Chip Taylor)
'Me as I Am' (written by Chip Taylor)
'Early Sunday Morning' (written by Chip Taylor)
'(It's a Long Way) Back to The Heart' (written by Chip Taylor)
'Something 'Bout The Way This Story Ends' (written by Chip Taylor)
'Funny Songs' (written by Chip Taylor)
'Coming From Behind' (written by Chip Taylor)
'If You're Ever in Warsaw' (written by Chip Taylor)
'If I Can't Be in Austin' (written by Chip Taylor)
'Here Again' (written by Chip Taylor)
'Some of Us' (written by Chip Taylor)

Morello Records Releases: February 2016

Tammy Wynette: 'Bedtime Story & My Man' (Morello Records, 2016)

On Friday 19 February 2016Morello Records released Tammy Wynette's 'Bedtime Story & My Man' (Morello Records, 2016) as MRLL53.

Two of Tammy Wynette's classic albums from 1972 are available for the first time on CD; they were produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and featured background vocals by The Jordanaires.

Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) was known as 'The First Lady of Country Music'.

Tammy Wynette: 'Bedtime Story' (Epic Records, 1972)

Tammy Wynette's 'Bedtime Story' (Epic Records, 1972) was released in March 1972 and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Bedtime Story', which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.1 for one week in March 1972)
'Reach Out Your Hand (& Touch Somebody)', which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) (No.2, 1972)

Tammy Wynette's 'Bedtime Story' (Epic Records, 1972) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972, and remained on the Billboard chart for 26 weeks.

Tammy Wynette: 'My Man' (Epic Records, 1972)

Tammy Wynette's 'My Man' (Epic Records, 1972), which was released in September 1972, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'My Man (Understands)', which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986), Norro Wilson and Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) (No.1 for one week in November 1972)
'Til I Get It Right', which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 - Wednesday 1 July 2015) and Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 - Thursday 18 December 2014) (No.1 for one week in March 1973)

Tammy Wynette's 'My Man' (Epic Records, 1972) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972, and remained on the chart for 22 weeks.

In 1998, Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) was posthumously inducted into The Country Music Hall of Fame, having sold more than 30 million records, reached No.1 some twenty times and became the first female country artist to sell a million albums.

George Jones: 'Cold Hard Truth & Live with The Possum' (Morello Records, 2016)

On Friday 19 February 2016Morello Records released George Jones' 'Cold Hard Truth & Live with The Possum' (Morello Records, 2016) as WMRLL52.

Two terrific albums from George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013), the greatest voice in country music.

George Jones: 'Cold Hard Truth' (Asylum Records, 1999)

George Jones' 'Cold Hard Truth' (Asylum Records, 1999), which was released on Tuesday 22 June 1999, was acclaimed as George Jones' return to real hardcore country music.  With Keith Stegall producing, it was back to the sound of a quarter of a century earlier -  a collection of strong songs that varied between belters and ballads backed with simple, straightforward instrumentation.

George Jones' 'Cold Hard Truth' (Asylum Records, 1999) included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Choices' (written by Billy Yates and Mike Curtis) (No.30, 1999)
'The Cold Hard Truth' (written by Jamie O'Hara) (No.45, 1999)
'Sinners & Saints' (written by J.B. Rudd, Vip Vipperman and Darryl Worley) (No.55, 2000)

George Jones' 'Cold Hard Truth' (Asylum Records, 1999) also included the following tracks:

'Day After Forever', which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004)
'Ain't Love a Lot Like That' (written  by Mark Collie and Dean Miller)
'Our Bed of Roses' (written by Keith Stegall and Zack Turner)
'Real Deal' (written by Jim Dowell and Keith Gattis)
'This Wanting You' (written by T. Graham Brown, Bruce C. Bouton and Bruce Burch)
'You Never Know Just How Good You've Got It' (written by Mark Nesler)
'When The Last Curtain Falls' (written by Emory Gordy Junior and Jim Rushing)

Personnel involved in the recording of George Jones' 'Cold Hard Truth' (Asylum Records, 1999) included the following:

Eddie Bayers and Owen Hale (drums)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Vince Gill, Patty Loveless, Larry Marrs and John Wesley Ryles (background vocals)
George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) (acoustic guitar, lead vocals)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Bruce Watkins (acoustic guitar)
Glenn Worf (bass guitar)

George Jones' 'Cold Hard Truth' (Asylum Records, 1999) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1999, No.53 on the Billboard Hot 200 Albums Chart in 1999, and No.8 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1999.

George Jones: 'Live with The Possum' (Asylum Records, 1999)

George Jones' 'Live with The Possum' (Asylum Records, 1999) was released on Tuesday 9 November 1999, but the concert was actually recorded in Knoxville on Friday 21 May 1993 at Knoxville Civic Center in Knoxville, Tennessee; the album included the following tracks:

'Intro' by Alan Jackson
'No Show Jones', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Glenn Martin / Ron Gaddis, George Jones' bass player and band leader, provided vocals on this track, the concert opener which George Jones originally recorded with Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) in 1982
'Once You've Had The Best', which was written by Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 - Wednesday 19 February 2003)
'The Race is On', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Don Rollins
'Bartender's Blues' (written by James Taylor)
'A Picture of Me (Without You)', which was written by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) and Norro Wilson
'The One I Loved Back Then (The Corvette Song)' (written by Gary Gentry)
'Who's Gonna Fill Their Shoes', which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004) and Troy Seals
'She Loved a Lot in Her Time', which was written by Randy Boudreaux, Sam Hogin (1950 - Monday 9 August 2004) and Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 - Thursday 11 February 2016)

Medley
'I'll Share My World with You' (written by Ben Wilson)
'Window Up Above', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013)
'The Grand Tour', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010)
'Walk Through This World with Me' (written by Kaye Savage and Sandy Seamons)

'One Woman Man', which was written by Tillman Franks (Wednesday 29 September 1920 - Thursday 26 October 2006) and Johnny Horton (Thursday 30 April 1925 - Saturday 5 November 1960)
'Orange Blossom Special' (instrumental) (written by Ervin T. Rouse)
'He Stopped Loving Her Today', which was written by Bobby Braddock and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016)
'I Don't Need Your Rockin' Chair', which was written by Billy Yates, Frank Dycus (Tuesday 5 December 1939 - Friday 23 November 2012) and Kerry Kurt Phillips / this track featured guest vocals from Mark Chesnutt and Tracy Lawrence

Personnel involved in the recording of George Jones' 'Live with The Possum' (Asylum Records, 1999) included the following:

Bobby Birkhead (drums)
James Buchanan (fiddle)
Ron Gaddis (bass guitar, backing vocals)
Kent Goodson (keyboards, harmonica)
George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) (lead vocals, acoustic guitar)
Tom Killen (pedal steel guitar)
Jerry Reid (acoustic guitar, electric guitar, backing vocals)

George Jones' 'Live with The Possum' (Asylum Records, 1999) reached No.72 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1999.

Morello Records Releases: May 2016

Marty Robbins: 'Today & Don’t Let Me Touch You' (Morello Records, 2016)

On Friday 20 May 2016Morello Records released Marty Robbins' 'Today & Don’t Let Me Touch You' (Morello Records, 2016) as MRLL54.

The two albums featured in this collection, 'Today' (Columbia Records, 1971) and 'Don’t Let Me Touch You' (Columbia Records, 1977) mainly spotlight Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) as a singer of ballads, material that perfectly shows off his effortless, distinctive vocal skills.

Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) was the master of many musical realms: country and western songs, rockabilly and pop standards, Caribbean and Hawaiian music.  Then also, of course, there are the gunfighter ballads, a genre that he virtually made his own.

It was such music, along with those unforgettable stage performances, that earned him a well-deserved place in Nashville’s Country Music Hall of Fame, just a couple of months before his untimely death, on Wednesday 8 December 1982.

On both albums, there are several fine Marty Robbins original songs proving that, in his third decade as a headlining star, he remained a leader of the country music pack.  Both albums appear on CD for the first time.

Marty Robbins: 'Today' (Columbia Records, 1971)

Marty Robbins' 'Today' (Columbia Records, 1971), with its cover portrait paying tribute to the singer's passion as a NASCAR racing car driver, was released in August 1971, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'The Chair', which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982(No.7, 1971) / this track was a double A-side with 'Seventeen Years', which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982)
'Early Morning Sunshine' (written by Jack Marshall) (No.9, 1971)

Marty Robbins' 'Today' (Columbia Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

'The Late & Great Lover' (written by Bud D. Johnson)
'I'm Not Blaming You' (written by Billy Mize)
'Another Day Goes By' (written by Don Winters Junior and Dennis Winters)
'Thanks, But No Thanks, Thanks to You' (written by Coleman Harwell II)
'Quiet Shadows' (written by Craig Blanchard and B. Blanchard)
'Too Many Places' (written by Don Winters)
'You Say It's Over' (written by Jimmy Sweeney)
'Put a Little Rainbow in Your Pocket' (written by Bob Binkley and Phoebe Binkley)

Marty Robbins' 'Today' (Columbia Records, 1971) reached No.15 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971.

Marty Robbins: 'Don’t Let Me Touch You' (Columbia Records, 1977)

Marty Robbins' 'Don’t Let Me Touch You' (Columbia Records, 1977), which was released in December 1977, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Don’t Let Me Touch You', which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) and Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) (No.6, 1977)
'Return to Me', which was written by Carmen Lombardo (16 July 1903 - Saturday 17 April 1971) and Danny Di Minno (No.6, 1978)

Marty Robbins' 'Don’t Let Me Touch You' (Columbia Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

'There's No More You & Me'
'To Get to You'
'Way I Loved You Best'
'Try a Little Tenderness'
'Harbor Lights'
'More Than Anything, I Miss You'
'Tree in The Meadow'
'Tomorrow, Tomorrow, Tomorrow'

Marty Robbins' 'Don’t Let Me Touch You' (Columbia Records, 1977) reached No.24 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.

Morello Records Releases: June 2016

Marty Robbins: 'All Around Cowboy & Everything I've Always Wanted' (Morello Records, 2016)

On Friday 17 June 2016Morello Records released Marty Robbins' 'All Around Cowboy & Everything I've Always Wanted' (Morello Records, 2016) as MRLL55.

Both of these Marty Robbins albums appear on CD for the first time.

A master of many music styles and an entertainer in a class of his own, Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) was a country music superstar who crossed boundaries, enjoyed chart success in both the country and pop listings and, in concert, presented a show that pleased equally varied audiences.

Whether it was a stone country song or a gunfighter tale, up-tempo rockabilly or pop standard, or a haunting melody from the faraway Caribbean or Hawaii, all were handled with equal ease in his highly recognisable baritone styling.

Marty Robbins: 'All Around Cowboy' (Columbia Records, 1979)

Marty Robbins' 'All Around Cowboy' (Columbia Records, 1979), which was released in August 1979, was the last of his western-themed recordings, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'All Around Cowboy' (No.16, 1979)
'Buenos Dias Argentina' (No.25, 1979)

Marty Robbins' 'All Around Cowboy' (Columbia Records, 1979) also included a revival of an earlier Marty Robbins title, 'San Angelo', along with a rendition of a Bob Nolan (Sons of The Pioneers) classic, 'Tumbling Tumbleweeds'.  On hand were long-time friends and band members Bobby Sykes and Don Winters, once again enhancing Marty Robbins' vocals with their fine back-up harmonies.

Marty Robbins: 'Everything I've Always Wanted' (Columbia Records, 1981)

Marty Robbins' 'Everything I've Always Wanted' (Columbia Records, 1981), which was released in January 1981, was one of Marty Robbins' final albums, and was released at a time when the sound of country music was changing.

So, Marty Robbins' 'Everything I've Always Wanted' (Columbia Records, 1981) is almost déjà-vu with his vocals and the accompanying musicians reflecting sounds of an earlier golden era, especially so with revivals of Eddy Arnold's 'There’s No Wings on My Angel' and his own 1952 chart debut 'I’ll Go on Alone'.

Some thirty years after he first appeared on the Billboard country music singles chart, Marty Robbins was still chalking up hits, 'An Occasional Rose' and 'Completely Out of Love', while another link to the past, western songs, came with 'Gene Autry, My Hero'.

Marty Robbins' 'Everything I've Always Wanted' (Columbia Records, 1981) included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'An Occasional Rose' (No.28, 1980)
'Completely Out of Love', which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) (No.47, 1981)

Gene Watson: 'Starting New Memories' (Epic Records, 1986)

Gene Watson recorded Marty Robbins' 'Completely Out of Love' and included the track on 'Starting New Memories' (Epic Records, 1986).

Marty Robbins' 'All Around Cowboy' (Columbia Records, 1979) and Marty Robbins' 'Everything I've Always Wanted' (Columbia Records, 1981) appear on CD for the first time.

Morello Records Releases: July 2016

Vern Gosdin: 'Out of My Heart and Nickels & Dimes & Love' (Morello Records, 2016)

On Friday 15 July 2016Morello Records released Vern Gosdin's 'Out of My Heart and Nickels & Dimes & Love' (Morello Records, 2016) as MRLL56.

So here we have two terrific albums from Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009).

Vern Gosdin: 'Out of My Heart' (Columbia Records, 1991) Vern Gosdin: 'Nickels & Dimes & Love' (Columbia Records, 1993)

'Out of My Heart' (Columbia Records, 1991) from 1991 included three hit singles, 'I Knew My Day Would Come', 'The Garden' and 'A Month of Sundays', while 'Nickels & Dimes & Love' (Columbia Records, 1993), which was released in 1993, was produced by Rick Hall in Muscle Shoals, Alabama and gave Vern Gosdin his last Billboard country music chart single with 'Back When'.

Vern Gosdin was born on Sunday 5 August 1934 and died on Tuesday 28 April 2009.

Country music has always enjoyed a wealth of distinctive singers with the likes of Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016), Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003), Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975), Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002) and Willie Nelson heading up those who are immediately recognisable.

Then there are the select few with the purest of country voices like Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 - Monday 16 December 2013), George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013), Gene Watson and Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009), whom - to fans and industry alike - was simply identified as 'The Voice'.

In fact, Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) had called him 'the only other singer who can hold a candle to George Jones', and there could hardly have been a better compliment.

Vern Gosdin: 'Out of My Heart' (Columbia Records, 1991)

Vern Gosdin's 'Out of My Heart' (Columbia Records, 1991), which was released on Friday 17 May 1991, included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'I Knew My Day Would Come', which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004) and Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009) (No.64, 1991)
'The Garden' (written by Bobby Fischer and Freddy Weller) (No.51, 1991)
'A Month of Sundays', which was written by Buddy Cannon, Vern Gosdin(Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009) and John Northrup (No.54, 1991)

Vern Gosdin's 'Out of My Heart' (Columbia Records, 1991) also included the following tracks:

'Love will Keep Your Hand on The Wheel', which was written by Buddy Cannon, Vern Gosdin(Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009) and John Northrup
'Out of My Heart', which was wrotten by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010) and Vern Gosdin(Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009)
'The Bridge I'm Still Building On', which was written by Buddy Cannon, Vern Gosdin(Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009) and John Northrup
'Once & For All', which was written by Buddy Cannon, Dean Dillon and Vern Gosdin(Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009)
'This Song Wrote Itself', which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004), Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010) and Vern Gosdin(Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009)
'You've Never Been in Love with You', which was written by Johnny Conn, Vern Gosdin(Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009), Tim Russell and Tony Russell
'I'd Better Write it Down', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010) and Jim Vest

Vern Gosdin's 'Out of My Heart' (Columbia Records, 1991) reached No.41 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1991.

Vern Gosdin: 'Nickels & Dimes & Love' (Columbia Records, 1993)

Vern Gosdin's 'Nickels & Dimes & Love' (Columbia Records, 1993), which was produced by Rick Hall in Muscle Shoals, Alabama and was released on Tuesday 23 March 1993, included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Back When' (written by Hugh Prestwood) (No.67, 1993) / this track gave Vern Gosdin his last Billboard country music chart single

Vern Gosdin's 'Nickels & Dimes & Love' (Columbia Records, 1993) also included the following tracks:

'Nickels & Dimes & Love'
'Where The Tall Glass Grows' (written by Andy Spooner)
'Bury Me in a Jukebox', which was written by Buddy Cannon and Vern Gosdin(Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009)
'Any Old Miracle'
'I Like My Country Music Kinda Rock', which was written by Vern Gosdin(Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009)
'Two Good People with a Love Gone Bad', which was written by Buddy Cannon, Dean Dillon and Vern Gosdin(Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009) / this track was a duet with Janie Fricke
'What Are We Gonna Do About Me', which was written by Vern Gosdin(Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009)
'Gone in a Heartbeat'
'Better Time to Say Goodbye', which was written by Buddy Cannon, Dean Dillon and Vern Gosdin(Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009)

George Jones: 'A Picture of Me (Without You) & Nothing Ever Hurt Me (Half as Bad as Losing You)' (Morello Records, 2013)

On Monday 15 July 2016Morello Records released George Jones'A Picture of Me (Without You) & Nothing Ever Hurt Me (Half as Bad as Losing You)' (Morello Records, 2013) as MRLL57.

With the death of George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) on Friday 26 April 2013, country music lost one of its finest exponents, if not the finest.  Many name him the greatest male vocalist in country music history and, in an almost 60 year recording career, he not only delighted fans but also influenced many other artists who followed in his footsteps.

George Jones was the genuine article, a singer who could involve the listener in the lyrics of his songs.  When he sang about heartbreak and past love affairs, you could share the emotion; when he sang about barrooms and the bottle, you could almost taste the liquor; and when he sang about smoky honkytonks and angels at the bar, you were swept into the atmosphere.

Very few artists could extract such sincerity from a country music song and George Jones won respect for that skill from audiences and artists alike from all realms of music.

George Jones: 'A Picture of Me (Without You)' (Epic Records, 1972)

George Jones' 'A Picture of Me (Without You)' (Epic Records, 1972), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), and was released on Monday 6 November 1972, included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'A Picture of Me (Without You)', which was written by Norro Wilson and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) (No.5, 1972)

George Jones' 'A Picture of Me (Without You)' (Epic Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

'Man Worth Lovin' You' (written by Earl Montgomery)
'She Knows What She's Crying About' (written by John Riggs)
'Second Handed Flowers' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'That Singing Friend of Mine', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016)
'She Loves Me (Right Out of My Mind)' (written by Freddy Weller and Spooner Oldham)
'Tomorrow Never Comes', which was written by Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 - Thursday 6 September 1984) and Johnny Bond
'Another Way to Say Goodbye', which was written by Jean Chapel (Friday 6 March 1925 - Saturday 19 August 1995)
'On The Back Row' (written by Jerry Chesnut and Norro Wilson)
'Let There Be a Woman' (written by Jacqueline Wellman)
'We Found a Match' (written by Earl Montgomery)

George Jones' 'A Picture of Me (Without You)' (Epic Records, 1972) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.

George Jones: 'Nothing Ever Hurt Me (Half as Bad as Losing You)' (Epic Records, 1973)

George Jones' 'Nothing Ever Hurt Me (Half as Bad as Losing You)' (Epic Records, 1973), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), and was released on Monday 4 June 1973, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'What My Woman Can't Do', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013), Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Earl Montgomery (No.6, 1972)
'Nothing Ever Hurt Me (Half as Bad as Losing You)' (written by Bobby Braddock) (No.7, 1972)

George Jones' 'Nothing Ever Hurt Me (Half as Bad as Losing You)' (Epic Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

'You're Looking at a Happy Man', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)
'Never Having You' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'Made for The Blues', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'What's Your Mama's Name?' (written by Dallas Frazier and Earl Montgomery)
'Mom & Dad's Waltz', which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975)
'You'll Never Grow Old (to Me)', which was written by Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) and Earl Montgomery
'My Loving Wife' (written by Earl Montgomery)
'Love Lives Again', which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986), George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) and Norro Wilson
'Wine (You've Used Me Long Enough)', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998)

George Jones' 'Nothing Ever Hurt Me (Half as Bad as Losing You)' (Epic Records, 1973) reached No.12 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) won Country Music Association (CMA) 'Male Vocalist of the Year' in 1980 and 1981, and was elected to The Country Music Hall of Fame in 1992.

Morello Records Releases: August 2016

Tammy Wynette: 'I Still Believe in Fairytales & 'Til I Can Make it on My Own' (Morello Records, 2016)

On Friday 19 August 2016Morello Records released Tammy Wynette's 'I Still Believe in Fairytales & 'Til I Can Make it on My Own' (Morello Records, 2016) as MRLL58.

Two classic Tammy Wynette albums from 1975 and 1976.

Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) was known as 'The First Lady of Country Music'.

Tammy Wynette: 'I Still Believe in Fairytales' (Epic Records, 1975)

Tammy Wynette's 'I Still Believe in Fairytales' (Epic Records, 1975), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), and was released in September 1975, included one track, which was a hit single on the Billlboard country music singles chart:

'I Still Believe in Fairy Tales', which was written by 
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 - Monday 3 December 2001) (No.13, 1975)

Tammy Wynette's 'I Still Believe in Fairytales' (Epic Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

'I Did My Best' (written by Danny Hice, Ruby Hice and Jimmy Payne)
'Brown Paper Bag' (written by Larry Gatlin)
'I Just Had You on My Mind' (written by Sue Richards)
'Dallas' (written by Leona Williams)
'I'll Take What You Can Give Me', which was written by Skeeter Davis (Wednesday 30 December 1931 - Sunday 19 September 2004), Sammy Lyons and Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015)
'I'm Not a Has Been', which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998)
'The Man from Bowling Green', which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004) and Troy Seals
'The Bottle', which was written by Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998)
'Your Memory's Gone to Rest'

Tammy Wynette's 'I Still Believe in Fairytales' (Epic Records, 1975) reached No.24 on the Billlboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

Tammy Wynette: 'Til I Can Make it on My Own' (Epic Records, 1976)

Tammy Wynette's 'Til I Can Make it on My Own' (Epic Records, 1976), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), and was released in October 1976, included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Til I Can Make It on My Own', which was written by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010), Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) (No.1 for one week in April 1976) / Tammy Wynette often referred to this song as her personal favourite of all the songs she had written

Tammy Wynette's 'Til I Can Make it on My Own' (Epic Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

'Just in Case' (written by Sonny LeMaire and J.P. Pennington)
'He's Just an Old Love Turned Memory' (written by John Schweers)
'World's Most Broken Heart'
'If I Could Only Win Your Love', which was written by Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 - Wednesday 26 January 2011) and Ira Louvin (Monday 21 April 1924 - Sunday 20 June 1965)
'Heart'
'You Can Be Replaced' (written by Bill Anderson and Jerry Crutchfield)
'Love is Something Good For Everybody'
'Where Some Good Love Has Been'
'Easy Come Easy Go' (written by Diane Hildebrand and Jack Keller)

Tammy Wynette's 'Til I Can Make it on My Own' (Epic Records, 1976) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.

Tammy Wynette's 'I Still Believe in Fairytales' (Epic Records, 1975) and Tammy Wynette's 'Til I Can Make it on My Own' (Epic Records, 1976) were released on CD for the first time.

In 1998, Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) was posthumously inducted into The Country Music Hall of Fame, having sold more than 30 million records, reached No.1 some twenty times and became the first female country artist to sell a million albums.

Dave & Sugar: 'Greatest Hits and New York Wine & Tennessee Sunshine' (Morello Records, 2016)

On Friday 19 August 2016Morello Records released Dave & Sugar's 'Greatest Hits and New York Wine & Tennessee Shine' (Morello Records, 2016) as MRLL59.

Dave & Sugar were a country music / pop music trio that had 17 hits on the Billboard country music singles chart between 1975 and 1981.  This is a first time coupling on CD for these albums.

Nicknamed by some as 'The Country Abba', trio Dave & Sugar possessed a similar penchant as the Swedish group for picking out catchy tunes and giving them attractive arrangements, with Dave Rowland's powerful baritone vocals blending well with the females’ equally strong harmonies.

Dave Rowland was no stranger to the music business.  A formally trained musician, he worked briefly as lead singer with the famed Stamps Quartet when they toured with Elvis Presley (Tuesday 8 January 1935 - Tuesday 16 August 1977) in 1974.

They worked as backing singers for Charley Pride before securing their own RCA Records deal.

Dave & Sugar: 'Greatest Hits' (RCA Victor Records, 1981)

Dave & Sugar's 'Greatest Hits' (RCA Victor Records, 1981), which was released in January 1981, included the following tracks:

'It's a Heartache' (written by Ronnie Scott and Steve Wolfe) (No.32, 1981)
'Queen of The Silver Dollar' (No.25, 1975)
'Tear Time' (written by Jan Crutchfield) (No.1 for one week in October 1978)
'Golden Tears' (written by John Schweers) (No.1 for three weeks in March 1979)
'The Door is Always Open' (written by Bob McDill and Dickey Lee) (No.1 for one week in July 1976)
'Don't Throw It All Away' (No.5, 1977)
'Gotta Quit Lookin' at You, Baby' (No.4, 1978)
'Baby, Take Your Coat Off' / this track was an album track from 1978
'I'm Knee Deep in Loving You' (No.2, 1977)
'My World Begins & Ends with You' (No.4, 1979)
'Can't Help But Wonder' / this track was an album track from 1976

Dave & Sugar's 'Greatest Hits' (RCA Victor Records, 1981) reached No.35 on the Billboard Top Counttry Albums Chart in 1981.

Dave & Sugar: 'New York Wine & Tennessee Shine' (RCA Victor Records, 1980)

Dave & Sugar's 'New York Wine & Tennessee Shine' (RCA Victor Records, 1980), which was released in January 1980, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'New York Wine & Tennessee Shine' (No.18, 1980)
'A Love Song' (No.40, 1980)

Dave & Sugar's 'New York Wine & Tennessee Shine' (RCA Victor Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

'You (Make Me Wonder Why)'
'Make Believe It's Your First Time'
'Things to Do without You'
'Changin'
'Delta Queen'
'It Ain't Easy Loving Me'
'Learnin' to Feel Love Again'
'Just a Whole Lotta Love'

Dave & Sugar's 'New York Wine & Tennessee Shine' (RCA Victor Records, 1980) reached No.47 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.

Morello Records Releases: September 2016

Dottie West: 'Here Comes My Baby & Dottie West Sings' (Morello Records, 2016)

On Friday 9 September 2016Morello Records released Dottie West's 'Here Comes My Baby & Dottie West Sings' (Morello Records, 2016) as MRLL60.

Dottie West’s first two highly acclaimed RCA albums available for the first time on CD.

Born on Tuesday 11 October 1932, Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991) passed away on Wednesday 4 September 1991, following a car accident in Nashville.

The first female diva in Nashville to write much of her own material, Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991) won a Grammy Award for her recording of 'Here Comes My Baby' (No.10, 1964) being the first country music female to do so.

Dottie West: 'Here Comes My Baby' (RCA Victor Records, 1965)

Dottie West's 'Here Comes My Baby' (RCA Victor Records, 1965), which was produced by Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001) and was released in June 1965, included three tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Touch Me' (written by Willie Nelson) / this track was released as a single on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1963, but it did not chart
'Here Comes My Baby', which was written by Bill West (1933 - Thursday 19 September 2013) and Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991) (No.10, 1964)
'Didn't I', which was written by Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991) (No.32, 1964)

Dottie West's 'Here Comes My Baby' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) also included the following tracks:

'Night Life' (written by Willie Nelson, Paul Buskirk and Walt Breeland)
'That's Where Our Love Must Be', which was written by Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991)
'In Its Own Little Way', which was written by Bill West (1933 - Thursday 19 September 2013) and Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991)
'Take Me as I Am (or Let Me Go)', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987)
'No One Will Ever Know', which was written by Fred Rose (Floyd Jenkins) (24 August 1898 - Wednesday 1 December 1954) and Mel Foree (Tuesday 25 July 1911 - Sunday 28 October 1990)
'Mama, Kiss The Hurt Away', which was written by Bill West (1933 - Thursday 19 September 2013) and Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991)
'Mama, You'd Been Proud of Me', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010)
'I Dreamed of An Old Love Affair', which was written by Bonnie Dodd, Charles Mitchell and Jimmie Davis (11 September 1899 - Sunday 5 November 2000)
'All The World is Lonely Now', which was written by Mel Foree (Tuesday 25 July 1911 - Sunday 28 October 1990)

Personnel involved in the recording of Dottie West's 'Here Comes My Baby' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) included the following:

Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991) (vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 - Monday 3 December 2001), Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Monday 1 September 2008), Harold Bradley, Ray Edenton and Velma Smith (guitar)
Bill West (1933 - Thursday 19 September 2013) (steel guitar)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) and Bob Moore (bass)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 - Wednesday 31 December 1997) and Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008), Willie Ackerman and Kenneth Buttrey (drums)
The Anita Kerr Singers (backing vocals)

Dottie West's 'Here Comes My Baby' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) reached No.12 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1965.

Dottie West: 'Dottie West Sings' (RCA Victor Records, 1965)

Dottie West's 'Dottie West Sings' (RCA Victor Records, 1965), which was produced by Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001) and was released in December 1965, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Gettin’ Married Has Made Us Strangers' (written by Peter Udell and Gary Geld) (No.30, 1965)
'No Sign of Living' (written by Jessi Colter) (No.32, 1965)

Dottie West's 'Dottie West Sings' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) also included the following tracks:

'Happiness Lives Next Door' (written by Willie Nelson)
'I Can Turn You Every Way But Loose', which was written by Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991) and Bill West (1933 - Thursday 19 September 2013)
'Left Over Corner of Your Heart', which was written by Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991), Bill West (1933 - Thursday 19 September 2013) and Charlie Dick (May 1934 - Sunday 8 November 2015)
'Don't You Ever Get Tired (of Hurtin' Me)', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010)
'It Just Takes Practice' (written by Jeannie Seely and Gail Talley)
'You're The Only World I Know', which was written by Bob Tubert and Sonny James (Wednesday 1 May 1929 - Monday 22 February 2016)
'I'll Pick Up My Heart & Go Home', which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 - Sunday 25 October 1992)
'You Took The Easy Way Out', which was written by Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991), Bill West (1933 - Thursday 19 September 2013) and Stonewall Jackson
'When Two Worlds Collide', which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 - Sunday 25 October 1992) and Bill Anderson
'If I Can Stay Away Long Enough' (written by Benny Martin)

Personnel involved in the recording of Dottie West's 'Dottie West Sings' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) included the following:

Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991) (vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 - Monday 3 December 2001), Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Monday 1 September 2008), Harold Bradley and Ray Edenton (guitar)
Bill West (steel guitar)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) (bass)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 - Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Kenneth Buttrey (drums)
The Anita Kerr Singers (backing vocals)

Dottie West's 'Dottie West Sings' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) reached No.12 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1965.

Morello Records Releases: October 2016

George Jones: 'Ladies' Choice & My Very Special Guests' (Morello Records, 2016)

On Friday 14 October 2016Morello Records released George Jones' 'Ladies' Choice & My Very Special Guests' (Morello Records, 2016) as MRLL61.

The two albums in this George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) collection, 'Ladies' Choice' (Epic Records, 1984) and 'My Very Special Guests' (Epic Records, 1978), both provide a variety of guests in the company of 'The Possum', as this artist was affectionately named.

One of the original intentions of 'Ladies' Choice' (Epic Records, 1984) was to pair George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) with, mainly, several up and coming female singers, although ironically, its biggest success came with its only solo track 'She's My Rock' (written by Gene Dobbins), which rose to No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1984.

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded 'She's My Rock' (written by Gene Dobbins) as a tribute to his wife Nancy, who had helped him turn his life around, putting behind him the years of alcoholism and drug addiction.

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) helped set a trend for album duet collaborations with 'My Very Special Guests' (Epic Records, 1978) bringing together a collection of artists who were admirers and peers.

Perhaps the presence of Elvis Costello might have been a little surprising, but he was a long-time fan and found inspiration from George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) for his country songwriting, 'Stranger in The House' (written by Elvis Costello) being one of those songs.

Elvis Costello: 'Almost Blue' (United Kingdom: F-Beat Records, 1981 / United States: Columbia Records, 1981)

Elvis Costello enjoyed British chart success with the George Jones hit 'A Good Year For The Roses' (written by Jerry Chesnut) (No.6, 1981); Elvis Costello included the track on 'Almost Blue' (United Kingdom: F-Beat Records, 1981 / United States: Columbia Records, 1981).

This is the first time CD release for George Jones' 'Ladies' Choice' (Epic Records, 1984).

George Jones: 'Ladies' Choice' (Epic Records, 1984)

George Jones' 'Ladies' Choice' (Epic Records, 1984), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), and was released in September 1984, included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'She's My Rock' (written by Gene Dobbins) (No.2, 1984)
'Hallelujah, I Love Her So', which was written by Ray Charles (Tuesday 23 September 1930 - Thursday 10 June 2004) (No.15, 1984) / this track featured guest vocals from Benda Lee
'Size Seven Round (Made of Gold)' (written by Monroe Fields and Gary Lumpkin) (No.19, 1984) / this track featured guest vocals from Lacy J. Dalton

George Jones' 'Ladies' Choice' (Epic Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

'All I Want to Do in Life', which was written by A. Reid Reynolds and Sandy Mason Theoret (Monday 18 December 1939 - Wednesday 1 April 2015) / this track featured guest vocals from Janie Fricke
'We Sure Make Good Love' (written by Mark Sherrill) / this track featured guest vocals from Loretta Lynn
'Daisy Chain' / this track featured guest vocals from Barbara Mandrell
'All Fall Down', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) and Ron Peterson / this track featured guest vocals from Emmylou Harris
'Our Love was Ahead of Its Time' (written by D.B. Allen and Bobby Braddock) / this track featured guest vocals from Deborah Allen
'Slow Burning Fire' / this track featured guest vocals from Terri Gibbs
'Best Friends' / this track featured guest vocals from Leona Williams

George Jones' 'Ladies' Choice' (Epic Records, 1984) on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.

George Jones: 'My Very Special Guests' (Epic Records, 1978)

George Jones 'My Very Special Guests' (Epic Records, 1978), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), and was released in October 1978, included the following tracks:

'Night Life' (written by Willie Nelson, Paul Buskirk and Walter Breeland) / this track featured guest vocals from Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002)
'Bartender's Blues' (written by James Taylor) / this track featured guest vocals from James Taylor
'Here We Are' (written by Rodney Crowell) / this track featured guest vocals from Emmylou Harris
'I've Turned You to Stone' (written by Jim Rushing) / this track featured guest vocals from Linda Ronstadt
'It Sure was Good', which was written by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) and Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) / this track featured guest vocals from Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998)
'I Gotta Get Drunk' (written by Willie Nelson) / this track featured guest vocals from Willie Nelson
'Proud Mary' (written by John Fogerty) / this track featured guest vocals from Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 - Wednesday 19 February 2003)
'Stranger in The House' (written by Elvis Costello) / this track featured guest vocals from Elvis Costello
'I Still Hold Her Body (But I Think I've Lost Her Mind)' (written by Dennis Locorriere and Ray Sawyer) / this track featured guest vocals from Dennis Locorriere and Ray Sawyer of Dr. Hook
'Will The Circle Be Unbroken' (written by Ada Habershon and Charles Gabriel) / this track featured guest vocals from Roebuck 'Pops' Staples (28 December 1914 - Tuesday 19 December 2000) and Mavis Staples

George Jones 'My Very Special Guests' (Epic Records, 1978) reached No.38 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.

Marty Robbins: 'R.F.D. & My Kind of Country' (Morello Records, 2016)

On Friday 14 October 2016Morello Records released Marty Robbins' 'R.F.D. & My Kind of Country' (Morello Records, 2016) as MRLL62.

As it's been said many times, by many people, Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) was a truly original stage entertainer and a recording artist without music barriers, although country was his natural forte.  The two vintage albums in this collection clearly proved his country status and why he was, and remains, in the view of numerous fans worldwide, one of this music's finest.

Marty Robbins' 'R.F.D.' (Columbia Records, 1964) and 'My Kind of Country' (Columbia Records, 1967), released in 1964 and 1967 respectively, well complemented each other and clearly showed the singer's return to that decade's root country sound.

Neither contained any classics or covers, but that hardly detracts from the quality of songs, with spare instrumental accompaniment further highlighting the vocals.  Several of the songs were penned by band members and Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) only contributed one original to each album.

There were no chart singles, though the albums themselves enjoyed high chart places, 'R.F.D.' (Columbia Records, 1964) reached No.4 in 1964, and 'My Kind of Country' (Columbia Records, 1967) reached No.9 in 1967, and many fans regard both as among Marty Robbins' finest work.  Incidentally, R.F.D. refers to the United States postal service, Rural Free Delivery.

Although country music changed over the years, Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) hardly ever disappeared from the charts, undoubtedly because of his skill to defy trends.

It was for such music, along with many other career achievements, that he earned country music's top honour - a place in the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1982, the induction coming just a few weeks before his death on Wednesday 8 December 1982.  The world lost an irreplaceable talent at the tragically early age of 57.

Marty Robbins' 'R.F.D.' (Columbia Records, 1964) and 'My Kind of Country' (Columbia Records, 1967) appear on CD for the first time.

Marty Robbins: 'R.F.D.' (Columbia Records, 1964)

Marty Robbins' 'R.F.D.' (Columbia Records, 1964), which was released in October 1964, included the following tracks:

'Melba From Melbourne'
'Change That Dial'
'Only a Picture Stops Time'
'Southern Dixie Flyer'
'Everybody's Darlin' Plus Mine'
'She Means Nothing to Me Now'
'Making Excuses'
'Rainbow'
'I Lived a Lifetime in a Day'
'You Won't Have Her Long'
'Things That I Don't Know'
'Urgently Needed'

Marty Robbins' 'R.F.D.' (Columbia Records, 1964) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1964.

Marty Robbins: 'My Kind of Country' (Columbia Records, 1967)

Marty Robbins' 'My Kind of Country' (Columbia Records, 1967), which was released in March 1967, included the following tracks:

'I'll Have to Make Some Changes'
'Possession is Nine Tenths of The Law'
'Sorting Memories'
'Hello Heartache'
'One Window, Four Walls'
'Working My Way Through a Heartache'
'Would You Take Me Back Again'
'Do Me a Favor'
'Sixteen Weeks'
'Seconds to Remember'
'Another Lost Weekend'

Marty Robbins' 'My Kind of Country' (Columbia Records, 1967) reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1967.

Jim Ed Brown & Helen Cornelius: 'Best of Jim Ed Brown and Jim Ed & Helen Greatest Hits' (Morello Records, 2016)

On Friday 14 October 2016Morello Records released Jim Ed Brown & Helen Cornelius' 'Best of Jim Ed Brown and Jim Ed & Helen Greatest Hits' (Morello Records, 2016) as MRLL63.

Jim Ed Brown (Sunday 1 April 1934 - Thursday 11 June 2015) was part of the brother-and-sister trio The Browns who clocked up twenty country music hit singles between 1955 and 1967.

The first ten tracks on this collection feature some of Jim Ed Brown's solo hit records from 1967 to 1973, which include three Billboard Top 10 hit singles, 'Pop a Top' (No.3, 1967), 'Morning' (No.4, 1970) and 'Southern Loving' (No.6, 1973).

A further development in Jim Ed Brown's career came in 1976 when he teamed with Helen Cornelius.  The result was a Billboard No.1 country music hit single with 'I Don’t Want to Have to Marry You' (written by Fred Imus and Phil Sweet) (No.1 for two weeks in September 1976) launching country music's teaming of talents and recognition coming their way with the Country Music Association (CMA) 'Vocal Duo of the Year' accolade.

The duo's 'Greatest Hits' (RCA Records, 1981) album, which was released in 1981, well lives up to its title and, besides kicking off with their award-winning debut single, also included six other Billboard Top 10 successes: 'If The World Ran Out of Love Tonight' (No.6, 1978), 'Morning Comes Too Early' (No.5, 1980), 'Lying in Love with You' (No.2, 1979), 'You Don’t Bring Me Flowers' (No.10, 1978), 'Saying Hello, Saying I Love You, Saying Goodbye' (No.2, 1976) and 'Fools' (No.3, 1979) - several bringing a new level of adult sensitivity to country lyrics.

In March 2014, it was announced that The Browns would be inducted into The Country Music Hall of Fame and, prior to the induction ceremony, Jim Ed Brown (Sunday 1 April 1934 - Thursday 11 June 2015) was presented with his Hall of Fame medallion by fellow Opry member Bill Anderson as he lay in a hospital bed stricken with cancer.  He died seven days later on Thursday 11 June 2015 - he was 81 years old.

Jim Ed Brown: 'The Best of Jim Ed Brown' (RCA Victor Records, 1973)

Jim Ed Brown's 'The Best of Jim Ed Brown' (RCA Victor Records, 1973), which was released in October 1973, included the following tracks:

'Morning' (No.4, 1970) / this track also reached No.47 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1970, and No.59 on the Cash Box Pop Chart in 1970
'Southern Loving' (No.6, 1973)
'Evening' (No.55, 1972)
'Unbelievable Love' (No.29, 1973)
'Pop a Top', which was written by Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988) (No.3, 1967)
Ann M. Stuckey submitted a 'Peer's Quote' about Gene Watson on Saturday 25 January 2014
'Broad Minded Man' (No.15, 1973) / this track was a new track and was exclusive to this collection
'How I Love Them Old Songs' (No.57, 1972)
'Angel's Sunday' (No.13, 1971)
'She's Leavin' (Bonnie, Please Don't Go)' (No.37, 1971)
'Bottle, Bottle' (No.13, 1967)

Jim Ed Brown's 'The Best of Jim Ed Brown' (RCA Victor Records, 1973) reached No.21 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.

Jim Ed Brown & Helen Cornelius: 'Greatest Hits' (RCA Victor Records, 1981)

Jim Ed Brown (Sunday 1 April 1934 - Thursday 11 June 2015) & Helen Cornelius' 'Greatest Hits' (RCA Victor Records, 1981), which was released in April 1981, included the following tracks:

'I Don’t Want to Have to Marry You' (written by Fred Imus and Phil Sweet) (No.1 for two weeks in September 1976)
'If The World Ran Out of Love Tonight' (No.6, 1978)
'The Bedroom' (No.24, 1980)
'Born Believer' (No.12, 1977)
'Morning Comes Too Early' (No.5, 1980)
'Lying in Love with You' (No.2, 1979)
'You Don't Bring Me Flowers' (written by Neil Diamond, Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman) (No.10, 1978)
'Saying Hello, Saying I Love You, Saying Goodbye' (written by Jeff Barry, Brad Burg and Dene Hotheinz) (No.2, 1976)
'Fools' (No.3, 1979)
'Don't Bother to Knock' (No.13, 1981) / this track was a new track and was exclusive to this collection

Jim Ed Brown (Sunday 1 April 1934 - Thursday 11 June 2015) & Helen Cornelius' 'Greatest Hits' (RCA Victor Records, 1981) reached No.47 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1981.

Morello Records Releases: November 2016

Charly McClain: 'Greatest Hits & Biggest Hits' (Morello Records, 2016)

On Friday 11 November 2016Morello Records released Charly McClain's 'Greatest Hits & Biggest Hits' (Morello Records, 2016) as MRLL64.

The two Charly McClain albums twinned in this collection might cause slight confusion by their titles.  Why have a 'Biggest Hits' (Epic Records, 1985) in 1985 when a 'Greatest Hits' (Epic Records, 1982) came out three years earlier?

But the releases, with different recordings, simply prove the immense success of this singer as she quickly piled one hit upon another.

Born on Monday 26 March 1956, native Tennessean Charlotte Denise McClain's country music preferences blended in well with the rock, jazz and blues sounds that surrounded her as she grew up in Memphis, a city that's a real melting pot of music.

She sang in her brother’s band, known as Charlotte & The Volunteers, had regular appearances on the local country music show 'Mid-South Jamboree' and toured with artists such as Obie Burnett (O.B.) McClinton (Thursday 25 April 1940 - Wednesday 25 September 1987).  This led onto a deal with Epic Records in 1976 with 'Charlotte' being dropped for the more catchy 'Charly'.

A 39-hit recording career that spanned 13 years saw her distinctive vocals surpass many others emerging on the scene.

With her natural beauty and sophistication giving rise to offers of modelling sessions from 'Playboy' and 'Penthouse' magazines (both turned down), television was to greatly benefit from her presence when videos became part of the country music norm.

Although Charly McClain continued as a chart artist until the end of the 1980s, she virtually retired from the music scene by the early 1990s when she chose to devote time to domestic life in South Western Tennessee.

Charly McClain: 'Greatest Hits' (Epic Records, 1982)

Charly McClain's 'Greatest Hits' (Epic Records, 1982), which was released in October 1982, included the following tracks:

'Sleepin' With The Radio On' (written by Stephen Allen Davis) (No.4, 1981)
'Let's Put Our Love in Motion' (No.23, 1983)
'I'll Love Away Your Troubles For Awhile' / this track was an album track from 1978
'The Very Best is You' (written by Frank Stephens and Larry Shell) (No.5, 1982)

Alan Jackson: 'Everything I Love' (Arista Nashville Records, 1996)

'Who's Cheatin' Who' (written by Jerry Hayes) (No.1 for one week in February 1981) / Alan Jackson recorded 'Who's Cheatin' Who' (written by Jerry Hayes) and included the track on 'Everything I Love' (Arista Nashville Records, 1996); Alan Jackson's version reached No.2 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1997

'You're a Part of Me' (No.20, 1979)
'Take Me Back' (No.24, 1978)
'It's Too Late to Love Me Now' (written by Gene Dobbins, Rory Bourke and Johnny Wilson) (No.87, 1977)
'Men', which was written by Jerry Hayes and Ronny Scaife (1947 - Wednesday 3 November 2010) (No.7, 1980)
'Surround Me With Love' (written by Wayland Holyfield and Norro Wilson) (No.5, 1981)

Charly McClain's 'Greatest Hits' (Epic Records, 1982) reached No.43 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.

Charly McClain: 'Biggest Hits' (Epic Records, 1985)

Charly McClain's 'Biggest Hits' (Epic Records, 1985), which was released in November 1985, included the following tracks:

'Paradise Tonight' (written by Mark Wright and Bill Kenner) (No.1 for one week in October 1983) / this track was a duet with Mickey Gilley
'Fly into Love' (No.20, 1983)
'Sentimental Ol' You' (written by Bob DiPiero and Pat McManus) (No.3, 1983)
'Dancing Your Memory Away' (written by Eddie Burton and Thomas Grant) (No.3, 1982)
'With Just One Look in Your Eyes' (written by Stephen Allen Davis and Dennis Morgan) (No.5, 1985) / this track was a duet with Wayne Massey
'Radio Heart' (written by Steve Davis and Dennis Morgan) (No.1 for one week in May / June 1985)
'Women Get Lonely' (No.18, 1980)
'Band of Gold' (written by Edythe Wayne and Ron Dunbar) (No.22, 1984)
'With You' (written by Ronald Muir and Larry Shell) (No.7, 1982)
'Some Hearts Get All The Breaks' (No.25, 1984)

Charly McClain's 'Biggest Hits' (Epic Records, 1985) reached No.39 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.

Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records Records, 2016)

On Friday 11 November 2016Morello Records released Gene Watson's 'Back in The Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) as WMRLL66.

Gene Watson is a godsend to all country music fans who like their music true and honest, and that's the way it's always been for this entertainer over the course of five decades, ever since his name first appeared in the country music chart some 50 hits ago.

Whenever there's talk about country music - the genuine, hard-core variety, that is - it's pretty inevitable that Gene Watson's name will soon come into the conversation, his being synonymous with pure country music.

Born Gary Gene Watson in Palestine, Texas in 1943 but raised in Paris, Texas within a musical family, where his father and brother both played guitar.  He also learned the instrument and first sang performing professionally in local clubs as a thirteen year old.  He soon picked up a reputation as one of the area's finest singers with his strong tenor vocals and slight nasal tone making him a very popular attraction at Houston's honky-tonk night spots, including The Dynasty, where he was resident for several years.

With songs that run the gamut of emotions, and a voice that convinces he lived them, 'Back in the Fire' (Warner Bros. Records, 1989) produced four chart singles, 'Don’t Waste it on The Blues' (No.5, 1988), 'Back in the Fire' (No.20, 1989), 'The Jukebox Played Along' (No.24, 1989) and 'The Great Divide' (No.41, 1989).

Two more hit singles came with 'At Last' (Warner Bros. Records, 1991), the first being the title track (No.61, 1991) and the second 'You Can’t Take It With You When You Go' (No.67, 1991).

With around 50 country chart hits, Gene Watson was voted into The Texas Country Music Hall of Fame in 2002 and was one of the first inductees into Houston's Music Hall of Fame in 2013.

Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire' (Warner Bros. Records, 1989)

Gene Watson's 'Back in the Fire' (Warner Bros. Records, 1989), which was released in January 1989, included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Don't Waste it on The Blues' (written by Sandy Ramos and Jerry Vandiver) (No.5, 1988)
'Back in the Fire' (written by Rory Bourke and Mike Reid) (No.20, 1989)
'The Jukebox Played Along' (written by Ken Bell and Charles Quillen) (No.24, 1989)
'The Great Divide' (written by John Lindley and Randy Travis) (No.41, 1989)

Gene Watson's 'Back in the Fire' (Warner Bros. Records, 1989) reached No.42 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1989.

Gene Watson: 'At Last' (Warner Bros. Records, 1991)

Gene Watson's 'At Last' (Warner Bros. Records, 1991), which was released in January 1991, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'At Last', which was written by Jay Booker and Jack Keller (Wednesday 11 November 1936 - Friday 1 April 2005) (No.61, 1991)
'You Can't Take It With You When You Go' (written by Larry Cordle, Larry Shell and Bert Colwell) (No.67, 1991)

Gene Watson's 'At Last' (Warner Bros. Records, 1991) reached No.74 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1991.

Morello Records Releases: January 2017

Tammy Wynette: 'Sometimes When We Touch & Higher Ground' (Morello Records, 2017)

On Friday 13 January 2017Morello Records released Tammy Wynette's 'Sometimes When We Touch & Higher Ground' (Morello Records, 2017) as MRLL67.

Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998), known as 'The First Lady of Country Music', was one of country music's truly iconic figures.

This much beloved entertainer who, during a twenty-seven year recording career, saw the release of 42 studio albums and charted 73 singles.

These two highly acclaimed albums from 1985 and 1987 saw Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) rising to the challenge of meeting country music's changing times with recordings that veered away from her own traditions.

Tammy Wynette's 'Sometimes When We Touch' (Epic Records, 1985) marked such changes with one critic (Stereo Review Magazine) noting the album as 'a radical departure but a natural progression'.

Tammy Wynette's 'Sometimes When We Touch' (Epic Records, 1985) included two chart singles, the title track (No.6, 1985) performed as a duet with Mark Eugene Gray (Friday 24 October 1952 - Friday 2 December 2016), and 'You Can Lead a Heart to Love (But You Can't Make It Fall)' (No.48, 1985).

Tammy Wynette's 'Sometimes When We Touch' (Epic Records, 1985) brought together the talents of many top songwriters, and Vince Gill and The Oak Ridge Boys are amongst those adding their voices as background singers.

Tammy Wynette's 'Higher Ground' (Epic Records, 1987) brought together many of country music's top stars contributing to Tammy's vocals, with three tracks enjoying chart success, 'Your Love' (No.12, 1987) with Ricky Skaggs, 'Talkin' to Myself Again' (No.16, 1987) with The O'Kanes (Kieran Kane & Jamie O'Hara) and 'Beneath a Painted Sky' (No.25, 1987) with Emmylou Harris.

Tammy Wynette's 'Higher Ground' (Epic Records, 1987) also included vocals by Vince Gill, Gene WatsonVern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009), Larry Gatlin & The Gatlin Brothers (Steve Gatlin & Rudy Gatlin), Rodney Crowell and Paul Overstreet.

Tammy Wynette: 'Sometimes When We Touch' (Epic Records, 1985)

Tammy Wynette's 'Sometimes When We Touch' (Epic Records, 1985), which was released in March 1985, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Sometimes When We Touch' (written by Dan Hill and Barry Mann) (No.6, 1985)
'You Can Lead a Heart to Love (But You Can Make It Fall)' (No.48, 1985)

Tammy Wynette's 'Sometimes When We Touch' (Epic Records, 1985) reached No.32 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.

Tammy Wynette: 'Higher Ground' (Epic Records, 1987)

Tammy Wynette's 'Higher Ground' (Epic Records, 1987), which was produced by Steve Buckingham and was released in June 1987, included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Your Love' (written by Beckie Foster and Tommy Rocco) (No.12, 1987) / this track featured harmony vocals from Ricky Skaggs
'Talkin' to Myself Again' (written by Jamie O'Hara) (No.16, 1987) / this track featured harmony vocals from The O'Kanes (Kieran Kane and Jamie O'Hara)
'Beneath a Painted Sky' (written by Joe Chambers and Bucky Jones) (No.25, 1987) / this track featured harmony vocals from Emmylou Harris

Tammy Wynette's 'Higher Ground' (Epic Records, 1987) also included the following tracks:

'Tempted' (written by Al Turney) / this track featured harmony vocals from Gene Watson
'Some Things Will Never Change', which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004) and Troy Seals / this track was a duet with Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009) 
'I Wasn't Meant to Like My Life Alone' (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz) / this track featured harmony vocals from Vince Gill
'Higher Ground' (written by Steve Buckingham) / this track featured harmony vocals from Larry Gatlin & The Gatlin Brothers (Steve Gatlin and Rudy Gatlin)
'Slow Burning Fire' (written by Jan Buckingham and Valerie Smith) / this track featured harmony Dennis Wilson, Harry Stinson, John Wesley Ryles & Ricky Van Shelton
'There's No Heart So Strong' (written by Don Schlitz and Paul Overstreet) / this track featured harmony vocals from Paul Overstreet
'All Through Throwing Good Love After Bad', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) and Richard Leigh / this track featured harmony vocals from Rodney Crowell and Jeanne Smith

Personnel involved in the recording of Tammy Wynette's 'Higher Ground' (Epic Records, 1987) included the following:

Mark O'Connor (fiddle, mandolin, guitar)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro)
Mark Casstevens, Steve Gibson, Steve Buckingham and Zane Ashton (guitar)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar, Dobro)
Tom Robb (bass)
Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (upright bass)
Eddie Bayers (drums)
Randy McCormick (piano)
Jay Spell (accordion)
Ricky Skaggs, Gene Watson, Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009), Emmylou Harris, Vince Gill, Larry Gatlin & The Gatlin Brothers (Steve Gatlin & Rudy Gatlin), The O’Kanes (Kieran Kane and Jamie O'Hara), Dennis Wilson, Harry Stinson, John Wesley Ryles, Ricky Van Shelton, Paul OverstreetRodney Crowell and Jeanne Smith (harmony vocals)

Tammy Wynette's 'Higher Ground' (Epic Records, 1987) reached No.43 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1987.

Gary Stewart: 'Gary and Cactus & a Rose' (Morello Records, 2017)

On Friday 13 January 2017Morello Records released Gary Stewart's 'Gary and Cactus & a Rose' (Morello Records, 2017) as MRLL68.

'Gary' (RCA Victor Records, 1979) and 'Cactus & a Rose' (RCA Victor Records, 19) are two great albums from arguably the greatest honky tonk singer.  With his distinctive vibrato voice, no-one sang drinking and cheating songs better than Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003).

Gary Stewart: 'Gary' (RCA Victor Records, 1979)

The first album, 'Gary' (RCA Victor Records, 1979) from 1979 kicks off with a pounding rocker 'Mazelle', the first charted single from the album (the other being the leisurely, bluesy 'Shady Streets').  This faultless ten-song set includes a distinctive rendition of Leon Payne's 'Lost Highway' evoking memories of Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953), and concludes with the truly memorable 'One More' where steel guitar and piano provide a perfect backdrop to the singer's unique vocals.

Gary Stewart: 'Cactus & a Rose' (RCA Victor Records, 1980)

Gary Stewart's 'Cactus & a Rose' (RCA Victor Records, 1980) moved away from familiar Nashville studio surroundings and into the southern country-rock arena that first inspired him.  Gregg Allman and Dickey Betts were among the musicians and, with Lincoln Wayne 'Chips' Moman (Saturday 12 June 1937 - Monday 13 June 2016) as producer, these ten tracks added up to a programme unique to Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003).

Gary Stewart's 'Cactus & a Rose' (RCA Victor Records, 1980) also provided another two chart singles - the title track and the double-sided 'Are We Dreamin' The Same Dream' and 'Roarin', the latter living up to its title as Bonnie Bramlett joins in the raucous barrelhouse fun.

Every track is a winner, right from the opening 'Okeechobee Purple', through to the poignant 'We Just Couldn’t Make it as Friends' finale.  Incidentally, this was the only Gary Stewart album to enter the Billboard pop chart.

Tragically on Tuesday 16 December 2003, Gary Stewart committed suicide, despondent following the death of Mary Lou, his wife of 43 years a few weeks previously.

Although his days of acclaim and ground-breaking recordings only lasted for a relatively short period during the 1970s / 1980s, he made a unique impression within country music that continues to be remembered.

Gary Stewart: 'Gary' (RCA Victor Records, 1979)

Gary Stewart's 'Gary' (RCA Victor Records, 1979), which was released in February 1979, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Shady Streets' (written by Dickey Betts) (No.66, 1979)
'Mazelle' (No.75, 1979)

Gary Stewart's 'Gary' (RCA Victor Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

'Next Thing You Know'
'Everything a Good Little Girl Needs', which was written by Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003)
'Same Man'
'The Blues Don't Care Who's Got 'Em' (written by Wayland Holyfield and Dickey Lee)
'I've Just Seen The Rock of Ages' (written by Johnny Preston)
'Walkaway'
'Lost Highway', which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 - Thursday 11 September 1969)
'One More'
'One More', which was written by Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003)

Gary Stewart's 'Gary' (RCA Victor Records, 1979) reached No.45 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1979.

Gary Stewart: 'Cactus & a Rose' (RCA Victor Records, 1980)

Gary Stewart's 'Cactus & a Rose' (RCA Victor Records, 1980), which was released in July 1980, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Cactus & a Rose', which was written by Lincoln Wayne 'Chips' Moman (Saturday 12 June 1937 - Monday 13 June 2016) and Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 - Wednesday 29 July 2015) (No.48, 1980)
'Are We Dreamin' The Same Dream' (written by Billy Burnette and Johnny Christopher) / 'Roarin' (written by Mike Lawler and Johnny Cobb) (No.66, 1980)

Gary Stewart's 'Cactus & a Rose' (RCA Victor Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

'Ghost Train', which was written by Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003) and Gregg Allman
'Harlan County Highway', which was written by Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003) and Dickey Betts
'How Could We Came to This After That', which was written by Reynolds and Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003)
'Lovers' Knot' (written by Richard Supa)
'Okeechobee Purple', which was written by Lincoln Wayne 'Chips' Moman (Saturday 12 June 1937 - Monday 13 June 2016) and Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 - Wednesday 29 July 2015)
'Staring Each Other Down', which was written by Lincoln Wayne 'Chips' Moman (Saturday 12 June 1937 - Monday 13 June 2016) and Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 - Wednesday 29 July 2015)
'We Made it as Lovers', which was written by Lincoln Wayne 'Chips' Moman (Saturday 12 June 1937 - Monday 13 June 2016) and Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 - Wednesday 29 July 2015)

Gary Stewart's 'Cactus & a Rose' (RCA Victor Records, 1980) reached No.49 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.

Morello Records Releases: February 2017

Bobby Bare & Skeeter Davis: 'Tunes For Two' / Bobby Bare, Liz Anderson & Norma Jean: 'The Game of Triangles' and Bobby Bare & Skeeter Davis:' 'Your Husband, My Wife' (Morello Records, 2017)

On Friday 10 February 2017Morello Records released Bobby Bare & Skeeter Davis' 'Tunes For Two', Bobby Bare, Liz Anderson & Norma Jean's 'The Game of Triangles', and Bobby Bare & Skeeter Davis' 'Your Husband, My Wife' (Morello Records, 2017) as MRLL70D; three original albums, plus three bonus tracks, on two CDs.  All tracks are in stereo and appear on CD for the first time.

Bobby Bare & Skeeter Davis: 'Tunes For Two' (RCA Victor Records, 1965)

Bobby Bare's 'Tunes For Two' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) with Skeeter Davis (Wednesday 30 December 1931 - Sunday 19 September 2004), which was released in February 1965, and was produced by Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001), was one of the most popular country music albums in the 1960s, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'A Dear John Letter', which was written by Billy 'Hillbilly' Barton (Thursday 21 November 1929 - Saturday 8 October 2011), Fuzzy Owen and Lewis Talley (No.11, 1965) / this track was a particular favourite in the United Kingdom

Bobby Bare's 'Tunes For Two' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) with Skeeter Davis (Wednesday 30 December 1931 - Sunday 19 September 2004) also included the following tracks:

'Too Used to Being with You'
'In The Misty Moonlight'
'We'll Sing in The Sunshine (written by Gale Garnett)
'I Don't Care'
'True Love', which was written by Cole Porter (9 June 1891 - Thursday 15 October 1964)
'Love You'
'We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds'
'Let It Be Me', which was written by Gilbert Bécaud (Monday 24 October 1927 - Tuesday 18 December 2001), Manny Curtis (1911 - 1984) and Pierre Delanoë (Monday 16 December 1918 - Wednesday 27 December 2006)
'Together Again'
'That's All I Want from You'
'Invisible Tears', which was written by Ned Miller (Sunday 12 April 1925 - Friday 18 March 2016)

Bobby Bare's 'Tunes For Two' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) with Skeeter Davis (Wednesday 30 December 1931 - Sunday 19 September 2004) reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1965.

Bobby Bare & Skeeter Davis: 'Your Husband, My Wife' (RCA Victor Records, 1970)

Bobby Bare's 'Your Husband, My Wife' (RCA Victor Records, 1970) with Skeeter Davis (Wednesday 30 December 1931 - Sunday 19 September 2004), which was released in March 1970 and was produced by Ronny Light, included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Your Husband, My Wife', which was written by Irwin Levine (Wednesday 23 March 1938 - Tuesday 21 January 1997) and Toni Wise (No.22, 1970)

Bobby Bare's 'Your Husband, My Wife' (RCA Victor Records, 1970) with Skeeter Davis (Wednesday 30 December 1931 - Sunday 19 September 2004), also included the following tracks:

'Before The Sunrise' (written by Jerry McBee)
'I Got You' (written by Gordon Galbraith and Ricci Mareno)
'I'm So Afraid of Losing You Again', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) and Dallas Frazier
'Dream Baby (How Long Must I Dream)', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006) 
'My Elusive Dreams', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015)
'Let's Make Love, Not War', which was written by Skeeter Davis (Wednesday 30 December 1931 - Sunday 19 September 2004)
'A Truer Love You'll Never Find', which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 - Wednesday 1 July 2015)
'Jackson' (written by Billy Edd Wheeler and Gaby Rodgers)
'There Never was a Time' (written by Margaret Lewis and Myra Smith)

Bobby Bare, Norma Jean & Liz Anderson: 'The Game of Triangles' (RCA Victor Records, 1967)

Bobby Bare's 'The Game of Triangles' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) with Norma Jean and Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 - Monday 31 October 2011), was released in January 1967; the album featured Bobby Bare with Norma Jean, who was best known as a featured artist on Porter Wagoner's television show, and Liz Anderson, who was a hit songwriter and the mother of Lynn Anderson (Friday 26 September 1947 - Thursday 30 July 2015).

Bobby Bare's 'The Game of Triangles' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) with Norma Jean and Liz Anderson, which was produced by Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001), Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and Felton Jarvis (Friday 16 November 1934 - Saturday 3 January 1981), included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'The Game of Triangles' (written by Cy Coben) (No.5, 1965) / Bobby Bare, Norma Jean & Liz Anderson were nominated for a Grammy Award for 'Best Duo / Group Country Vocal Performance'
'Homesick' (written by Billy C. Cole) (No.38, 1965) / this track was a Bobby Bare solo performance

Bobby Bare's 'The Game of Triangles' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) with Norma Jean and Liz Anderson, also included the following tracks:

'One Among The Three of Us' (written by Vic McAlpin)
'The Wife of The Party', which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 - Monday 31 October 2011) / this track was a Liz Anderson solo performance
'Pursuing Happiness', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) / this track was a Norma Jean solo performance
'Guess I'll Move on Down The Line' (written by Ken Sonnenberg and Martin Siegel) / this track was a Bobby Bare solo performance
'Bye Bye Love', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) and Felice Bryant (Friday 7 August 1925 - Tuesday 22 April 2003)
'Fairy Tale', which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 - Monday 31 October 2011) / this track was a Liz Anderson solo performance
'Three Mixed Up Hearts', which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 - Wednesday 25 May 2005)
'Don't Let That Doorknob Hit You' (written by Vic McAlpin) / this track was a Norma Jean solo performance
'Which One is to Blame', which was written by Redd Stewart (Sunday 27 May 1923 - Saturday 2 August 2003) and Sunny Dull

Bobby Bare's 'The Game of Triangles' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) with Norma Jean and Liz Anderson reached No.18 on the Billboard Country Albums Chart in 1968.

The three bonus tracks on theMorello Records' release of Bobby Bare & Skeeter Davis' 'Tunes For Two', Bobby Bare, Liz Anderson & Norma Jean's 'The Game of Triangles', and Bobby Bare & Skeeter Davis' 'Your Husband, My Wife' (Morello Records, 2017), feature Bobby Bare with his wife Jeannie on 'Vegas' (No.30, 1977), with Rosanne Cash on 'No Memories Hangin' Round' (No.17, 1979) and with Lacy J. Dalton on 'It’s a Dirty Job' (No.30, 1983).

Morello Records Releases: March 2017

Tammy Wynette: 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E & Stand By Your Man' (Morello Records, 2017)

On Friday 24 March 2017Morello Records released Tammy Wynette's 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E & Stand By Your Man' (Morello Records, 2017) as MRLL71.

This CD contains classic country music, the real McCoy, featuring a truly one voice-of-a-kind, singing timeless country songs.

Tammy Wynette: 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E' (Epic Records, 1968) Tammy Wynette: 'Stand By Your Man' (Epic Records, 1969)

Here are two albums, 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E' (Epic Records, 1968) and 'Stand By Your Man' (Epic Records, 1969), headed up by ground-breaking classics, 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E' and 'Stand By Your Man', songs that assured the future of a rising star back in the late 1960s - Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998), the singer with a sob in her voice, who frequently lived the heartache and heartbreak heard in the lyric of many of her songs.

With these two albums side by side, it provides an ideal opportunity to flash back to Tammy's early days.  Known as 'The First Lady of Country Music', she was one of the music's truly iconic figures.  This much loved entertainer who, during a 27-year recording career, saw the release of 42 studio albums and charted 73 singles.

The 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E' (Epic Records, 1968) album, which was released in 1968, reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart, while the 'Stand By Your Man' (Epic Records, 1969) album, which was released in 1969, reached No.2.

Both albums remained on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart for 36 weeks and the title tracks from the albums both reached No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart.

Classic songs included on this package include 'Gentle On My Mind', 'Honey', 'Sweet Dreams', 'Yesterday' and 'Lonely Street'.  Both albums were produced by legendary producer Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015).

Tammy Wynette: 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E' (Epic Records, 1968)

In December 1968, Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) saw the release of 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E' (Epic Records, 1968), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'D-I-V-O-R-C-E', which was written by Bobby Braddock and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) (No.1 for three weeks in June / July 1968)

Tammy Wynette's 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E' (Epic Records, 1968) also included the following tracks:

'Gentle on My Mind', which was written by John Hartford (Thursday 30 December 1937 - Monday 4 June 2001)
'Honey' (written by Bobby Russell)
'The Legend of Bonnie & Clyde', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 - Monday 24 April 2006)
'All Night Long', which was written by Don Chapel (1931 - Sunday 6 December 2015)
'Sweet Dreams', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'Yesterday', which was written by John Lennon (Wednesday 9 October 1940 - Monday 8 December 1980) and Paul McCartney
'Come on Home', which was written by Jack Rhodes and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010)
'When There's a Fire in Your Heart', which was written by Merle Kilgore (Thursday 9 August 1934 - Sunday 6 February 2005) and Sonny Williams
'Kiss Away', which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'Lonely Street', which was written by Carl Belew (Tuesday 21 April 1931 - Wednesday 31 October 1990), Kenny Sowder and Stevenson

Tammy Wynette's 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E' (Epic Records, 1968) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968.

Tammy Wynette: 'Stand By Your Man' (Epic Records, 1969)

In January 1969, Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) saw the release of 'Stand By Your Man' (Epic Records, 1969), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Stand By Your Man', which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) (No.1 for three weeks in November / December 1968)

Tammy Wynette's 'Stand By Your Man' (Epic Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

'It's My Way', which was written by Webb Pierce (Monday 8 August 1921 - Sunday 24 February 1991) and Wayne Walker
'Forever Yours' (written by Jimmy Peppers)
'I Stayed Long Enough', which was written by Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998)
'It Keeps Slipping My Mind' (written by Harry Mills)
'My Arms Stay Open All Night' (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
'I've Learned' (written by Nathan Russell)
'Cry, Cry Again', which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 - Monday 31 October 2011) and Dick Land
'Joey', which was written by Don Chapel (1931 - Sunday 6 December 2015)
'If I Were a Little Girl' (written by Harry Mills)
'Don't Make Me Go to School' (written by Gene Crysler)
'I'm Only a Woman', which was written by Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991)
'There's Quite a Difference'

Morello Records Releases: May 2017

Waylon Jennings, Mel Tillis, Bobby Bare & Jerry Reed: 'Old Dogs: Volumes One & Two' (Morello Records, 2017)

On Friday 12 May 2017Morello Records released Waylon Jennings, Mel Tillis, Bobby Bare & Jerry Reed's 'Old Dogs: Volumes One & Two' (Morello Records, 2017) as WMRLL72.

Signed in 1998 by Atlantic Records, the Old Dogs were country music legends Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002), Mel Tillis, Bobby Bare and Jerry Reed (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Monday 1 September 2008).

21 new songs written by multi-talented genius Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 - Saturday 8 May 1999 / Sunday 9 May 1999) on the subject of getting old.

This extraordinary project came about when Bobby Bare and Shel compared notes about this business of getting old.  'I went to Shel', says Bobby Bare 'and I said, we ain’t got no music, why don’t you write an album for us old farts?  So he did'.

One incident in particular had inspired Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 - Saturday 8 May 1999 / Sunday 9 May 1999) about the subject.  'Somebody called me sir', says Shel, 'that had never happened to me before and it really annoyed me.  The first time younger people start calling you sir, it’s really depressing'.

Bobby Bare, in looking forward to performing these songs, cautions against lamenting their fates.  'The first rule', he says, 'is no whining.  This is just four old farts going out and having the time of their life and making fun of theirselves gettin’ old.  Hell, I ain’t complaining.  I’ve never had to get a job.  I was tickled to death they weren’t playing Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 - Thursday 6 September 1984) and all those people on the radio when I was 22 years old.  I was glad they were playing me.  I mean, I was glad'.

Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 - Saturday 8 May 1999 / Sunday 9 May 1999) said, 'I’ve never had so much fun in my life, it was harder work but more laughs than anything I’ve ever done'.

Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 - Saturday 8 May 1999 / Sunday 9 May 1999) died six months after finishing this project.

Morello Records Releases: July 2017

Leon Everette: 'If I Keep On Going Crazy, Hurricane & Doin’ What I Feel' (plus 5 bonus tracks) (Morello Records, 2017)

On Friday 14 July 2017Morello Records released Leon Everette's 'If I Keep On Going Crazy, Hurricane & Doin’ What I Feel' (plus 5 bonus tracks) (Morello Records, 2017) as MRLL73D.

'Born Monday 21 June 1948 in Aiken, South Carolina and raised in the Queen’s district of New York, Leon Everette was a top selling country music artist for 5 years in the late 1970s to the mid-1980s.

Leon Everette: 'If I Keep On Going Crazy' (RCA Records, 1981) Leon Everette: 'Hurricane' (RCA Records, 1981) Leon Everette: 'Doin’ What I Feel' (RCA Records, 1983)

This 2-CD set will comprise 3 original Leon Everette albums, plus 5 bonus tracks, which were all released on RCA Records and will feature 17 hit singles.

'If I Keep On Going Crazy' (RCA Records, 1981), which was released in 1981, provided many hit singles, including the title track (No.11, 1981).  Other hits are 'Shadows of My Mind’ (No.15, 1982), ‘Over’ (No.10, 1980), ‘I Don’t Want to Lose’ (No.30, 1980), ‘Don’t Feel Like The Lone Ranger’ (No.33, 1979), ‘I Love That Woman (Like The Devil Loves Sin)’ (No.84, 1977 / a re-recording reached No.28 in 1980) and ‘Giving Up Easy’ (No.81, 1979).

'Hurricane' (RCA Records, 1981) gave Leon his biggest hit with the title track (written by Thom Schuyler, Keith Stegall and Stewart Harris) (No.4, September 1981).  The other chart single from this album was ‘Midnight Rodeo’ (No.9, 1981), while the revival of Stonewall Jackson’s ‘Don’t Be Angry’ revealed the singer’s fondness for old-time country music.

The third album in this collection, 'Doin’ What I Feel' (RCA Records, 1983), contained the hits, ‘The Lady, She’s Right’ (No.31, 1983), which featured harmony vocals by Rex Gosdin (1938 - Monday 23 May 1983) (brother of Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009), ‘I Could’a Had You’ (No.6, 1984) and ‘Shot in The Dark’ (No.30, 1984).

Leon Everette: 'Leon Everette' (RCA Records, 1982)

The five bonus tracks are taken from the 1982 mini album, 'Leon Everette' (RCA Records, 1982), and included the hits, ‘My Lady Loves Me (Just As I Am)’ (No.9, 1983), ‘Soul Searchin’ (No.10, 1982) and ‘Just Give Me What You Think is Fair’ (No.7, 1982).

This is the first time Leon Everette's 'If I Keep On Going Crazy', 'Hurricane' & 'Doin’ What I Feel' have been released on CD.

Track List
Disc One

Leon Everette: 'If I Keep On Going Crazy' (RCA Records, 1981)

'If I Keep On Going Crazy' (RCA Records, 1981)

1 'If I Keep On Going Crazy' (No.11, 1981)
2 'Over' (No.10, 1980)
3 ‘I Love That Woman (Like The Devil Loves Sin)’ (No.84, 1977) / a re-recording of this track reached No.28 in 1980
4 'It's Not Supposed to Be That Way'
5 'This Moment of Love'
6 ‘Giving Up Easy’ (No.81, 1979)
7 ‘I Don’t Want to Lose’ (No.30, 1980)
8 'Champagne Dreams'
9 'Shadows of My Mind’ (No.15, 1982)
10 ‘Don’t Feel Like The Lone Ranger’ (No.33, 1979)

Leon Everette: 'Hurricane' (RCA Records, 1981)

'Hurricane' (RCA Records, 1981)
11
'Hurricane' (written by Thom Schuyler, Keith Stegall and Stewart Harris) (No.4, September 1981)
12 'Make Me Stop Loving Her'
13 'Betty Ruth'
14 'Don't Be Angry' / this track was a revival of Stonewall Jackson’s ‘Don’t Be Angry’, which he recorded in revealed the singer’s fondness for old-time country music.
15 'The Feelin's Right'
16 'Midnight Rodeo'
17 'Let Me Apologise'
18 'Think It Over'
19 'Running on Love'
20. 'If You're Serious About Cheating'

Disc Two

Leon Everette: 'Doin’ What I Feel' (RCA Records, 1983)

'Doin’ What I Feel' (RCA Records, 1983)
1
‘The Lady, She’s Right’ (No.31, 1983) / this track featured harmony vocals by Rex Gosdin (1938 - Monday 23 May 1983) (brother of Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009)
2 'I Wanna Know Your Name'
3 'Anita, You're Dreaming'
4 'In a Letter of Goodbye'
5 'No Man's Land'
6 'This Man & Woman Thing'
7 'I Could'a Had You' (No.6, 1984)
8 'Shot in The Dark' (No.30, 1984)
9 'I Want to Be in Pictures'

Bonus Tracks

Leon Everette: 'Leon Everette' (RCA Records, 1982)

10
 'Soul Searchin' (No.10, 1982)
11 'The Rock I'm Leaning On'
12 'My Lady Loves Me (Just As I Am)' (No.9, 1983)
13 'Just Give Me What You Think is Fair' (No.7, 1982)

Morello Records Releases: August 2017

Tammy Wynette: 'Another Lonely Song & Woman to Woman' (Morello Records, 2017)

On Friday 11 August 2017Morello Records will release Tammy Wynette's 'Another Lonely Song & Woman to Woman' (Morello Records, 2017) as MRLL74.

'Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998), known as 'The First Lady of Country Music', was one of the music’s truly iconic figures.

This much beloved entertainer - during a twenty-seven year recording career - saw the release of 42 studio albums and charted 73 singles.

Tammy Wynette: 'Another Lonely Song' (Epic Records, 1974) Tammy Wynette: 'Woman to Woman' (Epic Records, 1974)

By the time the two albums, 'Another Lonely Song' (Epic Records, 1974) and 'Woman to Woman' (Epic Records, 1974), in this collection were released, producer Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) had developed a distinctive styling for the hit-making singer, with her 'sob in the voice' heightening the emotions of songs’ lyrics, perfectly blending in with the smooth musicianship and string arrangements and backup vocals by The Jordanaires.

Both albums were released in 1974 and each was headed up by a hit single.

'Another Lonely Song', which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 - Thursday 8 June 2017) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998), gave the singer her 14th No.1 solo chart single (No.1 for one week in February / March 1974).

The album also included covers of three already proven country hits, 'Satin Sheets' (written by John Volinkaty), 'Keep Me in Mind', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010), and 'Help Me Make It Through The Night' (written by Kris Kristofferson).

Seven months later came 'Woman to Woman' (Epic Records, 1974) with its Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) penned title track reaching No.4 on Billboard’s country music singles chart in 1974 and offering another touch of home-spun feminine advice.

Once again, the album presents songs from many of the most respected writers in the business - Dave Loggins' 'Please Come to Boston', Mickey Newbury's 'I Don’t Think About Him No More' and Shel Silverstein's 'For The Kids', the last revealing that this one-time Playboy cartoonist was more than just a humourist.

Both albums appear on CD for the first time.

Tammy Wynette: 'Another Lonely Song' (Epic Records, 1974)

In February 1974, Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) saw the release of 'Another Lonely Song' (Epic Records, 1974), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), and included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'One Final Stand', which was written by Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 - Thursday 8 June 2017), Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) / this track was released as a single in 1973, but it did not chart
'Another Lonely Song', which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 - Thursday 8 June 2017) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) (No.1 for one week in February / March 1974)

Tammy Wynette's 'Another Lonely Song' (Epic Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

'Crying Steel Guitar', which was written by 
Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Agnes Wilson
'What My Thoughts Do All The Time' (written by Jeanne Pruett)
'Stayin' Home Woman' (written by Earl Montgomery)
'Satin Sheets' (written by John Volinkaty)
'Homecoming', which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 - Thursday 8 June 2017)
'Help Me Make It Through The Night' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Keep Me in Mind', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010)
'Oh, How I Miss Him, which was written by Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 - Thursday 8 June 2017), Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Emily Mitchell
'With Child' (written by 
Earl Montgomery and Janette Tidwell)

Tammy Wynette's 'Another Lonely Song' (Epic Records, 1974) reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

Tammy Wynette: 'Woman to Woman' (Epic Records, 1974)

In November 1974, Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) saw the release of 'Woman to Woman' (Epic Records, 1974), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), and included one track, which was released as a single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Woman to Woman', which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) (No.4, 1974)

Tammy Wynette's 'Woman to Woman' (Epic Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

'Right Here in Your Arms' (written by 
Rafe VanHoy)
'What's a Little Rain' (written by Margie Singleton and Leon Ashley)
'This Time I Almost Made It', which was written by 
Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015)
'Please Come to Boston' (written by Dave Loggins)
'I Don't Think About Him No More (Poison Red Berries)', which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 - Sunday 29 September 2002)
'For The Kids', which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 - Saturday 8 May 1999 / Sunday 9 May 1999)
'Woman I Am', which was written by Earl Montgomery, Charlene Montgomery and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998)
'Touching Love', which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 - Thursday 8 June 2017) and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)
'I've Been Loved Before', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Earl Montgomery

Tammy Wynette's 'Woman to Woman' (Epic Records, 1974) reached No.21 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

Morello Records Releases: September 2017

George Hamilton IV: 'Abilene & Canadian Pacific' (Morello Records, 2017)

On Friday 15 September 2017, Morello Records will release George Hamilton IV's 'Abilene & Canadian Pacific' (Morello Records, 2017) as MRLL75.

George Hamilton IV was born on Monday 19 July 1937 and died on Wednesday 17 September 2014.  His two most popular and best-selling albums are coupled together for the first time on one CD.

'Canadian Pacific' (RCA Records, 1969) appears for the first time on CD.

George Hamilton IV’s success was internationally widespread, with Canada, Europe and the British Isles all becoming regular stomping grounds, with the last, well and truly a second home.  It was such activities that earned him the title 'International Ambassador of Country Music'.

George Hamilton: 'Abilene' (RCA Records, 1963) George Hamilton IV: 'Canadian Pacific' (RCA Records, 1969)

The 'Abilene' (RCA Records, 1963) album was released in 1963.  The title track reached No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart, remaining there for 4 weeks and staying on the chart for a total of 24 weeks.

'Canadian Pacific' (RCA Records, 1969) was released in 1969 and, due to its continuing popularity, entered the United Kingdom album chart two years later in 1971.  The album featured all Canadian songwriters, Gordon Lightfoot, Leonard Norman Cohen (Friday 21 September 1934 - Monday 7 November 2016), Buffy Sainte-Marie, Joni Mitchell, Hank Snow (Saturday 9 May 1914 - Monday 20 December 1999), Bruce Cockburn, Ian Tyson, and the writer of the title track, Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016).

The album contains three Billboard country music hit singles, 'Steel Rail Blues', 'Early Mornin' Rain' and 'Canadian Pacific'.

George Hamilton: 'Abilene' (RCA Records, 1963)

In August 1963, George Hamilton IV (Monday 19 July 1937 - Wednesday 17 September 2014) saw the release of 'Abilene' (RCA Victor Records, 1963), which was produced by Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'China Doll', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006) (No.22, 1962)
'If You Don't Know (I Ain't Gonna Tell You)' (written by George Hamilton) (No.6, 1962)
'Abilene', which was written by John D. Loudermilk (Saturday 31 March 1934 - Wednesday 21 September 2016) (No.1 for three weeks in September / October 1963) / this track also reached No.15 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1963

George Hamilton IV's 'Abilene' (RCA Victor Records, 1963) also included the following tracks:

'Roving Gambler' (written by Elie Seigmeister)
'I Want To Go (Where Nobody Knows Me)' (written by Dick Flood)
'Everglades', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'Oh, So Many Years' (written by Frankie Bailes)

'Come On Home, Boy', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'Jimmy Brown, The Newsboy', which was written by Alvin Pleasant (A.P.) Delaney Carter (15 December 1891 - Monday 7 November 1960)

'Little Lunch Box', which was written by John D. Loudermilk (Saturday 31 March 1934 - Wednesday 21 September 2016)
'Tender Hearted Baby', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987)

'You Are My Sunshine', which was written by Jimmie Davis (11 September 1899 - Sunday 5 November 2000) and Charles Mitchell

Personnel involved in the recording of George Hamilton IV's 'Abilene' (RCA Victor Records, 1963) included the following:

Wayne Moss, Billy Byrd, Ray Edenton and Billy Grammer (guitar)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 - Friday 29 July 1988) (steel guitar)
Floyd Chance (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) and James Isbell (drums)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 - Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Dottie Dillard, Millie Kirkham and Dolores Dinning (vocals)

George Hamilton IV's 'Abilene' (RCA Victor Records, 1963) reached No.18 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1963, and No.77 on the Billboard Top pop music albums chart in 1963.

George Hamilton IV: 'Canadian Pacific' (RCA Records, 1969)

In May 1969, George Hamilton IV (Monday 19 July 1937 - Wednesday 17 September 2014) saw the release of 'Canadian Pacific' (RCA Victor Records, 1969), which was produced by Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001) and Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Canadian Pacific', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016) (No.25, 1969)

George Hamilton IV's 'Canadian Pacific' (RCA Victor Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

'I'm Gonna Be a Country Boy Again' (written by Buffy Sainte Marie)
'Shake The Dust' (written by Alan McRae)
'Together Alone' (written by Bruce Cockburn)
'Steel Rail Blues' (written by Gordon Lightfoot) (No.15, 1966)
'Both Sides Now' (written by Joni Mitchell)
'Sisters of Mercy', which was written by Leonard Norman Cohen (Friday 21 September 1934 - Monday 7 November 2016)
'Early Morning Rain' (written by Gordon Lightfoot) (No.9, 1966)
'My Nova Scotia Home', which was written by Hank Snow (Saturday 9 May 1914 - Monday 20 December 1999)
'Summer Wages' (written by Ian Tyson)

'Long Thin Dawn' (written by Gordon Lightfoot)

Personnel involved in the recording of George Hamilton IV's 'Canadian Pacific' (RCA Victor Records, 1969) included the following:

Jerry Kennedy (guitar, Dobro)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 - Monday 3 December 2001), Wayne Moss, Pete Wade, Paul Yandell and Fred Carter (guitar)
Ray Edenton and Chip Young (rhythm guitar)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 - Friday 29 July 1988) and Stu Basore (steel guitar)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) and Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (bass)
James Isbell, Jerry Carrigan and Kenneth Buttrey (drums)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 - Wednesday 31 December 1997), Hargus 'Pig' Robbins and David Briggs (piano)
Sonny Osborne (banjo)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Dorothy Dillard, Priscilla Ann Reed Hubbard (1941 - Wednesday 24 September 2014), Louis Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012), William Wright, James Cason, Bergen White and Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 - Thursday 8 June 2017) (vocals)
Morello Records

Morello Records was launched in July 2012 and brings you the best in country music re-issues.

Many of the releases on Morello Records have never been available on CD before and, as a result, are proving to be welcome additions to music collectors.

Morello Records

Morello Records

Morello Records was launched in July 2012 and brings you the best in country music re-issues.

Many of the releases on Morello Records have never been available on CD before and, as a result, are proving to be welcome additions to music collectors.

CMP



Country Music People is Europe’s number one country music magazine.

Country Music People is the specialist expert on country music - past, present and future.

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Since February 1998, England-based Hux Records have been specialists in releasing classic archive recordings.

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