• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Webster PR



Webster Public Relations
, PO Box 23015, Nashville, TN 37202

Contact Scott Adkins
Telephone 615-777-6995



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted during 2010, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Neal McCoy, which he submitted to this site on Thursday 1 July 2010.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Neal McCoy who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Neal McCoy
This quote was submitted on Thursday 1 July 2010.

'I have always been in love with Gene Watson's voice, and recently being on the show with him at The Ryman, I am amazed at how really great he still sings.

Not to mention what a class guy he is.

Gene always has been and still is one of the best in the business!'

Thank you, Neal McCoy, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Neal McCoy...



Neal McCoy was born Hubert Neal McGaughey Junior on Wednesday 30 July 1958 in Jacksonville, Texas to a Filipina American mother and Irish American father.

Inspired by the variety of music which his parents listened to, which included country music, rock music, disco music and rhythm and blues, Neal McCoy first sang in his church choir before founding a rhythm and blues band.

Neal McCoy later switched his focus to country music, performing in various bars and clubs in Texas.  After attending junior college near his hometown, he found work selling shoes at a shopping mall.  In the early 1980s, Neal McCoy met his wife, Melinda, at the store.

After winning a 1981 talent contest which was hosted by Janie Fricke, Neal McCoy secured a spot as an opening act for Charley Pride.  It was also at this point when he assumed the stage name Neal McGoy, a phonetic spelling of his last name.

Still crediting himself as Neal McGoy, he signed to the independent 16th Avenue Records in 1988 and saw the release of the singles 'That's How Much I Love You' and 'That's American'.  Although 'That's How Much I Love You' reached No.85 on the Billboard country music singles chart, Neal McGoy did not release an album for 16th Avenue Records.  He continued, however, to tour with Charley Pride until 1990.

In 1990, Neal McGoy signed to Atlantic Records, changing his surname to McCoy, per the label's request, as fans had already begun to refer to him as McCoy.



On Tuesday 20 November 1990, Neal McCoy saw the release of his debut album, 'At This Moment' (Atlantic Records, 1990), which included three tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'If I Built You a Fire' (written by Don Sampson and Monty Holmes) (No.48, 1991) / this track also reached No.18 on the Canadian RPM Tracks Chart in 1991
'At This Moment' (written by Billy Vera) / this track did not chart
'This Time I Hurt Her More Than She Loves Me' (written by Earl Thomas Conley and Mary Larkin) (No.50, 1991)

Neal McCoy's debut album, 'At This Moment' (Atlantic Records, 1990), also included the following tracks:

'Take My Heart' (written by Don Reynolds and Mickey Stripling)
'Down on the River' (written by Kostas and Wayland Patton)
'Hillbilly Blue' (written by Bernie Nelson)
'Somebody Hold Me (Until She Passes By)' (written by Sue Richards, Ava Aldridge and Ray Aldridge)
'The Big Heat' (written by Bob Mould, David Wills and Rick West)
'If the Walls Had Ears' (written by John Alexander and Pal Rakes)
'This Time I'm Takin' My Time' (written by Bob Mould and Wyatt Easterling)

At this time, Neal McCoy continued touring and developed a 'reputation for exciting, freewheeling live shows'.



On Tuesday 2 June 1992, Neal McCoy saw the release of 'Where Forever Begins' (Atlantic Records, 1992), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Where Forever Begins' (written by Trey Bruce and Thom McHugh) (No.40, 1992)
'There Ain't Nothin' I Don't Like About You' (written by Mark Irwin and Katie Wallace) (No.57, 1992)
'Now I Pray For Rain' (written by George Teren and Lee Satterfield) (No.26, 1992)

Neal McCoy's 'Where Forever Begins' (Atlantic Records, 1992) also included the following tracks:

'Palm of My Hand' (written by Gene Dobbins and Tim Menzies)
'The Wall' (written by Curtis Wright and Billy Spencer)
'The Day The Boys Leave The Girls Alone' (written by Randy Edwards Junior, Jerry Michaels and Troy Seals)
'A Little at a Time' (written by Tim Menzies and Gary Harrison)
'Big Doggin' Around' (written by Mike Henderson and Wally Wilson)
'Where Do Daddies Go' (written by Steve Seskin and Larry Bastian)
'Mountains on the Moon' (written by Karen Staley and Jack White)

Neal McCoy's 'Where Forever Begins' (Atlantic Records, 1992) was his first album to enter the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart, peaking at No.58 in 1992.



Working with producer Barry Beckett for the first time, Neal McCoy saw the release, on Tuesday 8 February 1994, of 'No Doubt About It' (Atlantic Records, 1994), an album which proved to be a breakout for him, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'No Doubt About It' (written by John Scott Sherrill and Steve Seskin) (No.1 for one week in March 1994)
'Wink' (written by Bob DiPiero and Tom Shapiro) (No.1 for three weeks in June / July 1994) / this track also reached No.91 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1994
'The City Put the Country Back in Me' (written by Mike Geiger, Woody Mullis and Michael Huffman) (No.5, 1994) / this track also reached No.11 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1994

Neal McCoy's 'No Doubt About It' (Atlantic Records, 1994) also included 'Mudslide', which was written by Sandy Ramos.

Neal McCoy's 'No Doubt About It' (Atlantic Records, 1994) also earned a 'Platinum' certification from the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and 'Gold' certification from the Canadian Recording Industry Association (CRIA).



On Tuesday 24 January 1995, Neal McCoy saw the release of 'You Gotta Love That' (Atlantic Records, 1995), which continued his success, earning him a 'Platinum' certification and producing four hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'For a Change' (written by John Scott Sherrill and Steve Seskin) (No.3, 1994)
'They're Playin' Our Song', which was written by Bob DiPiero, John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 - Thursday 1 February 2001) and Mark D. Sanders (No.3, 1995)
'If I was a Drinkin' Man' (written by Byron Hill and J.B. Rudd) (No.16, 1995)
'You Gotta Love That' (written by Jess Brown and Brett Jones) (No.3, 1996)

Neal McCoy's 'You Gotta Love That' (Atlantic Records, 1995) also included the following tracks:

'You' (written by Craig Wiseman and Thom McHugh)
'Please Don't Leave Me Now' (written by Skip Ewing and Don Sampson)
'Twang' (written by Tony Martin and Reese Wilson)
'Spending Every Minute in Love' (written by Bob DiPiero and Jim Photoglo)
'Plain Jane' (written by J Fred Knobloch and Gary Scruggs)
'You're Backin' Up' (written by Chuck Jones, Gregory Swint and Chris Waters)



On Tuesday 4 June 1994, Neal McCoy saw the release of 'Neal McCoy' (Atlantic Records, 1996), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye', which was written by John D. Loudermilk () (No.4, 1996)
'Going, Going, Gone' (written by Steve Cropper, Bob DiPiero and John Scott Sherrill) (No.35, 1996)
'That Woman Of Mine' (written by Tim Menzies and Don Cook) reaching (No.35, 1996)

Neal McCoy's 'Neal McCoy' (Atlantic Records, 1996) also included the following tracks:

'Me Too' (written by Wendell Mobley and Jim Robinson)
'It Should've Happened That Way' (written by Steve Dorff, Michael Lunn and Jeff Pennig)
'I Ain't Complainin' (written by Jess Brown and Aggie Brown)
'Betcha Can't Do That Again' (written by Gene Dobbins, John Ramey and Bobby Taylor)
'She Can' (written by Austin Gardner and Steve Seskin)
'If It Hadn't Been So Good', which was written by Walt Aldridge and John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 - Thursday 1 February 2001)
'Hillbilly Rap' incorporating 'The Banana Boat Song' (written by Irving Burgie and William Attaway), 'The Ballad of Jed Clampett' (written by Paul Henning) and 'Rapper's Delight' (written by Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers) / this track was arranged by Neal McCoy

It was also in 1996 when Neal McCoy sang guest vocals on the multi-artist charity single 'Hope'.



On Tuesday 10 June 1997, Neal McCoy saw the release of 'Greatest Hits' (Atlantic Records, 1997), his first 'greatest hits' compilation, which included the following tracks:

'Now I Pray for Rain' (written by Lee Satterfield and George Teren) (No.26, 1992)
'No Doubt about It' (written by John Scott Sherrill and Steve Seskin) (No.1 for one week in March 1994)
'Wink' (written by Bob DiPiero and Tom Shapiro) (No.1 for three weeks in June / July 1994)
'The City Put The Country Back in Me' (written by Mike Geiger, Woody Mullis and Michael Huffman) (No.5, 1994)
'For a Change' (written by John Scott Sherrill and Steve Seskin) (No.3, 1994)
'They're Playin' Our Song', which was written by Bob DiPiero, John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 - Thursday 1 February 2001) and Mark D. Sanders (No.3, 1995)
'If I was a Drinkin' Man' (written by Byron Hill and J.B. Rudd) (No.16, 1995)
'You Gotta Love That' (written by Jess Brown and Brett Jones) (No.3, 1996)
'Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye' (written by John D. Loudermilk) (No.4, 1996)
'The Shake' (written by Jon McElroy and Butch Carr) (No.5, 1997) / this track was newly recorded for this compilation, and was later reprised on Neal McCoy's 'Be Good At It' (Atlantic Records, 1997)

Neal McCoy's 'Greatest Hits' (Atlantic Records, 1997), his first 'greatest hits' compilation, earned 'Platinum' certification by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).



On Tuesday 28 October 1997, Neal McCoy saw the release of 'Be Good at It' (Atlantic Records, 1997), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'The Shake' (written by Butch Carr and Jon McElroy) (No.5, 1997) / this track was reprised from Neal McCoy's 'Greatest Hits' (Atlantic Records, 1997)
'If You Can't Be Good, Be Good at It' (written by Blue Miller and Troy Seals)
(No.22, 1997)
'Party On' (written by Karen Taylor-Good and Paul Williams) (No.50, 1998)
'Love Happens Like That' (written by Aaron Barker, Ron Harbin and Anthony Smith) (No.29, 1998)

Neal McCoy's 'Be Good at It' (Atlantic Records, 1997) also included the following tracks:

'I Know You' (written by Chris Farren and Chuck Jones)
'You'll Always Be in My Life' (written by Stephen Allen Davis and Robin Lerner)
'Same Boots' (written by Wil Nance and Steve Dean)
'Back' (written by Craig Wiseman and Ronnie Samoset)
'Broken Record' (written by Jess Brown and Brett Jones)
'21 to 17' (written by Reese Wilson)
'Basic Goodbye' (written by Monty Holmes and Devon O'Day)

It was also in 1998 when Neal McCoy made a second appearance on a multi-artist charity single, as one of several collaborators on 'One Heart at a Time'.



On Tuesday 19 January 1999, Neal McCoy saw the release of his final album for Atlantic Records, 'The Life of The Party' (Atlantic Records, 1999), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'I Was' (written by Phil Vassar and Charlie Black) (No.37, 1999)
'The Girls of Summer' (written by Randy Boudreaux and Bobby Carmichael) (No.42, 1999)

Neal McCoy's final album for Atlantic Records, 'The Life of The Party' (Atlantic Records, 1999), also included the following tracks:

'Lipstick on the Radio' (written by Bob DiPiero and Gerry House)
'Only You' (written by Brett Jones)
'New Old Songs' (written by Dave Gibson)
'The Life of the Party' (written by Allen Shamblin and Billy Kirsch)
'Completely' (written by Marc Beeson and Jeff Wood)
'That's Not Her' (written by Jerry Salley and Steve Leslie)
'Ain't Nothin' Like It' (written by Phil Vassar, Charlie Black and Tommy Rocco)
'The Strongest Man in the World' (written by Ron Harbin, Ed Hill and Kim Tribble)
'Straighten Up & Fly Right', which was written by Nat King Cole (Monday 17 March 1919 - Monday 15 February 1965) and Irving Mills (16 January 1894 - Sunday 21 April 1985)



Due to the closure of Atlantic Records' Nashville division in mid-2000, Neal McCoy's next album, '24-7-365' (Warner Bros. Records, 2000), was issued via Warner Bros. Records, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Forever Works For Me' (written by Steve Bogard and Rick Giles) (No.38, 2000)
'Every Man For Himself', which was written by Mark Elliott and Tim Johnson (Friday 29 January 1960 - Sunday 21 October 2012) (No.37, 2000)
'Beatin' it In' (written by Brett Beavers and Kelly Garrett) (No.41, 2000)

Neal McCoy's '24-7-365' (Warner Bros. Records, 2000) also included the following tracks:

'Count on Me' (written by Michael Lunn and Mike Noble)
'My Life Began with You', which was written by Don Pfrimmer (Thursday 9 September 1937 - Monday 7 December 2015) and Marc Beeson
'What Would Love Say' (written by Allen Shamblin and Chuck Jones)
'Disconnected' (written by Brett Beavers and Kelly Garrett)
'A Love That Strong' (written by Jeffrey Steele and Reed Nielsen)
'24-7-365' (written by Donnie Fritts, Scott Boyer and N.C. Thurman)
'The Key to Your Heart' (written by John Hobbs and Jeff Wood)



In January 2003, 'The Luckiest Man in The World' (Warner Bros. Records, 2003) was intended to be the ninth studio album from Neal McCoy, but it was never released; the album's only single, which was the title track, reached No.46 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 2002, which resulted in Neal McCoy exiting Warner Bros. Records shortly afterwards.

The track listing for Neal McCoy's 'The Luckiest Man in The World' (Warner Bros. Records, 2003) was intended to be as follows:

'Sing' (written by Brett James and Angelo Petraglia)
'The Luckiest Man in the World' (written by Monty Powell and Eric Silver)
'All at the Same Time' (written by Jim Collins and D. Vincent Williams)
'Elvis at The Airport' (written by Leslie Satcher)
'Put Your Best Dress On', which was written by Billy Austin, Dillon Dixon, Don Pfrimmer (Thursday 9 September 1937 - Monday 7 December 2015) and D. Vincent Williams
'Mine is You' (written by Brett James and Frank Rogers)
'Never Got to Say' (written by Dean Blocker, Noah Gordon and Phil O'Donnell)
'Honky Tonk Mona Lisa' (written by Marcus Hummon and Darrell Scott)
'Too Far Gone' (written by Robert Ellis Orrall, John Bettis and Michael Post)
'I'm Your Biggest Fan' (written by Anthony Smith, Bobby Terry and Chris Wallin)

In 2005, Neal McCoy founded his own record label, 903 Music Records, along with his manager, Karen Kane.

Neal McCoy's first single for his 903 Music Records was 'Billy's Got His Beer Goggles On' (written by Philip White and Michael Mobley), which reached No.10 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2005.



On Tuesday 23 August 2005, Neal McCoy saw the release of his first album for 903 Music Records, 'That's Life' (903 Music Records, 2005), which included three tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

'Billy's Got His Beer Goggles On' (written by Philip White and Michael Mobley) (No.10, 2005)
'The Last of a Dying Breed' (written by Tommy Connors, Don Rollins and D. Vincent Williams) (No.36, 2006)
'Tail on the Tailgate' (written by Brian White, Tania Hancheroff and Rodney Clawson) / this track failed to chart

Neal McCoy's first album for 903 Music Records, 'That's Life' (903 Music Records, 2005), also included the following tracks:

'Got Mud' (written by Monty Criswell and Jerrod Niemann)
'Intro' (General Tommy Franks) / spoken word introduction to 'The Last of a Dying Breed', recited by Tommy Franks, which was followed by 'The Last of a Dying Breed' (written by Tommy Connors, Don Rollins and D. Vincent Williams)
'That's Life' (written by Eric Silver and Matt Rollings)
'All Over Again' (written by Randy Goodrum and Don Mescall)
'That's a Picture' (written by Bryan Simpson, Wade Kirby and Ashley Gorley)
'You Let Me Be the Hero' (written by Eric Silver and Rodney Clawson)
'Tails I Lose' (written by Eric Silver and Neal McCoy)
'Jessie' (written by Jeremy Campbell, Neal McCoy and Donny Hackett)



'You're My Jamaica', which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 - Saturday 27 December 1997)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Charley Pride, who originally recorded the track for his 'You're My Jamaica' (RCA Records, 1979) album; Charley Pride's version of 'You're My Jamaica' was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in September 1979

'Head South' (written by Darrell Scott)
'Hillbilly Rap (Live)' (written by Lord Burgess, Bernard Edwards, Nile Rodgers, William Attawar and Paul Henning) / the original version of this track, which was an album cut, was included on Neal McCoy's self-titled album, 'Neal McCoy' (Atlantic Records, 1996)

Background vocalists involved in the recording of Neal McCoy's first album for 903 Music Records, 'That's Life' (903 Music Records, 2005), included Wes Hightower, Bryan White and Andrea Zonn.

Neal McCoy's first album for 903 Music Records, 'That's Life' (903 Music Records, 2005), reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2005, No.32 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2005, and No.3 on the Billboard Independent Albums Chart in 2005.



In 2006, Darryl Worley signed to 903 Music Records and saw the release, on Tuesday 21 November 2006, of 'Here & Now' (903 Music Records, 2006), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

'Nothin' But a Love Thang' (written by Darryl Worley, Chris Stapleton and Steve Leslie) (No.35, 2006)
'I Just Came Back From a War' (written by Darryl Worley and Wynn Varble) (No.18, 2006)
'Living in the Here & Now' (written by Darryl Worley and Brett Jones) (No.54, 2007)

In May 2007, Neal McCoy announced the closure of 903 Music Records.



Lorianne Crook, Gene Watson, Rhonda Vincent, Neal McCoy and Charlie Chase on the set of 'Crook & Chase', with hosts Lorianne Crook and Charlie Chase, in Nashville, on Wednesday 6 February 2008

On Tuesday 3 June 2008, Rhino Records issued a compilation album; 'The Very Best of Neal McCoy' (Rhino Records, 2008) reprised most of Neal McCoy's biggest Billboard country music hit singles up to that point in his career and also included a new recording, 'Rednecktified', which was released as a single but did not chart.

In late 2008, Neal McCoy issued another single, 'For The Troops', but this track too also failed to chart.

In 2010, Neal McCoy signed to the Oklahoma City-based Tate Music Group.

At the time of the acquisition of this Gene Watson 'Peer's Quote' from Neal McCoy, on Thursday 1 July 2010, Neal McCoy was in the recording studio working on new material.



On Tuesday 6 March 2012, Neal McCoy saw the release of 'XII' (Blaster Records, 2012), which was co-produced by Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert with Brent Rowan, and included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

'A-OK' (written by Brett Eldredge, Luke Laird and Barry Dean) (No.52, 2011)
'Shotgun Rider' (written by Keith Anderson, Rhett Akins, Dallas Davidson and Ben Hayslip) / this track was released as a single in 2012, but it did not chart

Neal McCoy's 'XII' (Blaster Records, 2012) also included the following tracks:

'Real Good Feel Good' (written by Dallas Davidson, Jimmy Ritchey and Sam Hunt)
'Judge a Man by the Woman' (written by Barry Dean and Don Poythress)
'Mouth' (written by Jamey Johnson and David Tolliver)
'That's You' (written by Clint Daniels, Neal McCoy and Jeff Hyde)
'Crazy Women' (written by Rivers Rutherford and George Teren)
'Lucky Enough' (written by Neal McCoy, Jeff Hyde and Ryan Tyndell)
'Every Fire' (written by Cathy Majeski and John Scott Sherrill)
'That's Just How She Gets' (written by Shane Minor, Bart Butler and Dave Turnbull)
'Borderline Crazy' (written by Greg Barnhill, Kris Bergsnes and Jeremy Stover)
'Van Gogh' (written by Tom Douglas and Allen Shamblin)



On Tuesday 24 September 2013, Neal McCoy saw the release of 'Pride: A Tribute to Charley Pride' (Slate Creek Records, 2013); the album was a tribute to country music legend, Charley Pride, and featured covers of Charley Pride's songs, including the following:

'Is Anybody Goin' to San Antone', which was written by Glenn Martin and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) / Charley Pride's version of this track was No.1 for two weeks in April / May 1970

'I'm Just Me' (written by Glenn Martin)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Raul Malo / Charley Pride's version of this track was No.1 for four weeks in July / August 1971

'Kiss an Angel Good Mornin', which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 - Wednesday 25 May 2005)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Darius Rucker / Charley Pride's version of this track was No.1 for five weeks in December 1971 / January 1972

'Kaw-Liga', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) and Fred Rose (Floyd Jenkins) (24 August 1898 - Wednesday 1 December 1954)
 / Charley Pride's version of this track reached No.3 in 1969

'You're So Good When You're Bad', which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 - Wednesday 25 May 2005)
Charley Pride's version of this track was No.1 for one week in November 1982

'It's Gonna Take a Little Bit Longer', which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 - Wednesday 25 May 2005)
Charley Pride's version of this track was No.1 for three weeks in July / August 1972

'Roll on Mississippi' (written by Kye Fleming and Dennis Morgan)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Trace Adkins / Charley Pride's version of this track reached No.7 in 1981

'Just Between You & Me', which was written by Cowboy Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013)
Charley Pride's version of this track reached No.9 in 1966

'Mountain of Love' (written by Harold Dorman)
Charley Pride's version of this track was No.1 for one week in March 1982

'Someone Loves You Honey' (written by Don Devaney)
Charley Pride's version of this track was No.1 for two weeks in April 1978

'You're My Jamaica', which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 - Saturday 27 December 1997)
Charley Pride's version of this track was No.1 for one week in September 1979

• Visit Neal McCoy's Official Site at nealmccoy.com

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