• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Webster PR



Webster Public Relations
, PO Box 23015, Nashville, TN 37202

Contact Scott Adkins
Telephone 615-777-6995



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2005, were most gracious with their time & words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Curtis Young, which he submitted to this site on Sunday 30 October 2005.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Curtis Young who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.

Curtis Young
This quote was submitted on Sunday 30 October 2005.

'Gene Watson is one of the best singers I have ever worked with.

His delivery of a song makes you feel like you are singing it yourself.

His pitch is great and his phrasing is right on.


I have spent many enjoyable hours in the studio listening to Gene’s rich voice through my headphones and harmonising to some of the best songs ever written and the finest artistry ever.

I wish Gene the very best always and would love to work with him anytime'.

Thank you, Curtis Young, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Curtis Young...



Curtis Young was born in the hills of East Tennessee on Saturday 9 January 1943.

Curtis Young began his professional career performing on 'Tennessee Barn Dance' in Knoxville, Tennessee with his high school friend, Delmar Loveday.

Between 1962 and 1969, Curtis Young worked at WATE TV, Channel 6 in Knoxville as a cameraman and projectionist.  During this time, Curtis Young also performed on three television shows each week, plus weekend engagements as lead singer with The Kountry Kings Band.

In 1969, Curtis Young moved to Nashville, where he took up a position as bass player and singer with Wilma Lee Cooper (Monday 7 February 1921 - Tuesday 13 September 2011) & Stoney Cooper (Wednesday 16 October 1918 - Tuesday 22 March 1977), after being informed of a position by L. E. White (1930 - Tuesday 7 September 2004).

Curtis Young quickly advanced into recording sessions, playing bass and rhythm guitar, and singing harmony.  Curtis Young also began doing radio and television commercials.

In 1973, Curtis Young did a demo of a song for a movie theme.  The demo was chosen, and so was Curtis Young, who was flown to Hollywood to sing the theme song for Robby Benson's first movie, which was called 'Jory'.  Also starring was B.J. Thomas and John Marley.

After about three years with Wilma Lee Cooper (Monday 7 February 1921 - Tuesday 13 September 2011) and Stoney Cooper (Wednesday 16 October 1918 - Tuesday 22 March 1977), Curtis Young worked the road on weekends playing bass and singing for Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001).

Mickey Gilley: 'Mickey Gilley' (Epic Records, 1979) Mickey Gilley: 'Mickey Gilley' (Epic Records, 1979)

Mickey Gilley recorded Curtis Young's 'If You Love Me' and included the track on 'Mickey Gilley' (Epic Records, 1979).

In 1979, Curtis Young was called to work with one of The Grand Ole Opry's long-time members, Vic Willis of the famed Willis Brothers.

In January 1995, with the passing of John 'Vic' Willis (Wednesday 31 May 1922 - Sunday 15 January 1995), The Vic Willis Trio evolved, putting Curtis Young in the spotlight as the lead singer.

Curtis Young worked with The Willis Brothers for six years but kept his recording status with other major artists.



In 1983, Curtis Young provided invaluable vocal harmonies, on all tracks, on Gene Watson's 'Sometimes I Get Lucky' (MCA Records, 1983), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'You're Out Doing What I'm Here Doing Without' (written by Bo Roberts and Allen Frizzell) (No.2, 1983)
'Sometimes I Get Lucky', which was written by Ernie Rowell and Bobby Lee House (Friday 11 February 1949 - Thursday 25 November 2004) (No.9, 1983)



On Thursday 22 March 1984, Kathy Mattea saw the release of her self-titled debut album, 'Kathy Mattea' (Mercury Records, 1984), which was produced by Rick Peoples and Byron Hill, and which included four tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Street Talk' (written by Lee Domann and Ralph Whiteway) (No.25, 1983)
'Someone is Falling in Love' (written by Lee Domann and Pebe Sebert) (No.26, 1984)
'You've Got a Soft Place to Fall' (written by Kerry Chater, Bob McDill and H. Moore) (No.44, 1984)
'That's Easy for You to Say' (written by B. Clifford and D. Hodges) (No.50, 1984)

Kathy Mattea's self-titled debut album, 'Kathy Mattea' (Mercury Records, 1984), also included the following tracks:

'Takin' the Givin' Away' (written by Bob DiPiero and J. Wood)
'You Know That I Do (and I know that you won't)' (written by Pete McCann)
'Full Time Love', which was written by Bob DiPiero and Tim Krekel (Tuesday 10 October 1950 - Wednesday 24 June 2009)
'Somewhere Down the Road' (written by Tom Snow and Cynthia Weil)
'(Back to The) Heartbreak Kid', which was written by Van Stephenson (Wednesday 4 November 1953 - Sunday 8 April 2001) and Tim DuBois
'God Ain't No Stained Glass Window' (written by Mark Germino)

Kathy Mattea's self-titled debut album, 'Kathy Mattea' (Mercury Records, 1984), reached No.42 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.

Personnel involved in the recording of Kathy Mattea's self-titled debut album, 'Kathy Mattea' (Mercury Records, 1984), included the following:

Kathy Mattea (vocals, guitar, background vocals)
Mark CasstevensGregg Galbraith, Jon Goin, Chris Leuzinger and Dale Sellers (guitar)
Sonny Garrish (pedal steel guitar)
David Briggs and Bobby Wood (piano)
Spady Brannan and Alan Rush (bass)
Gene Chrisman and Tommy Wells (drums)
Curtis Young, Wade McCurdy, Pat McManus, Marcy Cates and Margie Cates (background vocals)
Nashville String Machine (strings, arranged by D. Bergen White)



In 1984, Curtis Young auditioned for a part in the Patsy Cline movie 'Sweet Dreams', which starred Jessica Lange (as Patsy Cline) and Ed Harris (as Charlie Dick).  Curtis Young got the part and played the role of a lead guitar player in Patsy Cline's road band and sang a solo with a full screen close-up.

'Sweet Dreams' was a 1985 biographical film which told the life story of country music singer Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 - Tuesday 5 March 1963).  The film's screenplay was written by Robert Getchell and was directed by Karel Reisz (Wednesday 21 July 1926 - Monday 25 November 2002).

'Sweet Dreams' starred Jessica Lange, Ed Harris, Ann Wedgeworth, David Clennon, James Staley, Gary Basaraba and John Goodman.  The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress (Jessica Lange).  For all the musical sequences, Jessica Lange lip-synced to the original Patsy Cline recordings; the soundtrack of the same name was released on Monday 16 September 1985.



The 'Sweet Dreams' soundtrack album, which was released by Decca Records / MCA Records in 1985, contained all original songs by Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 - Tuesday 5 March 1963) and was released following the movie.  Although the soundtrack included original songs performed by Patsy Cline, it did not contain the original background vocal music, as all of it was overdubbed to fit each part of the movie.

Patsy Cline's original producer, Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 - Wednesday 7 January 1998), produced the soundtrack.  The music was remixed and remastered by Doug Crider (Suzy Bogguss' husband) at Music City Music Hall in Nashville.  The overdub recording sessions took place in 1984 at Bradley's Barn in Mount Juliet, Tennessee.

'Sweet Dreams' (Decca Records / MCA Records, 1985) was originally released as an LP record, but was later re-issued on CD later in the decade.  The lead single from the soundtrack, 'Sweet Dreams', was released in 1985, but it failed to chart on any country music chart in the United States.

However, 'Sweet Dreams' (Decca Records / MCA Records, 1985) itself charted at No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.

In April 1987, 'Sweet Dreams' (Decca Records / MCA Records, 1985) was certified 'Gold' by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for shipments of over 500,000 copies in the United States.



In 1991, Curtis Young provided invaluable vocal harmonies, on all tracks, on Gene Watson's 'At Last' (Warner Bros. Records, 1991), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'At Last', which was written by Jay Booker and Jack Keller (Wednesday 11 November 1936 - Friday 1 April 2005) (No.61, 1991)
'You Can't Take it with You When You Go' (written by Larry Cordle, Larry Shell and Bert Colwell) (No.67, 1991)

Curtis Young was voted the No.1 vocalist in the 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1996 and 1998 'Top Ten Album All Stars' by Nashville's 'Music Row Magazine', as a result of having added his harmony vocals to over eighty Billboard Top 10 country music albums.

In 1992, Curtis Young was on more Billboard Top 10 albums than any other singer or musician in Nashville.



It was also in 1992 when Curtis Young, along with Tony Haselden and Butch Carr, provided background vocals on Tim Menzies' 'This Ol' Heart' (Giant Records, 1992).



On Tuesday 25 January 1994, Collin Raye saw the release of 'Extremes' (Epic Records, 1994), which included five tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'That's My Story' (written by Lee Roy Parnell and Tony Haselden) (No.6 in March 1994)
'Little Rock' (written by Tom Douglas) (No.2 in July 1994)
'Man of My Word' (written by Gary Burr and Allen Shamblin) (No.8 in November 1994)
'My Kind of Girl', which was written by Debi Cochran, John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 - Thursday 1 February 2001) and Monty Powell (No.1 for one week in February 1995)
'If I Were You' (written by John Hobbs and Chris Farren) (No.4, 1995)

Collin Raye's 'Extremes' (Epic Records, 1994) also included the following tracks:

'A Bible & a Bus Ticket Home' (written by James Dean Hicks and Craig Wiseman)
'Nothin' a Little Love Won't Cure' (written by Larry Boone, Rick Bowles and Don Cook)
'To the Border & Beyond' (written by Collin Raye)
'Angel of No Mercy' (written by Jim McBride and Chapin Hartford)
'Dreaming My Dreams with You' (written by Allen Reynolds)

Personnel involved in the recording of Collin Raye's 'Extremes' (Epic Records, 1994) included the following:

Eddie Bayers, Paul Liem and Lonnie Wilson (drums)
Larry Byrom, Billy Joe Walker Junior and Paul Worley (electric guitar)
Robert Charles and Carl Gorodetzky (strings)
Joe Chemay (bass guitar, background vocals)
Dan Dugmore (steel guitar, lap steel guitar)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
John Hobbs (piano, string arrangements, synthesizer, background vocals)
Anthony Martin, John Wesley Ryles, Dennis Wilson, Sammy Wray, Scotty Wray and Curtis Young (background vocals)
The Nashville String Machine (strings)
Collin Raye (lead vocals, background vocals)
Biff Watson (acoustic guitar)

Collin Raye's 'Extremes' (Epic Records, 1994) reached No.12 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1994, and No.73 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1994.



On Tuesday 22 August 1995, Collin Raye saw the release of 'I Think About You' (Epic Records, 1995), which included six tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'One Boy, One Girl' (written by Mark Alan Springer and Shaye Smith) (No.2, 1995)
'Not That Different' (written by Karen Taylor-Good and Joie Scott) (No.3, 1995)
'I Think about You' (written by Don Schlitz and Steve Seskin) (No.3, 1996)
'Love Remains' (written by Tom Douglas and Jim Daddario) (No.12 in November 1996)
'What if Jesus Comes Back Like That' (written by Pat Bunch and Doug Johnson) (No.21 in January 1997)
'On the Verge' (written by Hugh Prestwood) (No.2 in May 1997)

Collin Raye's 'I Think About You' (Epic Records, 1995) also included the following tracks:

'Sweet Miss Behavin' (written by Kostas and Wally Wilson)
'Heart Full of Rain' (written by Hugh Prestwood)
'The Time Machine' (written by Gary Burr)
'I Love Being Wrong', which was written by Billy Kirsch and John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 - Thursday 1 February 2001)
'I Volunteer' (written by Larry Boone, Will Robinson and Tammy Hyler)

Personnel involved in the recording of Collin Raye's 'I Think About You' (Epic Records, 1995) included the following:

Larry Byrom and Dann Huff (electric guitar)
Joe Chemay (bass guitar, background vocals)
Dan Dugmore and Paul Franklin (pedal steel guitar)
Larry Franklin (fiddle)
John Hobbs (piano, Hammond B-3 organ, synthesizer, accordion)
Paul Leim and Lonnie Wilson (drums)
Anthony Martin, John Wesley Ryles, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Collin Raye (lead vocals, background vocals)
Tom Roady (percussion)
Ed Seay (six-string bass guitar)
Billy Joe Walker Junior (electric guitar, acoustic guitar)
Biff Watson (acoustic guitar)

Collin Raye's 'I Think About You' (Epic Records, 1995) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1995, No.40 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1995, and No.13 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1995.



On Tuesday 9 January 1996, Chely Wright saw the release of 'Right in the Middle of It' (Polydor Records, 1996), which was produced by Ed Seay and Harold Shedd; the album included three tracks which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Listenin' to the Radio' (written by Sunny Russ and Stephony Smith) (No.66, 1995) / this track also reached No.84 on the Canadian RPM Country Singles Chart in 1995
'The Love That We Lost' (written by Gary Burr and Monty Powell) (No.41, 1996) / this track also reached No.51 on the Canadian RPM Country Singles Chart in 1996
'The Love He Left Behind' (written by Steven Dale Jones and Bobby Tomberlin) / this track failed to chart on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart or in Canada

Chely Wright's 'Right in the Middle of It' (Polydor Records, 1996) also included the following tracks:

'Heart Shaped World' (written by Kent Blazy, Bob DiPiero and Kim Williams)
'Right in the Middle of It' (written by Chely Wright)



'What I Learned from Loving You' (written by James Brown and Russell Smith) / this track was originally recorded by Lynn Anderson (Friday 26 September 1947 - Thursday 30 July 2015), who included the track on 'Back' (Permian Records, 1983); Lynn Anderson's version of 'What I Learned from Loving You' reached No.18 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1983

'Alligator Purse' (written by Nick Pellegrino and Kenya Slaughter Walker)
'The Other Woman' (written by Chely Wright)
'Day One' (written by Marv Green and Wendell Mobley)
'It's Not Too Late' (written by Tracy Byrd, Bill Rice and Sharon Rice)
'Gotta Get Good at Givin' Again' (written by Chely Wright)

Personnel involved in the recording of Chely Wright's 'Right in the Middle of It' (Polydor Records, 1996), included the following:

Eddie Bayers (drums)
Larry Byrom and Dann Huff (electric guitar)
Butch Carr (triangle)
Joe Chemay (bass)
Tod Culross, Mitch Shedd, Jimmy Stewart and Russ Zavitson (clapping)
Cindy Fee, Anthony Martin, Wendell Mobley, John Wesley Ryles, Cindy Richardson Walker, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Larry Franklin (fiddle, mandolin)
Paul Franklin (dobro, steel guitar)
John Hobbs (hammond organ, piano, synthesizer, wurlitzer)
Mark Lambert (programming)
Joey Miskulin (accordion)
Ed Seay (acoustic guitar)
Billy Joe Walker Junior and Biff Watson (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Chely Wright (background vocals, lead vocals)



On Tuesday 13 May 1997, Lee Ann Womack saw the release, on Decca Records, of 'Lee Ann Womack' (Decca Records, 1997), her self-titled debut album, which was produced by Mark Wright.

Lee Ann Womack's self-titled debut album, 'Lee Ann Womack' (Decca Records, 1997), included four tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Never Again, Again' (written by Monty Holmes and Barbie Isham) (No.23, 1997)
'The Fool' (written by Marla Cannon-Goodman, Gene Ellsworth and Charlie Stefl) (No.2, 1997)
'You've Got to Talk to Me' (written by Jamie O'Hara) (No.2, 1998)
'Buckaroo' (written by Mark D. Sanders and Ed Hill) (No.27, 1998)

Lee Ann Womack's self-titled debut album, 'Lee Ann Womack' (Decca Records, 1997), also included the following tracks:

'A Man with 18 Wheels' (written by Bobby Carmichael and Leslie Satcher)
'Am I the Only Thing That You've Done Wrong' (written by Billy Joe Foster, Lee Ann Womack and Jason Sellers)
'Make Memories with Me' (written by Leslie Satcher and Danny Stegall) / this track was a duet with Mark Chesnutt
'Trouble's Here' (written by Jann Browne and Matt Barnes)
'Do You Feel for Me' (written by Tim Johnson)
'Montgomery to Memphis' (written by Billy Montana and Anne Reeves)
'Get up in Jesus' Name' (written by Mike Curtis and Marty Raybon)

Personnel involved in the recording of Lee Ann Womack's self-titled debut album, 'Lee Ann Womack' (Decca Records, 1997), included the following:

Mike Brignardello (bass guitar)
Tony Brown (piano on 'You've Got to Talk to Me')
Larry Byrom (acoustic guitar; electric guitar on 'Make Memories with Me')
Pat Flynn and Biff Watson (acoustic guitar)
Larry Franklin (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Abe Manuel (accordion)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Steve Nathan (piano, Wurlitzer electric piano, Hammond B-3 organ)
Tom Roady (percussion)
Gary W. Smith (piano on 'Get up in Jesus' Name')
Lonnie Wilson (drums)
Lee Ann Womack (vocals)
Liana Manis, Gene Miller, John Wesley Ryles, Leslie Satcher, Lisa Silver, Ricky Skaggs, Sharon White Skaggs, Bergen White and Curtis Young (Background vocals)
Nashville String Machine (strings, conducted by Carl Gorodetzky and arranged by Bergen White)

Lee Ann Womack's self-titled debut album, 'Lee Ann Womack' (Decca Records, 1997), reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1997, No.106 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1997, and No.1 on the Billboard Top Heatseekers Chart in 1997.



The Jordanaires (Gordon Stoker, Curtis Young, Louis Nunley & Ray Walker) in 2000

In April 2000, following the passing of Neal Matthews (Saturday 26 October 1929 - Friday 21 April 2000) of the world famous The Jordanaires, Curtis Young was asked to join the group as second tenor and lead singer.  In awe of having the opportunity to be a part of such a prestigious quartet, Curtis Young graciously accepted and toured and recorded as an official Jordanaire.

The Jordanaires are members of The Gospel Hall of Fame and The Rockabilly Hall of Fame.

On Thursday 4 October 2001, The Jordanaires were inducted into The Country Music Hall of Fame.

In 2002, The Jordanaires won a Grammy Award for 'Best Southern Gospel Album', which was a tribute to James Blackwood.

In 2003, The Jordanaires received The Golden Voice Award and The Sun Records Lifetime Achievement Award.

 

Lee Ann Womack's 'Call Me Crazy' (MCA Records Nashville, 2008) was issued as a vinyl LP at the time of its release, as well as on CD.

Lee Ann Womack's 'Call Me Crazy' (MCA Records Nashville, 2008), which was produced by Tony Brown, included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

'Last Call' (written by Erin Enderlin and Shane McAnally) (No.14, 2008)
'Solitary Thinkin' (written by Waylon Payne) (No.39, June 2009)

Lee Ann Womack's 'Call Me Crazy' (MCA Records Nashville, 2008) also included the following tracks:

'Either Way' (written by Chris Stapleton, Kendall Marvel and Tim James)
'New Again' (written by Lee Ann Womack, Dale Dodson and Casey Beathard)
'I Found it in You' (written by Nash, Michael T. Post and Whitney Duncan)
'Have You Seen That Girl' (written by Lee Ann Womack, Dale Dodson and Dean Dillon)
'The Bees' (written by Natalie Hemby and Daniel Tashian) / this track featured background vocals from Keith Urban
'I Think I Know' (written by Tom Shapiro, Mark Nesler and Tony Martin)
'If These Walls Could Talk' (written by Lee Ann Womack and Dale Dodson)
'Everything but Quits' (written by Lee Ann Womack, Dale Dodsonand Dean Dillon) / this track was a duet with George Strait
'The King of Broken Hearts' (written by Jim Lauderdale) / this track, which was originally recorded by George Strait, was included on the soundtrack of the film 'Pure Country' (MCA Records Nashville, 1993)
'The Story of My Life' (written by Hillary Lindsey, Brett James and Angelo Petraglia)

Personnel involved in the recording of Lee Ann Womack's 'Call Me Crazy' (MCA Records Nashville, 2008) included the following:

Perry Coleman, Melissa Hayes, Morgane Hayes, Wes Hightower, Kim Keyes, Aubrey Sellers, Jason Sellers, Judson Spence, Chris Stapleton, Keith Urban and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Eric Darken (percussion)
Larry Franklin (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle, mandolin)
John Barlow Jarvis (piano, Hammond B-3 organ)
Brent Mason (electric guitar, gut string guitar)
Greg Morrow (drums, bongos)
Steve Nathan (piano, Hammond organ, Fender Rhodes, Wurlitzer, keyboards, synthesizer, synthesizer accordion)
Michael Rhodes (bass guitar, upright bass)
Randy Scruggs and Bryan Sutton (acoustic guitar)
Ilya Toshinsky (electric guitar)
Lee Ann Womack (lead and background vocals)
Bergen White (string arrangements)

On Monday 20 October 2008, in order to promote 'Call Me Crazy' (MCA Records Nashville, 2008), Lee Ann Womack previewed the album in Nashville, at Nashville's War Auditorium, where she sang nearly all of the songs on the album.  Lee Ann Womack also previewed the album at The Jazz Lincoln Centre in New York City in September 2008.

Lee Ann Womack's 'Call Me Crazy' (MCA Records Nashville, 2008) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2008, and No.23 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2008.

Lee Ann Womack's 'Call Me Crazy' (MCA Records Nashville, 2008) was nominated for a Grammy Award for 'Best Country Album' in December 2009.

• Visit Curtis Young's Official Site at curtisyoung.com

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Gene Watson Fan Site