• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Webster PR



Webster Public Relations
, PO Box 23015, Nashville, TN 37202

Contact Scott Adkins
Telephone 615-777-6995

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Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2006, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Connie Smith, which she submitted to this site on Monday 30 January 2006.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Connie Smith who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Connie Smith
This quote was submitted on Monday 30 January 2006.

'Gene Watson is one of the greatest singers of all time'.

Thank you, Connie Smith, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Connie Smith...



Connie Smith was born Constance June Meador in Elkhart, Indiana but was raised in West Virginia and Ohio.

Connie Smith remembered from an early age of wanting to become a member of The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville.

In the early 1960s, Connie Smith married and became a housewife in Marietta, Ohio but continued to sing.  While performing near Columbus, Ohio in 1963, Bill Anderson first heard her and offered his help in gaining Connie Smith a recording contract.

Shortly after discovering Connie Smith, Bill Anderson had her perform on 'Ernest Tubb's Record Shop Live Show' in 1964.

Two months later, Connie Smith made demo recordings written by Bill Anderson, recordings which included his song 'Once a Day'.

After hearing the demos, producer Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001) signed Connie Smith to RCA Victor Records in Nashville; because Chet Atkins was working with too many artists during Connie Smith's first years at RCA Victor Records, Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) served as her producer.

Under the guidance of RCA Victor Records producer Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), Connie Smith enjoyed a string of hit songs.

Connie Smith's first hit, 'Once a Day' (written by Bill Anderson), was at No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for eight weeks, commencing Saturday 28 November 1964; the track remained on the charts for twenty-seven weeks and took Connie Smith into the record books as the first female country singer to hit No.1 on the American country music singles chart with her first country music release.



In March 1965, Connie Smith saw the release of her debut album, 'Connie Smith' (RCA Victor Records, 1965), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), and remained on the charts for thirty weeks, seven of those weeks at No.1.

By the end of 1964, 'Once a Day' (written by Bill Anderson) had become one of the biggest country songs of the year.

Connie Smith's debut album, 'Connie Smith' (RCA Victor Records, 1965), included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Once a Day' (written by Bill Anderson) (No.1 for eight weeks between November 1964 and January 1965)
'Then & Only Then' (written by Bill Anderson) (No.4, 1965)
'Tiny Blue Transistor Radio' (written by Bill Anderson) (No.25, 1965)

Connie Smith's debut album, 'Connie Smith' (RCA Victor Records, 1965), also included the following tracks:

'Other Side of You' (written by William Broadwell Morgan)
'Hinges on the Door', which was written by Thomas Baker Knight Junior (Tuesday 4 July 1933 - Wednesday 12 October 2005)
'Don't Forget I Still Love You' (written by Guy Louis)
'Darling Are You Ever Coming Home', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010) and Willie Nelson
'The Threshold' (written by Bill Anderson)
'It's Just My Luck' (written by Betty Sue Perry)
'I'm Ashamed of You' (written by Bill Anderson)
'I Don't Love You Anymore' (written by Bill Anderson)
'Tell Another Lie', which was written by Christian Bruhn, Randy Startt and Fred Wise (Thursday 27 May 1915 - Tuesday 18 January 1966)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's debut album, 'Connie Smith' (RCA Victor Records, 1965), included the following:

Harold Bradley, Ray Edenton, Jerry Kennedy and Jimmy Lance (guitar)
Floyd Taylor Chance (Monday 21 December 1925 - Monday 11 April 2005) (bass)
Dorothy Dillard, Dolores Edgin, Karl Garvin, Priscilla Hubbard, Anita Kerr, Louis Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012), Harold Ragsdale and William Wright (background vocals)
Leonard Miller (drums)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)

Connie Smith's debut album, 'Connie Smith' (RCA Victor Records, 1965), reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1965, where it remained for seven weeks.



In October 1965, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Cute 'n' Country' (RCA Victor Records, 1965), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I Can't Remember' (written by Bill Anderson and Bette Anderson) (No.9, 1965)

Connie Smith's 'Cute 'n' Country' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) also included the following tracks:

'Two Empty Arms' (written by Bill Anderson)
'Even Tho', which was written by Willie Jones, Curt Peeples and Webb Pierce (Monday 8 August 1921 - Sunday 24 February 1991)
'I Thought of You' (written by Jimmy Rollins)
'More to Love Than This', which was written by Hank Mills (Thursday 9 April 1936 - Friday 11 November 2005)
'Not Till You Come Back to Me' (written by Bill Anderson)
'Senses' (written by Glen Campbell and Jeannie Seely)
'I'll Be There (if you ever want me)', which was written by Rusty Gabbard and Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 - Monday 16 December 2013)
'Love is No Excuse', which was written by Justin Tubb (Tuesday 20 August 1935 - Saturday 24 January 1998)
'I Can Stand It (as long as he can)' (written by Ramona Redd and Mitchell Torok)
'House Divided' (written by Bobby Bare)
'I Can Turn Your World Around', which was written by Harry Ebner, Jack Rhodes (1908 - 1968) and Billie Jo Spears (Friday 14 January 1938 - Wednesday 14 December 2011)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Cute 'n' Country' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) included the following:

Kenneth Buttrey and Leonard Miller (drums)
Anita Carter (Friday 31 March 1933 - Thursday 29 July 1999), Dorothy Dillard, Jan Howard, Anita Kerr, Louis Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012), Gordon Stoker (Sunday 3 August 1924 - Wednesday 27 March 2013), Ray Walker and William Wright (background vocals)
Floyd Taylor Chance (Monday 21 December 1925 - Monday 11 April 2005) and Ron Huskey (bass)
Ray Edenton, Jimmy Lance, Jerry Reed (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Sunday 31 August 2008), Velma Smith and Pete Wade (guitar)
Bobby Dyson (electric bass guitar)
Charlie McCoy and James Wilkerson (bass guitar)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) and Hal Rugg (steel guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)

Connie Smith's 'Cute 'n' Country' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1965.



On Monday 27 March 2006, England's Hux Records released Connie Smith's 'Connie Smith' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) & 'Cute 'n' Country' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) as a special 2-for-1 CD set (HUX 076).



In March 1966, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Miss Smith Goes to Nashville' (RCA Victor Records, 1966), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'If I Talk to Him' (written by Dolores Edgin and Priscilla Mitchell) (No.4, 1965)
'Nobody But a Fool (would love you)' (written by Bill Anderson) (No.4, 1966)

Connie Smith's 'Miss Smith Goes to Nashville' (RCA Victor Records, 1966) also included the following tracks:

'Back in My Baby's Arms Again', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'Go Ahead & Make Me Cry' (written by Leslie Lyle)
'Same as Mine' (written by Marge Barton)
'Ain't Nothin' Shakin' (but the leaves)', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'I Don't Have Any Place to Go' (written by Bill Anderson)
'I'll Never Get Over Loving You' (written by Connie Smith)
'Holdin' On' (written by Lee Emerson)
'For Better or for Worse' (written by Bill Anderson and Moneen Carpenter)
'Will The Real Me Please Stop Crying' (written by Bob Tubert)
'If You Won't Tell on Me' (written by Dallas Frazier)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Miss Smith Goes to Nashville' (RCA Victor Records, 1966) included the following:

Kenneth Buttrey and Leonard Miller (drums)
Dorothy Dillard, Dolores Edgin, Priscilla Hubbard, Millie Kirkham, Louis Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012), Gordon Stoker (Sunday 3 August 1924 - Wednesday 27 March 2013), Ray Walker and William Wright (background vocals)
Ray Edenton, Keslo Herston, Jimmy Lance and Jerry Reed (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Sunday 31 August 2008) (guitar)
Walter Haynes (bass guitar, guitar)
Roy Huskey and Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) (bass)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)

Connie Smith's 'Miss Smith Goes to Nashville' (RCA Victor Records, 1966) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1966.



In June 1966, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Connie Smith Sings Great Sacred Songs' (RCA Victor Records, 1966), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and was Connie Smith's first Gospel recording and would set the trend for a series of Gospel album releases she would issue in the next decade.

Connie Smith's 'Connie Smith Sings Great Sacred Songs' (RCA Victor Records, 1966) included the following tracks:

'Satisfied', which was written by Martha Carson (Saturday 19 March 1921 - Thursday 16 December 2004)
'When God Dips His Love in My Heart', which was written by Cleavant Derricks (Friday 13 May 1910 - Thursday 14 April 1977) and W.S. Stevenson
'Farther Along' (written by Jesse R. Baxter and W.B. Stevens)
Where Could I Go But to the Lord' (written by James B. Coats)
'I Wouldn't Take Nothing from My Journey Now', which was written by Jimmie Davis (11 September 1899 - Sunday 5 November 2000) and Charles R. Goodman
'I Saw a Man' (written by Arthur Q. Smith)
'Wayfaring Pilgrim' (traditional)
'In the Garden' (written by Robert Hebble and Austin C. Miles)
'Wings of a Dove', which was written by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001)
'Keep on Holding to Those Nail Scarred Hands' (written by Henry Slaughter)
'He Set Me Free'which was written by Albert Edward Brumley (1905 - 1977)
'Just a Closer Walk with Thee'

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Connie Smith Sings Great Sacred Songs' (RCA Victor Records, 1966) included the following:

Willie Ackerman and Leonard Miller (drums)
Anita Carter (Friday 31 March 1933 - Thursday 29 July 1999), Dolores Edgin, Jake Hess, Millie Kirkham, Gary McSpadden, Armond Morales, Charles Nelsen, Gordon Stokey and Ray Walker (background vocals)
Ray Edenton, Jimmy Lance, Dean Porter and Pete Wade (guitar)
Roy Huskey (bass)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Henry Slaughter (harpsichord)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Jerry Smith (organ, vibes)

Connie Smith's 'Connie Smith Sings Great Sacred Songs' (RCA Victor Records, 1966) reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1966.



In September 1966, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Born to Sing' (RCA Victor Records, 1966), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Ain't Had No Lovin' (written by Dallas Frazier) (No.2, 1966)

Connie Smith's 'Born to Sing' (RCA Victor Records, 1966) also included the following tracks:

'Strange' (written by Curly Fox and Pat White)
'Five Fingers to Spare', which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 - Monday 31 October 2011)
'Paper Roses' (written by Fred Spielman and Janice Torre)
'My Little Corner of The World' (written by Bob Hillard and Lee Pockriss)
'Gone' (written by Smokey Rodgers)
'Go Away Stranger', which was written by June Carter (Sunday 23 June 1929 - Thursday 15 May 2003)
'I Don't Know Why I Keep Loving You', which was written by Fred Carter (Sunday 31 December 1933 - Saturday 17 July 2010)
'Born to Sing', which was written by Cyrus 'Cy' Coben (Friday 4 April 1919 - Friday 26 May 2006)
'Invisible Tears', which was written by Ned Miller (Sunday 12 April 1925 - Friday 18 March 2016) and Sue Miller
'I Will' (written by Dick Glasser)
'Touch of Yesterday', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Born to Sing' (RCA Victor Records, 1966) included the following:

Byron Bache and Harvey Wolfe (cello)
Brenton Banks, Howard Carpenter, Kenneth Goldsmith, Lillian Hunt, Shelly Kurland and Piere Menard (violin)
Jerry Carrigan, Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) and Len Miller (drums)
Dorothy Dillard, Dolores Edgin, Priscilla Hubbard, Louis Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012) and William Wright (background vocals)
Ray Edenton, Jimmy Lance, Wayne Moss and Pete Wade (guitar)
Solie Fott, Martin Katahn and Dorothy Walker (viola)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Jerry Smith (piano)

Connie Smith's 'Born to Sing' (RCA Victor Records, 1966) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1966.



In February 1967, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Downtown Country' (RCA Victor Records, 1967), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), and which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'The Hurtin's All Over', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) (No.3, 1966)

Connie Smith's 'Downtown Country' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) also included the following tracks:

'Ride, Ride, Ride, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 - Monday 31 October 2011)
'Downtown' (written by Tony Hatch)
'It's Now or Never' (written by Wally Gold and Aaron Schroeder)
'Born a Woman' (written by Martha Sharp)
'Everybody Loves Somebody' (written by Ken Lane and Irving Taylor)
'The Night Has a Thousand Eyes' (written by Marilyn Garret, Dorothy Wayne and Ben Weisman)
'It's Gonna Rain Today' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'My Heart Has a Mind of its Own' (written by Howard Greenfield and Jack Keller)
'Your Mem'ry Comes Along' (written by Paul Tannen and Johnny Tillotson)
'It'll Be Easy' (written by Jan Crutchfield)
'My Own Peculiar Way' (written by Willie Nelson)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Downtown Country' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) included the following:

Brenton Banks, Lillian Hunt, Shelly Kurland and Piere Menard (violin)
Byron Bach and Harvey Wolfe (cello)
Howard Carpenter, Solie Fott, Martin Katahn and Gary Vanosdale (viola)
Jerry Carrigan, Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) and Leo Taylor (drums)
Dorothy Dillard, Dolores Edgin, Priscilla Hubbard and William Wright (background vocals)
Ray Edenton, Dean Porter, Pete Wade and Lamar Watkins (guitar)
Roy Huskey (bass)
Wayne Moss (bass guitar, guitar)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Harold Ragsdale (harpsichord, vibes)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Bill Walker (harpsichord)

Connie Smith's 'Downtown Country' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1967.



In February 1967, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Connie in The Country' (RCA Camden Records, 1967), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and was a showcase of unreleased material, which Connie Smith had recorded in the RCA studios on Monday 22 August 1966 and Tuesday 23 August 1966.

Connie Smith's 'Connie in The Country' (RCA Camden Records, 1967) included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Cry, Cry, Cry' (written by Shirley Wood) (No.20, 1967)

Connie Smith's 'Connie in The Country' (RCA Camden Records, 1967) also included the following tracks:

'
Foolin' Around', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) and Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 - Saturday 25 March 2006)
'World of Forgotten People' (written by Loretta Lynn)
'I'm Little But I'm Loud', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) and Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 - Friday 2 January 2015)
'Slowly', which was written by Tommy Hill and Webb Pierce (Monday 8 August 1921 - Sunday 24 February 1991)
'I Overlooked an Orchid (while searching for a rose)', which was written by Shirley Lyn, Carl Smith (Tuesday 15 March 1927 - Saturday 16 January 2010) and Carl Story (Monday 29 May 1916 - Friday 31 March 1995)
'A-Sleepin' at The Foot of the Bed' (written by Luther Patrick and Happy Wilson)
'You Ain't Woman Enough (to take my man)' (written by Loretta Lynn)
'Y'all Come Home' (written by Arlie Duff)
'Love's Gonna Live Here', which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 - Saturday 25 March 2006)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Connie in The Country' (RCA Camden Records, 1967) included the following:

Anita Carter (Friday 31 March 1933 - Thursday 29 July 1999), Dorothy Dillard, Dolores Edgin, Priscilla Hubbard, William Wright and Louis Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012) (background vocals)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) and Leonard Miller (drums)
Walter Haynes (bass guitar, guitar)
Ron Huskey (bass)
Charles Justice (fiddle)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Dean Porter and Velma Smith (guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)



In September 1967, Connie Smith saw the releaase of her first compilation album, 'The Best of Connie Smith' (RCA Victor Records, 1967), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001); the album compiled Connie Smith's major hits between 1964 and 1966, including one new single.

Although a compilation album, 'The Best of Connie Smith' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) included one new song:

'I'll Come Runnin' (written by Connie Smith) (No.10, 1967)

Connie Smith's 'The Best of Connie Smith' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) also included the following tracks:

'Once a Day' (written by Bill Anderson) (No.1 for eight weeks between November 1964 and January 1965)
'I Can't Remember' (written by Bill Anderson and Bette Anderson) (No.9, 1965)
'Tiny Blue Transistor Radio' (written by Bill Anderson) (No.25, 1965)
'I Saw a Man' (written by Arthur Q. Smith)
'If I Talk to Him' (written by Dolores Edgin and Priscilla Mitchell) (No.4, 1965)
'Then & Only Then' (written by Bill Anderson) (No.4, 1965)
'Ain't Had No Lovin' (written by Dallas Frazier) (No.2, 1966)
'Darling Are You Ever Coming Home', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010) and Willie Nelson
'The Hurtin's All Over', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) (No.3, 1966)
'Cincinnati, Ohio'  (written by Bill Anderson) (No.4, 1967)
'Nobody But a Fool (would love you)' (written by Bill Anderson) (No.4, 1966)

Connie Smith's 'The Best of Connie Smith' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) reached No.22 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1967.



In June 1967, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Connie Smith Sings Bill Anderson' (RCA Victor Records, 1967), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Cincinnati, Ohio' (written by Bill Anderson)
(No.4, 1967)

Connie Smith's 'Connie Smith Sings Bill Anderson' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) also included the following tracks:

'It Comes & Goes' (written by Bill Anderson)
'I Love You Drops' (written by Bill Anderson)
'City Lights' (written by Bill Anderson)
'It' Not the End of Everything' (written by Bill Anderson)
'My Whole World's Falling Down' (written by Bill Anderson and Jerry Crutchfield)
'Easy Come, Easy Go' (written by Bill Anderson)
'That's What Lonesome Is' (written by Bill Anderson)
'Walk Out Backwards' (written by Bill Anderson)
'In Case You Ever Change Your Mind' (written by Bill Anderson)
'On & On & On' (written by Bill Anderson)
'That's What It's Like to Be Lonesome' (written by Bill Anderson)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Connie Smith Sings Bill Anderson' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) included the following:

Brenton Banks, Lillian Hunt, Shelly Kurland and Piere Menard (violin)
Byron Bach and Harvey Wolfe (cello)
Howard Carpenter, Solie Fott, Martin Katahn, John Kline and Gary Vanosdale (viola)
Dorothy Dillard, Dolores Edgin, Priscilla Hubbard and William Wright (background vocals)
Ray Edenton, Dean Porter, Pete Wade and Lamar Watkins (guitar)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) and Leo Taylor (drums)
Roy Huskey (bass)
Wayne Moss (bass guitar, guitar)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Harold Ragsdale (harpsichord, vibes)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Bill Walker (vibes)

Connie Smith's 'Connie Smith Sings Bill Anderson' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) reached  No.11 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1967.



In December 1967, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Soul of Country Music' (RCA Victor Records, 1967), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and included the following tracks:

'Don't Keep Me Lonely Too Long' (written by Melba Montgomery)
'Surely' (written by Peggy Whittington)
'Last Letter', which was written by Rex Griffin (Monday 12 August 1912 - Sunday 11 October 1959)
'Burning Bridges' (written by Walter Scott)
'I'm Your Woman', which was written by Jean Chapel (Friday 6 March 1925 - Saturday 19 August 1995)
'There Goes My Everything' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'It Only Hurts for a Little While', which was written by Mack David (Friday 5 July 1912 - Thursday 30 December 1993) and Fred Spielman
'Family Bible' (written by Walt Breeland, Claude Gray and Paul Buskirk)
'If Teardrops Were Silver', which was written by Don Wayne (Tuesday 30 May 1933 - Monday 12 September 2011)
'Walk Through This World with Me' (written by Kay Savage and Sandy Seamons)
'It's Such a Pretty World Today' (written by Dale Noe)
'Touch My Heart', which was written by Aubrey Mayhew and Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 - Wednesday 19 February 2003)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Soul of Country Music' (RCA Victor Records, 1967), included the following:

Dorothy Dillard, Priscilla Hubbard, Louis Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012) and William Wright (background vocals)
Ray Edenton, Dean Porter and Lamar Watkins (guitar)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Russ Hicks (steel guitar)
Roy Huskey (bass)
Charles Justice (fiddle)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)

Connie Smith's 'Soul of Country Music' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1967.



In April 1968, Connie Smith saw the release of 'I Love Charley Brown' (RCA Victor Records, 1968), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Burning a Hole in My Mind', which was written by Cyrus 'Cy' Coben (Friday 4 April 1919 - Friday 26 May 2006) (No.5, 1967)
'Baby's Back Again' (written by Betty Jean Robinson) (No.7, 1967)
'Run Away Little Tears' (written by Dallas Frazier) (No.10, 1968)

Connie Smith's 'I Love Charley Brown' (RCA Victor Records, 1968) also included the following tracks:

'Sunshine of My World' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'That's All This Old World Needs' (written by Demetrius Tapp and Bob Tubert)
'Little Things' (written by Shirley Nelson and Willie Nelson)
'If The Whole World Stopped Lovin', which was written by Bob Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 - Wednesday 25 May 2005)
'Don't Feel Sorry for Me' (written by Ted Harris)
'I Love Charley Brown' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Let Me Help You Work It Out' (written by Jerry Foster)
'Between Each Tear' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'There Are Some Things' (written by Betty Anderson and Red Hayes)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'I Love Charley Brown' (RCA Victor Records, 1968) included the following:

Brenton Banks, Lillian Hunt, Shelly Kurland and Piere Menard (violin)
Byron Bach and Harvey Wolfe (cello)
Howard Carpenter, Solie Fott and Gary Vanosdale (viola)
Jerry Carrigan, Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) and Leo Taylor (drums)
Dorothy Dillard, Dolores Edgin, Priscilla Hubbard and Bill Wright (background vocals)
Ray Edenton, Dean Porter and Lamar Watkins (guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Roy Huskey (bass)
Wayne Moss (bass guitar, guitar)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Bill Walker (vibes)

Connie Smith's 'I Love Charley Brown' (RCA Victor Records, 1968) reached No.14 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968.



In October 1968, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Sunshine & Rain' (RCA Victor Records, 1968), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and included the following tracks:

'Natchilly Ain't Good', which was written by Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Sunday 31 August 2008)
'Deepening Snow', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'You are Gone' (written by Johnny Carver)
'Hurt Goes On', which was written by Sheb Wooley (Sunday 10 April 1921 - Tuesday 16 September 2003)
'To Chicago with Love', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'Gentle on My Mind', which was written by John Hartford (Thursday 30 December 1937 - Monday 4 June 2001)
'Only Mama That'll Walk the Line' (written by Ivy J. Bryant)
'Heartbreak Avenue', which was written by Mel Foree (Tuesday 25 July 1911 - Sunday 28 October 1990)
'What Makes a Man Wander', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'Sundown on My Mind' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'How Much Lonelier Can Lonely Be' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Just a Little Sunshine in The Rain' (written by Ricci Mareno)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Sunshine & Rain' (RCA Victor Records, 1968) included the following:

Byron Bach and Harvey Wolfe (cello)
Brenton Banks, Solie Fott, Lillian Hunt, Martin Katahn, Shelly Kurland, Piere Menard and Roby Story (violin)
Howard Carpenter, John Kline and Gary Vanosdale (viola)
Jerry Carrigan and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Dorothy Dillard, Priscilla Hubbard, Louis Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012) and William Wright (background vocals)
Ray Edenton, Dean Porter and Lamar Watkins (guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) and Charles Justice (fiddle)
Russ Hicks (steel guitar)
Charlie McCoy (electric bass, harmonica)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Bill Walker (vibes)

Connie Smith's 'Sunshine & Rain' (RCA Victor Records, 1968) reached No.32 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968.



In April 1969, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Connie's Country' (RCA Victor Records, 1969), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Ribbon of Darkness' (written by Gordon Lightfoot) (No.13, 1969)

Connie Smith's 'Connie's Country' (RCA Victor Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

'Seattle', which was written by Jack Keller (Wednesday 11 November 1936 - Friday 1 April 2005), Hugo Montenegro and Ernie Sheldon)
'Gotta Lotta Blues to Lose', which was written by Jimmy Gateley (Friday 1 May 1931 - Sunday 17 March 1985)
'Today I Started Loving You Again', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 - Monday 24 April 2006)
'You' (written by Jimmy Holder)
'I'll Love You Enough (for both of us)', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016)
'Sound of Different Drums', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'Happy Street', which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 - Wednesday 25 May 2005)
'Blue Little Girl' (written by Betty Jean Robinson)
'Lonely Woman', which was written by Alda Calogne and Jean Chapel (Friday 6 March 1925 - Saturday 19 August 1995)
'You Don't Have Very Far to Go', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Red Simpson (Tuesday 6 March 1934 - Friday 8 January 2016)
'Gathering Flowers for The Master's Bouquet' (written by Marvin E. Baumgardner)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Connie's Country' (RCA Victor Records, 1969) included the following:

Byron Bach and Harvey Wolfe (cello)
Brenton Banks, Solie Fott, Lillian Hunt, Martin Katahn, Shelly Kurland, Piere Menard and Roby Story (violin)
Howard Carpenter, John Kline and Gary Vanosdale (viola)
Jerry Carrigan, Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) and Leo Taylor (drums)
Dorothy Dillard, Priscilla Hubbard, Louis Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012) and William Wright (background vocals)
Ray Edenton, Dean Porter and Lamar Watkins (guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) and Charles Justice (fiddle)
Roy Huskey (bass)
Charlie McCoy (electric bass, harmonica)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Bill Walker (vibes)

Connie Smith's 'Connie's Country' (RCA Victor Records, 1969) reached No.14 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1969.



In July 1969, Connie Smith & Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988) saw the release of 'Young Love' (RCA Victor Records, 1969), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and Felton Jarvis (Friday 16 November 1934 - Saturday 3 January 1981), and which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Young Love' (written by Ric Cartey and Carole Joyner) (No.20, 1969)

Connie Smith & Nat Stuckey's 'Young Love' (RCA Victor Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

'Even The Bad Times Are Good', which was written by Carl Belew (Tuesday 21 April 1931 - Wednesday 31 October 1990) and Clyde Pitts Junior (1939 - Saturday 26 March 2011)
'Two Together', which was written by Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988)
'Whispering Hope' (written by Alice Hawthorne and Alton Howard)
'I'll Share My World with You' (written by Ben Wilson)
'I Got You' (written by Gordon Galbraith and Ricci Mareno)
'Together Alone' (written by Bruce Cockburn)
'Something Pretty' (written by Wayne Stokes and Charles P. Williams)
'Yours Love', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'Stand Beside Me', which was written by Tompall Glaser (Sunday 3 September 1933 - Tuesday 13 August 2013)
'Rings of Gold' (written by Gene Thomas)
'Let It Be Me' (written by Gilbert Bécaud, Mann Curtis and Pierre Delanoë)

Connie Smith & Nat Stuckey's 'Young Love' (RCA Victor Records, 1969) reached No.29 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1969.

Ann M. Stuckey submitted a 'Peer's Quote' about Gene Watson on Saturday 25 January 2014



In October 1969, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Back in Baby's Arms' (RCA Victor Records, 1969), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and included the following tracks:

'Back in Baby's Arms', which was written by Bob Montgomery (Wednesday 12 May 1937 - Thursday 4 December 2014)
'Long Black Limousine' (written by Bobby George and Vern Stovall)
'I Can't Get Used to Being Lonely' (written by Melba Montgomery)
'Fool No.1' (written by Kathryn R. Fulton)
'Gone Too Far' (written by Jack Ripley)
'The Wedding Cake' (written by Margaret Lewis and Mira Smith)
'Too Many Rivers', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'How Great Thou Art', which was written by Stuart Wesley Keene Hine (25 July 1899 - Tuesday 14 March 1989)
'Call', which was written by Cyrus 'Cy' Coben (Friday 4 April 1919 - Friday 26 May 2006)
'Now' (written by Paul Parnes and Herb Strizik)
'What Would I Do Without You', which was written by Cyrus 'Cy' Coben (Friday 4 April 1919 - Friday 26 May 2006)

Connie Smith's 'Back in Baby's Arms' (RCA Victor Records, 1969) reached No.12 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1969.



In January 1970, Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988) & Connie Smith saw the release of 'Sunday Morning' (RCA Victor Records, 1970), an album of gospel material, which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and Felton Jarvis (Friday 16 November 1934 - Saturday 3 January 1981).

Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988) & Connie Smith's 'Sunday Morning' (RCA Victor Records, 1970) included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'If God is Dead (who's that living in my soul)' (written by Lawrence Reynolds) (No.59, 1970)

Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988) & Connie Smith's 'Sunday Morning' (RCA Victor Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

'Sunday Morning' (written by Van Trevor and Dick Heard)
'Love Takes Care of Me' (written by Jimmy Peppers)
'Crumbs from The Table' (written by Barbara Miller)
'Daddy Sang Bass', which was written by Carl Perkins (Saturday 9 April 1932 - Monday 19 January 1998)
'Now Lord What Can I Do for You', which was written by Ira Louvin (Monday 21 April 1924 - Sunday 20 June 1965) and Anne Young
'Well It's All Right', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006)
'If He Turned the Water into Wine', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)
'Way Up on The Mountain', which was written by Ira Louvin (Monday 21 April 1924 - Sunday 20 June 1965) and Anne Young
'God Will', which was written by John D. Loudermilk and Marijohn Wilkin (Wednesday 14 July 1920 - Saturday 28 October 2006)
'Did You Let Your Light Shine' (written by Barbara Miller)



Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988) & Connie Smith's 'Sunday Morning' (RCA Victor Records, 1970) did not chart on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1970; the album, however, was re-issued, on CD, as 'God Will' (Music Row Talent Records, 2001) in 2001.

Ann M. Stuckey submitted a 'Peer's Quote' about Gene Watson on Saturday 25 January 2014



In March 1970, Connie Smith saw the release of 'The Best of Connie Smith, Volume 2' (RCA Victor Records, 1970), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'You & Your Sweet Love' (written by Bill Anderson) (No.6, 1969)

Connie Smith's 'The Best of Connie Smith, Volume 2' (RCA Victor Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

'Ribbon of Darkness' (written by Gordon Lightfoot) (No.13, 1969)
'Cry, Cry, Cry' (written by Shirley Wood) (No.20, 1968)
'Burning a Hole in My Mind', which was written by Cyrus 'Cy' Coben (Friday 4 April 1919 - Friday 26 May 2006) (No.5, 1967)
'Baby's Back Again' (written by Betty Jean Robinson) (No.7, 1967)
'How Great Thou Art', which was written by Stuart Wesley Keene Hine (25 July 1899 - Tuesday 14 March 1989/ this was an album track only
'Seattle', which was written by Jack Keller (Wednesday 11 November 1936 - Friday 1 April 2005), Hugo Montenegro and Ernie Sheldon / this was an album track only
'Run Away Little Tears' (written by Dallas Frazier) (No.10, 1968)
'Only for Me', which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 - Monday 31 October 2011) / this was a new track, but was not released as a single
'Don't Feel Sorry for Me' (written by Ted Harris) / this was an album track only

Connie Smith's 'The Best of Connie Smith, Volume 2' (RCA Victor Records, 1970) reached No.26 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1970.



In September 1970, Connie Smith saw the release of 'I Never Once Stopped Loving You' (RCA Victor Records, 1970), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and Ronny Light, and which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I Never Once Stopped Loving You' (written by Bill Anderson and Jan Howard) (No.5, 1970)
'Louisiana Man' (written by Doug Kershaw) (No.14, 1970)

Connie Smith's 'I Never Once Stopped Loving You' (RCA Victor Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

'There's Something Lonely in This House' (written by Lola Jean Dillon)
'If My Heart Had Windows' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'You & Your Sweet Love' (written by Bill Anderson)
'I'll Fly Away', which was written by Albert Edward Brumley (Sunday 29 October 1905 - Tuesday 15 November 1977)
'Alone with You', which was written by Roy Drusky (Sunday 22 June 1930 - Thursday 23 September 2004), Lester Vanadore and Faron Young (Thursday 25 February 1932 - Tuesday 10 December 1996)
'The Sun Shines Down on Me', which was written by Larry Lee Favorite (Saturday 6 January 1940 - Saturday 26 May 2001)
'Think I'll Go Somewhere & Cry Myself to Sleep' (written by Bill Anderson)
'(I'm So) Afraid of Losing You Again', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)

Connie Smith's 'I Never Once Stopped Loving You' (RCA Victor Records, 1970) reached No.15 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1970.



In January 1971, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Where is My Castle' (RCA Victor Records, 1971), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), and which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Where is My Castle' (written by Dallas Frazier)
(No.11, 1971)

Connie Smith's 'Where is My Castle' (RCA Victor Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

'I'm So Used to Loving You', which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 - Saturday 5 June 1993)
'Too Good to Be True' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Before I'm Over You' (written by Betty Sue Perry)
'When a House is Not a Home', which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 - Sunday 25 October 1992)
'Clinging to a Saving Hand' (written by Bill Mack)
'Darling Days' (written by Dallas Frazier and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer)
'Jesus, Take a Hold', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'I Can't Believe That You've Stopped Loving Me', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'Hello Darlin', which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 - Saturday 5 June 1993)

Connie Smith's 'Where is My Castle' (RCA Victor Records, 1971) reached No.39 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971.



In May 1971, Connie Smith saw the release of 'My Heart Has a Mind of Its Own' (RCA Camden Records, 1971), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), and was a compilation album, consisting of the following tracks:

'My Heart Has a Mind of Its Own', which was written by Howard Greenfield (Sunday 15 March 1936 - Tuesday 4 March 1986) and Jack Keller (Wednesday 11 November 1936 - Friday 1 April 2005)
'I Don't Know Why I Keep Loving You' (written by Fred Carter)
'Ain't Had No Lovin' (written by Dallas Frazier(No.2, 1966)
'The Hurtin's All Over', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) (No.3, 1966)
'Two Empty Arms' (written by Bill Anderson)
'I Don't Love You Any More' (written by Bill Anderson)
'It's Not the End of Everything' (written by Bill Anderson)
'I'll Be There (if you ever want me)', which was written by Rusty Gabbard and Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 - Monday 16 December 2013)
'That's What It's Like to Be Lonesome' (written by Bill Anderson)
'The Other Side of You' (written by William Broadwell Morgan)

In 1971, Connie Smith became a member of The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville.



In June 1971, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Just One Time' (RCA Victor Records, 1971), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), and which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Just One Time', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003) (No.2, 1971)

Connie Smith's 'Just One Time' (RCA Victor Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

'I Don't Want to Be with Me' (written by Mickey Jaco)
'Amazing Grace', which was written by John Newton (24 July 1725 - 21 December 1807)
'Love Has a Mind of Its Own' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'If You Were Mine to Lose' (written by Mickey Jaco)
'Don't Walk Away' (written by Connie Smith)
'He's My Everything' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'One More Time', which was written by Larry Butler (Thursday 26 March 1942 - Friday 20 January 2012), Jan Crutchfield and Buddy Killen (Sunday 13 November 1932 - Wednesday 1 November 2006)
'I Love You More & More Everyday', which was written by Don Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 - Monday 16 March 2015)
'Wait for the Light to Shine', which was written by Fred Rose (24 August 1897 or 1898 - Wednesday 1 December 1954)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Just One Time' (RCA Victor Records, 1971) included the following:

Stu Basore (electric bass)
Larry Butler (Thursday 26 March 1942 - Friday 20 January 2012) (piano)
Jerry Carrigan and Jimmy Isbell (drums)
Ray Edenton, Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Jerry Shook (rhythm guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
John Hughey (Wednesday 27 December 1933 - Sunday 18 November 2007) (steel guitar)
Roy Huskey and Bob Moore (bass)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
The Nashville Edition (background vocals)
Dean Potter, Billy Sanford and Pete Wade (guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins and Jerry Whitehurst (piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Carol Snow (organ)
Billy Walker (vibes)

Connie Smith's 'Just One Time' (RCA Victor Records, 1971) reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971.



In October 1971, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Come Along & Walk with Me' (RCA Victor Records, 1971), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and included the following tracks:

'Plenty of Time' (written by Clay McLean)
'Street Where the Lonely Walk' (written by Gladness Jennings)
'Bridge of Love', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'Crumbs from The Table' (written by Barbara Miller)
'He Touched Me' (written by Bill Gaither)
'Come Along & Walk with Me', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'(In the Valley) He Restoreth My Soul', which was written by Joyce Reba Rambo (Friday 2 March 1934 - Sunday 11 May 2008)
'Too Much to Gain to Lose', which was written by Joyce Reba Rambo (Friday 2 March 1934 - Sunday 11 May 2008)
'Don't Let Me Walk Too Far from Calvary', which was written by Joyce Reba Rambo (Friday 2 March 1934 - Sunday 11 May 2008)
I'd Still Want to Serve Him Today' (written by Ray Lewis)



In April 1972, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Ain't We Havin' Us a Good Time' (RCA Victor Records, 1972), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Just for What I Am', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) (No.5, 1972)

Connie Smith's 'Ain't We Havin' Us a Good Time' (RCA Victor Records, 1972) included the following tracks:

'If We Want Love to Last', which was written by L.E. White (1930 - Tuesday 7 September 2004)
'How Sweet It Is' (written by Bobby Braddock)
'As Long as We've Got Each Other', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'Way Up on The Mountain', which was written by Ira Louvin (Monday 21 April 1924 - Sunday 20 June 1965) and Anne Young
'Thank You for Loving Me, which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'I Know You're Going Away' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Ain't We Havin' Us a Good Time' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Precious Love' (wriitten by Byron R. Walls)
'If God is Dead (then who's this living in my soul)' (written by Lawrence Reynolds)

Connie Smith's 'Ain't We Havin' Us a Good Time' (RCA Victor Records, 1972) reached No.25 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.



Connie Smith & Dallas Frazier in Nashville




In July 1972, Connie Smith saw the release of 'If It Ain't Love & Other Great Dallas Frazier Songs' (RCA Victor Records, 1972), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'If It Ain't Love (let's leave it alone)' (written by Dallas Frazier) (No.7, 1972)

Connie Smith's 'If It Ain't Love & Other Great Dallas Frazier Songs' (RCA Victor Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

'If It Ain't Strong Enough' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'My Ecstasy' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Living Without You (is too much to live with)' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Laying on The Hands' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'You're Gettin' Heavy on My Mind' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Don't Tell Him That I'm Still Crying' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'For Goodness Sake It's Love' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Everything's Found a Home with Me But You' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Bringin' It Home' (written by Dallas Frazier)

On three of the tracks on Connie Smith's 'If It Ain't Love & Other Great Dallas Frazier Songs' (RCA Victor Records, 1972), Dallas Frazier joined Connie as a duet partner.

Connie Smith's 'If It Ain't Love & Other Great Dallas Frazier Songs' (RCA Victor Records, 1972) reached No.14 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.

Having nearly served ten years at RCA Records, Connie Smith signed with Columbia Records in 1973; she began to add more gospel music into her act and Columbia Records permitted her to record more gospel material.



In February 1973, Connie Smith saw the release of the compilation album, 'Love is The Look You're Looking For' (RCA Victor Records, 1973), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), and which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Love is The Look You're Looking For' (written by Rose Lee Mathis) (No.8, 1973) / this track was a newly recorded track

Connie Smith's 'Love is the Look You're Looking For' (RCA Victor Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

'How Great Thou Art', which was written by Stuart Wesley Keene Hine (25 July 1899 - Tuesday 14 March 1989)
'It'll Be Easy' (written by Jan Crutchfield)
'Burning a Hole in My Mind', which was written by Cyrus 'Cy' Coben (Friday 4 April 1919 - Friday 26 May 2006)
'Ain't Had No Lovin' (written by Dallas Frazier)

'If I Could Just Get Over You' (written by Kay Arnold) / this track was a newly recorded track
'Born to Sing', which was written by Cyrus 'Cy' Coben (Friday 4 April 1919 - Friday 26 May 2006)
Cry, Cry, Cry' (written by Shirley Wood)

'It's Now or Never' (written by Wally Gold and Aaron Schroeder)
'Pas Souvent (Once a Day)' (written by Bill Anderson) / this track was a newly recorded track and was a French translation of 'Once a Day', which was recorded for the Canadian market and previously unreleased in the United States

Connie Smith's 'Love is The Look You're Looking For' (RCA Victor Records, 1973) reached No.24 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.



In May 1973, Connie Smith saw the release of her album for Columbia Records, 'A Lady Named Smith' (Columbia Records, 1973), which was produced by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010), and which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'You've Got Me (right where you want me)', which was written by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) and Connie Smith (No.21, 1973)

Connie Smith's first album for Columbia Records, 'A Lady Named Smith' (Columbia Records, 1973), also included the following tracks:

'Soul Song', which was written by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010), Billy Sherrill and Norro Wilson
'Jesus' (written by Bill Gaither)
'When You Hurt Me More Than I Love You' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Never Love Again', which was written by Bill Deaton, Doug Kershaw and Rusty Kershaw (Wednesday 2 February 1938 - Tuesday 23 October 2001)
'House Where Love Shines' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Love Held on Me' (written by Helen Cornelius)
'Pass Me By (if you're only passing through)' (written by Hillman Hall)
'Too Soon to Know', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'Let's All Go Down to the River' (written by Earl Montgomery and Sue Richards)
'A Picture of Me (without you)', which was written by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) and Norro Wilson)

Connie Smith's first album for Columbia Records, 'A Lady Named Smith' (Columbia Records, 1973), reached No.31 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.



In July 1973, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Dream Painter' (RCA Victor Records, 1973), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), and which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Dream Painter' (written by Dallas Frazier and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer) (No.23, 1973)

Connie Smith's 'Dream Painter' (RCA Victor Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

'Born a Woman' (written by Martha Sharp)
'I Can Turn Your World Around', which was written by Harry Ebner, Jack Rhodes (1908 - October 1968) and Billie Jo Spears (Friday 14 January 1938 - Wednesday 14 December 2011)
'Don't Keep Me Lonely Too Long' (written by Melba Montgomery)
'Sunshine of My World' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Tiny Blue Transistor Radio' (written by Bill Anderson)
'Everybody Loves Somebody' (written by Ken Lane and Irving Taylor)
'All the Praises', which was written by Jerry Strickland and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)
'I Love You Drops' (written by Bill Anderson)
'Love is No Excuse', which was written by Justin Tubb (Tuesday 20 August 1935 - Saturday 24 January 1998)

Connie Smith's 'Dream Painter' (RCA Victor Records, 1973) reached No.39 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.



In November 1973, Connie Smith saw the release of 'God is Abundant' (Columbia Records, 1973), which was produced by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010), and which included the following tracks:

'God is Abundant' (written by Marie Boyer)
'Well of His Mercy' (written by Wayne Manning)
'When I Sing for Him', which was written by Porter Wagoner (Friday 12 August 1927 - Sunday 28 October 2007)
'You Can Move That Mountain' (written by Dannie Lee)
'Remind Me Dear Lord', which was written by Joyce Reba Rambo (Friday 2 March 1934 - Sunday 11 May 2008)
'At the Foot of the Cross', which was written by Larry Lee Favorite (Saturday 6 January 1940 - Saturday 26 May 2001)
'Why Me' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'The Baptism of Jesse Taylor' (written by Dallas Frazier and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer)
'Help Me' (written by Larry Gatlin)
'Golden Streets of Glory' (written by Dolly Parton)
'He Did It All for Me' (written by Duane Allen and Sager Powell)

Connie Smith's 'God is Abundant' (Columbia Records, 1973) reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.



In March 1974, Connie Smith saw the release of 'That's The Way Love Goes' (Columbia Records, 1974), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Ain't Love a Good Thing' (written by Dallas Frazier) (No.10, 1973)
'Dallas' (written by Leona Williams) (No.35, 1974)

Connie Smith's 'That's The Way Love Goes' (Columbia Records, 1974) also included the following:

'That's The Way Love Goes', which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer
'Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round The Ole Oak Tree' (written by Russell L. Brown and Irwin Levine)
'Be All Right in Arkansas' (written by Billy Burns and Gerry House)
'Thanks a Lot for Trying Anyway' (written by Jim Glaser)
'The Baptism of Jesse Taylor' (written by Dallas Frazier and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer)
'Teddy Bear Song' (written by Don Earl and Nick Nixon)
'My Uncle Abel' (written by Billy Ed Wheeler)
'The Wonders You Perform' (written by Jerry Chesnut)
'We're Gonna Hold On', which was written by Earl Montgomery and George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'That's The Way Love Goes' (Columbia Records, 1974) included the following:

Dorothy Delenoibus, Holladay Sisters, The Jordanaires and Laverna Moore (background vocals)
Ray Edenton, Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 - Monday 3 December 2001) and Chip Young (guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle, mandolin)
Lloyd Green (dobro, steel guitar)
Shane Keister (keyboards)
Kenny Malone (drums)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, vibes)
Bob Moore and R. Stevie Moore (bass)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (organ, piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (banjo)

Connie Smith's 'That's The Way Love Goes' (Columbia Records, 1974) reached No.41 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.



In July 1974, Connie Smith saw the release of the compilation album, 'Connie Smith Now' (RCA Victor Records, 1974), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), and which included one new song, 'Now' (written by Paul Parnes and Herb Strizik).

Connie Smith's 'Connie Smith Now' (RCA Victor Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

'Someone to Give My Love To' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Seattle', which was written by Jack Keller (Wednesday 11 November 1936 - Friday 1 April 2005), Hugo Montenegro (Wednesday 2 September 1925 - Friday 6 February 1981) and Ernie Sheldon
'Back in Baby's Arms', which was written by Bob Montgomery (Wednesday 12 May 1937 - Thursday 4 December 2014) 
'I'm So Glad', which was written by Neal Matthews (Saturday 26 October 1929 - Friday 21 April 2000) and Gordon Stoker (Sunday 3 August 1924 - Wednesday 27 March 2013)
'I'm Sorry If My Love Got in Your Way' (written by Dallas Frazier and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer)
'Louisiana Man' (written by Doug Kershaw)
'You Are Gone' (written by Johnny Carver)
'Born to Sing', which was written by Cyrus 'Cy' Coben (Friday 4 April 1919 - Friday 26 May 2006)
'Plenty of Time' (written by Clay McLean)

Connie Smith's 'Connie Smith Now' (RCA Victor Records, 1974) reached No.40 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.



In August 1974, Connie Smith saw the release of 'I Never Knew (What That Song Meant Before)' (Columbia Records, 1974), which was produced by Ray Baker and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I Never Knew (what that song meant before)' (written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer) (No.13, 1974)

Connie Smith's 'I Never Knew (What That Song Meant Before)' (Columbia Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

'Them Ole Rainy Lovesick Songs (are hittin' home)', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'I Just Had You on My Mind' (written by Sue Richards)
'I'll Still Be Missing You' (written by Warner McPherson)
'Because of Yesterday' (written by Cleon Dewey and Levon Dewey)
'I Wish We'd All Be Ready' (written by Larry Norman)
'Key's in The Mailbox', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'Letting Go', which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Glenn Martin
'Never Having You' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'Did We Have to Come This Far (to say goodbye)', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'Is This All You Hear (when a heart breaks)' (written by Charlie Williams)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'I Never Knew (What That Song Meant Before)' (Columbia Records, 1974) included the following:

Dorothy Delenoibus, Holladay Sisters, The Jordanaires and Laverna Moore (background vocals)
Ray Edenton and Chip Young (rhythm guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle, mandolin)
Lloyd Green (dobro, steel guitar)
Shane Keister (keyboards)
Kenny Malone (drums)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 - Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, vibes)
Bob Moore (bass)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (organ, piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (banjo)

Connie Smith's 'I Never Knew (What That Song Meant Before)' (Columbia Records, 1974) reached No.22 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.



In January 1975, Connie Smith saw the release of 'I Got a Lot of Hurtin' Done Today / I've Got My Baby on My Mind' (Columbia Records, 1975), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I've Got My Baby on My Mind' (written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer) (No.13, 1974)
'I Got a Lot of Hurtin' Done Today' (written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer) (No.30, 1975)
'Why Don't You Love Me', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) (No.15, 1975)

Connie Smith's 'I Got a Lot of Hurtin' Done Today / I've Got My Baby on My Mind' (Columbia Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

'Praying Hands', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'Searching (for someone just like you)' (written by Pee Wee Maddux)
'Loving You (has changed my whole life)', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'Ain't It Good to be in Love Again' (written by Dewayne Orender)
'Sunshine Blue' (written by Billy Graham)
'Back in The Country' (written by Eddy Raven)
'You'll See Jesus' (written by Eddy Raven)
'I Still Feel the Same About You' (written by Bill Anderson)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'I Got a Lot of Hurtin' Done Today / I've Got My Baby on My Mind' (Columbia Records, 1975) included the following:

Dorothy Delenoibus, Holladay Sisters, The Jordanaires and Laverna Moore (background vocals)
Ray Edenton and Chip Young (rhythm guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle, mandolin)
Lloyd Green (dobro, steel guitar)
Shane Keister (keyboards)
Kenny Malone (drums)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 - Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, vibes)
Bob Moore (bass)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (organ, piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (banjo)

Connie Smith's 'I Got a Lot of Hurtin' Done Today / I've Got My Baby on My Mind' (Columbia Records, 1975) reached No.30 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.



In May 1975, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Connie Smith Sings Hank Williams Gospel' (Columbia Records, 1975), which was produced by Ray Baker and included the following tracks, which were originally written and recorded by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953):

'I Saw the Light' (written by by Hank Williams)
'Home in Heaven' (written by by Hank Williams)
'Jesus Remembered Me' (written by by Hank Williams)
'How Can You Refuse Him Now' (written by by Hank Williams)
'Jesus is Calling' (written by Charlie Monroe and Hank Williams)
'When the Book of Light is Read' (written by by Hank Williams)
'Are You Walking & Talking for the Lord' (written by by Hank Williams)
'House of Gold' (written by by Hank Williams)
'I'm Gonna Sing Sing' (written by by Hank Williams)
'Calling You' (written by by Hank Williams)
'Jesus Died for Me' (written by by Hank Williams)

Connie Smith's 'Connie Smith Sings Hank Williams Gospel' (Columbia Records, 1975) reached No.47 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.



In October 1975, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Joy to the World' (Columbia Records, 1975), which was produced by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010); the album was Connie Smith's first and only album of Christmas music.

Connie Smith's 'Joy to the World' (Columbia Records, 1975) included the following tracks:

'What Child Is This?', which was written by William Chatterton Dix (14 June 1837 - 9 September 1898)
'O Holy Night', which was written by Adolphe Charles Adam (24 July 1803 - 3 May 1856) and Placide Cappeau (25 October 1808 - 8 August 1877)
'Go Tell It on The Mountain' (written by John W. Work)
'The First Noel', which was written by Davies Gilbert (6 March 1767 - 24 December 1839) and William B. Sandys (1792 - 18 February 1874)
'Little Drummer Boy', which was written by Katherine Kennicott Davis (25 June 1892 - Sunday 20 April 1980), Henry Onorati and Harry Moses Simeone (Tuesday 9 May 1911 - Tuesday 22 February 2005)
'Sweet Little Jesus Boy', which was written by Robert MacGimsey (1898 - 1979)
'Away in a Manger' (written by James R. Murray)
'Silent Night', which was written by Franz Xaver Gruber (25 November 1787 - 7 June 1863)
'Joy to The World', which was written by Isaac Watts (17 July 1674 - 25 November 1748)
'O Come All Ye Faithful (Adeste Fideles)', which was written by John Francis Wade (1711 - 16 August 1786)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Joy to the World' (Columbia Records, 1975) included the following:

Tommy Allsup, Carol Cooper and Ray Edenton (guitar)
Dorothy Delenoibus, Holladay Sisters, The Jordanaires and Laverna Moore (background vocals)
Lloyd Green (steel guitar)
Shane Keister (organ, vibes)
Kenny Malone (drums)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 - Monday 3 December 2001) and Chip Young (guitar)
Bob Moore (bass)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)

Connie Smith's 'Joy to the World' (Columbia Records, 1975) did not chart on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975; in addition, the album did not have any singles released from it.



In March 1976, Connie Smith saw the release of 'The Song We Fell in Love To' (Columbia Records, 1976), which was produced by Ray Baker, and which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'The Song We Fell in Love To', which was written by Ray Baker and Frederick Tupper Saussy III (Friday 3 July 1936 - Friday 16 March 2007) (No.29, 1975)
'(Till) I Kissed You' (written by Don Everly) (No.10, 1976)

Connie Smith's 'The Song We Fell in Love To' (Columbia Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

'Because I Love You That's Why' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Jesus Hears, He Cares, He Can' (written by Ray Lewis)
'Ridin' on a Rainbow', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Larry Lee Favorite (Saturday 6 January 1940 - Saturday 26 May 2001)
'One Little Reason' (written by Clyde Pitts)
'Once a Day' (written by Bill Anderson) / this is a re-recorded version of Connie Smith's No.1 single from 1964
'Viva La Love' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Nothing in This World', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'When I Need Jesus, He's There' (written by Lee Petrucci)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'The Song We Fell in Love To' (Columbia Records, 1976) included the following:

Carol Cooper and Shane Keister (synthesizer)
Ray Edenton (rhythm guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) and Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Lloyd Green and Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Kenny Malone (drums)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 - Monday 3 December 2001) and Leon Rhodes (guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Bob Moore and Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) (bass)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (banjo, rhythm guitar)

Connie Smith's 'The Song We Fell in Love To' (Columbia Records, 1976) reached No.34 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.



Moe Bandy recorded Connie Smith's 'Ring Around Rosie's Finger' (co-written with Cathy Manser) and included the track on 'Hank Williams, You Wrote My Life' (Columbia Records, 1976).



In October 1976, Connie Smith saw the release of 'I Don't Wanna Talk It Over Any More' (Columbia Records, 1976), which was produced by Ray Baker, and which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'So Sad (To Watch Good Love Go Bad)' (written by Don Everly) (No.31, 1976)
'I Don't Wanna Talk It Over Anymore' (written by Eddy Raven) (No.13, 1977)
'The Latest Shade of Blue' (written by Eddy Raven) (No.42, 1977)

Connie Smith's 'I Don't Wanna Talk It Over Any More' (Columbia Records, 1976), which was Connie's final album for Columbia Records, also included the following tracks:

'Love Don't Care (where it grows)', which was written by Frederick Tupper Saussy III (Friday 3 July 1936 - Friday 16 March 2007)
'Come on Down' (written by Jack Hayford and Steve Stone)

'Storms Never Last' (written by Jessi Colter)
'Constantly' (written by Connie Smith)
'I'm All Wrapped Up in You', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'You Crossed My Mind a Thousand Times Today' (written by Dewayne Orender and Phyllis Powell)
'I Wonder if The Angels Could Use Another Singer', which was written by Joyce Reba Rambo (Friday 2 March 1934 - Sunday 11 May 2008)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'I Don't Wanna Talk It Over Any More' (Columbia Records, 1976) included the following:

Jerry Carrigan and Kenny Malone (drums)
Jimmy Day (Tuesday 9 January 1934 - Friday 22 January 1999), Buddy Emmons and Lloyd Green (steel guitar)
Bobby Dyson (bass guitar)
Ray Edenton and Leo Jackson (rhythm guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Shane Keister (keyboards)
Billy Linneman, Bob Moore and Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) (bass)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Leon Rhodes, Bob Moore and Reggie Young (guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins and Jerry Smith (piano)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (banjo, rhythm guitar)

Connie Smith's 'I Don't Wanna Talk It Over Any More' (Columbia Records, 1976) reached No.33 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.



In 1977, Connie Smith switched record labels, moving from Columbia Records to Monument Records where, in September 1977, she saw the release of 'Pure Connie Smith' (Monument Records, 1977), which was produced by Ray Baker, and which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Coming Around' (No.58, 1977)

Connie Smith's 'Pure Connie Smith' (Monument Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

'That's What Loving You Can Do'
'Don't Treat Me Like a Stranger'
'Scrapbook'
'Every Move You Make (is saying goodbye)'
'It Pleases Me to Please You'
'I Don't Want to be Free'
'When It's Just You & Me'
'You & Love & I'
'Lovin' One Day at a Time'

Connie Smith's 'Pure Connie Smith' (Monument Records, 1977) failed to chart on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.



In March 1978, Connie Smith saw the release of 'New Horizons' (Monument Records, 1978), which was produced by Ray Baker, and which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I Just Want to Be Your Everything' (written by Barry Gibb) (No.14, 1977)
'Lovin' You Baby' (written by Ann C. Seals and Troy Seals) (No.34, 1978)
'They'll Never Be Another for Me', which was written by John Coley, Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009) and Parker McGee (No.68, 1978)

Connie Smith's 'New Horizons' (Monument Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

'All of a Sudden' (written by Steve Collom)
'Too Good to be True'
'The Wayward Wind' (written by Stanley Lebowsky and Herb Newman)
'Your Smiling Face'
'You Light Up My Life' (written by Joe Brooks)
'Loving You Has Sure Been Good to Me' (written by Dallas Frazier and Earl Montgomery)
'It's Not Easy to Say Goodbye'

Connie Smith's 'New Horizons' (Monument Records, 1978) failed to chart on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.

However, Connie Smith's next several singles, 'Smooth Sailing' and 'Ten Thousand & One' all peaked outside of the Billboard country music Top 40 singles chart, progressively going into lower positions on the country chart between 1978 and 1979.

In 1979, Connie Smith left Monument Records and neglected actively performing and touring between for six years, only appearing on The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville.  Over the next six years, Connie Smith focused on spending time with her family and raising her children.

 

Reba McEntire recorded Connie Smith's 'You've Got Me (right where you want me)', which was co-written with George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010), and included the track on 'My Kind of Country' (MCA Records, 1984).

On Monday 10 November 2014, England's Hux Records released Reba McEntire's 'My Kind of Country' (MCA Records, 1984), along with 'Just a Little Love' (MCA Records, 1985), as a special '2-for-1' CD set (HUX 142).

Connie Smith: 'A Far Cry From You' (written by Jimbeau Hinson & Steve Earle) (Epic Records, 1985) (No.71, 1985)

In 1985, Connie Smith made a brief comeback on Epic Records and saw the release of two singles; the first single, 'A Far Cry From You' (written by Jimbeau Hinson and Steve Earle) charted at No.71, while the second single, 'Hold Me Back', failed to chart in 1986.

In 1990, Connie Smith made a trip to the United Kingdom to tour there for her British fans.



On Tuesday 13 October 1992, Connie Smith recorded a 'live' album, 'Live in Branson, MO, USA' (Laserlight Records, 1993), which was produced by Ralph Jungheim, and included the following tracks:

'I've Got My Baby on My Mind' (written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer)
'Where is My Castle' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Just One Time', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'Louisiana Man' (written by Doug Kershaw)
'You've Got Me (right where you want me)', which was written by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) and Connie Smith
Medley of Hits - various
'Once a Day' (written by Bill Anderson)
'Satisfied', which was written by Martha Carson (Saturday 19 March 1921 - Thursday 16 December 2004)
'How Great Thou Art', which was written by Stuart Wesley Keene Hine (25 July 1899 - Tuesday 14 March 1989)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Live in Branson, MO, USA' (Laserlight Records, 1993), included the following:

Jimmy Capps (guitar)
Rod Ham (bass)
Mark Pearman (fiddle)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Gary Smith (piano)
Jack Smith (steel guitar, leader)
Steve Turner (drums)



On Tuesday 9 March 1993, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Greatest Hits on Monument' (Sony Music Entertainment Records, 1993), a compilation album, which was produced by Ray Baker, and included Connie Smith's singles and other tracks recorded during her three years at Monument Records between 1977 and 1979:

'Coming Around', which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 - Wednesday 1 July 2015)
'You & Love & I' (written by Warren D. Robb and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer)
'I Just Want to Be Your Everything' (written by Barry Gibb)
'Lovin' You Baby' (written by Ann C. Seals and Troy Seals)
'All of a Sudden' (written by Steve Collom)
'There'll Never Be Another for Me', which was written by John Coley, Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009) and Parker McGee
'Lovin' You, Lovin Me' (written by Sonny Throckmorton)
'The Wayward Wind', which was written by Stanley Lebowsky (Friday 26 November 1926 - Sunday 19 October 1986) and Herb Newman
'Smooth Sailin' (written by Curly Putman and Sonny Throckmorton)
'Loving You Has Sure Been Good to Me' (written by Dallas Frazier and Earl Montgomery)
'Ten Thousand & One' (written by Pat Bunch and Dan Mitchell)
'Don't Say Love' (written by Jim Glaser and Jimmy Payne)
'I Don't Want to be Free', which was written by Paul Craft (Friday 12 August 1938 - Saturday 18 October 2014)
'Don't Make Me Dream (if dreamin' can't come true)' (written by Wanada Mallette and Bob Morrison)



In 1995, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Clinging to a Saving Hand' (Connie Smith Fan Club Records, 1995), which included the following tracks:

'Clinging to a Saving Hand' (written by Bill Mack)
'Softly & Tenderly' (written by Will L. Thompson)
'One Day at a Time', which was written by Kris Kristofferson and Marijohn Wilkin (Wednesday 14 July 1920 - Saturday 28 October 2006)
'I Saw a Man', which was written by Arthur 'Guitar Boogie' Smith (Friday 1 April 1921 - Thursday 3 April 2014)
'When I Get to the Glory' (written by Connie Smith)
'He Was There all the Time' (written by Gary S. 'Flip' Paxton)
'Satisfied', which was written by Martha Carson (Saturday 19 March 1921 - Thursday 16 December 2004)
'Peace in the Valley' (written by Rev. Thomas A. Dorsey)
'Crumbs from the Table' (written by Barbara Miller)
'How Great Thou Art', which was written by Stuart Wesley Keene Hine (25 July 1899 - Tuesday 14 March 1989)



In April 1996, Connie Smith saw the release of 'The Essential Connie Smith' (RCA Records, 1996), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001) and Ethel Gabriela, and was a two-disc collection of Connie Smith's singles released between 1964 and 1972, including the following:

'Once a Day' (written by Bill Anderson)
'Nobody But a Fool (would love you)' (written by Bill Anderson)
'I Can't Remember' (written by Bill Anderson and Becki Anderson)
'Cry, Cry, Cry' (written by Shirley Wood)
'Then & Only Then' (written by Bill Anderson)
'If I Talk to Him' (written by Dolores Edgin and Priscilla Mitchell)
'Ain't Had No Lovin' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'The Hurtin's All Over', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'I Never Once Stopped Loving You' (written by Bill Anderson and Jan Howard)
'You & Your Sweet Love' (written by Bill Anderson)
'Cincinnati, Ohio' (written by Bill Anderson)
'I'll Come Runnin' (written by Connie Smith)
'Burning a Hole in My Mind', which was written by Cyrus 'Cy' Coben (Friday 4 April 1919 - Friday 26 May 2006)
'Run Away Little Tears' (written by Dallas Frazier)

'Ribbon of Darkness' (written by Gordon Lightfoot)
'Just One Time', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'Just for What I Am', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'Love is the Look You're Looking For' (written by Rose Lee Maphis)
'If It Ain't Love (let's leave it alone)' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'How Great Thou Art', which was written by Stuart Wesley Keene Hine (25 July 1899 - Tuesday 14 March 1989)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'The Essential Connie Smith' (RCA Records, 1996), included the following:

Connie Smith (guitar, lead vocals)



In 1997, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Connie Smith Sings Her Hits' (Sony Special Products, 1997), which was a collection of Connie Smith's major hits at Columbia Records between 1973 and 1976, including the following:

'You've Got Me (right where you want me)', which was written by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) and Connie Smith
'Ain't Love a Good Thing' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'I Never Knew (what that song meant before)' (written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer)
'I've Got My Baby on My Mind' (written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer)
'I Got a Lot of Hurtin' Done Today' (written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer)
'Why Don't You Love Me', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'The Song We Fell in Love To', which was written by Ray Baker and Tupper Saussy (Friday 3 July 1936 - Friday 16 March 2007)
'(Till) I Kissed You' (written by Don Everly)
'So Sad (To Watch Good Love Go Bad)' (written by Don Everly)
'I Don't Wanna Talk It Over Anymore' (written by Eddy Raven)



Connie Smith & Marty Stuart

On Tuesday 8 July 1997, Connie Smith married fellow country music artist Marty Stuart.  The couple met while writing songs together for Connie Smith's 1998 comeback album, 'Connie Smith' (Warner Bros. Records, 1998).

Twenty-eight years before, in 1970, Marty Stuart first encountered Connie Smith one night after attending her concert: 'I met Connie when I was twelve years old.  She came to the Indian reservation in my home-town to work at a fair.  She hasn't changed a bit.  She looked great then and she looks great now'.

Connie Smith said that they have sustained their marriage by making '...the Lord the centre...and commit'.



In 1998, Connie Smith returned to recording after a twenty-year gap with the release of her self-titled album 'Connie Smith' (Warner Bros. Records, 1998); the album was released on Tuesday 6 October 1998.

'Connie Smith' (Warner Bros. Records, 1998) was produced by Connie's husband Marty Stuart, along with Justin Neibank; Connie Smith and Marty Stuart were married on Tuesday 8 July 1997.

'Connie Smith' (Warner Bros. Records, 1998) was given a positive reviews but, although it was her first album in many years, it attracted little attention; the album included the following tracks:

'How Long', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002), Connie Smith and Marty Stuart
'Lonesome' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'Hearts Like Ours' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'You Can't Back a Teardrop' (written by Tom Shapiro and Chris Waters)
'Looking for a Reason' (written by Connie Smith and Chris Wright)
'Love's Not Everything' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'Just Let Me Know' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'Your Light' (written by Allen Shamblin, Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'When It Comes to You' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'A Tale from Taharrie' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Connie Smith' (Warner Bros. Records, 1998) included the following:

Steve Arnold and Michael Rhodes (bass)
Mark Casstevens, Stuart Smith and Biff Watson (guitar)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Gary Hogue (R.I.P.) (steel guitar)
Larry Marrs (background vocals, bass)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Gary W. Smith (keyboards)
Marty Stuart (guitar, mandolin)
Steve Turner (drums)
Cheryl White (background vocals)



In 1999, John Prine saw the release of 'In Spite of Ourselves' (Oh Boy Records, 1999), which featured duets with various well-known female folk and alternative country vocalists, including Iris DeMent, Connie Smith, Lucinda Williams, Trisha Yearwood, Melba Montgomery, Emmylou Harris, Dolores Keane, Patty Loveless and John's wife, Fiona Prine.

The tracks on John Prine's 'In Spite of Ourselves' (Oh Boy Records, 1999), which featured Connie Smith, are 'So Sad (to Watch Good Love Go Bad)' and 'Loose Talk'.

John Prine's 'In Spite of Ourselves' (Oh Boy Records, 1999) reached No.21 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1999.



In August 2003, Connie Smith realised a long-time dream to record a gospel album with her best friends in country music, Barbara Fairchild and Sharon White.

Connie Smith, Barbara Fairchild and Sharon White's 'Love Never Fails' (Daywind Records, 2003), which was produced by Ricky Skaggs and Dorothy Leonard Miller, included the following tracks:

'Secret Place' (written by Ann Downing and Jeff Silvey)
'Where Angels Fear to Tread' (written by Ron Hendrix, Bobby Price and Jerry Salley)
'Closer to Home' (written by Dave Clark, Wayne Haun and Tony Wood)
'Fight On' (written by Cindi Ballard and Gina Vera)
'Ever Near' (written by Mary Funderburk and Dee Gaskin)
'Reach for the Stars' (written by Jerry Salley and Jeff Silvey)
'Trouble Me No More' (written by Mary Funderburk and Daryl Williams)
'In Gethsemane' (written by Sue Smith and Gina Vera)
'He's Alive' (written by Ann Ballard)
'Love Never Fails' (written by Dave Clark, Wayne Haun and Jerry Salley)
'Walkin' Through the Fire' (written by Marty Stuart and Jerry Sullivan)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith, Barbara Fairchild and Sharon White's 'Love Never Fails' (Daywind Records, 2003) included the following:

Jim 'Moose' Brown (piano)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Juraj Durovic (orchestra director)
Mark Fain (bass, session leader)
Barbara Fairchild (lead vocals, harmony vocals)
Paul Franklin (pedal steel guitar, string guitar)
Wayne Haun (conductor)
David Huntsinger (keyboards, piano, Hammond organ)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Ricky Skaggs (electric guitar)
Connie Smith (lead vocals, harmony vocals)
Marty Stuart (mandolin)
Bryan Sutton (acoustic guitar, banjo)
Sharon White (lead vocals, harmony vocals)

Connie Smith, Barbara Fairchild and Sharon White's 'Love Never Fails' (Daywind Records, 2003) received a nomination from The Dove Awards.



Marty Stuart & The Fabulous Superlatives recorded Connie Smith's 'Farmer's Blues' (co-written with Marty Stuart) and included the track on 'Country Music' (Columbia Records, 2003); the track was a duet with Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016).



On Tuesday 25 September 2007, Gene Watson saw the release of 'In a Perfect World' (Shanachie Records, 2007); one of the included tracks was 'A Good Place to Turn Around', which was written by J. Matthews, Rebecca Lynn Howard and Jon Mabe, and featured Connie Smith on backing vocals.



Marty Stuart & The Fabulous Superlatives recorded Connie Smith's 'A World Without You' (co-written with Marty Stuart) and included the track on 'Ghost Train (The Studio B Sessions)' (Superlatone Records, 2008).



Marty Stuart & The Fabulous Superlatives recorded Connie Smith's 'I Run to You' (co-written with Marty Stuart) and included the track on 'Ghost Train (The Studio B Sessions)' (Superlatone Records, 2008); the track was a duet with Connie Smith.



Connie Smith & Gene Watson backstage at The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville on Friday 25 July 2008

In November 2008, Connie Smith joined the cast of Marty Stuart's television series 'The Marty Stuart Show', which aired on the RFD-TV network every Saturday night.  The thirty-minute program features traditional country music performed by both Marty Stuart and Connie Smith, as well as WSM 650AM radio personality, Eddie Stubbs.



On Tuesday 23 August 2011, Connie Smith saw the release of 'Long Line of Heartaches' (Sugar Hill Records, 2011), which was produced by Marty Stuart, and included the following tracks:

'Long Line of Heartaches' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'I'm Not Blue' (written by Kostas, Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'Pain of a Broken Heart' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'Ain't You Even Gonna Cry', which was written by Johnny Russell (Tuesday 23 January 1940 - Tuesday 3 July 2001)
'I Don't Believe That's How You Feel', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) and Kostas
'A Heart Like You' (written by Glenn Ashworth and Dallas Frazier)
'Anymore', which was written by Vic McAlpin, Roy Drusky (Sunday 22 June 1930 - Thursday 23 September 2004) and Marie Wilson
'That Makes Two of Us' (written by Emory Gordy Junior, Kostas and Patty Loveless)
'You & Me' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'My Part of Forever' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Blue Heartaches' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'Take My Hand' (written by Diane Berry)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Long Line of Heartaches' (Sugar Hill Records, 2011), included the following:

Julie Barnick, Ron Ham, Jeanne Hayes and Jody Seyfried (background vocals)
Gary Carter (steel guitar)
Dirk Johnson (piano)
Paul Martin (bass, vibraphone)
Ric McClure (drums)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Marty Stuart (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Rick Wright (background vocals, electric guitar, gut string guitar)



Hargus 'Pig' Robbins, Connie Smith & Garth Brooks at Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum in Nashville on Wednesday 7 March 2012, following the Country Music Association (CMA) announcement of their induction, on Tuesday 6 March 2012

On Tuesday 6 March 2012, the Country Music Association (CMA) announced that Connie Smith, Hargus 'Pig' Robbins and Garth Brooks were the latest inductees of The Country Music Hall of Fame.

Connie Smith was inducted in the 'Veterans Era Artist' category, Hargus 'Pig' Robbins was inducted in the 'Recording and/or Touring Musician Active Prior to 1980' category (which was awarded every third year in a rotation with the 'Non-Performer' and 'Songwriter' categories), while Garth Brooks was inducted in the 'Modern Era Artist' category.

The addition of Connie Smith, Hargus 'Pig' Robbins and Garth Brooks increased membership in the coveted Country Music Hall of Fame from 115 to 118 inductees.



Connie Smith at the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville on Wednesday 7 March 2012, following the announcement of her induction, on Tuesday 6 March 2012, by the Country Music Association Association (CMA)

Connie Smith was quoted as saying:
'I've had the privilege of participating in several Hall of Fame inductions.  They were all very special.  But now to become a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame myself is an honour for me and my family.  So touching, it's difficult to find the words to express my gratitude'.

Induction ceremonies for Connie Smith, Hargus 'Pig' Robbins and Garth Brooks took place at Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum in Nashville on Sunday 21 October 2012.

Since 2007, the Museum's Medallion Ceremony, an annual reunion of the Hall of Fame membership, has served as the official rite of induction for new members.

CMA created the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1961 to recognize noteworthy individuals for their outstanding contributions to the format with Country Music's highest honour.



• Visit Connie Smith's Official Site at conniesmithmusic.com
• Marty Stuart

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