• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2006, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Charlie McCoy, which he submitted to this site on Tuesday 10 October 2006.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Charlie McCoy who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Charlie McCoy
This quote was submitted on Tuesday 10 October 2006.

'Gene Watson is one of the classic country singers and is still carrying on a great tradition'.

Thank you, Charlie McCoy, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Charlie McCoy...



Charlie McCoy is one of a number of super-session musicians in Nashville, who has enjoyed longevity in the business and who has been a fixture in Nashville studios for years.

Charlie McCoy has also enjoyed a recording career of his own, having recorded twenty-eight albums in the space of thirty-two years.  Charlie McCoy has also served as musical director on 'Hee-Haw', the long running syndicated television series.

Charlie McCoy began working sessions in the early 1960s, one of the first being on Roy Orbison's Monument Records hit 'Candy Man', which was written by Beverly Ross and Fred Neil (Monday 16 March 1936 - Saturday 7 July 2001).

The recording session lasted three hours and Charlie McCoy was paid $49.  The year was 1961 and shortly after the release of 'Candy Man', Charlie McCoy became one of the most in-demand session players in Nashville.



Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 - Tuesday 6 December 1988) recorded 'Candy Man', which was written by Beverly Ross and Fred Neil (Monday 16 March 1936 - Saturday 7 July 2001); the track reached No.25 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1961 and was subsequently included on 'Roy Orbison's Greatest Hits' (Monument Records, 1962).



On Monday 10 April 1961, Wanda Jackson recorded Charlie McCoy's 'Funnel of Love' (co-written with Kent Westberry); the track was subsequently included on 'Heart Trouble' (CMH Records, 2003).



Webb Pierce (Monday 8 August 1921 - Sunday 24 February 1991) recorded Charlie McCoy's 'Too Long' and included the track on 'Country Music Time' (Decca Records, 1965).



Charlie McCoy began his recording career with Monument Records in the late 1960s and saw the release of twelve albums for the label, beginning in June 1968 with the release of 'The World of Charlie McCoy' (Monument Records, 1968), which included the following tracks:

'Jump Back Baby'
'Gimmie Some Lovin'
'Hey Baby'
'Candy Man'
'Turn on Your Love Light'
'Harpoon Man'
'Fingertips'
'Up Tight'
'Ode to Billie Joe'
'Shotgun'
'Juke'
'Good Vibrations'



In July 1969, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'The Real McCoy' (Monument Records, 1969), which included the following tracks:

'Orange Blossom Special', which was written by Ervin Thomas Rouse (Wednesday 19 September 1917 - Wednesday 8 July 1981)
'Only Daddy That'll Walk The Line'
'Today I Started Loving You Again', which was written by Merle Haggard and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 - Monday 24 April 2006)
'Jackson'
'Hangin' On'
'Real McCoy'
'Son of a Preacher Man'
'Build Me Up Buttercup'
'Harper Valley P.T.A.' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'Hooked on a Feeling'
'Games People Play', which was written by Joe South (Wednesday 28 February 1940 - Wednesday 5 September 2012)
'Look of Love'



In February 1972, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'The Real McCoy' (Monument Records, 1972), which included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Today I Started Loving You Again', which was written by Merle Haggard and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 - Monday 24 April 2006)
 (No.16, 1972)

Charlie McCoy's 'The Real McCoy' (Monument Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

'Orange Blossom Special', which was written by Ervin Thomas Rouse (Wednesday 19 September 1917 - Wednesday 8 July 1981)
'Only Daddy That'll Walk The Line'
'Jackson'
'Hangin' On'
'Real McCoy'
'Loving Her Was Easier' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Easy Lovin' (written by Freddie Hart)
'How Can I Unlove You'
'Help Me Make It Through The Night' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Take Me Home Country Roads'

Charlie McCoy's 'The Real McCoy' (Monument Records, 1972) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.



In September 1972, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'Charlie McCoy' (Monument Records, KZ - 31910 Sep / 1972), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) (No.23, 1972)
'I Really Don't Want to Know', which was written by Don Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 - Monday 16 March 2015) and Howard Barnes (No.19, 1972)

Charlie McCoy's 'Charlie McCoy' (Monument Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

'Me & Bobby McGee' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Delta Dawn'
'First Time Ever (I saw your face)'
'I Can't Stop Loving You', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'Grade A'
'Woman (Sensuous Woman)' (written by Gary S. Paxton)
'To Get to You'
'Danny Boy'
'Rocky Top'

Charlie McCoy's 'Charlie McCoy' (Monument Records, 1972) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.



In April 1973, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'Good Time Charlie' (Monument Records, 1973), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Orange Blossom Special', which was written by Ervin Thomas Rouse (Wednesday 19 September 1917 - Wednesday 8 July 1981) (No.26, 1973)
'Shenandoah' (No.33, 1973)

Charlie McCoy's 'Good Time Charlie' (Monument Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

'Good Time Charlie's Got The Blues'
'Is Anybody Going to San Antone', which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Glenn Martin
'Soul Song'
'Something'
'Minor Miner'
'Don't Touch Me', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010)
'John Henry'
'Till I Get It Right'
'Louisiana Man'

Charlie McCoy's 'Good Time Charlie' (Monument Records, 1973) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.



In November 1973, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'The Fastest Harp in The South' (Monument Records, 1973), which included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Release Me (and let me love again)'
(No.33, 1973)

Charlie McCoy's 'The Fastest Harp in The South' (Monument Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

'Silver Wings' (written by Merle Haggard)
'Why Me'
'Paper Roses'
'You are the Sunshine of My Life'
'Almost Persuaded'
'Fastest Harp in The South'
'Rollin' in My Sweet Baby's Arms'
'Behind Closed Doors'
'Faded Love'
'Maiden's Prayer'
'Ruby (are you mad)'

Charlie McCoy's 'The Fastest Harp in The South' (Monument Records, 1973) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.



In July 1974, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'The Nashville Hit Man' (Monument Records, 1974), which included three tracks which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Silver Threads & Golden Needles'
(No.68, 1974)
'Boogie Woogie' (No.22, 1974) / this track featured Barefoot Jerry
'I Can't Help It (if I'm still in love with you)', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) / this track was released as a single in 1974, but it did not chart

Charlie McCoy's 'The Nashville Hit Man' (Monument Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

'Help Me'
'Fireball Mail'
'Way We Were'
'Keep On Harpin'
'You Win Again'
'Heart Over Mind'
'Ruby'
'Let Me Be There'

Charlie McCoy's 'The Nashville Hit Man' (Monument Records, 1974) reached No.13 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.



In November 1974, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'Christmas with Charlie' (Monument Records, 1974), which included one track which was released as a single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Blue Christmas' (written by Billy Hayes and Jay W. Johnson) / this track was released as a single in 1974, but it did not chart

Charlie McCoy's 'Christmas with Charlie' (Monument Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

'Jingle Bells'
'White Christmas'
'Christmas Time is Coming'
'Christmas Cheer'
'Christmas Song'
'Silent Night'
'Angels We have Heard on High'
'Away in a Manger'
'O, Holy Night'
'First Noel'



In March 1975, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'Charlie My Boy' (Monument Records, 1975), which included two tracks which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Everybody Stand Up & Holler for The Union'
/ this track was released as a single in 1975, but it did not chart
'Juke' / this track was released as a single in 1975, but it did not chart

Charlie McCoy's 'Charlie My Boy' (Monument Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

'Old Joe Clark'
'12th of Never'
'City Lights' (written by Bill Anderson)
'I Honestly Love You'
'New River Gorge'
'Please Don't Tell Me How The Story Ends'
'Making Believe'
'Back Home Again in Indiana'
'Sweet Memories'

Charlie McCoy's 'Charlie My Boy' (Monument Records, 1975) reached No.36 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.



In July 1975, Gene Watson saw the release of his debut album, 'Love in the Hot Afternoon' (Capitol Records, 1975); Charlie McCoy's contribution to the album included playing rhythm guitar, harmonica and marimba.



In December 1975, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'Harpin' The Blues' (Monument Records, 1975), which included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Columbus Stockade Blues' / this track was released as a single in 1975, but it did not chart

Charlie McCoy's 'Harpin' The Blues' (Monument Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

'After Hours'
'Lovesick Blues'
'(I Heard That) Lonesome Whistle'
'Basin Street Blues'
'Tribute to Little Walter'
'T for Texas (Blue Yodel No.1)'
'Blues Stay Away from Me'
'St. Louis Blues'
'Night Life'
'Workin' Man Blues' (written by Merle Haggard)

Charlie McCoy's 'Harpin' The Blues' (Monument Records, 1975) reached No.34 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.



In December 1976, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'Play It Again, Charlie' (Monument Records, 1976), which included three tracks which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Pots & Pans' / this track was released as a single in 1975, but it did not chart
'Wabash Cannonball' (written by J.A. Roff) (No.97, 1976)
'Summit Ridge Drive' (No.98, 1977) / this track featured Barefoot Jerry

Charlie McCoy's 'Play It Again, Charlie' (Monument Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

'Tuff'
'Mule Skinner Blues (Blue Yodel No.8)'
'Summer Place'
'We Sure Can Love Each Other'
'Missing You'
'Ode to Billie Joe'
'Stephen Foster Nashville Style'
'Play it Again, Charlie'

Charlie McCoy's 'Play It Again, Charlie' (Monument Records, 1976) reached No.48 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.



In 1977, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'Country Cookin' (Monument Records, 1977), which included two tracks which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Amazing Grace' / this track was released as a single in 1977, but it did not chart
'Foggy River' / this track was released as a single in 1977, but it did not chart

Charlie McCoy's 'Country Cookin' (Monument Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

'Country Cookin'
'Last Letter'
'Crazy Arms'
'Love Theme from A Star Was Born'
'Squeezing'
'Together Again', which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 - Saturday 25 March 2006)
'Cotton Eyed Joe'
'We Could'
'18th Century Rosewood Clock'



In 1977, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'Stone Fox Chase' (Monument Records, 1977), which included the following tracks:

'Stone Fox Chase'
'Me & Bobby McGee'
'Release Me (and let me love again)'
'I Can't Stop Loving You', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'Fireball Mail'
'Today I Started Loving You Again', which was written by Merle Haggard and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 - Monday 24 April 2006)
'Delta Dawn'
'Let Me Be There'
'Louisiana Man'
'Behind Closed Doors'
'Silver Threads & Golden Needles'
'Help Me Make it Through The Night'
'Lovesick Blues'
'I Can't Help It (if I'm still in love with you)', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'I Honestly Love You'
'Rollin' in My Sweet Baby's Arms'



In 1978, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'The Greatest Hits of Charlie McCoy' (Monument Records, 1978), which included the following tracks:

'Today I Started Loving You Again', which was written by Merle Haggard and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 - Monday 24 April 2006) (No.16, 1972)
'Wabash Cannonball' (written by J.A. Roff) (No.97, 1976)
'Release Me (and let me love again)' (No.33, 1977)
'I Really Don't Want to Know' (No.19, 1972)
'Silver Threads & Golden Needles' (No.68, 1974)
'I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry' (No.23, 1972)
'Boogie Woogie' (No.22, 1974) / this track featured Barefoot Jerry
'I Can't Help It (if I'm still in love with you)', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) / this track was released as a single in 1974, but it did not chart
'Shenandoah' (No.33, 1973)
'Orange Blossom Special', which was written by Ervin Thomas Rouse (Wednesday 19 September 1917 - Wednesday 8 July 1981) (No.26, 1973)



In January 1979, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'Appalachian Fever' (Monument Records, 1979), which included four tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Fair & Tender Ladies' (No.30, 1978)
'Drifting Lovers' (No.96, 1978)
'Midnight Flyer' (No.94, 1979)
'Ramblin' Music Man' (No.94, 1979)

Charlie McCoy's 'Appalachian Fever' (Monument Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

'West Virginia Mountain Melody'
'Cripple Creek'
'Red Haired Boy'
'Ruby (are you mad)'
'In The Pines'
'Carolina Morning'
'Appalachian Fever'

In 1981, Charlie McCoy saw the release of the non-album single, 'Until the Nights', which featured guest vocals from Laney Smallwood; the track reached No.94 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1981.



In 1981, Gene Watson saw the release of 'Between This Time & The Next Time' (MCA Records, 1981); Charlie McCoy's contribution to the album included playing harmonica, vibes and rhythm guitar.

In 1982, Monument Records folded and, as a result, Charlie McCoy was without any record company affiliation for almost five years.

In 1983, Charlie McCoy saw the release of the non-album single, 'The State of Our Union', which featured guest vocals from Laney Smallwood as Laney Hicks; the track reached No.74 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1983.



In 1986, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'One For The Road' (Asphodel Records, 1986), which included the following tracks:

'Scotland'
'Georgia on My Mind'
'In The Mood'
'Last Date'
'Red Haired Boy'
'Real Love'
'I Believe You'
'Gospel Medley'
'Shenandoah'
'Orange Blossom Special', which was written by Ervin Thomas Rouse (Wednesday 19 September 1917 - Wednesday 8 July 1981)



In September 1987, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'Another Side of Charlie McCoy' (World Wide Records, 1987), which included the following tracks:

' Southern Comfort'
'Funky Country Living'
'Fingertips'
'You Can't Get off with Your Shoes On'
'You Got It All Over Him'
'Friendship Song'
'Birdland'
'Katy Hill'
'Funky Country Music'
'She Knows How to Treat Me Right'
'Take The New River'
'If There Were Only Time For Love'
'Invitation to the Blues'
'Little Maggie'



In September 1987, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'Harmonica Jones' (World Wide Records, 1987), which included the following tracks:

'Harmonica Jones'
'Mississippi Blues'
'Cold, Cold Heart'
'You were always on My Mind'
'Orange Blossom Special'
'Today I Started Lovin' You Again', which was written by Merle Haggard and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 - Monday 24 April 2006)
'One O'Clock Jump'
'Peace in The Valley'
'I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry'
'Shenandoah'



In 1988, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'Charlie McCoy's 13th' (Step One Records, 1988), which included two tracks which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry' / this track, which was a re-recording, was released as a single in 1988, but it did not chart
'One O'Clock Jump' / this track was released as a single in 1988, but it did not chart

Charlie McCoy's 'Charlie McCoy's 13th' (Step One Records, 1988) also included the following tracks:

'Harmonica Jones'
'Always on My Mind'
'You Can't Get off with Your Shoes On'
'Shenandoah'
'Orange Blossom Special', which was written by Ervin Thomas Rouse (Wednesday 19 September 1917 - Wednesday 8 July 1981)
'Take The New River'
'Funky Country Living'
'Today I Started Loving You Again', which was written by Merle Haggard and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 - Monday 24 April 2006)



In January 1989, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'Candlelight, Wine & Charlie' (World Wide Records, 1989), which included the following tracks:

'Spanish Eyes'
'Yesterday'
'Fool on The Hill'
'Step Inside Love'
'Leaving on a Jet Plane'
'Love Me Tender'
'Green Green Grass of Home'
'Sloop John B.'
'Pretty Magic'
'Windmills of Your Mind'
'Streets of London'
'He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother'



In 1989, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'Beam Me Up, Charlie' (Step One Records, 1989), which included the following tracks:

'Katy Hill'
'Cold, Cold Heart'
'Funky Country Music'
'Peace in The Valley'
'Birdland'
'Southern Comfort'
'Mississippi Blues'
'Little Maggie'
'She Knows How to Treat Me Right'
'Fingertips'



In April 1992, Charlie McCoy saw the release of 'Out on a Limb' (Step One Records, 1992), which included the following tracks:

'Whiskey Before Breakfast'
'You Don't Know Me'
'I Hope It Ain't a Train'
'Cayman Moon'
'You've Still Got a Place in My Heart'
'Out on a Limb'
'Smoky Places'
'Other Woman (in my life)'
'Dutch Treat'
'Lasso The Moon'
'Saved by The Belle'
'Julia'

In 1994, Charlie McCoy was awarded the 'Musician' Award from R.O.P.E. (Reunion of Professional Entertainers).

In 1998, Charlie McCoy was elected to the German-American Country Music Federation Hall of Fame.

In 2000, Charlie McCoy was elected to The Hall of Fame of the North American Country Music Association International.

In addition to making his own recordings, Charlie McCoy was also a member of two legendary Nashville bands, Area Code 615 and Barefoot Jerry, both groups having featured many of the top session players in Nashville.

Charlie McCoy's recording session credits are literally a who's who of country music; at one time, he was doing upwards of four hundred sessions per year.  In recent years, Charlie McCoy has cut back on his session appearances in order to devote more time to touring Europe and Japan, in addition to the United States.

In addition to his country music recording sessions, Charlie McCoy was a mainstay on Elvis Presley (Tuesday 8 January 1935 - Tuesday 16 August 1977) recordings, both in Nashville and Los Angeles.

  

Charlie McCoy was also heavily involved on the Nashville recording sessions for a number of Bob Dylan albums:

'Blond on Blond' (Columbia Records, 1966) / Charlie McCoy contributed bass guitar, guitar, harmonica and trumpet
'John Wesley Harding' (Columbia Records, 1967) / Charlie McCoy contributed bass guitar
'Nashville Skyline' (Columbia Records, 1969) / Charlie McCoy contributed guitar and harmonica

Charlie McCoy has won a number of awards over the years; he's won a Grammy Award, two Country Music Association (CMA) Awards and eight Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards.

Charlie McCoy has also won numerous awards provided by the three music industry trade publications, Billboard, Cash Box and Record World.

Charlie McCoy is predominantly known for his prowess on the harmonica, but he is also a master of the guitar, bass, drums and keyboards, as well as a variety of wind and brass instruments.

Roy Clark, Barbara Mandrell & Charlie McCoy / Inducted as members into Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville on Sunday 17 May 2009

On Wednesday 4 February 2009, it was announced that Roy Clark, Barbara Mandrell and Charlie McCoy would be inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame; this special ceremony took place on Sunday 17 May 2009.

• Visit Charlie McCoy's Official Site at charliemccoy.com

Peers

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Since February 1998, England-based Hux Records have been specialists in releasing classic archive recordings.

Gene Watson Fan Site