• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Webster PR



Webster Public Relations
, PO Box 23015, Nashville, TN 37202

Contact Scott Adkins
Telephone 615-777-6995



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2006, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Marty Stuart, which he submitted to this site on Monday 30 January 2006.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Marty Stuart who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Marty Stuart
This quote was submitted on Monday 30 January 2006.

'Gene Watson is as authentic as Texas rain, and is a true master of the country song'.

Thank you, Marty Stuart, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Marty Stuart...



Marty Stuart was born John Marty Stuart in Philadelphia, Mississippi on Tuesday 30 September 1958 and has become renowned for both his traditional style and eclectic merging of rockabilly, honky tonk and traditional country music.

Marty Stuart is also known for wearing rhinestone-studded Nudie suits onstage, but after the passing of his friend and former father-in-law Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003), he now wears black in his honour.

Marty Stuart has, since an early age, been obsessed with country music; he was so obsessed, in fact, that he taught himself how to play the guitar and mandolin.  When he was twelve years old, Marty Stuart started performing with the bluegrass group The Sullivans.

Marty Stuart later met Lester Flatt band-member Roland White who invited Marty to play with him and The Nashville Grass at the Labor Day gig in Delaware in 1972.  After this, Roland White asked him to join the band permanently and Marty Stuart accepted.

Marty Stuart stayed with Lester Flatt (Friday 19 June 1914 - Friday 11 May 1979) up until Lester Flatt broke up the band in 1978 due to Lester Flatt's failing health.

On Friday 11 May 1979, Lester Flatt passed away, so Marty Stuart pushed forward and worked with fiddler Vassar Clements (Wednesday 25 April 1928 - Tuesday 16 August 2005).

Marty Stuart also worked with guitarist Doc Watson (Saturday 3 March 1923 - Tuesday 29 May 2012).

In 1980, Marty Start joined Johnny Cash's backing band.  The previous year (1979), Marty Stuart had seen the release of his first solo album, 'With a Little Help From My Friends' (Ridge Runner Records, 1979), which was released on Ridge Runner Records.



Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) recorded Marty Stuart's 'Hey Hey Train' and included the track on 'Baron' (Columbia Records, 1981).



In 1982, Marty Stuart saw the release of his second album, 'Busy Bee Cafe' (Sugar Hill Records, 1982), which was released on Sugar Hill Records. Both albums, 'With a Little Help From My Friends' (Ridge Runner Records, 1979) and 'Busy Bee Cafe' (Sugar Hill Records, 1982), were strongly bluegrass albums, but they failed to garner any success for Marty Stuart.

Marty Stuart's 'Busy Bee Cafe' (Sugar Hill Records, 1982) paid tribute to the people with whom Marty Stuart honed his craft as a musician; with songs written by Lester Flatt (Friday 19 June 1914 - Friday 11 May 1979), Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 - Wednesday 28 March 2012), Bill Monroe (Wednesday 13 September 1911 - Monday 9 September 1996) and Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003).

Marty Stuart's 'Busy Bee Cafe' (Sugar Hill Records, 1982) included the following tracks:

'One More Ride', which was written by Bob Nolan (Monday 13 April 1908 - Monday 16 June 1980) / this track was a duet with Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)
'Blue Railroad Train', which was written by Lionel Alton Delmore (Tuesday 19 March 1940 - Monday 20 May 2002)
'I Don't Love Nobody' (traditional) / arranged by Lester Flatt (Friday 19 June 1914 - Friday 11 May 1979)
'Watson's Blues', which was written by Bill Monroe (Wednesday 13 September 1911 - Monday 9 September 1996)
'Busy Bee Cafe' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Down The Road', which was written by Lester Flatt (Friday 19 June 1914 - Friday 11 May 1979) and Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 - Wednesday 28 March 2012)
'Hey Porter', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) / this track was a duet with Johnny Cash
'Boogie For Clarence' (written by Marty Stuart) / this track was a tribute to country music guitar icon Clarence White (Wednesday 7 June 1944 - Saturday 14 July 1973)
'Get in Line, Brother', which was written by Lester Flatt (Friday 19 June 1914 - Friday 11 May 1979) / this track was a duet wth Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)
'Soldier's Joy' (traditional) arranged by M. Christian
'Long Train Gone' (written by Marty Stuart)

In 1983, Marty Stuart married Cindy Cash, daughter of Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003).

In 1985, Marty Stuart left Johnny Cash's band in order to pursue a solo country music career.



In 1986, Marty Stuart landed a recording contract with Columbia Records and saw the release, on Saturday 9 August 1986, of a self-titled album, 'Marty Stuart' (Columbia Records, 1986).

Marty Stuart's 'Marty Stuart' (Columbia Records, 1986) was his only album for Columbia Records; he did record a second album for Columbia Records, 'Let There Be Country', but it was not released until 1992.

Marty Stuart's 'Marty Stuart' (Columbia Records, 1986) included four tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Arlene' (written by Curtis Allen) (No.19, 1985)
'Honky Tonker' (written by Steve Forbert) (No.59, 1986)
'All Because of You' (written by Steve Forbert) (No.39, 1986)
'Do You Really Want My Lovin', which was written by Marty Stuart and Steve Goodman (Sunday 25 July 1948 - Thursday 20 September 1984) (No.59, 1986)

Marty Stuart's 'Marty Stuart' (Columbia Records, 1986) also included the following tracks:

'The Shape I'm In' (written by Robbie Robertson)
'Hometown Heroes' (written by David Mallett)
'Maria (love to see you again)' (written by Marty Stuart and Curtis Allen)
'Heart of Stone' (written by Marty Stuart and Curtis Allen)
'Beyond The Great Divide' (written by J.C. Crowley and Jack Wesley Routh)

Personnel involved in the recording of Marty Stuart's 'Marty Stuart' (Columbia Records, 1986) included the following:

Marty Stuart (vocals, rhythm guitar)
Curtis Allen, Kathie Baillie, Alan LeBoeuf and Colleen Peterson (Tuesday 14 November 1950 - Wednesday 9 October 1996) (backing and harmony vocals)
Jody Maphis (harmony vocals, acoustic guitar)
Duane Eddy, Vince Gill, Biff Watson and Reggie Young (lead and rhythm guitars)
Mark O'Connor (fiddle)
Flip Anderson (piano)
Shane Keister (synthesizer)
Bobby Whitlock (organ)
Jim Horn (saxophone)
Paco Shipp (harmonica)
T. Michael Coleman and Ralph Ezell (bass)
W.S. Holland, David Humphreys and Milton Sledge (drums)
Kenny Malone (percussion)

Marty Stuart's 'Marty Stuart' (Columbia Records, 1986) reached No.34 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1986.



In 1987, Marty Stuart was a special vocal guest, along with Butch Baker, Steve Earle, Highway 101, Dana McVicker, Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989) and T. Graham Brown, on the track 'Young Country', which was included on Hank Williams Junior's 'Born to Boogie' (Warner Bros. Records, 1987).

In 1988, Marty Stuart's marriage to Cindy Cash ended in divorce, which led to Marty returning home to Mississippi.

Roland White invited Marty Stuart to rejoin his band as their fiddle player and this helped Marty Stuart build his confidence to try again at becoming a singer in his own right.

  

Marty Stuart's 'Let There Be Country' (Columbia Records, 1992) was Marty's seventh studio album and was released in 1992.  It was actually the fourth album Marty Stuart recorded, cut between 'Marty Stuart' (Columbia Records, 1986) and 'Hillbilly Rock' (MCA Nashville Records, 1989).



Marty Stuart's 'Let There Be Country' (Columbia Records, 1992) was recorded in 1988, but Columbia Records refused to release it.

When Marty Stuart later gained a larger following and became increasingly popular after the releases of 'Hillbilly Rock' (MCA Nashville Records, 1989) and 'Tempted' (MCA Nashville Records, 1991) under MCA Records, Columbia Records then saw fit to release the album in 1992.

In 1989, Marty Stuart returned to Nashville where he landed a deal with MCA Nashville Records.



On Tuesday 17 October 1989, Marty Stuart saw the release of 'Hillbilly Rock' (MCA Nashville Records, 1989), which was produced by Richard Bennett and Tony Brown, and included four tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Cry! Cry! Cry!', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) (No.32, 1989)
'Don't Leave Her Lonely Too Long' (written by Marty Stuart and Kostas) (No.42, 1990)
'Hillbilly Rock' (written by Paul Kennerley) (No.8, 1990)
'Western Girls' (written by Paul Kennerley and Marty Stuart) (No.20, 1990)

Marty Stuart's 'Hillbilly Rock' (MCA Nashville Records, 1989) also included the following tracks:

'The Coal Mine Blues' (written by Marty Stuart)
'The Wild One', which was written by Tillman Franks (Wednesday 29 September 1920 - Thursday 26 October 2006) and Merle Kilgore (Thursday 9 August 1934 - Sunday 6 February 2005)
'Me & Billy The Kid' (written by Joe Ely)
'When The Sun Goes Down' (written by Marty Stuart and Mark Collie)
'Easy To Love (hard to hold)' (written by Marty Stuart and Paul Kennerley)
'Since I Don't Have You' (written by Marty Stuart and Mark Collie)

Personnel involved in the recording of Marty Stuart's 'Hillbilly Rock' (MCA Nashville Records, 1989) included the following:

Richard Bennett (electric guitar, rhythm guitar, 6 string bass)
Paul Franklin and Ralph Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 - Sunday 20 March 2011) (steel guitar)
Glen D. Hardin (piano)
Paul Kennerley, Kostas and Harry Stinson (background vocals)
Joey Miskulin (concertina)
Leland Sklar (bass guitar)
Marty Stuart (vocals, electric guitar, mandolin, rhythm guitar)
Billy Thomas (drums, background vocals)

Marty Stuart's 'Hillbilly Rock' (MCA Nashville Records, 1989) reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1989.



On Tuesday 22 January 1991, Marty Stuart saw the release of 'Tempted' (MCA Nashville Records, 1991), which was produced by Richard Bennet and Tony Brown, and included four tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Little Things' (written by Marty Stuart and Paul Kennerley) (No.8, 1991)
'Til I Found You' (written by Hank DeVito and Paul Kennerley) (No.12, 1991)
'Tempted' (written by Marty Stuart and Paul Kennerley) (No.5, 1991)
'Burn Me Down' (written by Eddie Miller) No.7, 1992)

Marty Stuart's 'Tempted' (MCA Nashville Records, 1991) also included the following tracks:

'I'm Blue, I'm Lonesome', which was written by Bill Monroe (Wednesday 13 September 1911 - Monday 9 September 1996) and Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'Paint The Town Tonight' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Blue Train', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) and Billy Smith
'Half a Heart' (written by Marty Stuart and Kostas)
'I Want a Woman' (written by Marty Stuart and Kostas)
'Get Back to The Country' (written by Neil Young)

Personnel involved in the recording of Marty Stuart's 'Tempted' (MCA Nashville Records, 1991) included the following:

Sam Bacco (percussion, timpani)
Amanda Bennett (tambourine, hand claps)
Richard Bennett (acoustic guitar, electric guitar, mandolin, 6-string bass, mandolin-guitarophone)
Bill Cuomo (Hammond organ)
Stuart Duncan and Mark O'Connor (fiddle)
Dave Durocher and Harry Stinson (drums)
Ray Flacke (electric guitar)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Ray Herndon, Paul Kennerley, Kostas, Alan O'Bryant and Billy Thomas (background vocals)
John Barlow Jarvis (keyboards)
Larry Marrs (bass guitar, background vocals)
Les & Janice Reynolds (hand claps)
Marty Stuart (vocals, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, mandolin)
Glenn Worf (bass guitar)

Marty Stuart's 'Tempted' (MCA Nashville Records, 1991) reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1991.



Travis Tritt recorded Marty Stuart's 'The Whiskey Ain't Working', which was co-written with Ronny Scaife (1947 - Wednesday 3 November 2010), and included the track on 'It's All About to Change' (1991); the track, which was a duet with Marty Stuart, reached No.2 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1991.

Marty Stuart played electric guitar and performed a guitar solo on Travis Tritt's recording of 'The Whiskey Ain't Working', which was written by Marty Stuart and Ronny Scaife (1947 - Wednesday 3 November 2010).



Mark Collie recorded Marty Stuart's 'When The Sun Goes Down' (co-written with Mark Collie) and included the track on 'Born & Raised in Black & White' (MCA Records, 1991).



George Strait recorded Marty Stuart's 'You're Right, I'm Wrong' (co-written with Wayne Perry) and included the track on 'Holding My Own' (MCA Records, 1992).

  

Marty Stuart's 'Let There Be Country' (Columbia Records, 1992) was Marty's seventh studio album and was released in 1992.  It was actually the fourth album Marty Stuart recorded, cut between 'Marty Stuart' (Columbia Records, 1986) and 'Hillbilly Rock' (MCA Nashville Records, 1989).



Marty Stuart's 'Let There Be Country' (Columbia Records, 1992) was recorded in 1988, but Columbia Records refused to release it.

When Marty Stuart later gained a larger following and became increasingly popular after the releases of 'Hillbilly Rock' (MCA Nashville Records, 1989) and 'Tempted' (MCA Nashville Records, 1991) under MCA Records, Columbia Records then saw fit to release the album in 1992.

Marty Stuart's 'Let There Be Country' (Columbia Records, 1992) included the following tracks:

'Let There Be Country' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Mirrors Don't Lie', which was written by Merle Haggard) (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'Matches', which was written by Keith Stegall and Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011)
'Last Train Done Gone Down' (written by Peter Rowan)
'Be Careful Who You Love (Arthur's Song)', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'Old Hat' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Get Down on Your Knees & Pray', which was written by Bill Monroe (Wednesday 13 September 1911 - Monday 9 September 1996)
'I'm a One Woman Man', which was written by Tillman Franks (Wednesday 29 September 1920 - Thursday 26 October 2006) and Johnny Horton (Thursday 30 April 1925 - Saturday 5 November 1960)
'Stone Blind', which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004)
'I'll Love You Forever (If I Want To)', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004)



On Tuesday 7 July 1992, Marty Stuart saw the release of 'This One's Gonna Hurt You' (MCA Nashville Records, 1992), which was produced by Richard Bennett and Tony Brown, which included four tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'This One's Gonna Hurt You (For a Long, Long Time)' (written by Marty Stuart) (No.7, 1992) / this track was a duet with Travis Tritt
'Now That's Country' (written by Marty Stuart) (No.18, 1992)
'High on a Mountain Top' (written by Alex Campbell and Ola Belle Reed) (No.24, 1993)
'Hey Baby' (written by Marty Stuart and Paul Kennerley) (No.38, 1993)

Marty Stuart's 'This One's Gonna Hurt You' (MCA Nashville Records, 1992) also included the following tracks:

'Me, Hank & Jumpin' Jack Flash' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Down Home' (written by Marty Stuart and Paul Kennerley)
'Just Between You & Me', which was written by Cowboy Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013)
'Doin' My Time' (written by Jimmie Skinner) / this track was a duet with Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)
'The King of Dixie' (written by Marty Stuart and Allen Shamblin)
'Honky Tonk Crowd' (written by Marty Stuart)

Marty Stuart's 'This One's Gonna Hurt You' (MCA Nashville Records, 1992) reached No.12 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1992 and became Marty Stuart's first 'Gold' album.



Emmylou Harris & The Nash Ramblers recorded Marty Stuart's 'Get Up John', which was co-written with Bill Monroe (Wednesday 13 September 1911 - Monday 9 September 1996) and Jerry Sullivan, and included the track on 'Live at The Ryman’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1992); the album was recorded at the one-time home of The Grand Ole Opry, Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, between Tuesday 30 April 1991 and Thursday 2 May 1991.

The Nash Ramblers included the following musicians:

Sam Bush (fiddle, mandolin and vocals)
Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (double bass and vocals)
Larry Atamanuik (drums)
Al Perkins (banjo, guitar, resonator guitar and vocals)
John Randall Stewart (guitar, mandolin and vocals)



Wynonna recorded Marty Stuart's 'A Little Bit of Love (goes a long, long way)' (co-written with Kostas) and included the track on 'Wynonna' (MCA / Curb Records, 1992).



Travis Tritt recorded Marty Stuart's 'A Hundred Years from Now' and included the track on 'T-R-O-U-B-L-E' (Warner Bros. Records, 1992).



In 1993, Mark O'Connor saw the release of 'Heroes' (Warner Bros. Records, 1993), which was an album on which Mark O'Connor played duets alongside his childhood violin heroes, including Jean-Luc Ponty, Benny Thomasson, Byron Berline, Stéphane Grappelli, Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015), and others.

Mark O'Connor's 'Heroes' (Warner Bros. Records, 1993) crossed a variety of musical genres and included recordings made between 1976 and 1992.

One of the tracks included on Mark O'Connor's 'Heroes' (Warner Bros. Records, 1993) was 'The Devil Comes Back to Georgia' (written by Charlie Daniels), which featured Charlie Daniels (violin), Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) (vocals), Marty Stuart (vocals) and Travis Tritt (vocals).



On Tuesday 15 March 1994, Marty Stuart saw the release of 'Love & Luck' (MCA Nashville Records, 1994), which was produced by Tony Brown and Marty Stuart, and included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Kiss Me, I'm Gone' (written by Marty Stuart and Bob DiPiero) (No.26, 1994)
'Love & Luck' (written by Marty Stuart and Bob DiPiero) (No.54, 1994)
'That's What Love's About' (written by Marty Stuart) (No.68, 1994)

Marty Stuart's 'Love & Luck' (MCA Nashville Records, 1994) also included the following tracks:

'Wheels', which was written by Gram Parsons (Tuesday 5 November 1946 - Wednesday 19 September 1973) and Chris Hillman
'I Ain't Giving Up on Love', which was written by Marty Stuart and Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'Marty Stuart Visits The Moon' (instrumental) (written by Marty Stuart)
'Oh, What a Silent Night', which was written by Marty Stuart and Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'Shake Your Hips' (written by James Moore and Slim Harpo)
'You Can Walk All Over Me' (written by Marty Stuart and Wayne Perry)
'That's When You'll Know It's Over' (written by Butch Carr and Russ Zavitson)
'If I Give My Soul' (written by Billy Joe Shaver)

Personnel involved in the recording of Marty Stuart's 'Love & Luck' (MCA Nashville Records, 1994), included the following:

Musicians (all tracks except 'Love & Luck')
Mike Brignardello (bass guitar)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle, mandolin)
Béla Fleck (banjo)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
John Barlow Jarvis (piano, keyboards)
John Jorgenson (electric guitar, acoustic guitar)
Steve Nathan (synthesizer, keyboards)
Randy Scruggs (acoustic guitar, electric guitar, mandolin)
Marty Stuart (vocals, electric guitar, acoustic guitar, mandolin)
Lonnie Wilson (drums)

Musicians on 'Love & Luck'
Eddie Bayers
(drums)
Vince Gill, Liana Manis, Larry Marrs, Ricky Skaggs and Harry Stinson (background vocals)
Brent Mason (mandolin)
Michael Rhodes (bass guitar)

Marty Stuart's 'Love & Luck' (MCA Nashville Records, 1994) reached No.28 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1994.



Rick Trevino recorded Marty Stuart's 'Honky Tonk Crowd' and included the track on 'Rick Trevino' (Columbia Records, 1994); the track reached No.35 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1994.



Rick Trevino recorded Marty Stuart's 'It Only Hurts When I Laugh' (co-written with Kostas) and included the track on 'Rick Trevino' (Columbia Records, 1994).



Travis Tritt recorded Marty Stuart's 'Hard Times & Misery' and included the track on 'Ten Feet Tall & Bulletproof' (Warner Bros. Records, 1994).



In 1995, Marty Stuart's record sales began to slip and led to MCA Records releasing 'The Marty Party Hit Pack' (MCA Records, 1995), a compilation album, which included the following tracks:

'If I Ain't Got You' (written by Trey Bruce and Craig Wiseman) (No.46, 1995)
'The Whiskey Ain't Workin', which was written by Ronny Scaife (1947 - Wednesday 3 November 2010) and Marty Stuart (No.2, 1991) / this track featured guest vocals from Travis Tritt
'Hillbilly Rock' (written by Paul Kennerley) (No.8, 1990)
'Now That's Country' (written by Marty Stuart) (No.18, 1992)
'Burn Me Down' (written by Eddie Miller and Don Sessions) (No.7, 1992)
'The Likes of Me', which was written by Larry Boone, Rick Bowles and Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Monday 1 September 2008) (No.68, 1995)
'Tempted' (written by Paul Kennerley and Marty Stuart) (No.5, 1991)
'This One's Gonna Hurt You (For a Long, Long Time)' (written by Marty Stuart) (No.7, 1992) / this track featured Travis Tritt
'Little Things' (written by Jett Beres, Ken Block, Andrew Copeland, Paul Kennerley, Ryan Newell, Marty Stuart and Mark Trojanowski) (No.8, 1991)
'The Weight' (written by Robbie Robertson) / this track featured guest vocals from The Staple Singers
'Western Girls' (written by Paul Kennerley and Marty Stuart) (No.20, 1990) / this track featured guest vocals from The Staple Singers
'Don't Be Cruel (To a Heart That's True)', which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002) and Elvis Presley (Tuesday 8 January 1935 - Tuesday 16 August 1977) / this track featured guest vocals from The Staple Singers



Wade Hayes recorded Marty Stuart's 'I Still Do' (co-written with Chick Rains) and included the track on 'On a Good Night' (Columbia Records, 1996).



Travis Tritt recorded Marty Stuart's 'Draggin' My Heart Around' (co-written with Paul Kennerley) and included the track on 'The Restless Kind' (Warner Bros. Records, 1996).



Travis Tritt recorded Marty Stuart's 'Sack Full of Stones' (co-written with Travis Tritt) and included the track on 'The Restless Kind' (Warner Bros. Records, 1996).



On Tuesday 18 June 1996, Marty Stuart saw the release of 'Honky Tonkin's What I Do Best' (MCA Nashville Records, 1996), which was produced by Tony Brown and Justin Niebank, and included four tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Honky Tonkin's What I Do Best' (written by Marty Stuart) (No.23, 1996) / this track was a duet with Travis Tritt
'Thanks to You' (written by Marty Stuart and Gary Nicholson) (No.50, 1996)
'You Can't Stop Love' (written by Marty Stuart and Kostas) (No.26, 1997)
'Sweet Love', which was written by Del Shannon (Sunday 30 December 1934 - Thursday 8 February 1990) / this track was released as a single in 1997, but it did not chart

Marty Stuart's 'Honky Tonkin's What I Do Best' (MCA Nashville Records, 1996) also included the following tracks:

'Country Girls' (written by Marty Stuart and Paul Kennerley)
'Shelter From The Storm' (written by Marty Stuart and Kostas)
'I'll Be There For You' (written by Marty Stuart)
'The Mississippi Mudcat & Sister Sheryl Crow' (written by Marty Stuart) / this track featured Jimmy Martin (Wednesday 10 August 1927 - Saturday 14 May 2005), along with his country music coon dogs and beagle hounds
'Rocket Ship' (written by Marty Stuart and Paul Kennerley)
'Country' (written by Roger Murrah and Marcus Hummon)
'So Many People' (written by Roger D. Ferris)

Marty Stuart's 'Honky Tonkin's What I Do Best' (MCA Nashville Records, 1996) reached No.27 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1996.



On Tuesday 8 July 1997, Marty Stuart married legendary country music artist Connie Smith in Pine Ridge, South Dakota; it was Connie Smith's fourth marriage, while it was Marty Stuart's second.

At the time, Connie Smith and Marty Stuart were working on a Bluegrass album for Rebel Records, which included special guests Ralph Stanley (Friday 25 February 1927 - Thursday 23 June 2016), Ricky Skaggs and Hal Ketchum.



Clint Black recorded Marty Stuart's 'Still Holding On' (co-written with Matraca Berg and Clint Black) and included the track on 'Nothin' But The Taillights' (RCA Records, 1997); the track, which was a duet with Martina McBride, reached No.11 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1997.



John Anderson recorded Marty Stuart's 'Takin' The Country Back' (co-written with Curtis Wright) and included the track on 'Takin' The Country Back' (Mercury Records, 1997).



Martina McBride recorded Marty Stuart's 'Still Holdin' On' (co-written with Matraca Berg and Clint Black) and included the track on 'Evolution' (RCA Records, 1997); the track, which was a duet with Clint Black, reached No.11 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1997.



Gary Allan recorded Marty Stuart's 'Don't Leave Her Lonely Too Long' (co-written with Kostas) and included the track on 'It Would Be You' (Decca Nashville Records, 1998).



In 1998, Connie Smith returned to recording after a twenty-year gap with the release of her self-titled album 'Connie Smith' (Warner Bros. Records, 1998); the album was released on Tuesday 6 October 1998.

'Connie Smith' (Warner Bros. Records, 1998) was produced by Connie Smith's husband Marty Stuart, along with Justin Neibank; Connie Smith and Marty Stuart were married on Tuesday 8 July 1997.

'Connie Smith' (Warner Bros. Records, 1998) was given positive reviews but, although it was her first album in many years, it attracted little attention; the album included the following tracks:

'How Long', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002), Connie Smith and Marty Stuart
'Lonesome' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'Hearts Like Ours' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'You Can't Back a Teardrop' (written by Tom Shapiro and Chris Waters)
'Looking For a Reason' (written by Connie Smith and Chris Wright)
'Love's Not Everything' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'Just Let Me Know' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'Your Light' (written by Allen Shamblin, Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'When It Comes to You' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)
'A Tale From Taharrie' (written by Connie Smith and Marty Stuart)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith's 'Connie Smith' (Warner Bros. Records, 1998) included the following:

Steve Arnold and Michael Rhodes (bass)
Mark Casstevens, Stuart Smith and Biff Watson (guitar)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Gary Hogue (Tuesday 30 March 1954 - Sunday 14 May 2000) (steel guitar)
Larry Marrs (background vocals, bass)
Connie Smith (lead vocals)
Gary W. Smith (keyboards)
Marty Stuart (guitar, mandolin)
Steve Turner (drums)
Cheryl White (background vocals)



On Tuesday 15 June 1999, Marty Stuart saw the release of 'The Pilgrim' (MCA Nashville Records, 1999); produced by Marty Stuart, the album was a concept album, which told the story of a man (The Pilgrim) from Marty Stuart's hometown of Philadelphia, Mississippi.

Marty Stuart played the role of 'The Pilgrim', as well as other roles.  The album was a significant move in Marty Stuart's career, as before 'The Pilgrim', he had been focusing more on trying to get a hit song instead of making the music that really mattered to him.

With the release of 'The Pilgrim' (MCA Nashville Records, 1999), Marty Stuart demonstrated his songwriting skills (every track on the album was written by Marty Stuart), along with his diverse instrumental skills.

Marty Stuart's 'The Pilgrim' (MCA Records, 1999) included many legendary country music / bluegrass music legends as guest stars, including Emmylou Harris, Pam Tillis, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013), Ralph Stanley (Friday 25 February 1927 - Thursday 23 June 2016), Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 - Wednesday 28 March 2012) and Marty Stuart's old boss, Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003).

Marty Stuart's 'The Pilgrim' (MCA Nashville Records, 1999) included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Red, Red Wine & Cheatin' Songs' (written by Marty Stuart) (No.69, 1999)

Marty Stuart's 'The Pilgrim' (MCA Records, 1999) included the following tracks:

'Intro' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Sometimes The Pleasure's Worth The Pain' (written by Marty Stuart and Gary Nicholson)
'The Pilgrim (Act I)' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Harlan County' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Reasons' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Love Can Go To...' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Truckstop' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Hobo's Prayer' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Goin' Nowhere Fast' (written by Marty Stuart)
'The Observations of a Crow' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Intermission' (written by Marty Stuart)
'The Greatest Love of All Time' (written by Marty Stuart)
'The Greatest Love of All Time (Reprise)' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Draggin' Around These Chains of Love' (written by Marty Stuart and Mike Campbell)
'The Pilgrim (Act II)' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Redemption' (written by Marty Stuart)
'The Pilgrim (Act III)' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Outro' (Words: Excerpt from 'Sir Galahad' by Alfred, Lord Tennyson / Music by Marty Stuart)
'Mr. John Henry, Steel Driving Man', which was written by Marty Stuart and Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 - Wednesday 28 March 2012)

Marty Stuart, alongside his Fabulous Superlatives, often perform tracks from 'The Pilgrim' (MCA Nashville Records, 1999) on 'The Marty Stuart Show' on RFD-TV.  They have performed tracks such as 'Reasons', 'Red, Red Wine & Cheatin' Songs', 'Hobo's Prayer', 'The Greatest Love of All Time', 'The Pilgrim (Act III)' and, with special guest Earl Scruggs, 'Mr John Henry, Steel Driving Man'.

Personnel involved in the recording of Marty Stuart's 'The Pilgrim' (MCA Nashville Records, 1999) included the following:

Marty Stuart (vocals, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, mandolin)

The Rock & Roll Cowboys
Steve Arnold (bass)
Gary Hogue (Tuesday 30 March 1954 - Sunday 14 May 2000) (steel guitar)
Brad Davis (vocals, electric guitar, acoustic guitar)
Gregg Stocki (drums, timpani, percussion)

Other personnel involved in the recording of Marty Stuart's 'The Pilgrim' (MCA Nashville Records, 1999) included the following:

Mike Campbell (12-string guitar, electric guitar)
Tony Brown (piano)
Barry Beckett (Hammond B-3 organ)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Larry Marrs (background vocals)
Johnny Counterfeit (voices)
Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 - Wednesday 28 March 2012) (acoustic guitar, banjo)
'Uncle' Josh Graves (Tuesday 27 September 1927 - Saturday 30 September 2006) (Dobro)
Carl Marsh (sound effects, calliope, organ)
Rusty Golden (piano)
Mike Bub (upright bass)
Jim Brown (B3 organ, piano)
Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) (vocals on 'Outro')
George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) (vocals on 'Truckstop')
Emmylou Harris (vocals on 'The Pilgrim (Act I)' and 'Truckstop')
Pam Tillis (vocals on 'Reasons')
Ralph Stanley (Friday 25 February 1927 - Thursday 23 June 2016) & The Clinch Mountain Boys (vocals, banjo, acoustic bass, acoustic guitar and fiddle on 'Harlan County' and 'The Pilgrim: Act II')

Marty Stuart's 'The Pilgrim' (MCA Nashville Records, 1999) reached No.63 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1999.



Gary Allan recorded Marty Stuart's 'Don't Leave Her Lonely Too Long' (co-written with Kostas) and included the track on 'It Would Be You' (Decca Records, 1999).



Charlie Shearer recorded Marty Stuart's 'At The Feet of God' (co-written with Jerry Sullivan) and included the track on 'Breakin' Out' (Universal Sound Records, 2000).



On Tuesday 25 April 2000, Jeff Foxworthy saw the release of 'Big Funny' (DreamWorks Records, 2000); one of the included tracks was 'Blue Collar Dollar' (written by Bill Engvall, Jeff Foxworthy, Doug Grau and Porter Howell), which featured guest vocals from Bill Engvall and Marty Stuart.

Jeff Foxworthy's 'Big Funny' (DreamWorks Records, 2000) reached No.15 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2000.



Travis Tritt recorded Marty Stuart's 'I Can't Seem To Get Over You' (co-written with Travis Tritt) and included the track on 'Strong Enough' (Columbia Records, 2002); the track featured backing vocals from Andrea Zonn.

In 2000, Marty Stuart left MCA Records and signed with Sony Music.



On Tuesday 1 July 2003, Marty Stuart saw the release of 'Country Music' (Columbia Records, 2003).  For this album, Marty Stuart formed a new backing band called The Fabulous Superlatives, the members of which are as follows:

'Cousin' Kenny Vaughan (guitar)
'Handsome' Harry Stinson (drums)
'Brother' Brian Glenn (bass) / Brian Glenn was later replaced by 'The Apostle' Paul Martin

Marty Stuart & The Fabulous Superlatives' 'Country Music' (Columbia Records, 2003) included three tracks which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'If There Ain't, There Oughta Be' (written by Bobby Pinson and Trey Bruce) (No.41, 2003)
'Too Much Month (at the end of the money)' (written by Bob DiPiero, Dennis Robbins and John Sherrill) (No.54, 2003)
'Farmer's Blues' (written by Marty Stuart and Connie Smith) / this track, which was a duet with Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) was released as a single in 2003, but it did not chart

Marty Stuart & The Fabulous Superlatives' 'Country Music' (Columbia Records, 2003) also included the following tracks:

'A Satisfied Mind' (written by Jack Rhodes and Joe Hayes)
'Fool For Love' (written by Marty Stuart and Tom Douglas)
'Here I Am' (written by Rivers Rutherford)
'Sundown in Nashville' (written by Dwayne Warwick)
'By George' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Wishful Thinkin' (written by Mike Henderson and Wally Wilson)
'If You Wanted Me Around' (written by Marty Stuart and Paul Kennerley)
'Tip Your Hat' (written by Jeffrey Steele)
'Walls of a Prison', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)

Marty Stuart & The Fabulous Superlatives' 'Country Music' (Columbia Records, 2003) reached No.40 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2003.



Patty Loveless recorded Marty Stuart's 'Draggin' My Heart Around' (co-written with Paul Kennerley) and included the track on 'On Your Way Home' (Epic Records, 2003).



On Tuesday 21 October 2003, Lost Highway Records released 'A Very Special Acoustic Christmas' (Lost Highway Records, 2003), which was the sixth in the 'A Very Special Christmas' series of Christmas music-themed compilation albums, which were produced to benefit the Special Olympics.

As opposed to earlier editions which contained a wide variety of musical styles, this version of 'A Very Special Christmas' featured primarily country music and Bluegrass music artists, including the following:

'Silent Night' / performed by Reba McEntire
'Frosty The Snowman' / performed by Dan Tyminski
'Please Come Home For Christmas' / performed by Willie Nelson
'Just Put a Ribbon in Your Hair' / performed by Alan Jackson
'Only You Can Bring Me Cheer (Gentleman`s Lady)' / performed by Alison Krauss
'Even Santa Claus Gets The Blues' / performed by Marty Stuart
'Jingle Bells' / performed by Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 - Wednesday 28 March 2012)
'Christmas is Near' / performed by Ralph Stanley (Friday 25 February 1927 - Thursday 23 June 2016)
'O Come All Ye Faithful' / performed by Patty Loveless
'O Holy Night' / performed by Wynonna Judd
'Winter Wonderland' / performed by Pat Green
'Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow' / performed by Sam Bush
'Away in a Manger' / performed by Ricky Skaggs
'Christmas Time at Home' / performed by Rhonda Vincent
'I'll Be Home for Christmas' / performed by Tift Merritt
'Peace' / performed by Norah Jones

Lost Highway Records' 'A Very Special Acoustic Christmas' (Lost Highway Records, 2003) reached No.24 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2003.



Travis Tritt recorded Marty Stuart's 'We've Had It All' (co-written with Travis Tritt) and included the track on 'My Honky Tonk History' (Columbia Records, 2004).

In 2005, Marty Stuart launched a custom record label, Superlatone Records, in order to issue overlooked southern gospel and roots music recordings.



On Tuesday 30 August 2005, Marty Stuart saw the release of 'Souls' Chapel' (Superlatone Records / Universal South Records, 2005), which was recorded with his band, The Fabulous Superlatives, and was also Marty Stuart's second concept album.

With the release of Marty Stuart & His Superlatives' 'Souls' Chapel' (Superlatone Records / Universal South Records, 2005), Marty Stuart devoted the entire album to gospel songs.  The album also featured songs where Marty Stuart does not sing at all, but instead takes a back seat and allows 'Cousin' Kenny Vaughan (guitar), 'Handsome' Harry Stinson (drums) or 'Brother' Brian Glenn (bass) to contribute their own vocals to the tracks.

Marty Stuart & His Superlatives' 'Souls' Chapel' (Superlatone Records / Universal South Records, 2005) included the following tracks:

'Somebody Saved Me' (written by Roebuck Staples)
'Lord, Just Give Me a Little More Time', which was written by Albert Edward Brumley (Sunday 29 October 1905 - Tuesday 15 November 1977)
'Way Down' (written by Marty Stuart and Harry Stinson)
'Come into The House of The Lord' (written by Marty Stuart and Kenny Vaughan)
'The Gospel Story of Noah's Ark' (written by Marty Stuart and Jerry Sullivan)
'I Can't Even Walk (Without You Holding My Hand)' (written by Colbert Croft and Joyce Croft)
'It's Time to Go Home' (written by Marty Stuart)
'The Unseen Hand' (written by A.J. Sims)
'There's a Rainbow (At The End of Every Storm)' (written by Marty Stuart and Harry Stinson)
'Slow Train' (written by Steve Cropper and William Bell)
'Move Along Train', which was written by Roebuck 'Pops' Staples (Monday 28 December 1914 - Tuesday 19 December 2000) / The album featured a guest appearance from Mavis Staples
'Souls' Chapel' (written by Marty Stuart)

Marty Stuart & His Superlatives' 'Souls' Chapel' (Superlatone Records / Universal South Records, 2005) was nominated for a Dove Award for 'Country Album of the Year' at the 37th GMA Dove Awards, and reached No.75 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2005.



On Tuesday 25 October 2005, Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives saw the release of 'Badlands: Ballads of The Lakota' (Superlatone Records / Universal South Records, 2005), which was a concept album, focusing on the history of the Native American struggle, and which included the following tracks:

'Everette Helper's Song' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Badlands' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Trip to Little Big Horn' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Old Man's Vision' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Wounded Knee' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Big Foot', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)
'Hotchkiss Gunner's Lament' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Broken Promise Land' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Casino' (written by Marty Stuart)
'So You Want to be An Indian' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Walking Through The Prayers' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Three Chiefs' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Listen to The Children' (written by Marty Stuart)



On Tuesday 7 February 2006, Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives saw the release of 'Live at The Ryman' (Superlatone Records / Universal South Records, 2006); the album is significant as it is the first, and so far, only album composed of entirely 'live' performances.

Marty Stuart had just finished his tour with Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016), The Old Crow Medicine Show and his wife, Connie Smith.

The tour, which was dubbed 'Electric Barnyard Tour', was designed to bring a show to what Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) called 'the forgotten people' (poor people in small towns across rural America).

However, due to incredibly hot weather, the tour was unsuccessful at the box office, which left Marty Stuart feeling distraught.  He then was even more disappointed to be reminded that almost a year earlier, he had agreed to perform a bluegrass show at The Ryman Auditorium in Nashville.

Marty Stuart was not at all in the mood to create any more music for a while, but nonetheless called up bluegrass legends Charlie Cushman, 'Uncle' Josh Graves (Tuesday 27 September 1927 - Saturday 30 September 2006) and Stuart Duncan, as well as the iconic announcer and radio disc jockey Eddie Stubbs.

The performers met at The Ryman Auditorium on the afternoon of the concert, and spent no more than twenty minutes choosing their songs and rehearsing them.  They knew they had no time to learn anything new, so agreed on 'marquee level songs with a built in fun factor'.

Marty Stuart was then informed that the concert had sold out, which gave him a much needed boost of confidence.

On the walk from the dressing room to the stage, Marty Stuart commented to Charlie Cushman that he 'hated being thought of as an unrehearsed, half-assed bluegrass band', to which Charlie Cushman replied 'Why don't we just go out there and play music and not worry about calling it anything?'

The concert proved to be a success and, after leaving the stage, Les Banks handed Marty Stuart two CDs and told him that he should listen to it.  Marty Stuart was amazed to find that his performance that evening had been recorded.  Upon listening to it, he knew that it was a special performance, and consequently the concert was released as a 'live' album.

Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives' 'Live at The Ryman' (Superlatone Records / Universal South Records, 2006) included the following tracks:

'Eddie Stubbs Intro'
'Orange Blossom Special'
'No Hard Times Blues'
'Homesick'
'Shuckin' The Corn'
'The Whiskey Ain't Workin' Anymore'
'Mr. John Henry (Intro)'
'Mr. John Henry, The Steel Drivin' Man'
''Uncle' Josh's Intro'
'Train 45'
'Josh's Joke'
'The Great Speckled Bird'
'Sure Wanna Keep My Wine'
'Walk Like That'
'Hillbilly Rock'

Personnel involved in the recording of Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives' 'Live at The Ryman' (Superlatone Records / Universal South Records, 2006) included the following:

Marty Stuart (mandolin, acoustic guitar, vocals)
Kenny Vaughan (acoustic guitar, vocals
Harry Stinson (snare drum, vocals)
Brian Glenn (bass guitar, vocals)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Charlie Cushman (banjo)
Josh Graves (Tuesday 27 September 1927 - Saturday 30 September 2006) (Dobro, vocals)

In 2007, Marty Stuart's collection of music memorabilia and photography was exhibited at Tennessee State Museum under the banner 'Sparkle & Twang: Marty Stuart's American Musical Odyssey'.



On Tuesday 5 June 2007, Marty Stuart saw the release of 'Compadres: An Anthology of Duets' (Hip-O Records, 2007), which was a compilation album of duets, and included the following tracks:

'Farmer's Blues' (written by Marty Stuart and Connie Smith) / this track featured guest vocals from Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'Doin' My Time' (written by Jimmie Skinner) / this track featured guest vocals from Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)
'Rawhide', which was written by Bill Monroe (Wednesday 13 September 1911 - Monday 9 September 1996) / this track featured guest vocals from Lester Flatt (Friday 19 June 1914 - Friday 11 May 1979) & The Nashville Grass
'The Whiskey Ain't Workin' Anymore', which was written by Marty Stuart and Ronny Scaife (1947 - Wednesday 3 November 2010) / this track featured guest vocals from Travis Tritt
'Will You Visit Me on Sunday?' (written by Dallas Frazier) / this track featured guest vocals from Loretta Lynn
'Crying, Waiting, Hoping', which was written by Buddy Holly (Monday 7 September 1936 - Tuesday 3 February 1959) / this track featured guest vocals from Steve Earle
'Mr. John Henry, The Steel Driving Man', which was written by Marty Stuart and Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 - Wednesday 28 March 2012) / this track featured guest vocals from Earl Scruggs
'Hearts Like Ours' (written by Marty Stuart and Connie Smith) / this track featured guest vocals from Connie Smith
'The Weight' (written by Robbie Robertson) / this track featured guest vocals from The Staples Singers
'One Woman Man', which was written by Tillman Franks (Wednesday 29 September 1920 - Thursday 26 October 2006) and Johnny Horton (Thursday 30 April 1925 - Saturday 5 November 1960) / this track featured guest vocals from George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013)
'Confessin' The Blues' (written by Jay McShann and Walter Brown) / this track featured guest vocals from B.B. King (Wednesday 16 September 1925 - Thursday 14 May 2015)
'I Can See For Miles' (written by Peter Townshend) / this track featured guest vocals from The Old Crow Medicine Show
'Let Us Travel, Travel On', which was written by Ira Louvin (Monday 21 April 1924 - Sunday 20 June 1965) and Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 - Wednesday 26 January 2011) / this track featured guest vocals from Del McCoury
'Move Along Train', which was written by Roebuck 'Pops' Staples (Monday 28 December 1914 - Tuesday 19 December 2000) / this track featured guest vocals from Mavis Staples

Porter Wagoner: 'Wagonmaster' (ANTI Records, 2007)

On Tuesday 5 June 2007, Porter Wagoner (Friday 12 August 1927 - Sunday 28 October 2007) saw the release of 'Wagonmaster' (ANTI Records, 2007), the country music legend's debut album for the predominantly punk label ANTI Records.

'Wagonmaster' (ANTI Records, 2007), which was Porter Wagoner's final studio album, was produced by Marty Stuart and included the following tracks:

'Wagonmaster, Pt. 1' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Be a Little Quieter' (written by Porter Wagoner)
'Who Knows Right from Wrong', which was written by Pearl Butler (Friday 30 September 1927 - Tuesday 1 March 1988)
'Albert Erving' (written by Porter Wagoner)
'A Place to Hang My Hat' (written by Shawn Camp, Byron Hill and Brice Long)
'Eleven Cent Cotton' (written by Porter Wagoner and Marty Stuart)
'My Many Hurried Southern Trips' (written by Dolly Parton and Porter Wagoner)
'Committed to Parkview', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) / a music video was made for this track, which was the album's only single
'The Agony of Waiting' (written by Porter Wagoner)
'Buck & The Boys' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Fool Like Me' (written by Porter Wagoner)
'Late Love of Mine' (written by Porter Wagoner)
'Hotwired' (written by Shawn Camp and Mark D. Sanders)
'Brother Harold Dee' (written by Porter Wagoner)
'Satan's River' (written by Porter Wagoner)
'Wagonmaster, Pt. 2' (written by Marty Stuart)
Porter Wagoner & Marty Stuart: 'Men with Broken Hearts' (written by Porter Wagoner) / (I Heard That) Lonesome Whistle', which was written by Jimmie Davis (11 September 1899 - Sunday 5 November 2000) and Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)

Personnel involved in the recording of Porter Wagoner's 'Wagonmaster' (ANTI Records, 2007) included the following:

Stuart Duncan (acoustic guitar, fiddle)
Eric Fritsch (piano, Hammond organ)
Brian Glenn (upright bass)
Carl Jackson (background vocals)
Mike Johnson and Fred Newell (pedal steel guitar)
Gordon Mote (piano)
Harry Stinson (drums)
Marty Stuart (acoustic & electric guitar, background vocals)
Buck Trent (banjo, electric banjo)
Kenny Vaughan (acoustic & electric guitar, archguitar)

Porter Wagoner's 'Wagonmaster' (ANTI Records, 2007) reached No.63 on the included the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2007.



On Tuesday 25 September 2007, Gene Watson saw the release of 'In a Perfect World' (Shanachie Records, 2007); one of the tracks, 'A Good Place to Turn Around', which was written by J. Matthews, Rebecca Lynn Howard and Jon Mabe, featured Connie Smith on backing vocals.



On Tuesday 2 October 2007, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of 'The Bluegrass Sessions' (McCoury Music Records, 2007), the majority of which was recorded 'live' in the studio in one day, with very little overdubbing.

Guests on Merle Haggard's 'The Bluegrass Sessions' (McCoury Music Records, 2007) included Alison Krauss, Marty Stuart, Rob Ickes, Scott Joss and Carl Jackson.

The liner notes for Merle Haggard's 'The Bluegrass Sessions' (McCoury Music Records, 2007) were written by Marty Stuart.

Merle Haggard's 'The Bluegrass Sessions' (McCoury Music Records, 2007) included the following tracks:

'Runaway Momma' (written by Merle Haggard)
'Pray' (written by Merle Haggard)
'What Happened?' (written by Merle Haggard)
'Jimmie Rodgers Blues' (written by Merle Haggard)
'Learning to Live With Myself' (written by Merle Haggard)
'Mama's Hungry Eyes' (written by Merle Haggard) / this track featured guest vocals from Alison Krauss
'I Wonder Where to Find You' (written by Merle Haggard)
'Holding Things Together' (written by Merle Haggard)
'Big City' (written by Merle Haggard and Dean Holloway)
'Momma's Prayers' (written by Merle Haggard)
'Wouldn't That Be Something', which was written by Merle Haggard and Freddy Powers (Tuesday 13 October 1931 - Tuesday 21 June 2016)
'Blues Stay Away From Me', which was written by Lionel Alton Delmore (Tuesday 19 March 1940 - Monday 20 May 2002), Rabon Delmore, Henry Glover and Wayne Raney



In July 2008, Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives saw the release of 'Cool Country Favorites' (Superlatone Records, 2008), an album which was considered to be a tribute to traditional country music, and included the following tracks:

'Freight Train Boogie' (written by Ken Griffin)
'Sundown In Nashville' (written by Dwayne Warwick)
'Bluegrass Express' (written by Bobby Osborne) / this track featured 'The Apostle' Paul Martin
'Keep Her Off Your Mind', which was written by Arthur Jackson and Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 - Sunday 20 March 2011)
'Buckaroo' (written by Bob Morris)
'Pretty Boy Floyd', which was written by Woody Guthrie (Sunday 14 July 1912 - Tuesday 3 October 1967) / this track featured 'Handsome' Harry Stinson
'A Satisfied Mind', which was written by Jack Rhodes (1908 - 1968) and Joe 'Red' Hayes (Sunday 4 April 1926 - Friday 2 March 1973)
'Truck Drivers' Blues' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Old, Old House', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Hal Bynum
'Carol Lee' (written by Kenny Vaughan) / this track featured 'Cousin' Kenny Vaughan
'Big River', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)
'A Honky Tonk Song', which was written by Aubrey Ross 'Buck' Peddy (Thursday 23 April 1908 - Tuesday 13 March 1990) and Mel Tillis



On Tuesday 24 August 2010, Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives saw the release of 'Ghost Train (The Studio B Sessions)' (Superlatone Records, 2010), which was produced by Marty Stuart; the album was recorded in the historic RCA Studio B in Nashville, which was being used by The Country Music Hall of Fame as a type of museum until Marty Stuart asked to use the 'Home of a Thousand Hits' to record 'Ghost Train'.

Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives' 'Ghost Train (The Studio B Sessions)' (Superlatone Records, 2010) included the following tracks:

'Branded' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Country Boy Rock & Roll', which was written by Don Wesley Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 - Tuesday 16 October 1984) / this track was a duet between Marty Stuart and his lead guitarist, 'Cousin' Kenny Vaughan
'Drifting Apart' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Bridge Washed Out' (written by Warner Mack)
'A World without You' (written by Marty Stuart and Connie Smith)
'Hummingbyrd' (written by Marty Stuart) / this track, which was an electric instrumental, was designed as a tribute to Clarence White (Wednesday 7 June 1944 - Saturday 14 July 1973), and was performed on Clarence White's electric guitar, which White's wife sold to Marty Stuart some years after Clarence White's death
'Hangman', which was written by Marty Stuart and Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)
'Ghost Train Four-Oh-Ten' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Hard Working Man' (written by Marty Stuart)
'I Run to You' (written by Marty Stuart and Connie Smith) / this track was a duet with Connie Smith
'Crazy Arms', which was written by Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 - Sunday 20 March 2011) and Charles P. Seals / this track featured Ralph E. Mooney
'Porter Wagoner's Grave' (written by Marty Stuart)
'Little Heartbreaker (the likes of you)', which was written by Marty Stuart and Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 - Sunday 20 March 2011)
'Mississippi Railroad Blues' (written by Marty Stuart)

Personnel involved in the recording of Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives' 'Ghost Train (The Studio B Sessions)' (Superlatone Records, 2010) included the following:

Marty Stuart (lead vocals, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, mandolin)
Kenny Vaughan (lead vocals on 'Country Boy Rock & Roll', acoustic guitar, electric guitar, high string guitar)
Harry Stinson (harmony vocals, drums)
Paul Martin (harmony vocals, electric bass, upright bass, TAC, piano
Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 - Sunday 20 March 2011) (steel guitar, spoken introduction on 'Crazy Arms')
Kayton Roberts (Saturday 25 November 1933 - Thursday 13 July 2017), Gary Carter and Tommy White (steel guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Karen Winkelmann and Pamela Sixfin (violin)
Sarighani Reist (cello)
Monisa Angell (viola)

Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives' 'Ghost Train (The Studio B Sessions)' (Superlatone Records, 2010) reached No.46 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2010.



On Tuesday 24 April 2012, Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives saw the release of 'Nashville, Vol. 1: Tear The Woodpile Down' (Sugar Hill Records, 2012), which included the following tracks:

'Tear The Woodpile Down' / this track featured guest vocals from Buck Trent
'Sundown in Nashville'
'A Matter of Time' / this track featured guest vocals from Kenny Lovelace
'Hollywood Boogie'
'Holding On To Nothing' / this track featured guest vocals from Buck Trent
'Truck Driver's Blues'
'Going, Going, Gone'
'The Lonely Kind'
'A Song of Sadness' / this track featured guest vocals from Lorrie Carter Bennett
'Picture From Life's Other Side' / this track featured guest vocals from Hank 3



Darin & Brooke Aldridge recorded Marty Stuart's 'Get Up John', which was co-written with Bill Monroe (Wednesday 13 September 1911 - Monday 9 September 1996) and Jerry Sullivan, and included the track on 'Snapshots' (Mountain Home Music Company, 2015).

• Visit Marty Stuart's Official Site at martystuart.net
• Connie Smith
• Visit Marty Stuart's Fan Site at martystuart.com (this site is run by Sherry Mattioli in Nashville)

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