• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Webster PR



Webster Public Relations
, PO Box 23015, Nashville, TN 37202

Contact Scott Adkins
Telephone 615-777-6995



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted during 2010, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Con Hunley, which he submitted to this site on Saturday 27 November 2010.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Con Hunley who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.

Con Hunley

Con Hunley
This quote was submitted on Saturday 27 November 2010.

'Gene Watson is the best true country singer I've ever heard in my life.

You can quote me on it!'

Thank you, Con Hunley, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Con Hunley...

Con Hunley

Con Hunley was born Conard Logan 'Con' Hunley in Knoxville, Tennessee on Monday 9 April 1945.

One of six children, Con Hunley had music in his life from birth.  His first entrance into the music world was singing gospel songs at church with his family.  Con Hunley was overjoyed when his parents bought him a used 'Stella' guitar for Christmas when he was nine years old; his parents taught him basic chords (G,C,D and A) and some simple songs.

Con Hunley's first professional gig came in 1964 at The Eagles Club in downtown Knoxville.  He played in a band which was headed up by Gene Hammock, who was a well-known local singer who sang in the style of Jim Reeves (Monday 20 August 1923 - Friday 31 July 1964) and Eddie Arnold (Wednesday 15 May 1918 - Thursday 8 May 2008).

After high school, Con Hunley began playing with local bands, maturing musically and gaining his first fans.  Con Hunley joined the United States Air Force in May 1965 and spent most of his service on a military base in Illinois, teaching aircraft mechanics; he also played music in area clubs whenever possible.

After his tour of duty had finished in 1968, Con Hunley returned to Knoxville and began performing weekly at a local nightclub called The Corner Lounge on Central Avenue, where he met businessman Sam Kirkpatrick, who formed the independent record label Prairie Dust Records to showcase Con Hunley's talents.

In 1975, Con Hunley travelled to Nashville for the first time.

Between 1976 and 1978, Con Hunley saw the release of a number of non-album singles, including the following:

'Misery Loves Company', which was written by Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Monday 1 September 2008) / this track was released in 1976, but it did not chart
'Loving You is a Habit I Can't Break' / this track was released in 1976, but it did not chart
'Pick Up The Pieces' (No.96, 1977)
'I'll Always Remember That Song' (No.75, 1977)
'Breaking Up is Hard to Do' (No.67, 1977)
'Cry, Cry, Darling' (No.34, 1978)

After some minor success on the Billboard country music singles chart, Con Hunley caught the attention of Warner Bros. Records, who signed him to a recording contract in 1978.

Con Hunley: 'No Limit' (Warner Bros. Records, 1979)

Con Hunley's first album for Warner Bros. Records was 'No Limit' (Warner Bros. Records, 1979), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Week-End Friend' (No.13, 1978)
'You've Still Got a Place in My Heart', which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 - Thursday 11 September 1969) (No.14, 1978)
'I've Been Waiting for You All of My Life' (No.14, 1979)
'Since I Fell for You', which was written by Woodrow Wilson 'Buddy' Johnson (10 January 1915 - Wednesday 9 February 1977) (No.20, 1979)

Con Hunley's first album for Warner Bros. Records, 'No Limit' (Warner Bros. Records, 1979), also included 'That's All That Matters to Me', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010).

Con Hunley: 'I Don't Want to Lose You' (Warner Bros. Records, 1980)

In 1980, Con Hunley saw the release of his second album for Warner Bros. Records, 'I Don't Want to Lose You' (Warner Bros. Records, 1980), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I Don't Want to Lose You'
(No.20, 1980)
'You Lay a Whole Lot of Love on Me' (written by Hank Beach and Forest Borders II) (No.19, 1980)

Con Hunley: 'Don't It Break Your Heart' (Warner Bros. Records, 1980)

It was also in 1980 when Con Hunley saw the release of his third album for Warner Bros. Records, 'Don't It Break Your Heart' (Warner Bros. Records, 1980), which included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'They Never Lost You'
(No.19, 1980)
'What's New with You' (No.11, 1980)

Con Hunley: 'Ask Any Woman' (Warner Bros. Records, 1981)

In 1981, Con Hunley saw the release of his fourth album for Warner Bros. Records, 'Ask Any Woman' (Warner Bros. Records, 1981), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart: 

'She's Steppin' Out'
(No.17, 1981)
'No Relief in Sight' (No.20, 1982)

Con Hunley: 'Oh Girl' (Warner Bros. Records, 1982)

In 1982, Con Hunley saw the release of his fifth album for Warner Bros. Records, 'Oh Girl' (Warner Bros. Records, 1982), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Oh, Girl', which was written by Eugene Booker Record (Monday 23 December 1940 - Friday 22 July 2005)
 (No.12, 1982)
'Confidential' (No.43, 1982)

It was during his tenure at Warner Bros. Records when Con Hunley was nominated for 'Male Vocalist of the Year' and 'Newcomer of the Year' by both the Academy of Country Music (ACM) and the Country Music Association (CMA).

In 1983, Con Hunley saw the release of the following non-album single:

'Once You Get the Feel of It'
(No.42, 1983)

Con Hunley's passionate vocals won him a devoted and enthusiastic fan base; he moved to MCA Records, where he issued a 1983 version of Porter Wagoner's classic 'Satisfied Mind', which was written by Joe 'Red' Hayes (Sunday 4 April 1926 - Friday 2 March 1973) and Jack Rhodes (1908 - 1968), which reached No.84 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1983; the track featured guest vocals from Porter Wagoner (Friday 12 August 1927 - Sunday 28 October 2007).

In 1984 and 1985, Con Hunley saw the release of a number of non-album singles on MCA Records, including the following:

'Deep in the Arms of Texas'
(No.75, 1984)
'All American Country Boy' (No.57, 1984)
'I'd Rather be Crazy' (No.54, 1985)
'Nobody Ever Gets Enough Love' (No.49, 1985)

After a major shakeup at MCA Records, Jim Fogelsong, who signed Con Hunley to MCA Records, moved to Capitol Records.  Con Hunley followed Jim Fogelsong to Capitol Records and began recording a new album, resulting in a new string of singles, including the much-aired 'What Am I Gonna Do About You' (No.48, 1985).

Con Hunley also saw the release of a further two singles on Capitol Records, 'Blue Suede Blues' (No.49, 1986) and 'Quittin' Time' (No.55, 1985).

Con Hunley also toured throughout the United States, playing large venues around the country with artists such as Alabama, The Oak Ridge Boys, Larry Gatlin, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998).

Although he continued to perform in a variety of venues, including a 1996 performance at the White House and a performance at the World Heavyweight Championship fight in South Africa, Con Hunley recorded no new music for over a decade after his last release for Capitol Records.

Con Hunley: 'Sweet Memories' (IMMI Records, 2003)

In 2003, having signed a recording contract with IMMI Records, Con Hunley saw the release of his comeback album, 'Sweet Memories' (IMMI Records, 2003), which was embraced by thousands of people who'd never forgotten the blue-eyed country singer.  Major national retailers, including KMart and Wal-Mart, opened rack space to stock the new album.

Con Hunley's comeback album, 'Sweet Memories' (IMMI Records, 2003), which was embraced by thousands of people who'd never forgotten the blue-eyed country singer.  Major national retailers, included four tracks, which were released as ingles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

Still' (written by Bill Anderson) / this track was released as a single in 2004, but it did not chart
'Only Time will Tell' / this track was released as a single in 2005, but it did not chart
'She Ain't You' / this track was released as a single in 2005, but it did not chart
'Sweet Memories' / this track was released as a single in 2005, but it did not chart

Billboard, Country Weekly and other periodicals published ecstatic reviews of Con Hunley's comeback album, 'Sweet Memories' (IMMI Records, 2003); Music Row magazine not only raved about the album, it featured Con Hunley on its cover.

Country Music Television (CMT) considered Con Hunley's 'Sweet Memories' (IMMI Records, 2003) to be one of the Top 10 country music albums of the year.  Praise poured in from celebrities, including Vince Gill, Kenny Chesney, Ralph Emery and Bill Anderson; Con Hunley's official website at conhunley.com attracted nearly a million hits at this time.

Con Hunley's triumphant return was featured at the 2005 Country Music Association Music Festival in Nashville and he performed in concert at The Country Music Hall of Fame and at Ryman Auditorium.

Con Hunley's new music received airplay at radio stations from coast to coast (in America), as well as on both national satellite country outlets, XM and Sirius.

Con Hunley: 'The First Time From Studio B' (IMMI Records, 2006)

Following the success of 'Sweet Memories' (IMMI Records, 2003), Con Hunley saw the release of 'The First Time From Studio B' (IMMI Records, 2006), a compilation of the singer's earliest recordings made between 1975 and 1977; the compilation included the following tracks, which were originally released on Prarie Dust Records, as 45rpm singles:

'Misery Loves Company', which was written by Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Monday 1 September 2008)
'Loving You is a Habit (I Can't Break)'
'Columbus Stockade Blues'
'Breaking Up is Hard to Do'
'It Looks Like a Good Night For Drinking'
'Pick Up The Pieces of Your Heart'
'Deep in The Arms of Texas'
'Never Felt More Like Dying'
'I'll Always Remember That Song'
'Look at Me Loving You Again'
'Woman to Man, Man to Woman'

Con Hunley: 'Shoot From The Heart' (IMMI Records, 2006)

In 2006, Con Hunley saw the release of 'Shoot From The Heart' (IMMI Records, 2006), which was produced by Norro Wilson and Con Hunley, and included the following tracks:

'Shoot From The Heart', which was written by Con Hunley, Harry Smith and Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 - Thursday 11 February 2016)
'Deep in The Arms of Texas' (written by Kelly Bach)
'Rockin' in The Arms of Your Memory' (written by Dean Dillon and Norro Wilson)
'The Keys', which was written by Dean Dillon, Dale Dodson and Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010)
'I Can't Make It Alone' (written by Neil Thrasher, Kelly Shiver and Kent Blazy)
'I Can See You with My Eyes Closed' (written by Larry Bastian)
'Look at Me Loving You Again' (written by Kelly Bach and Jeanne Lane)
'Just Like Old Times' (written by Rafe Van Hoy and Deborah Allen)
'Georgia on My Mind' (Tribute to Ray), which was written by Hoagy Carmichael (22 November 1899 - Sunday 27 December 1981) and Stuart Gorrell
'That Old Clock', which was written by Con Hunley, Larry Shell and Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 - Thursday 11 February 2016)
'Words From Con' (spoken by Con Hunley)
'Hollow Man', which was written by Larry Shell, Steve Gulley and Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 - Thursday 11 February 2016)
'Why Me Lord' (written by Kris Kristofferson)

Personnel involved in the recording of Con Hunley's 'Shoot From The Heart' (IMMI Records, 2006) included the following:

Reggie Young (electric guitar)
B. James Lowry (acoustic guitar)
Larry Paxton (bass)
Eddie Bayers (drums)
Gary Prim (piano)
John Hughey (Wednesday 27 December 1933 - Sunday 18 November 2007) (steel guitar)
Randy McCormick (keyboard, B-3 organ)
Tim Hunley, Ruth Akers and Kenny Hunley (background vocals)

Gene Watson with Vince Gill (with T. Graham Brown and Con Hunley in the background) during the recording of 'Country's Family Reunion' in Nashville on Thursday 7 October 2010

Gene Watson with
Vince Gill (with T. Graham Brown and Con Hunley in the background) during the recording of 'Country's Family Reunion' in Nashville on Thursday 7 October 2010

Con Hunley

• Visit Con Hunley's Official Site at conhunley.com

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Gene Watson Fan Site