• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Webster PR



Webster Public Relations
, PO Box 23015, Nashville, TN 37202

Contact Scott Adkins
Telephone 615-777-6995



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2005, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Lacy J. Dalton, which she submitted to this site on Friday 25 March 2005.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Lacy J. Dalton who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Lacy J. Dalton
This quote was submitted on Friday 25 March 2005.

'May I wish Gene all the very best with his new, fan-based, website.

Gene Watson is, within the genre of country music, the real deal!'

Thank you, Lacy J. Dalton, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Lacy J. Dalton...



Lacy J. Dalton was born Jill Lynne Byrem on Sunday 13 October 1946 in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania and has one of the most instantly recognisable voices in country music.

 

Lacy J. Dalton enjoyed a string of Top 10 country music singles on the Billboard country music singles chart in the United States, following the release, and success of, her first two albums, 'Lacy J. Dalton' (Columbia Records, 1980) and 'Hard Times' (Columbia Records, 1980) in 1980.

Lacy J. Dalton is known for her gritty, powerful vocals and has one of the most instantly recognisable voices in country music - she is the woman 'People Magazine' hailed as 'Country music’s Bonnie Raitt'.

From the first time Lacy J. Dalton caught the public's ear, that soulful delivery, full of texture and grit, has been a mainstay of country music.

When you sit and listen to a Lacy J. Dalton album, you find yourself pulled in by the very power and heart of this vocalist, because she's not merely performing a ten-song set, she's bringing each and every tune to life; it's as if they were all written especially for her.

Lacy J. Dalton's music is a product of her wide-ranging musical tastes; she was born in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, into a family of musicians.  Lacy J. Dalton's father played a variety of stringed instruments, sang and wrote country songs, while her mother played guitar, wrote and sang harmony and her sister played piano and guitar.

Lacy J. Dalton's early influences were the classic country music of the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, along with the folk and rock sounds of writer / artists such as Bob Dylan, Joan Baez and Fred Neil.

Lacy J. Dalton has always been a writer and an artist who loved music with a message and lyrics that somehow brought a new awareness to the listener.  Lacy J. Dalton was already a regional star in California when she went to Nashville; her national success appeared immediate.  This was another case of an 'overnight' star that had paid dues for a long time.

Lacy J. Dalton's success was powered not just by the artist's recordings, but by a stage show which truly electrified audiences.  Lacy J. Dalton quickly became one of the few women who could successfully open a show for the likes of Hank Williams Junior, Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) or Charlie Daniels.

Lacy J. Dalton's hit records are legendary million-airplay cuts, including the following:

'Hard Times' (written by Bobby Braddock) (No.7, 1980)
'Crazy Blue Eyes' (No.17, 1979)
'Hillbilly Girl with The Blues' (written by Lacy J. Dalton) (No.8, 1981)
'Takin’ It Easy', which was written by Lacy J. Dalton, Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Mark Sherrill (No.2, 1981)
'Everybody Makes Mistakes' (written by Lacy J. Dalton and Mark Sherrill) (No.5, 1981)
'Black Coffee' (written by Hillary Kanter and Even Stevens) (No.15, 1990) / this track was also a world-wide hit single
'16th Avenue' (written by Thom Schuyler) (No.7, 1982) / this track was voted one of country music's Top 100 songs by Billboard Magazine and is considered Lacy J. Dalton's signature song

Jill Croston (Lacy J. Dalton): 'Jill Croston' (Harbor Records, 1978)

In 1978, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of 'Jill Croston' (Harbor Records, 1978), which included the following tracks:

'Good Time Mama'
Personnel involved in the recording of 'Good Time Mama'
'Hungry' Bob Brozman (acoustic guitar - Hawaiian)
Rick Messina (bass)
Tim Ackerman (drums)
Jack Bowers (piano)
Michael Belanger (rhythm guitar, vocals)
The Abrasions (vocals)

'Jamaica'
Personnel involved in the recording of 'Jamaica'
Michael Belanger (acoustic guitar)
John Fitzgerald (acoustic guitar, vocals)
Steve Loveless (bass, percussion, drums)
Danny Moon (vocals)

'Burnin' Love'
Personnel involved in the recording of 'Burnin' Love'
Johnny Mello (acoustic rhythm guitar)
Rick Messina (bass)
Tim Ackerman (drums)
'Slippery' John Weston (pedal steel guitar)
Jack Bowers (piano)
Michael Belanger (rhythm guitar)

'Isabella'
Personnel involved in the recording of 'Isabella'
Michael Belanger (acoustic guitar)
Ann Hughes (acoustic guitar, vocals)
Jimmy Zils (bass Guitarone guitar, vocals)
Jack Bowers (mandolin)

'Higher & Higher'
Personnel involved in the recording of 'Higher & Higher'
Rick Messina (bass)
Tim Ackerman (drums)
Jill Croston and Sara Pond (harmony vocals)
John Fitzgerald (lead guitar)
Michael Belanger (lead guitar, rhythm guitar)
Walt Gaffert (organ)
Jack Bowers (piano)
Wayne Goodwin (violin)

'Black Jack Davey'
Personnel involved in the recording of 'Black Jack Davey'
Rick Messina (bass)
Tim Ackerman (drums)
Jill Croston, Joe Richardson and Michael Belanger (harmony vocals)
Jack Bowers (piano)
Darol Anger (violin, mandolin)

'Evenin' Comes'
Personnel involved in the recording of 'Evenin' Comes'
Larry Scala (acoustic guitar, lead guitar)
Rick Messina (bass)
Tim Ackerman (drums)
Bill Grossman and Jill Croston (harmony vocals)
Jack Bowers (piano)
Michael Belanger (rhythm guitar, vocals)

'Threw It All Away'
Personnel involved in the recording of 'Threw It All Away'
Michael Belanger (acoustic guitar, rhythm guitar)
Rick Messina (bass)
Tim Ackerman (drums)
'Slippery' John Weston (pedal steel guitar)
Jack Bowers (piano)
Darol Anger (violin)

'Snake Song'
Personnel involved in the recording of 'Snake Song'
Jill Croston and Michael Belanger (acoustic guitar)
Jack Bowers (piano)

'Do I Have to Tell You'
Personnel involved in the recording of 'Do I Have to Tell You'
Rick Messina (bass)
Tim Ackerman (drums)
Jack Bowers (piano)
Michael Belanger (rhythm guitar, 12-string guitar)
Darol Anger (violin)

Voted 'Best New Female Artist' by the ACM (Academy of Country Music) in 1979, Lacy J. Dalton brought home numerous Grammy nominations, along with three prestigious Bay Area Music Awards for 'Best Country-Folk Recording', appearing with the likes of Neil Young,  The Grateful Dead and Grace Slick and Jefferson Airplane.



In February 1980, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of her self-titled album, 'Lacy J. Dalton' (Columbia Records, 1980), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Crazy Blue Eyes' (written by Mary McFadden and Lacy J. Dalton)
(No.17, 1979)
'Tennessee Waltz', which was written by Redd Stewart (Sunday 27 May 1923 - Saturday 2 August 2003) and Pee Wee King (Wednesday 18 February 1914 - Tuesday 7 March 2000) (No.18, 1980)
'Losing Kind of Love' (written by Mark Sherrill and Lacy J. Dalton) (No.14, 1980)

Lacy J. Dalton's self-titled album, 'Lacy J. Dalton' (Columbia Records, 1980), also included the following tracks:

'High Like an Angel' (written by Rainne Pierce and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Honky Tonk Man', which was written by Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003) and Richard Coleman
'Carolina, Come On' (written by Larry Collins and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Beer Drinkin' Song' (written by David Wood and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Late Night Kind of Lonesome' (written by Lacy J. Dalton)
'Are There Any Cowboys Left (in The Good Ol' U.S.A.)' (written by John Fitzgerald and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Turn My Head Around' (written by Lacy J. Dalton)

Lacy J. Dalton's self-titled album, 'Lacy J. Dalton' (Columbia Records, 1980), reached No.11 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.



In September 1980, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of 'Hard Times' (Columbia Records, 1980), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Hard Times' (written by Bobby Braddock)
(No.7, 1980)
'Hillbilly Girl with The Blues' (written by Lacy J. Dalton) (No.8, 1981)
'Whisper' (written by Lacy J. Dalton and Mark Sherrill) (No.10, 1981)

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Hard Times' (Columbia Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

'China Doll' (written by Mary McFadden, John Fitzgerald and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Old Soldier' (written by Mary McFadden and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Ain't Nobody Who Could Do It Like My Daddy Could' (written by Don Goodman and Mark Sherrill)
'You Can't Save Love' (written by Steve Davis and Mark Sherrill)
'Wide Eyed & Willing' (written by Johnny Blackburn)
'Girls From Santa Cruz' (written by Michael Belanger and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Me 'n' You' (written by Adam Hughes)

Personnel involved in the recording of Lacy J. Dalton's 'Hard Times' (Columbia Records, 1980) included the following:

Billy Sanford, Reggie Young, Pete Wade, Jimmy Capps and Pete Bordonali (guitar)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 - Friday 29 July 1988) (Dobro)
Joe Osborn and Bob Wray (bass)
Jerry Carrigan, Jerry Kroon and Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) (drums)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) and Ron Reynolds (percussion)
Tommy Williams (fiddle)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins and Bobby Wood (piano, keyboards)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Shelly Kurland Strings (strings)
Louis Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012), Lea Jane Berinati, Hurshel Wiginton and Dennis Wilson (vocals)

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Hard Times' (Columbia Records, 1980) reached No.18 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.



In June 1981, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of 'Takin' It Easy' (Columbia Records, 1981), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), and which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:


'Takin' It Easy', which was written by Lacy J. Dalton, Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Mark Sherrill
 (No.2, 1981)
'Everybody Makes Mistakes' (written by Lacy J. Dalton and Mark Sherrill) (No.5, 1981) / this track was a double A-side with 'Wild Turkey' (written by Hugh Moffatt and Pebe Sebert)

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Takin' It Easy' (Columbia Records, 1981) also included the following tracks:

'Where Were You When I Needed You' (written by Marvin Moore and Bernie Wayne)
'Come to Me', which was written by Bobby Braddock and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016)

'Comes a Time' (written by Neil Young)
'Golden Memories' (written by John Fitzgerald and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Let Me in The Fast Lane' (written by Robert Frye, Jean Embry and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Feedin' The Fire' (written by Becky Hobbs)
'Somebody Killed Davey Jones' Daughter' (written by Larry Jenkins and Joe Chambers)

Personnel involved in the recording of Lacy J. Dalton's 'Takin' It Easy' (Columbia Records, 1981) included the following:

Billy Sanford, Reggie Young, Pete Wade, Pete Bordonali and Jimmy Capps (guitar)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Bob Wray and Joe Osborn (bass)
Jerry Carrigan, Jerry Kroon and Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) (drums)
Tommy Williams (fiddle)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins, Bobby Wood and Kurt Howell (piano, keyboards)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) and Ron Reynolds (percussion)
Don Sheffield (trumpet)
Dennis Good (trombone)
Sam Levine (clarinet)
The Sheldon Kurland Strings (strings)
Lea Jane Berinati, Dennis Wilson, Hurshel Wiginton and Louis Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012) (vocals)

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Takin' It Easy' (Columbia Records, 1981) reached No.12 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1981 and remained on the chart for 39 weeks..

Lacy J. Dalton's '16th Avenue & Takin' It Easy' (Morello Records, 2014)

On Monday 28 April 2014, England's Morello Records released Lacy J. Dalton's 'Takin' It Easy' (Columbia Records, 1981), along with Lacy J. Dalton's '16th Avenue' (Columbia Records, 1982), as a special 2-CD set (MRLL33).



In June 1982, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of '16th Avenue' (Columbia Records, 1982), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), and which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Slow Down', which was written by Lacy J. Dalton, Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Mark Sherrill
(No.13, 1982)
'16th Avenue' (written by Thom Schuyler) (No.7, 1982) / this track has been hailed as one of the all-time great country music records and is the song most associated with Lacy J. Dalton

Lacy J. Dalton's '16th Avenue' (Columbia Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

'Rained On' (written by Lamar Hill and Richard Rector)
'Blue Eyed Blues' (written by Mark Sherrill and Lacy J. Dalton)
'You Can't Take The Texas Out of Me' (written by Fred Koller, John Toomey and Lacy J. Dalton)
'One of The Unsatisfied' (written by Lee Kellison and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Jamaica' (written by Fred Koller, John Fitzgerald and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Heartbeat' (written by Ken Compton and Wayne Crook)
'Love It Away' (written by Troy Seals and Eddie Setser)
'Imagine That' (written by Jessica Boucher and Carmen Didier)

Lacy J. Dalton's '16th Avenue' (Columbia Records, 1982) reached No.23 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.

Lacy J. Dalton's '16th Avenue & Takin' It Easy' (Morello Records, 2014)

On Monday 28 April 2014, England's Morello Records released Lacy J. Dalton's '16th Avenue' (Columbia Records, 1982), along with Lacy J. Dalton's 'Takin' It Easy' (Columbia Records, 1981), as a special '2-for-1' CD set (MRLL33).



Bobby Bare
recorded Lacy J. Dalton's 'Golden Memories' (co-written with John Fitzgerald) and included the track on 'Ain't Got Nothin' to Lose' (Columbia Records, 1982).



In June 1983, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of 'Dream Baby' (Columbia Records, 1983), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), and which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Dream Baby (How Long Must I Dream)', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006)
 (No.9, 1983)
'Windin' Down' (written by Fred Koller, Mark Sherrill and Lacy J. Dalton) (No.54, 1983)

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Dream Baby' (Columbia Records, 1983) also included the following tracks:

'My Old Yellow Car' (written by Thom Schuyler)
'Too Many Miles' (written by Fred Koller, Pebe Sebert and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Waltz That Time Forgot' (written by Patrick Hubbard, John Fitzerald and Lacy J. Dalton)
'You Satisfy Me' (written by Troy Seals, Eddie Setser and Mike Reid)
'Baby, You Can Rock with Me' (written by Keith Sykes)
'Baby, Better Start Turnin' 'Em Down' (written by Rodney Crowell)
'You Got It Comin' Tonight' (written by Troy Seals and Mike Reid)
'Dixie Devil' (written by Patrick Hubbard, John Fitzerald and Lacy J. Dalton)

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Dream Baby' (Columbia Records, 1983) reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.



In December 1983, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of her first compilation album, 'Greatest Hits' (Columbia Records, 1983), which included the following tracks:

'Takin' It Easy', which was written by Lacy J. Dalton, Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Mark Sherrill
 (No.2, 1981)
'Slow Down', which was written by Lacy J. Dalton, Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Mark Sherrill (No.13, 1982)
'Crazy Blue Eyes' (written by Mary McFadden and Lacy J. Dalton) (No.17, 1979)
'Hard Times' (written by Bobby Braddock) (No.7, 1980)
'Everybody Makes Mistakes' (written by Lacy J. Dalton and Mark Sherrill) (No.5, 1981)
'Dream Baby (How Long Must I Dream)', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006) (No.9, 1983)
'Whisper' (written by Lacy J. Dalton and Mark Sherrill) (No.10, 1981)
'Losing Kind of Love' (written by Mark Sherrill and Lacy J. Dalton) (No.14, 1980)
'Tennessee Waltz', which was written by Redd Stewart (Sunday 27 May 1923 - Saturday 2 August 2003) and Pee Wee King (Wednesday 18 February 1914 - Tuesday 7 March 2000) (No.18, 1980)
'16th Avenue' (written by Thom Schuyler) (No.7, 1982)

It was also in 1983 when Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of the single 'It's a Dirty Job' (written by Don Cook and Rafe Van Hoy); the track was a duet with Bobby Bare and reached No.30 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1983.

 

'It's a Dirty Job' (written by Don Cook and Rafe Van Hoy) was subsequently included on Lacy J. Dalton's 'Blue Eyed Blues' (Columbia Records, 1987) and Bobby Bare's 'Bare Tracks: The Columbia Years' (Koch Records, 1999).

It was also in 1983 when Bobby Bare & Lacy J Dalton recorded 'Caught in The Spotlight' (written by Fred Koller and L. Anderson); the track, which was the 'B-side' of 'It's a Dirty Job' (written by Don Cook and Rafe Van Hoy) (No.30, 1983), was subsequently included on Bobby Bare's 'Bare Tracks: The Columbia Years' (Koch Records, 1999).



Lacy J. Dalton & George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded 'Size Seven Round (made of gold)'; the track, which reached No.19 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1985, was included on George Jones' 'Ladies Choice' (Epic Records, 1984).



In May 1985, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of 'Can't Run Away From Your Heart' (Columbia Records, 1985), which was produced by Marshall Morgan and Paul Worley, and which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'If That Ain't Love' (written by Jeff Harrington and Jeff Pennig)
(No.15, 1984)
'You Can't Run Away From Your Heart' (written by Wendy Waldman and Jim Photoglo) (No.20, 1985)
'The Night Has a Heart of It's Own' (written by Paul Worley and Lacy J. Dalton) (No.58, 1985)
'Don't Fall in Love With Me' (written by Mary McFadden and Lacy J. Dalton) (No.43, 1986)

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Can't Run Away From Your Heart' (Columbia Records, 1985) also included the following tracks:

'Too Late to Stop Lovin' You Now' (written by Jim McBride and Stewart Harris)
'Over You' (written by Marshall Morgan, Nancy Montgomery and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Perfectly Crazy' (written by Tom Kimmel)
'Silver Eagle' (written by Chip Hardy, Janis Carnes and Rick Carnes)
'Adios & Run' (written by Lacy J. Dalton)
'Slow Movin' Outlaw' (written by Dee Moeller) / this track was a duet with Willie Nelson

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Can't Run Away From Your Heart' (Columbia Records, 1985) reached No.33 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.



In July 1986, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of 'Highway Diner' (Columbia Records, 1986), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Working Class Man' (written by Jonathan Cain)
(No.16, 1986)
'This Ol' Town' (written by Rick Giles and George Green) (No.33, 1986)

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Highway Diner' (Columbia Records, 1986) also included the following tracks:

'12:05' (written by Larry Boone, Paul Nelson and Charles Nelson)
'Changing All The Time' (written by Ralph Ezell and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Takin' It All in Stride' (written by Tom Snow)
'Can't See Me Without You' (written by Marie Landry)
'Up With The Wind' (written by Rick Giles and George Green)
'Boomtown' (written by Fred Koller and Walter Carter)
'Gone Again' (written by Larry Henley and Billy Burnette)
'Closing Time' (written by Lyle Lovett)

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Highway Diner' (Columbia Records, 1986) reached No.32 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1986.

Lacy J. Dalton: 'Highway Diner & Blue Eyed Blues' (Morello Records, 2014)

On Monday 28 July 2014, England's Morello Records released Lacy J. Dalton's 'Highway Diner' (Columbia Records, 1986), along with Lacy J. Dalton's 'Blue Eyed Blues' (Columbia Records, 1987), as a special '2-for-1' CD set (MRLL38).



In 1987, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of 'Blue Eyed Blues' (Columbia Records, 1987), which was a mix of new recordings with career highlights:

'Have I Got a Heart for You' (written by Keith Stegall and Marvin Morrow)
'It's a Dirty Job' (written by Don Cook and Rafe VanHoy) / this track, which reached No.30 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1987, was a duet with Bobby Bare
'Blue-Eyed Blues' (written by Mark Sherrill and Lacy J. Dalton)
'That's Good - That's Bad' (written by Michael Garvin and Ron Hellard) / this track was a duet with George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013)
'Gotta' Serve Somebody' (written by Bob Dylan) / this track was a duet with David Allan Coe
'I'll Love 'Em Whatever They Are' (written by John Fitzherald and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Hillbilly Girl with The Blues' (written by Lacy J. Dalton)
'16th Avenue' (written by Thom Schuyler)
'My Old Yellow Car' (written by Thom Schuyler)
'Love Gone Cold' (written by John Fitzherald and Lacy J. Dalton) / this track featured guest vocals from Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 - Wednesday 28 March 2012)

Lacy J. Dalton: 'Highway Diner & Blue Eyed Blues' (Morello Records, 2014)

On Monday 28 July 2014, England's Morello Records released Lacy J. Dalton's 'Blue Eyed Blues' (Columbia Records, 1987), along with Lacy J. Dalton's 'Highway Diner' (Columbia Records, 1986), as a special '2-for-1' CD set (MRLL38).



Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 - Saturday 5 June 1993) recorded Lacy J. Dalton's 'Too White to Sing The Blues' (co-written with Roger Murrah) and included the track on 'House on Old Lonesome Road' (MCA Records, 1989).



In January 1989, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of 'Survivor' (Universal Records, 1989), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'The Heart' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
 (No.13, 1989) / Lacy J. Dalton probably heard Kris Kristofferson's song 'The Heart' when they toured Europe together
'I'm a Survivor' (written by Mark Erwin and Bill Tinker) (No.57, 1989)
'Hard Luck Ace' (written by Aaron Anderson and Lacy J. Dalton) (No.38, 1989)

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Survivor' (Universal Records, 1989) also included the following tracks:

'Walking Wounded' (written by Lewis Anderson and Lacy J. Dalton)
'A Diamond All The Time' (written by Pat Bunch and Mary Ann Kennedy)
'Still Crazy After All These Years' (written by Paul Simon) / this track was the best-known song on the album
'Old Friends', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016), Susanna Clark (Saturday 11 March 1939 - Wednesday 27 June 2012) and Richard Dobson
'Turn to The One' (written by Austin Cunningham and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Me & These Arms' (written by Tony Colton)
'They Don't Make Them Like They Used To' (written by Lewis Anderson and Fred Koller)

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Survivor' (Universal Records, 1989) was re-issued by Capitol Records in 1990.

Lacy J. Dalton: 'Survivor & Lacy J.' (Morello Records, 2012)

On Monday 20 August 2012, England's Morello Records released Lacy J. Dalton's 'Survivor' (Universal Records, 1989), along with Lacy J. Dalton's 'Lacy J.' (Capitol Records, 1990), as a special '2-for-1' CD set (MRLL4).

Lacy J. Dalton: 'Somethin' Special' (Sony Music, 1990)

In February 1990, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of 'Somethin' Special' (Sony Music, 1990), which included the following tracks:

'Hard Times' (written by Bobby Braddock)
 (No.7, 1980)
'Over You' / this track was an album track from Lacy J. Dalton's 'Can't Run Away From Your Heart' (Columbia Records, 1985)
'Closing Time' / this track was an album track from Lacy J. Dalton's 'Highway Diner' (Columbia Records, 1986)
'Losing Kind of Love' (No.14, 1980)
'Are There Any Cowboys Left (in The Good Ol' U.S.A.)' / this track was an album track from Lacy J. Dalton's 'Lacy J. Dalton' (Columbia Records, 1980)
'Old Soldier' / this track was an album track from Lacy J. Dalton's 'Hard Times' (Columbia Records, 1980)
'If That Ain't Love' (No.15, 1984)
'16th Avenue' (written by Thom Schuyler) (No.7, 1982)
'Honky Tonk Man' / this track was an album track from Lacy J. Dalton's 'Lacy J. Dalton' (Columbia Records, 1980)
'Dream Baby (How Long Must I Dream)', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006) (No.9, 1983)



In April 1990, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of 'Lacy J' (Capitol Nashville Records, 1990), which included three tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Black Coffee' (written by Hillary Kanter and Even Stevens)
(No.15, 1990) / this track became a line dance favourite
'Where Did We Go Right?' (written by Don Schlitz and Dave Loggins) / this track was released as a single in 1990, but it did not chart
'Lonesome (As The Night is Long)' (written by Even Stevens and Hillary Kanter) / this track was released as a single in 1990, but it did not chart

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Lacy J' (Capitol Nashville Records, 1990) also included the following tracks:

'Don't Try to Tell Me (Nothin's Goin' On)' (written by Even Stevens, Hillary Kanter and Nancy Montgomery)
'Turn to a Little Third Rate Romance' (written by Even Stevens, Hillary Kanter and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Long Way Down' (written by Even Stevens, Hillary Kanter and Nancy Montgomery)
'Ain't No Question' (written by Chris Waters, Tom Shapiro and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Walk That Line' (written by David Wills and Rick West)
'Shaky Ground' (written by Even Stevens, Hillary Kanter and Lacy J. Dalton) / this track was a duet with Glen Campbell
'That Road' (written by Even Stevens and Hillary Kanter)

Lacy J. Dalton: 'Survivor & Lacy J.' (Morello Records, 2012)

On Monday 20 August 2012, England's Morello Records released Lacy J. Dalton's 'Lacy J.' (Capitol Records, 1990), along with Lacy J. Dalton's 'Survivor' (Universal Records, 1989), as a special '2-for-1' CD set (MRLL4).



Glen Campbell & Lacy J. Dalton recorded 'Woodcarver' (written by Rusty Wolfe); the track was included on Glen Campbell's 'Walkin' in The Sun' (Capitol Records, 1990) and featured guest vocals from Steve Wariner.



In April 1991, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of 'Crazy Love' (Capitol Nashville Records, 1991), which included three tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Forever in My Heart' (written by Even Stevens, Hillary Kanter and Lacy J. Dalton)
 / this track was released as a single in 1991, but it did not chart
'Lightnin' Strikes a Good Man' (written by Sterling Whipple) / this track was released as a single in 1991, but it did not chart
'The Deal' (written by James Knobloch and Ed Tree) / this track was released as a single in 1991, but it did not chart

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Crazy Love' (Capitol Nashville Records, 1991) also included the following tracks:

'Crazy Love' (written by Van Morrison)
'Loveless Cafe' (written by Bob Regan and Baverly Ross)
'Walk Away' (written by Dianne Warren and Michael Bolton)
'Restless' (written by Carl Perkins) / this track featured guest vocals from Carl Perkins
'Rainman' (written by Even Stevens and Alan Ray)
'Lay a Little Love on Me' (written by Even Stevens and Hillary Kanter)
'Little Boy Blue' (written by Adam Croston and Lacy J. Dalton)



In April 1992, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of 'Chains on The Wind' (Liberty Records, 1992), which included one track, which was released as a single on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Bye Bye Love', which was written by 
Felice Bryant (Friday 7 August 1925 - Tuesday 22 April 2003) and Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) / this track, which was a duet with Eddie Rabbitt (Thursday 27 November 1941 - Thursday 7 May 1998), was released as a single in 1992, but it did not chart

Although Lacy J. Dalton & Eddie Rabbitt's version of 'Bye Bye Love', which was written by Felice Bryant (Friday 7 August 1925 - Tuesday 22 April 2003) and Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987), did not chart on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in the United States, it did reach No.69 on the RPM Country Tracks Chart in Canada in 1992.

Lacy J. Dalton's 'Chains on The Wind' (Liberty Records, 1992) also included the following tracks:

'Rocks From a Rolling Stone', which was written by Tony Colton and Eddy Shaver (Wednesday 20 June 1962 - Sunday 31 December 2000)
'Chains on The Wind' (written by Stewart Harris and Jill Colucci)
'Heartache in Disguise' (written by Mary Ann Kennedy, Pat Bunch and Pam Rose)
'Here Today, Here Tomorrow' (written by Chris Waters and Chuck Jones)
'Never Gonna' Lose My Love' (written by Lacy J. Dalton and A. Melendez)
'Like The Answer to a Prayer' (written by Tony Colton and Brian Cadd)
'Love Hurts', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987)
'Stay With Me' (written by Even Stevens, Hillary Kanter and J.P. Pennington)
'Lay a Little Love on Me' (written by Even Stevens and Hillary Kanter)



In 1994, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of 'The Best of Lacy J. Dalton' (Liberty Records, 1994), which included the following tracks:

'Black Coffee' (written by Hillary Kanter and Even Stevens) (No.15, 1990)
'Where Did We Go Right?' (written by Don Schlitz and Dave Loggins) / this track was released as a single in 1990, but it did not chart
'Love Hurts', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) / this track was an album track on Lacy J. Dalton's 'Chains on The Wind' (Liberty Records, 1992)
'Lonesome (As The Night is Long)' (written by Even Stevens and Hillary Kanter) / this track was released as a single in 1990, but it did not chart
'The Deal' (written by James Knobloch and Ed Tree) / this track was released as a single in 1991, but it did not chart
'Bye, Bye Love', which was written by Felice Bryant (Friday 7 August 1925 - Tuesday 22 April 2003) and Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987)  / this track was a duet with Eddie Rabbitt (Thursday 27 November 1941 - Thursday 7 May 1998)
'I'm a Survivor' (written by Mark Erwin and Bill Tinker) (No.57, 1989)
'Turn to The One' (written by Austin Cunningham and Lacy J. Dalton) / this track was an album track from Lacy J. Dalton's 'Survivor' (Universal Records, 1989 / Capitol Records, 1990)
'Crazy Love' (written by Van Morrison) / this track was an album track from Lacy J. Dalton's 'Crazy Love' (Capitol Nashville Records, 1991)
'Hard Luck Ace' (written by Aaron Anderson and Lacy J. Dalton) (No.38, 1989)



Fred Koller
recorded Lacy J. Dalton's 'Beyond the Blues' (co-written with Fred Koller) and included the track on 'Sweet Baby Fred' (Appaloosa Records, 1998).



In 2004, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of her first independent album, 'The Last Wild Place' (Song Dog Records, 2004), which was co-produced with her then husband and business manager, Aaron Anderson, and old friend, Tom Bocci.  Lacy J. Dalton used her long time band, The Dalton Gang.

Lacy J. Dalton's first independent album, 'The Last Wild Place' (Song Dog Records, 2004), included the following tracks:

'Listen to The Wind' (written by Lacy J. Dalton)
'Heart of Hearts' (written by Lacy J. Dalton)
'Wanderers' (written by Lacy J. Dalton)
'Old Dog Blue' (written by Lacy J. Dalton)
'Alaska Song' (written by Aaron Anderson and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Standin' Knee Deep' (written by Lacy J. Dalton)
'Slip Away' (written by John Fitzgerald and Larry Hosford)
'Little Boy Blue' (written by Adam Croston and Lacy J. Dalton)
'Last Wild Place' (written by Lacy J. Dalton)
'Sanctuary' (written by Larry Bastian and Tom Bocci)
'she Could Run' (written by Lacy J. Dalton)
'Bouldless Skies' (written by Aaron Anderson and Lacy J. Dalton)

Lacy J. Dalton's first independent album, 'The Last Wild Place' (Song Dog Records, 2004), was a great critical success; it reached No.1 on the World Country Independent Chart, while the track 'Slip Away' (written by John Fitzgerald and Larry Hosford) became the No.1 single on the World Country Independent Chart.

In 2005, Lacy J. Dalton's first independent album, 'The Last Wild Place' (Song Dog Records, 2004) reached No.1 on the American Western Music Chart and, once again, 'Slip Away' reached No.1 on that chart.  Less than a year later, 'Slip Away' was used on the soundtrack of Clint Eastwood's daughter, Alison Eastwood's, Sundance film, 'Don't Tell'.

Ironically, over the twenty years since it was written for her, four major record companies in Nashville had refused to allow Lacy J. Dalton to record 'Slip Away', one reason for her foray into the unchartered waters of independent recording.

Lacy J. Dalton's former duet partners have included George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013), Eddie Rabbitt (Thursday 27 November 1941 - Thursday 7 May 1998), Bobby Bare, David Allan Coe and Glen Campbell.



Liz Talley
recorded Lacy J. Dalton's 'You Can't Take The Texas out of Me' (co-written with Fred Koller and John T. Toomey) and included the track on 'More Than Satisfied' (Diamond Music Group, 2009).

Lacy J. Dalton: 'Here's to Hank' (BSW Records, 2010)

In November 2010, Lacy J. Dalton saw the release of 'Here's to Hank' (BSW Records, 2010), which included the following tracks:

'Hey, Good Lookin'
'Lovesick Blues'
'My Bucket's Got a Hole in It'
'Long Gone Lonesome Blues'
'Your Cheatin' Heart'
'(I Heard That) Lonesome Whistle'
'Jambalaya (on The Bayou)'
'Why Don't You Love Me'
'Cold, Cold Heart'
'Honky Tonk Blues'
'Take These Chains From My Heart'
'You Win Again'



Mandy Heinemann
recorded Lacy J. Dalton's 'Hillbilly Girl With The Blues' and included the track on 'The Real Me' (Right Side Up Records, 2013).

Now living in the Comstock region near Virginia City, Nevada where she is a wild horse advocate and the president of her own not-for-profit organisation to help save Nevada's endangered creatures, Lacy J. Dalton continues to record and perform.

Lacy J. Dalton has taken an interest in saving Nevada's wild horses after she found some of them roaming around Virginia City.

When asked about her musical influences, Lacy J. Dalton is quick to reply, 'Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Kris Kristofferson, Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016), Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002), Willie Nelson, Dolly Parton, Janis Lyn Joplin (Tuesday 19 January 1943 - Sunday 4 October 1970), Robert Johnson, Karen Dalton, Fred Koller, Big Mama Thornton, Billie Holliday (7 April 1915 - Friday 17 July 1959), Hank Williams Senior (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953), Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) and J.J. Cale (Monday 5 December 1938 - Friday 26 July 2013)'.

• Visit Lacy J. Dalton's Official Site at lacyjdalton.com

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