Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2006, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Hank Thompson, which he submitted to this site on Sunday 16 July 2006.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Hank Thompson who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Hank Thompson
This quote was submitted on Sunday 16 July 2006.

'I have known Gene for many years and worked with him on many occasions.

I have always considered him to be one of the best in the business.

Good luck with Gene's website'.

Thank you, Hank Thompson, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Hank Thompson...



Hank Thompson was born Henry William 'Hank' Thompson in Waco, Texas on Thursday 3 September 1925.



Hank Thompson's parents were Jule Thomas Thompson and Zexia Ilda Wells Thompson, and his paternal grandparents were German Czechs named 'Kocek' who Anglicised the name to 'Thompson'.  Jule Thompson was a auto mechanic, and his son always had at least an amateur's interest in such handy things as radio electronics.

Hank Thompson earned part-time money doing radio shop work in Waco, Texas during his high school days, then studied radio communications and electronics while serving in the United States Navy and attended Princeton University and University of Texas, which helped him earn credits toward his postwar discharge.

Growing up, country music was the only music which Hank Thompson listened to and the only music that anybody he knew listened to.

Radio from Dallas and the Mexican border stations featured such diverse groups and artists as The Light Crust Doughboys, The Carter Family and Cowboy Slim Rhinehart.  The records Hank Thompson actually preferred were by country music's more traditional early stars, including Carson Robison (4 August 1890 - Sunday 24 March 1957), Vernon Dalhart (6 April 1883 - Tuesday 14 September 1948) and, of course, Jimmie Rodgers (September 1897 - Friday 26 May 1933).

Movies then brought Hank Thompson the thrill of a cowboy who sang like Jimmie Rodgers (September 1897 - Friday 26 May 1933), the great Gene Autry (Sunday 29 September 1907 - Friday 2 October 1998).

When he was ten years old, Hank Thompson got his first guitar and began aping all these musical favourites.

Peg Moreland and Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 - Thursday 6 September 1984) became radio favourites during Hank Thompson's years at Waco High School in the early 1940s.

Known within his family as Henry William, in order to distinguish him from an Uncle Hank, Thompson became Hank when he began regularly winning a Saturday morning talent contest from Waco Theater, which was broadcast on radio station WACO as 'The Kiddies Matinee'.  From this, Hank Thompson got his own before school 7:15am radio show on WACO as 'Hank, The Hired Hand', singing the songs of childhood and current country music favourites.

Following high school, Hank Thompson enlisted in the United States Navy in January 1943 when he was seventeen years old (Hank's parents had to sign for him).  Hank Thompson then headed off to Dallas for induction and later to San Diego for basic training.  Whille in the Navy, Hank Thompson studied to be a radio operator and technician, fully expecting that to be his postwar career.

Discharged in March 1946, Hank Thompson enrolled under G.I. benefits for further electrical training at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.

However, when he finished that course, Hank Thompson went home to Waco, Texas where he hoped to get his old job back at radio station WACO.

Instead, Hank Thompson got the brushoff, so he signed instead with a brand new radio station, KWTX, which gave him a prime-time 12:15pm daily quarter-hour show.  For KWTX, 'Hank, The Hired Hand' became simply 'Hank Thompson', a solo singer with a guitar.

For schoolhouse dates around the Waco area, Hank Thompson built a band and used for their name that of a defunct area band, The Brazos Valley Boys ('Brazos Valley Rancho' was his theme song at the time).

A local record store owner hooked Hank Thompson up with a new Los Angeles independent record label, Globe Records, and for them he recorded his first four songs at Dallas' Sellars Studio in August 1946.  All of the tracks were songs which Hank Thompson had written and which he would later reprise for Capitol Records, 'Swing Wide Your Gate of Love', 'Whoa Sailor', 'What Are We Gonna Do About The Moonlight' and 'California Women'.

Pappy Hal Horton's late night disc jockey show on Dallas' KRLD, 'The Hillbilly Hit Parade', made Hank Thompson's Globe Records recordings at least regional favourites, as baskets full of fan mail and requests poured in to Hal Horton in Dallas and to Hank Thompson at KWTX.

Before long, Hank Thompson was under Hal Horton's career supervision.  For the Dallas-based Blue Bonnet Records, in 1947, Hank Thompson made four more recordings, two from his Globe Records catalogue and two new ones, 'A Lonely Heart Knows', which was later recorded by his friend Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 - Thursday 6 September 1984) and 'My Starry-Eyed Texas Gal'.

In 1948, Hank Thompson saw the release of three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Humpty Dumpty Heart' (No.2, 1948)
'Yesterday's Mail' (No.12, 1948)
'Green Light' (written by Hank Thompson) (No.7, 1948)

In 1949, Hank Thompson saw the release of three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'What Are We Gonna Do About The Moonlight' (No.10, 1949)
'I Find You Cheatin' on Me' (No.14, 1949)
'You Broke My Heart (in Little Bitty Pieces)' (No.15, 1949)
'Whoa Sailor' (No.8, 1949)
'Soft Lips' (No.10, 1949)
'The Grass Looks Greener Over Yonder' (No.15, 1949)

Hal Horton lobbied the touring movie and recording star Tex Ritter (Thursday 12 January 1905 - Wednesday 2 January 1974) to get Hank Thompson onto Tex Ritter's own record label, Capitol Records.

When he came through Texas on a theatre tour and guested on Hank Thompson's radio show, Tex Ritter (Thursday 12 January 1905 - Wednesday 2 January 1974) and Hank Thompson hit it off immediately.


Already, an acetate demo of Hank Thompson singing a new song, 'Humpty Dumpty Heart', was big on Hal Horton's radio show, so Capitol Records' Lee Gillette and Cliffie Stone (Thursday 1 March 1917 - Saturday 17 January 1998) flew to Waco in Texas to meet Hank Thompson, then took him to WFAA in Dallas to record 'Humpty Dumpty Heart' on a magnetic tape recorder, which was the first time Hank had seen such a machine.

Upon the recommendation of Tex Ritter (Thursday 12 January 1905 - Wednesday 2 January 1974), Hank Thompson signed with Capitol Records where, between 1948 and 1965, he enjoyed a very successful period of hit songs with the label.

Hank Thompson's first hit was 'Humpty Dumpty Heart', which reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1948 and remained on the chart for thirty eight weeks.  Hank Thompson also saw the re-release of 'Whoa Sailor' on Capitol Records, a recording which reached No.8 in late 1949.

When 'Humpty Dumpty Heart' became a national hit, Lee Gillette encouraged Hank Thompson to write more love songs around nursery rhymes.

They even brought him the second one, 'Mary Had a Little Lamb', which was recorded along with 'The Green Light' at Hank Thompson's first California sessions in December 1947.

'Rub-a-Dub-Dub' from late 1952 was probably the biggest later hit of this type, followed by 'A Fooler, a Faker' in 1953 and 'Simple Simon' later the next year.  Even 'The Blackboard of My Heart', which was a big Hank Thompson hit single in 1955, used childhood school days as the background for another love-gone-wrong hit.

Before the ailing Hal Horton passed away, he arranged country music's first broadcast nuptials when Hank Thompson married girlfriend Dorothy Jean Ray on Hal Horton's KRLD radio show on Wednesday 14 April 1948.

By this time, Hank Thompson's program was on an 18-station Texas network, which was broadcasting out of Dallas, where he and his new wife made their home.

Hal Horton next used his close connections with Eddy Arnold (Wednesday 15 May 1918 - Thursday 8 May 2008) and The Brown Brothers in Nashville to link Hank Thompson with Nashville's Grand Ole Opry, a move to which Hank was not initially averse since he was still somewhat searching for musical direction and lucrative venues.

Hank Thompson first tried a Brown Brothers radio production, 'Smoky Mountain Hayride', which first aired in September 1948, and then came a short-lived early morning radio show on WLAC in Nashville.

With hits already to his credit, it wasn't hard to land a gig with The Grand Ole Opry on radio station WSM 650AM, a move which Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 - Thursday 6 September 1984) strongly encouraged and facilitated.

However, the low pay, Hank Thompson's first appearance paid him $9.00, and stifling musical conservatism, led Hank Thompson to leave in disgust about the same time another Hank, Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953), was joining.

'Whoa Sailor' and 'Soft Lips' became a double-sided Top 10 hit for Hank Thompson in 1949 and, by the fall of the same year, fans voted the young Texan as the fifth most popular country music artist after Eddy Arnold (Wednesday 15 May 1918 - Thursday 8 May 2008), Red Foley (Friday 17 June 1910 - Thursday 19 September 1968), Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) and Jimmy Wakely (Monday 16 February 1914 - Thursday 23 September 1982).

Back in Dallas but bereft of Hal Horton, who died in November 1948, Hank Thompson began building his new Brazos Valley Boys with the help of Billy Gray, a guitarist and singer from Paris, Texas who joined him in 1950 and stayed for most of the following decade.

Hank Thompson soon found that he made the bulk of his road money in dance halls, with their larger crowds and bigger gate percentages to the artists.

So, in 1950 - 1951, The Brazos Valley Boys, for the first time, became a Western Swing unit, built to play this Southwestern and Western circuit.

Dallas audiences were not as receptive to the new sound as Hank Thompson had hoped, but he found a warm welcome and a new career base in Oklahoma City's Trianon Ballroom, where a young college graduate from Kansas named Jim Halsey came down to manage him (Jim Halsey would later manage Roy Clark, The Oak Ridge Boys and others).

At The Trianon and on Oklahoma City's WKY-TV, between 1954 and 1957, Hank Thompson and Billy Gray honed their brand of Western Swing, which was less jazzy than Bob Wills (who had just left Oklahoma for Dallas and later California), less orchestral than Spade Cooley (Saturday 17 December 1910 - Sunday 23 November 1969) and different and distinctive from popular Oklahoma bandleaders Leon McAuliffe (Wednesday 3 January 1917 - Saturday 20 August 1988) and Merl Lindsay.

Hank Thompson had to move beyond the raw honky-tonk of a Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) or Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975), and even the spare sound of Hank's own earliest recordings, if he was to keep the dance hall circuit happy.

Hank Thompson found the sound he wanted with the help of Billy Gray's arrangements and a procession of great musicians.

Hank Thompson never thought of himself as a bandleader, such as Lawrence Welk (Wednesday 11 March 1903 - Sunday 17 May 1992) or Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 - Tuesday 13 May 1975).

Instead, Hank Thompson was a featured singer with his band, and he loved to meet and greet fans at dances while the band kept playing, a habit which infuriated a lot of Texas club owners, who were used to the non-stop, no frills Bob Wills approach.

And, Hank Thompson was right, since the multi-award-winning Brazos Valley Boys really did develop an identity and song repertory of its own.

Capitol Records cut numerous instrumentals and often marketed the recordings separately.

Billy Walker (Monday 14 January 1929 - Sunday 21 May 2006), a young Dallas and KRLD hopeful, opened Hank Thompson's road shows for a while and even made his first Capitol Records recording on tape in Hank Thompson's Dallas living room early in 1950.

Billy Walker (Monday 14 January 1929 - Sunday 21 May 2006) would not be the last major artist boosted by Hank Thompson, who'd been helped himself by Tex Ritter (Thursday 12 January 1905 - Wednesday 2 January 1974).

Hank Thompson was instrumental in the careers of two early female stars, Jean Shepard and Wanda Jackson.

In 1951, Hank Thompson's first wife, Dorothy, brought to his attention a Jimmy Heap recording to the tune of 'Great Speckled Bird'.  Entitled 'The Wild Side of Life', Hank Thompson recorded it at his first Capitol Records recording session with producer Ken Nelson, in Dallas, in late 1951.

Kitty Wells' answer hit, 'It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels' gave Hank Thompson's hit a second life.



In June 1952, Hank Thompson saw the release of 'Hank Thompson: Favourites' (Capitol Records, 1952), which was produced by Lee Gillette and Ken Nelson, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Wild Side of Life' (written by William Warren and Arlie Carter) (No.1 for fourteen weeks in May, June, July and August 1952) / this track also reached No.27 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1952
'Waiting in The Lobby of Your Heart' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray) (No.3, 1952)

Hank Thompson's 'Hank Thompson: Favourites' (Capitol Records, 1952) also included the following tracks:

'Today' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Tomorrow Night' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Whoa Sailor' (written by Hank Thompson and Walt McCoy)
'Green Light' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Love Thief' (written by Hank Thompson and Mary Lou Powers)
'Humpty Dumpty Heart' (written by Hank Thompson)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'Hank Thompson: Favourites' (Capitol Records, 1952) included the following:

Billy Gray (guitar)
Curly Chalker and Lefty Nason (steel guitar)
Cliffie Stone (Thursday 1 March 1917 - Saturday 17 January 1998) and Billy Stewart (bass)
Bill Foster (drums)
Red Hayes (fiddle)
Gil Baca (piano)
Buddy Woody (accordion)

In 1952, Hank Thompson saw the release of a non-album single, 'The New Wears Off Too Fast', which reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart.

In 1953, Hank Thompson saw the release of the non-album single, 'You're Walking On My Heart', which did not chart on the Billboard country music singles chart; the track did, however, reach No.21 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart.

Between 1953 and 1959, Hank Thompson saw the release of the following tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Wake Up, Irene' (No.1, 1953)
'Breakin' The Rules' (No.10, 1954)
'A Fooler, A Faker' (No.9, 1954)
'Honky-Tonk Girl' (No.9, 1954)
'We've Gone Too Far' (No.10, 1954)
'The New Green Light' (No.3, 1954) / this track was a re-recording
'If Lovin' You is Wrong' (No.12, 1955)
'Annie Over' (No.13, 1955)
'Wildwood Flower', which was written by Joseph Philbrick Webster (18 February 1819 - 18 January 1875) (No.5, 1955) / this track featured guest vocals from Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983)
'Breakin' in Another Heart' (No.7, 1955)
'Most of All' (No.6, 1955)
'Don't Take It Out On Me' (No.5, 1955)
'Honey, Honey Bee Ball' (1955) / this track was a flip-side
'The Blackboard of My Heart' (No.4, 1956)
'I'm Not Mad, Just Hurt' (No.14, 1956)
'Rockin' In The Congo' (No.13, 1957)
'I Was The First One' (1957) (flip-side)
'Tears Are Only Rain' (No.14, 1957)
'How Do You Hold a Memory' (No.11, 1958)
'Squaws Along The Yukon' (No.2, 1958)
'I've Run Out of Tomorrows' (No.7, 1958)
'You're Going Back to Your Old Ways Again' (No.26, 1959)
'Anybody's Girl' (No.13, 1959)
'Total Strangers' (No.25, 1959)



In 1955, Hank Thompson saw the release of 'Songs of The Brazos Valley' (Capitol Records, 1955), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Rub-a-Dub-Dub' (written by Hank Thompson) (No.1, 1953)
'Yesterday's Girl' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray) (No.8, 1953)

Hank Thompson's 'Songs of The Brazos Valley' (Capitol Records, 1955) also included the following tracks:

'Wild Side of Life' (written by William Warren and Arlie Carter)
'When You're Lovin', You're Livin' (written by Hank Thompson)
'John Henry' (written by Hank Thompson)
'I Saw My Mother's Name' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray)
'Letter Edged in Black' (written by Roy Carter)
'Mother, The Queen of My Heart', which was written by Jimmie Rodgers (8 September 1897 - Friday 26 May 1933) and Hoyt Bryant
'You Don't Have The Nerve' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray)
'At The Rainbow's End', which was written by Bob Nolan (Monday 13 April 1908 - Monday 16 June 1980)
'Green Light' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Simple Simon, Simple Heart' (written by Hank Thompson, Billy Gray and Bud Auge)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'Songs of The Brazos Valley' (Capitol Records, 1955) included the following:

Hank Thompson (vocal, guitar)
Billy Raymond Carson and Billy Gray (guitar)
Pee Pee Whitewong (steel guitar)
Billy Stewart (bass)
Paul McGhee (drums)
Amos Hedrick, Bob White and Curly Lewis (fiddle)
Gill Baca and Donny McDaniel (piano)
Dubert Dobson (trumpet)

Hank Thompson: 'North of The Rio Grande' (Capitol Records, 1956)

In 1956, Hank Thompson saw the release of 'North of The Rio Grande' (Capitol Records, 1956), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included the following tracks:

'Baby, I Need Lovin' (written by Hank Thompson and Dorothy Thompson)
'Dusty Skies', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006)
'Where My Sweet Baby Used to Walk' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Little Rosewood Casket', which was written by Roy Acuff (Tuesday 15 September 1903 - Monday 23 November 1992)
'Big Beaver', which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 - Tuesday 13 May 1975) / this track was an instrumental
'I'd Do It Again' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Panhandle Rog', which was written by Leon McAuliffe (Wednesday 3 January 1917 - Saturday 20 August 1988) / this track was an instrumental
'New Deal of Love' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray)
'Too in Love', which was written by Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) and Ned Fairchild
'Gloria' (written by Leon Rene)
'This Train' (written by Rosetta Tharpe) / this track featured guest vocals from Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983)
'When Your Love Burns Low' (written by Johnny Hatchcock and Weldon Allard)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'North of The Rio Grande' (Capitol Records, 1956), included the following:

Billy Gray, Billy Carson and Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) (guitar)
Pee Wee Whitewing and Bobbie White (steel guitar)
Billy Stewart (bass)
Paul McGhee, Kermit Baca, Roy Harte and Jack Greenback (drums)
Amos Hedrick and Bob White (fiddle)
Gil Baca and Donald McDaniel (piano)
Dubert Dobson (trumpet)

Hank Thompson: 'New Recordings of Hank Thompson's All-Time Hits' (Capitol Records, 1956)

In 1956, Hank Thompson saw the release of 'New Recordings of Hank Thompson's All-Time Hits' (Capitol Records, 1956), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included the following tracks:

'Humpty Dumpty Heart' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Today' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Don't Flirt With Me' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Grass Looks Greener Over Yonder' (written by Hank Thompson)
'My Front Door is Open' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Standing On The Outside Looking In' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Whoa Sailor' (written by Hank Thompson and Walt McCoy)
'Tomorrow Night' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Swing Wide Your gate of Love' (written by Hank Thompson)
'I Find You Cheatin' On Me' (written by Hank Thompson)
'You Remembered Me' (written by Hank Thompson)
'I'll Be Your Sweetheart For a Day' (written by Hank Thompson)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'New Recordings of Hank Thompson's All-Time Hits' (Capitol Records, 1956) included the following:

Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) (guitar, steel guitar)
Bobbie White (steel guitar)
Billy Stewart (bass)
Paul McGhee (drums)
Amos Hedrick, Bob White and Curly Lewis (fiddle)
Donald McDaniel (piano)
Dubert Dobson (trumpet)

Hank Thompson: 'Hank' (Capitol Records, 1957)

In 1957, Hank Thompson saw the release of 'Hank' (Capitol Records, 1957), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included the following tracks:

'Hang Your Head in Shame', which was written by Fred Rose (Floyd Jenkins) (24 August 1898 - Wednesday 1 December 1954), Ed G. Nelson and Steve Nelson
'String of Pearls' (written by Eddie DeLange and Jerry Gray) / this track was an instrumental
'Gypsy' (written by Billy Reid)
'You'll Be The One' (written by Orville Proctor and Lyle Gaston)
'Don't Be That Way' (written by Mitchell Parish, Edgar Sampson and Benny Goodman) / this track was an instrumental
'Ole Napoleon' (written by Orville Proctor and Billy Gray)
'I Don't Want to Know' (written by Hank Thompson and Don Clay)
'Prosperity Special' (written by Hank Thompson) / this track was an instrumental
'Someone Can Steal You From Me' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Don't Look Now (But Your Broken Heart is Showing)', which was written by Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 - Thursday 6 September 1984)
'Across The Alley From The Alamo' (written by Joe Greene) / this track was an instrumental
'Don't Get Around Much Anymore' (written by Bob Russell and Duke Ellington)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'Hank' (Capitol Records, 1957) included the following:

Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) (guitar, steel guitar)
Bobbie White (steel guitar)
Billy Stewart (bass)
Paul McGhee (drums)
Amos Hedrick, Billy Peters and Curly Lewis (fiddle)
Donald McDaniel (piano)
Dubert Dobson (trumpet)

Hank Thompson: 'Dance Ranch' (Capitol Records, 1958)

In April 1958, Hank Thompson saw the release of 'Dance Ranch' (Capitol Records, 1958), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included the following tracks:

'Beaumont Rag' (written by Hank Thompson) / this track was an instrumental
'Headin' Down The Wrong Highway', which wass written by Ted Daffan (Saturday 21 September 1912 - Sunday 6 October 1996)
'After All The Things I've Done' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Woodchopper's Ball' (written by Joe Bishop and Woody Herman) / this track was an instrumental
'Drivin' Nails in My Coffin' (written by Jerry Irby)
'Klishama Klingo' (written by Orville Proctor and Bill Penix)
'Bartender's Polka' (written by Dale Ward and Garlach Demey) / this track was an instrumental
'Bubbles in My Beer', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006), Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 - Tuesday 13 May 1975) and Tommy Duncan (Wednesday 11 January 1911 - Tuesday 25 July 1967)
'Make Room in Your Heart (For a Memory)' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Summit Ridge Grave' (written by Artie Shaw) / this track was an instrumental
'I Wouldn't Miss It For The World' (written by Orville Proctor and Preston Sergeant)
'Lawdy, What a Gal', which was written by Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) and Cliffie Stone (Thursday 1 March 1917 - Saturday 17 January 1998)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'Dance Ranch' (Capitol Records, 1958) included the following:

Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) and Bob Bain (guitar)
Bobbie White (steel guitar)
Billy Stewart (bass)
Paul McGhee (drums)
Harold Hensley, Billy Armstrong and Billy Peters (fiddle)
Vic Davis (piano)
Dubert Dobson (trumpet)
Stamps Quartet (vocals)

Hank Thompson: 'Favorite Waltzes By Hank Thompson' (Capitol Records, 1958)

In December 1958, Hank Thompson saw the release of 'Favorite Waltzes By Hank Thompson' (Capitol Records, 1958), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included the following tracks:

'Shenandoah Waltze' (written by Clyde Moody and Chubby Wise)
'Wednesday Night Waltz' (written by Spencer Williams) / this track was an instrumental
'Signed, Sealed & Delivered' (written by Lloyd Copas and Lois Mann)
'Skater's Waltz' (written by Hank Thompson and Emile Waldteufel) / this track was an instrumental
'Warm Red Wine', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006)
'Fifty Year Ago Waltz' (written by Hank Thompson) / this track was an instrumental
'In The Valley of The Moon' (written by Charles Tobias and Joe Burke)
'La Zinda Waltz' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray) / this track was an instrumental
'Let Me Call You Sweetheart' (written by Leo Friedman and Beth Whitson)
'Anniversary Waltz' (written by Dave Franklin and Al Dubin) / this track was an instrumental
'What Will I Do Next Monday' (written by Johnny Hatchcock and Weldon Allard)
'Gold & Silver Waltz' (written by Hank Thompson and Franz Lehar) / this track was an instrumental

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'Favorites Waltzes By Hank Thompson' (Capitol Records, 1958) included the following:

Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) and Billy Gray (guitar)
Bobbie White (steel guitar)
Billy Stewart (bass)
Butch White (drums)
Harold Hensley, Bob White and Tommy Camfield (fiddle)
Vic Davis (piano)
Dubert Dobson (trumpet)
Stamps Quartet (vocals)



Kitty Wells (Saturday 30 August 1919 - Monday 16 July 2012) recorded Hank Thompson's 'I'm Tired of Pretending' and included the track on 'After Dark' (Decca Records, 1959).

Hank Thompson: 'Songs For Rounders' (Capitol Records, 1959)

In August 1959, Hank Thompson saw the release of 'Songs For Rounders' (Capitol Records, 1959), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included the following tracks:

'Three Times Seven' (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) and Cliffie Stone (Thursday 1 March 1917 - Saturday 17 January 1998)
'I'll Be a Bachelor 'Till I Die', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'Drunkard's Blues' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Teach 'Em How to Swim' (written by Orville Proctor and Bill Penix)
'Dry Bread', which was written by Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983)
'Cocaine Blues' (written by T.J. Arnall)
'Deep Elem Blues' (written by Bob Attlesey and Joe Attlesey)
'Bummin' Around' (written by Pete Graves)
'Little Blossom' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Roving Gambler' (written by Elie Seigmeister)
'Left My Gal in The Mountains', which was written by Carson Robison (4 August 1890 - Sunday 24 March 1957)
'May I Sleep in Your Barn Tonight, Mister' (traditional)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'Songs For Rounders' (Capitol Records, 1959) included the following:

Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) and Billy Gray (guitar)
Bobbie White (steel guitar)
Pete Burke (bass)
Gwin Nichols (drums)
Billy Armstrong and Bob White (fiddle)
Henry Boatman (fiddle, saxophone)
Joe Losciuto (piano)
Dubert Dobson (trumpet)
The Stamps Quartet (vocals)

Rose Maddox: 'The One Rose' (Capitol Records, 1960)

Rose Maddox (Saturday 15 August 1925 - Wednesday 15 April 1998) recorded Hank Thompson's 'Whoa Sailor' and included the track on 'The One Rose' (Capitol Records, 1960).

Hank Thompson: 'Most of All' (Capitol Records, 1960)

In March 1960, Hank Thompson saw the release of 'Most of All' (Capitol Records, 1960), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included the following tracks:

'Most of All' (written by Hank Thompson) (No.6, 1955)
'Blackwood of My Heart' (written by Hank Thompson and Lyle Gaston) (No.4, 1956)
'Tears Are Only Rain' (written by Johnny Hatchcock and Weldon Allard) (No.14, 1957)
'Wake Up, Irene' (written by Johnny Hatchcock and Weldon Allard)
'Breakin' The Rules' (written by Hank Thompson, Billy Gray and Al Blasingame)
'Squaws Along The Yukon' (written by Cam Smith (No.2, 1958)
'Green Light' (written by Hank Thompson) (No.3, 1954)
'We've Gone Too Far' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray)
'I Was The One' (written by Orville Proctor) (No.13, 1957) / this track was the flip-side of 'Rockin' in The Congo'
'Girl in The Night' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Waiting in The Lobby of Your Heart' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray)
'Rockin' in The Congo' (written by Orville Proctor) (No.13, 1957)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'Most of All' (Capitol Records, 1960) included the following:

Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) and Billy Gray (guitar)
Pee Wee Whitewing and Bobbie White (steel guitar)
Billy Stewart and Pete Burke (bass)
Paul McGhee, Jack Greenback and Gwin Nichols (drums)
Amos Hedrick, Bob White, Billy Peters and Curly Lewis (fiddle)
Gil Baca, Donald McDaniel and Joe Losciuto (piano)
Dubert Dobson (trumpet)



Kitty Wells (Saturday 30 August 1919 - Monday 16 July 2012) recorded Hank Thompson's 'Most of All' and included the track on 'Seasons of My Heart' (Decca Records, 1960).



Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) recorded Hank Thompson's 'Honky Tonk Girl' (co-written with Chuck Hardin) and included the track on 'Now There Was a Song' (Columbia Records, 1960).

Hank Thompson: 'This Broken Heart of Mine' (Capitol Records, 1960)

In November 1960, Hank Thompson saw the release of 'This Broken Heart of Mine' (Capitol Records, 1960), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included the following tracks:

'Take a Look At This Broken Heart of Mine' (written by Hank Thompson)
'She's a Girl Without Any Sweetheart' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Love Thief' (written by Hank Thompson and Mary Lou Powers)
'Soft Lips' (written by Walt McCoy)
'Give a Little, Take a Little' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Hangover Heart' (written by Hank Thompson and Pat Hagan)
'Those Things Money Can't Buy' (written by Vic McAlpin)
'Fooler a Faker' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray)
'Gypsy & The Tea Leaves' (written by Hank Thompson and Marvin Hipps)
'Rock in The Ocean' (written by Hank Thompson)
'How Do You Feel' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Cryin' in The Deep Blue Sea' (written by Hank Thompson)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'This Broken Heart of Mine' (Capitol Records, 1960) included the following:

Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) and Billy Gray (guitar)
Pee Wee Whitewing (steel guitar)
Billy Stewart (bass)
Gwin Nichols (drums)
Billy Armstrong, Billy White and Harold Hensley (fiddle)
Jimmy Pruett (piano)



Roy Drusky (Sunday 22 June 1930 - Thursday 23 September 2004) recorded Hank Thompson's 'Swing Wide Your Gate of Love' (co-written with Nathan Sydney) and included the track on 'Anymore' (Decca Records, 1961).

Hank Thompson: 'An Old Love Affair' (Capitol Records, 1961)

In July 1961, Hank Thompson saw the release of 'An Old Love Affair' (Capitol Records, 1960), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included the following tracks:

'I Dreamed of An Old Love Affair', which was written by Jimmie Davis (11 September 1899 - Sunday 5 November 2000), Charles Mitchell and Bonnie Dodd
'It's My Fault' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Just An Old Faded Photograph' (written by Rex Griffin)
'Sing Me Something Sentimental', which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982)
'I'll Be Around' (written by Alec Wilder)
'I've Convinced Everybody But Myself' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray)
'Paying Off The Interest With My Tears' (written by Hank Thompson)
'I'd Like to Tell You' (written by Hank Thompson)
'I Keep Meeting Girls Like You' (written by Hank Thompson and Bud Auge)
'Just a Little While' (written by Hank Thompson and Ray Williams)
'I Gotta Have My Baby Back', which was written by Floyd Tillman (Tuesday 8 December 1914 - Friday 22 August 2003)
'My Old Flame' (written by Hank Thompson and Lyle Gaston)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'This Broken Heart of Mine' (Capitol Records, 1960) included the following:

Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) and Billy Gray (guitar)
Bobby Garrett (steel guitar)
Al Williams (bass)
Gwin Nichols (drums)
Billy Armstrong, Billy White and Harold Hensley (fiddle)
Jimmy Pruett (piano)



In September 1961, Hank Thompson saw the release of a pioneering 'live' country music concert album, 'Hank Thompson & His Brazos Valley Boys: Live at The Golden Nugget' (Capitol Records, 1961), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I Didn't Mean To Fall in Love' (written by Hank Thompson) (No.22, 1959)
'A Six Pack To Go' (written by Hank Thompson, Johnny Lowe and Dick Hart) (No.10, 1960)
'She's Just a Whole Lot Like You' (written by Hank Thompson) (No.14, 1960)

Hank Thompson's 'Hank Thompson & The Brazos Valley Boys: Live at The Golden Nugget' (Capitol Records, 1961) also included the following tracks:

'Honky Tonk Girl' (written by Hank Thompson and Chuck Hardin)
'I Guess I'm Getting Over You' (written by Hank Thompson and Al Blasingame)
'I'll Step Aside' (written by Johnny Bond)
'Orange Blossom Special' (written by Ervin T. Rouse) / this track was an instrumental
'John Henry' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Nine Pound Hammer', which was written by Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983)
'Have I Told You Lately That I Love You', which was written by Scott Greene Wiseman (Sunday 8 November 1908 - Saturday 31 January 1981)
'Steel Guitar Rag', which was written by Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983), Cliffie Stone (Thursday 1 March 1917 - Saturday 17 January 1998) and Leon McAuliffe (Wednesday 3 January 1917 - Saturday 20 August 1988) / this track was an instrumental
'Just One Step Away' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray)
'Lost Highway', which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 - Thursday 11 September 1969)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'Hank Thompson & The Brazo Valley Boys: Live at The Golden Nugget' (Capitol Records, 1961) included the following:

Hank Thompson's Brazos Valley Boys
Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) and Billy Gray (guitar)
Bobby Garrett (steel guitar)
Billy Stewart (bass)
Gwen Nichols (drums)
Curly Lewis and Billy White (fiddle)
Dubert Dobson (trumpet)

Hank Thompson's 'Hank Thompson & His Brazos Valley Boys: Live at The Golden Nugget' (Capitol Records, 1961) was recorded 'live', in March 1961, at The Golden Nugget in Las Vegas.

The Wilburn Brothers (Doyle Wilburn & Teddy Wilburn): 'The Wonderful Wilburn Brothers' (King Records, 1961)

The Wilburn Brothers - Doyle Wilburn (Monday 7 July 1930 - Saturday 16 October 1982) and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 - Monday 24 November 2003) - recorded Hank Thompson's 'Give a Little, Take a Little' and included the track on 'The Wonderful Wilburn Brothers' (King Records, 1961).

Hank Thompson & The Brazo Valley Boys: 'The No.1 Country & Western Band' (Capitol Records, 1962)

In May 1962, Hank Thompson & His Brazos Valley Boys saw the release of 'The No.1 Country & Western Band' (Capitol Records, 1962), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included the following tracks:

'Gathering Flowers From The Hillside', which was written by Alvin Pleasant (A.P.) Delaney Carter (15 December 1891 - Monday 7 November 1960) / this track was an instrumental
'Jersey Bounce' (written by Bobby Plater, Tiny Bredshaw and Edward Johnson) / this track was an instrumental
'Westphalia Waltz' (written by Cotton Collins) / this track was an instrumental
'Weeping Willow' (written by Hank Thompson) / this track was an instrumental
'Coconut Grove' (written by Harry Owens) / this track was an instrumental
'Give The World a Smile' (written by Marshall Yandell and Otis Deaton) / this track was an instrumental
'Wildwood Flower', which was written by Alvin Pleasant (A.P.) Delaney Carter (15 December 1891 - Monday 7 November 1960) / this track was an instrumental
'Johnson Rag' (written by Jack Lawrence and Guy Hall) / this track was an instrumental
'Blue Skirt Waltz' (written by Mitchell Parish, Vaclav Blaha and Rudolf Dvorsky) / this track was an instrumental
'Red Skin Gal' (written by Hank Thompson) / this track was an instrumental
'Tuxedo Junction' (written by William Johnson, Erskine Hawkins and Buddy Feyne) / this track was an instrumental
'Under The Double Eagle' (written by J.F. Wagner) / this track was an instrumental

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'The No.1 Country & Western Band' (Capitol Records, 1962) included the following:

Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983), Billy Gray and Hank Thompson (guitar)
Pee Wee Whitewing, Bobbie White and Bobby Garrett (steel guitar)
Billy Stewart, Pete Burke and Jack Saucer (bass)
Roy Harte, Jack Greenback, Paul McGhee, Gwin Nichols and Bernard Young (drums)
Amos Hedrick, Bob White, Curly Lewis, Billy Armstrong and Harold Hensley (fiddle)
Henry Boatman (fiddle, saxophone)
Gil Baca, Donald McDaniel, Joe Losciuto and Jimmy Pruett (piano)
Dubert Dobson (trumpet)



In November 1962, Hank Thompson saw the release of the 'live' album, 'Cheyenne Frontier Days' (Capitol Records, 1962), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included the following tracks:

'Annie Over' (written by Hank Thompson, Billy Gray and Don Clay) (No.13, 1955)
'Drop Me Gently (So Many Heart Won't Break)' (written by Hank Thompson and Dorothy Thompson)
'Forgive Me' (written by Jack Yellen and Milton Ager)
'Rose City Chimes' (written by John Garrett)
'You're Walking On My Heart' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray)
'Oklahoma Hills', which was written by Woody Guthrie (Sunday 14 July 1912 - Tuesday 3 October 1967) and Jack Guthrie (Saturday 13 November 1915 - Thursday 15 January 1948) (No.7, 1961)
'Cowboy's Prayer' (written by Curley Fletcher and S.O. Baker)
'That's The Recipe For a Heartache' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray)
'Darling, What More Can I Say', which was written by Jenny Lou Carson (Wednesday 13 January 1915 - Saturday 16 December 1978) and Gene Autry (Sunday 29 September 1907 - Friday 2 October 1998)
'Hangover Tavern' (written by Hank Thompson, Johnny Lowe and Mary Lowe) (No.12, 1961)
'I'll Sign My Heart Away' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Teach Me How To Lie' (written by Hank Thompson) (No.25, 1961)
'Cincinnati Lou', which was written by Merle Travis and Shug Fisher

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'Cheyenne Frontier Days' (Capitol Records, 1962) included the following:

Hank Thompson (vocal, guitar)
Billy Gray, Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) and Roy Clark (guitar)
Bobby Garrett (steel guitar)
Billy Stewart (bass)
Bernard Young (drums)
James Belken, Francis Coleman and Billy Jack Saucer (fiddle)
Dubert Dobson (trumpet)

Hank Thompson's 'Cheyenne Frontier Days' (Capitol Records, 1962) was recorded 'live', in July 1962, at Cheyenne Frontier Days, in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

Hank Thompson: 'The Best of Hank Thompson' (Capitol Records, 1963)

In March 1963, Hank Thompson saw the release of 'The Best of Hank Thompson' (Capitol Records, 1963), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included the following tracks:

'Humpty Dumpty Heart' (written by Hank Thompson) (No.2, 1948)
'The Wild Side of Life' (written by William Warren and Arlie Carter) (No.1, 1952) / this track also reached No.27 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1952
'A Six Pack To Go' (written by Hank Thompson, Johnny Lowe and Dick Hart) (No.10, 1960)
'Oklahoma Hills', which was written by Woody Guthrie (Sunday 14 July 1912 - Tuesday 3 October 1967) and Jack Guthrie (Saturday 13 November 1915 - Thursday 15 January 1948) (No.7, 1961)
'Waiting in The Lobby of Your Heart' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray) (No.3, 1952)
'Wake Up, Irene' (written by Johnny Hatchcock and Weldon Allard) (No.1, 1953)
'Squaws Along The Yukon' (written by Cam Smith) (No.2, 1958)
'Hangover Tavern' (written by Hank Thompson, Johnny Lowe and Mary Lowe) (No.12, 1962)
'Rub-a-Dub-Dub' (written by Hank Thompson) (No.1, 1953)
'Green Light' (written by Hank Thompson) (No.7, 1948)
'Blackboard of My Heart' (written by Hank Thompson and Lyle Gaston) (No.4, 1956)
'Whoa Sailor' (written by Hank Thompson and Walt McCoy) (No.6, 1949)



In August 1963, Hank Thompson saw the release of a 'live' album, 'Hank Thompson & His Brazos Valley Boys at The State Fair of Texas' (Capitol Records, 1963), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included the following tracks:

'Deep in The Heart of Texas' (written by June Hershey and Don Swander)
'My Heart is a Playground' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray)
'Charmaine' (written by Erno Rapee and Lew Pollack)
'How Many Teardrops Will It Take' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray)
'New Wears Off Too Fast' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray)
'Rub-a-Dub-Dub' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Beautiful Texas' (written by Lee O'Daniel)
'Will We Start It All Over Again' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray)
'River Road Two-Step', which was written by Pee Wee King (Wednesday 18 February 1914 - Tuesday 7 March 2000) and Redd Stewart (Sunday 27 May 1923 - Saturday 2 August 2003)
'I Cast a Lonesome Shadow' (written by Hank Thompson and Lynn Russwurm)
'Simple Simon, Simple Heart' (written by Hank Thompson, Billy Gray and Bud Auge)
'There's a Little Bit of Everything in Texas', which was written by Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 - Thursday 6 September 1984)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'Hank Thompson & His Brazos Valley Boys at The State Fair of Texas' (Capitol Records, 1963) included the following:

Hank Thompson (vocal, guitar)
Billy Gray and Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) (guitar)
Bobby Garrett (steel guitar)
Billy Stewart (bass)
Bernard Young (drums)
James Belken, Rodd Bristol and Billy Saucer (fiddle)
Dubert Dobson (trumpet)

Hank Thompson's 'Hank Thompson & His Brazos Valley Boys at The State Fair of Texas' (Capitol Records, 1963) was recorded 'live', in October 1962, at State Fair of Texas in Dallas, Texas.

Hank Thompson: 'Golden Country Hits' (Capitol Records, 1964)

In April 1964, Hank Thompson saw the release of 'Golden Country Hits' (Capitol Records, 1964), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included the following tracks:

'San Antonio Rose', which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 - Tuesday 13 May 1975)
'Pick Me Up On Your Way Down', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'The Wild Side of Life' (written by William Warren and Arlie Carter) (No.1, 1952) / this track also reached No.27 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1952
'Shotgun Boogie', which was written by Tennessee Ernie Ford (Thursday 13 February 1919 - Thursday 17 October 1991)
'Back Street Affair' (written by Billy Wallace and Jimmy Rule)
'Detour' (written by Paul Westmoreland)
'Wabash Cannonball', which was written by Alvin Pleasant (A.P.) Delaney Carter (15 December 1891 - Monday 7 November 1960)
'You Nearly Lose Your Mind', which was written by Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 - Thursday 6 September 1984)
'Yesterday's Girl' (written by Hank Thompson and Billy Gray) (No.8, 1953)
'I'll Keep On Loving You', which was written by Floyd Tillman (xTuesday 8 December 1914 - Friday 22 August 2003)
'I Don't Hurt Anymore', which was written by Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 - Monday 16 March 2015) and Jack Rollins
'Beer Barrel Polka' (written by Lew Brown, Wladimir Timm and Jaromir Vejvoda) / this track was an instrumental

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'Golden Country Hits' (Capitol Records, 1964) included the following:

Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983) and Billy Gray (guitar)
Bobby Garrett (steel guitar)
Billy Stewart (bass)
Bernard Young (drums)
Tommy Camfield, Jimmy Belken and Curtis Potter () (fiddle)
Jimmy Pruett (piano)

Hank Thompson's 'Golden Country Hits' (Capitol Records, 1964) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1964.



In October 1964, Hank Thompson saw the release of 'It's Christmas Time' (Capitol Records, 1964), which was produced by Ken Nelson, and included the following tracks:

'It's Christmas Time', which was written by Charlie Louvin () and Ira Louvin ()
'White Christmas', which was written by Irving Berlin ()
'It's Christmas Every Day in Alaska' (written by Hank Thompson)
'I'd Like To Have An Elephant For Christmas' (written by Hank Thompson)
'Mr. & Mrs. Christmas' (written by Hank Thompson and Lyle Gaston)
'Blue Christmas' (written by Bill Hayes and Jay Johnson)
'Here Comes Santa Claus', which was written by Gene Autry () and Oakley Haldeman
'Silver Bells', which was written by Jay Livingston () and Ray Evans ()
'Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer' (written by Johnny Marks)
'Little Christmas Angel' (written by Hank Thompson, Johnny Hatchcock and Weldon Allard)
'santa Claus is Coming to Town' (written by Haven Gillespie and Fred J. Coots)
'Gonna Wrap Up Heart in Ribbons' (written by Hank Thompson, Johnny Hatchcock and Weldon Allard)
'We Wish You A Merry Christmas' (traditional)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hank Thompson's 'It's Christmas Time' (Capitol Records, 1964) included the following:

Hank Thompson (vocal, guitar)
Joe Maphis () and Floyd Thompson (guitar)
Bert Rivera (steel guitar)
Red Wooten (bass)
Hugo Chambers (drums)
Billy Armstrong, Harold Hensley and Curly Lewis (fiddle)
Jimmy Pruett (piano)











A true groundbreaker, Hank Thompson was one of the first to transport his band in a bus, although he himself normally flew his own private plane.

Along with Leon McAuliffe (Wednesday 3 January 1917 - Saturday 20 August 1988), Hank Thompson was one of the first in country music to do so.

Hank Thompson cut his last sides for Capitol Records in 1964, then moved on to moderately successful affiliations with Warner Bros. Records (1965 - 1966) and Dot / MCA Records (1967 - 1979) where, minus The Brazos Valley Boys and dependent upon studio pickers, the emphasis shifted away from Western Swing and toward the reigning Nashville Sound.



Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) recorded Hank Thompson's 'Honky Tonk Girl' (co-written with Chuck Hardin) and included the track on 'More of Old Golden Throat' (CBS Records, 1969).

Mel Tillis: 'Love Revival' (MCA Records, 1976)

Mel Tillis recorded Hank Thompson's 'Green Light' and included the track on 'Love Revival' (MCA Records, 1976).



Seldom Scene recorded Hank Thompson's 'Girl in The Night' and included the track on 'Act Four' (Sugar Hill Records, 1978).

In the early 1980s, Hank Thompson resurfaced on manager Jim Halsey's label out of Tulsa, Churchill Records.

It was about this time when Hank Thompson moved back to Texas in the Dallas-Fort Worth area and, for years after Jim Halsey's retirement, handled his own more limited bookings through Thompson Enterprises.



Barry Berrier recorded Hank Thompson's 'Honky Tonk Girl' (co-written with Chuck Harding) and included the track on 'First Time With Feeling' (Pinecastle Records, 1996).

It was also in 1996 when Germany's Bear Family Records re-issued Hank Thompson's complete early catalogue (1946 - 1964), including all of Globe Records, Blue Bonnet Records and Capitol Records cuts, including a few never previously issued, as Hank Thompson & His Brazos Valley Boys.



In the 1990s, Hank Thompson returned to the recording studios for Curb Records and was honoured by one of the better multi-artist tribute albums, 'Hank Thompson & Friends' (Curb Records, 1997).



Gary Buck (Thursday 21 March 1940 - Tuesday 14 October 2003) recorded Hank Thompson's 'Green Light' and included the track on 'Western Swing & Country' (Broadland International Records, 1998).



Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) recorded Hank Thompson's 'I'll Sign My Heart Away' and included the track on 'Roots, Volume 1' (ANTI-Epitaph Records, 2001).

In August 2007, Capitol Records released eighteen of Hank Thompson's classic albums as digital downloads.

Having performed on seven continents, Hank Thompson continued to record and tour into the 21st century, earning him the distinction of a seven-decade career.  Hank Thompson completed work on his autobiography, 'My Side of Life', with writer Warren Kice.

From the 1950s through to the mid-1970s, Hank Thompson enjoyed an enviable list of hit singles on Capitol Records, including the following:

'The Wild Side Of Life' (No.1, 1952) / this track also reached No.27 on the Billboard pop music singles chart
'Wake Up Irene' (No.1, 1953)
'A Six Pack To Go' (No.10, 1960)
'Most of All' (No.6, 1960)
'Blackboard of My Heart' (No.4, 1960)
'Tears Are Only Rain' (No.14, 1960)
'Squaws Along The Yukon' (No.2, 1960)
'I Was The First One' (No.13, 1960)
'Rockin' in The Congo' (No.13, 1960)
'I Didn't Mean to Fall in Love' (No.22, 1961)
'She's Just a Whole Lot Like You' (No.14/99, 1961)
'Six Packs To Go' (No.10, 1961)
'Wildwood Flower' (No.5, 1962)
'Annie Over' (No.13, 1962)
'Oklahoma Hills' (No.7, 1962)
'Hangover Tavern' (No.12, 1962)
'Teach Me How To Lie' (No.25, 1962)
'Yesterday's Girl' (No.8, 1964)
'How Do You Hold a Memory' (No.11, 1965)
'Don't Take it Out on Me' (No.5, 1965)
'Breakin' in Another Heart' (No.7, 1965)
'Then I'll Start Believing in You' (No.42, 1965)
'I Wasn't Even in The Running' (No.23, 1965)
'You're Going Back to Your Old Ways Again' (No.26, 1965)
'Twice As Much' (No.1, 1965)
'Total Strangers' (No.25, 1965)
'Anybody's Girl' (No.13, 1966)
'I'm Not Mad, Just Hurt' (No.14, 1966)
'Where is The Circus' (No.15, 1967)
'Green Light' (No.7, 1967)
'I've Run Out of Tomorrows' (No.7, 1968)
'Too in Love' (No.22, 1968)
'On Tap, in The Can or in The Bottle' (No.7, 1968)
'He's Got a Way With Women' (No.16, 1968)
'Smoky The Bar' (No.5, 1969)
'I See Them Everywhere' (No.47, 1969)
'Oklahoma Home Brew' (No.60, 1969)
'Next Time I Fall in Love (I Won't)' (No.15, 1971)
'Glow Worm' (No.52, 1972)
'I've Come Awful Close' (1971)
'Cab Driver' (No. 16, 1972)
'The Older The Violin, The Sweeter The Tune' (No.8, 1974)
'Who Left The Door to Heaven Open?' (No.10, 1974)
'Mama Don't Allow' (No.29, 1974)

Hank Thompson's 'The Wild Side of Life', which contained the memorable line 'I didn't know God made honky tonk angels', inspired songwriter Jimmy D. Miller to write the answer song 'It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels'.



'It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels' became the first hit single for pioneer female country vocalist Kitty Wells (Saturday 30 August 1919 - Monday 16 July 2012); she included the track on 'Country Hit Parade' (Decca Records, 1956).

Hank Thompson quit Capitol Records in 1965, moving to Warner Bros. Records in 1966 and then to Dot Records in 1968.

In the intervening years, Hank Thompson & His Brazos Valley Boys continued to play dates worldwide, and logged occasional hits on record labels including ABC Records, MCA Records and Churchill Records.

In the 1970s, Hank Thompson's music reached a whole different group of fans when British rock band Status Quo had a world-wide Top 10 hit single with their version of 'Wild Side of Life'.



Status Quo recorded 'The Wild Side of Life' and enjoyed a Top 10 pop music hit single with the track in 1976; the track, however, was not included on any Status Quo album until the release of '12 Gold Bars, Volume 1' (Vertigo Records, 1980), a compilation album, which was released in 1980.

Hank Thompson made a significant contribution to country music, fusing honky tonk and Western Swing, and his talents were justly rewarded when he was inducted into The Country Music Hall of Fame in 1989.

In 1997, Hank Thompson was inducted into The Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame.



It was also in 1997 when Hank Thompson recorded a new album for Curb Records, 'Hank Thompson & Friends' (Curb Records, 1997), which included guest appearances from Brooks & Dunn (Kix Brooks and Ronnie Dunn), Vince Gill, Joe Diffie, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Lyle Lovett.



In 2000, Hank Thompson saw the release of a new album; 'Seven Decades' (Hightone Records, 2000) was released on Hightone Records and the material was closer in sound to his older Capitol Records material.

On Thursday 1 November 2007, Hank Thompson cancelled the remainder of his 2007 'Sunset Tour' and retired from singing, two days after being released from a Texas hospital and diagnosed with aggressive lung cancer.

Hank Thompson went into hospice care at his home in Keller, Texas; Hank Thompson's last performance was on Monday 8 October 2007 in Waco, Texas, his birthplace.

Hank Thompson died a month later, on Tuesday 6 November 2007, from lung cancer.

According to his spokesman, Tracy Pitcox, President of Heart of Texas Records, Hank Thompson requested that no funeral be held.


On Wednesday 14 November 2007, a 'celebration of life', which was open to both fans and friends, took place at Billy Bob's Texas, a Fort Worth, Texas country music nightclub which billed itself as 'The World's Largest Honky Tonk'.



Hank Thompson
Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007

• Visit Hank Thompson's Official Site at hankthompson.com

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