• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Webster PR



Webster Public Relations
, PO Box 23015, Nashville, TN 37202

Contact Scott Adkins
Telephone 615-777-6995



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene Watson is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2010, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Tommy Overstreet, which he submitted to this site on Wednesday 20 January 2010.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Tommy Overstreet who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Tommy Overstreet
This quote was submitted on Wednesday 20 January 2010.

'Gene Watson is a good friend and a great country artist'.

Thank you, Tommy Overstreet, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Tommy Overstreet...



Tommy Overstreet, who was born on Friday 10 September 1937 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma is a 'Nashville sound'-style country music artist whose popularity peaked in the 1970s.

Tommy Overstreet, often known simply as 'T.O' by fans and radio disc jockeys, achieved eleven Top Ten singles on the Billboard country music singles chart, along with five Top Five hit singles.

Tommy Overstreet grew up in both Houston, Texas and Abilene, Texas.

Tommy Overstreet decided on a singing career when he was very young, influenced largely by Gene Austin, his third cousin: Gene Austin (24 June 1900 - Monday 24 January 1972) was a singing star of the 1920s and 1930s.

Tommy Overstreet's musical career started when he was seventeen years old, singing on country music star Slim Willet's television show in Abilene, Texas.

In the late 1950s, Tommy Overstreet started a group called 'The Shadows', who entertained at various venues throughout western Texas, including Air Force bases and movie theatres.

Tommy Overstreet first recorded at Norman Petty's studio in Clovis, New Mexico along with Jimmy Gilmer and The Fireballs.

In 1960, Tommy Overstreet recorded in New York City at Roulette Records, with Doc Severinsen on trumpet, Sam 'The Man' Taylor on saxophone and Ray Charles Singers singing background vocals.  But these recordings never saw the light of day.

In 1967, Tommy Overstreet was hired to manage Dot Records in Nashville.

Between 1968 and 1970, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of the following non-album singles:

'Every Day I Fall More in Love with You' / this track was released in 1968, but it did not chart
'Watching the Trains Go By' / this track was released in 1969, but it did not chart
'Games People Play' / this track was released in 1969, but it did not chart
'Rocking a Memory (that won't go to sleep)' (No. 73, 1969)
'Painted by the Wine' / this track was released in 1970, but it did not chart
'Good Day Sunshine' / this track was released in 1970, but it did not chart



In July 1971, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of his debut album, 'Gwen, Congratulations' (Dot Records, 1971), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'If You're Looking for a Fool' (No.56, 1971)
'Gwen (Congratulations)' (written by Ricci Mareno and Jerry Gillespie) (No.5, 1971)
'I Don't Know You (Anymore)' (written by Ricci Mareno and Charlie Black) (No.15, 1971)

Tommy Overstreet's debut album, 'Gwen, Congratulations' (Dot Records, 1971), reached No.33 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971.



In January 1972, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'This is Tommy Overstreet' (Dot Records, 1972), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Ann (Don't Go Runnin')' (written by Buzz Cason)
 (No.2, 1972) / this track was Tommy Overstreet's highest charting Billboard country music hit single

Tommy Overstreet's 'This is Tommy Overstreet' (Dot Records, 1972) reached No.22 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.



In November 1972, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'Heaven is My Woman's Love' (Dot Records, 1972), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'A Seed Before The Rose' (written by Ricci Mareno and Jerry Gillespie)
(No.16, 1972)
'Heaven is My Woman's Love' (written by Sharon Dobbins) (No.3, 1972)

Tommy Overstreet's 'Heaven is My Woman's Love' (Dot Records, 1972) reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.



In September 1973, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'My Friends Call Me T.O.' (Dot Records, 1973), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Send Me No Roses' (written by Ricci Mareno and Charlie Black)
(No.7, 1973)
'I'll Never Break These Chains' (written by Ricci Mareno, Tommy Rocco and Charlie Black) (No.7, 1973)

Tommy Overstreet's 'My Friends Call Me T.O.' (Dot Records, 1973) reached No.23 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.



In April 1974, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'Woman, Your Name is My Song' (Dot Records, 1974), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'(Jeannie Marie) You were a Lady' (written by Charlie Black, Ricci Mareno and Tommy Rocco)
(No.3, 1974)

Tommy Overstreet's 'Woman Your Name is My Song' (Dot Records, 1974) reached No.41 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.



In December 1974, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'I'm a Believer' (Dot Records, 1974), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'If I Miss You Again Tonight' (written by Ricci Mareno, Charlie Black and Marianne Mareno) (No.8, 1974)
'I'm a Believer' (written by Ricci Mareno and Tommy Rocco) (No.9, 1975)

Tommy Overstreet's 'I'm a Believer' (Dot Records, 1974) reached No.38 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.



In July 1975, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'Greatest Hits, Volume 1' (Dot Records, 1975), which included the following tracks:

'Heaven is My Woman's Love' (written by Sharon Dobbins)
 (No.3, 1972)
'Gwen (Congratulations)' (written by Ricci Mareno and Jerry Gillespie) (No.5, 1971)
'If I Miss You Again Tonight' (written by Ricci Mareno, Charlie Black and Marianne Mareno) (No.8, 1974)
'I'm a Believer' (written by Ricci Mareno and Tommy Rocco) (No.9, 1975)
'A Seed Before The Rose' (written by Ricci Mareno and Jerry Gillespie) (No.16, 1972)
'I Don't Know You (Anymore)' (written by Ricci Mareno and Charlie Black) (No.15, 1971)
'If You're Looking for a Fool' (No.56, 1971)
'(Jeannie Marie) You were a Lady' (written by Charlie Black, Ricci Mareno and Tommy Rocco) (No.3, 1974)
'Send Me No Roses' (written by Ricci Mareno and Charlie Black) (No.7, 1973)
'Ann (Don't Go Runnin')' (written by Buzz Cason) (No.2, 1972) / this track was Tommy Overstreet's highest charting Billboard country music hit single
'I'll Never Break These Chains' (written by Ricci Mareno, Tommy Rocco and Charlie Black) (No.7, 1973)

Tommy Overstreet's 'Greatest Hits, Volume 1' (Dot Records, 1975) reached No.18 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.



In November 1975, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'The Tommy Overstreet Show at The Silver Slipper' (Dot Records, 1975), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'That's When My Woman Begins' (written by Jerry Gillespie) (No.6, 1975)

Tommy Overstreet's 'The Tommy Overstreet Show at The Silver Slipper' (Dot Records, 1975) reached No.36 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

In late 1975, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'From Woman to Woman' (written by Jerry Gillespie and Ricci Mareno), a non-album single, which reached No.16 on the Billboard country music singles chart.



In September 1976, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'Turn on to Tommy Overstreet' (Dot Records, 1976), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Here Comes That Girl Again' (written by Rory Bourke, G. Dobbins and J. Wilson)
(No.15, 1976)
'Young Girl' (No.29, 1976)

Tommy Overstreet's 'Turn on to Tommy Overstreet' (Dot Records, 1976) reached No.46 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.



In January 1977, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'Vintage '77' (Dot Records, 1977), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'If Love was a Bottle of Wine' (written by Sterling Whipple)
(No.11, 1977)
'Don't Go City Girl on Me' (written by Michael Kusser and Rafe Van Hoy) (No.5, 1977)

Tommy Overstreet's 'Vintage '77' (Dot Records, 1977) reached No.26 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.



In October 1977, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'Hangin' Round' (Dot Records, 1977), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'This Time I'm in it for the Love' (written by Bob McDill)
(No.20, 1977)
'Yes, Ma'am' (written by Sonny Throckmorton) (No.12, 1978)

Tommy Overstreet's 'Hangin' Round' (Dot Records, 1977) reached No.44 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.



In 1978, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'Better Me' (ABC Records, 1978), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Better Me' (written by Sterling Whipple)
(No.20, 1978)
'Fadin' In, Fadin' Out' (written by Bobby Braddock and Sonny Throckmorton) (No.11, 1978)
'Cheater's Kit' (45, 1979)

In 1979, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'Tears (there's nowhere else to hide)', a non-album single, which reached No.91 on the Billboard country music singles chart; the track featured guest vocals from The Nashville Express.



In April 1979, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'I'll Never Let You Down' (Elektra Records, 1979), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I'll Never Let You Down' (No.27, 1979)



In July 1979, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'The Real Tommy Overstreet' (Elektra Records, 1979), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'What More Could a Man Need' (No.23, 1979)
'Fadin' Renegade' (No.36, 1979)
'Down in the Quarter' (No.41, 1980)



In September 1982, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'The Best of Tommy Overstreet' (Elektra Records, 1982), which included the following tracks:

'Heaven is My Woman's Love' (written by Sharon Dobbins) (No.3, 1972)
'Gwen (Congratulations)' (written by Ricci Mareno and Jerry Gillespie) (No.5, 1971)
'Ann (Don't Go Runnin')' (written by Buzz Cason) (No.2, 1972) / this track was Tommy Overstreet's highest charting Billboard country music hit single
'Mississippi (Why You Bayou)' / this track was an album track from 1979
'I'll Never Break These Chains' (written by Ricci Mareno, Tommy Rocco and Charlie Black) (No.7, 1973)
'Me & The Boys in The Band' (No.72, 1980)
'(Jeannie Marie) You were a Lady' (written by Charlie Black, Ricci Mareno and Tommy Rocco) (No.3, 1974)
'That's When My Woman Begins' (written by Jerry Gillespie) (No.6, 1975)
'Send Me No Roses' (written by Ricci Mareno and Charlie Black) (No.7, 1973)
'Sue' (No.47, 1980)



In 1982, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'Tommy Overstreet's General Store Nuggets' (51-West Records, 1982), which included the following tracks:

'He Stopped Loving Her Today' (written by Bobby Braddock and Curly Putman)
'My Own Kind of Hat', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 - Wednesday 1 July 2015)
'Back on My Mind Again' (written by Conrad Pierce and Charles Quillen)
'Love will Turn You Around'
'Georgia on My Mind'
'Burgers & Fries'
'September Song'
'Old Flame'
'Sail Away'
'I Wouldn't Have Missed it for The World'



In 1983, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'Dream Maker' (Intercord Records, 1983), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Dream Maker' (No.69, 1983)
'Heart of Dixie' (No.84, 1983)



In 1983, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'Good Lovin' Feelin' (Intercord Records, 1983), which included the following tracks:

'Good Lovin' Feelin'
'Lovesong Singalong'
'I Guess I'm Good for Something (after all)'
'Arms Around My Past'
'Comin' on Again'
'Wanted (everywhere but home)'
'Tied to a Tiger'
'When I've Drank Texas Dry'
'Whiskey Woman'
'Lonestar Cowboy'
'Sad Songs & Guitars'



In 1983, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'Audiograph Alive' (Audiograph Records, 1983), which included the following tracks:

'Fadin' In, Fadin' Out' (written by Bobby Braddock and Sonny Throckmorton)
 / this track reached No.11 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978
'Heaven is My Woman's Love' (written by Sharon Dobbins) / this track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1972
'Findin' Revenge'
'Carolyn', which was written by Tommy Collins (Sunday 28 September 1930 - Tuesday 14 March 2000)
'Ruby, Don't Take Your Love to Town' (written by Mel Tillis)
'(Jeannie Marie) You were a Lady' (written by Charlie Black, Ricci Mareno and Tommy Rocco) / this track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1974
'Gwen (Congratulations)' (written by Ricci Mareno and Jerry Gillespie) / this track reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1971
'What More Could a Man Need' / this track reached No.23 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1979
'Me & The Boys in The Band' / the track reached No.72 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1980
'Yes, Ma'am' (written by Sonny Throckmorton) / the track reached No.12 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978

In 1984, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'I Still Love Your Body', a non-album single, which reached No.87 on the Billboard country music singles chart.

In 1986, Tommy Overstreet saw the release of 'Next to You', a non-album single, which reached No.74 on the Billboard country music singles chart.



On Monday 16 February 2015, England's Hux Records released Tommy Overstreet's 'The Best of Tommy Overstreet' (Hux Records, 2015) as HUX143.

'Tommy Overstreet was one of country music's biggest stars in the 1970s and was regularly featured on the country charts throughout the decade.

But, when he had his first hit, he was no newcomer.  he'd been performing since his early teens and had been a radio and TV regular in Oklahoma and Texas since the mid-1950s.

Top 5 hits like 'Heaven is My Woman's Love', 'Gwen (Congratulations)', and 'I Don't Know You Anymore' saw Overstreet push country music in a new, more adult direction.  This won him fans not only in America, but also in Canada, Britain and much of Europe.

Here, we gather together the cream of his country hits, as well as a selection of album tracks where Tommy stamps his style on classics by Neil Diamond, Kenny Rogers and Charlie Rich (Wednesday 14 December 1932 - Tuesday 25 July 1995).

Many of these tracks are issued here on CD for the first time.  The accompanying 16-page booklet includes photographs, extensive liner notes and complete lyrics to every featured track'.

Hux Records' Tommy Overstreet's 'The Best of Tommy Overstreet' (Hux Records, 2015) included the following tracks:

'Gwen (Congratulations)' (written by Ricci Mareno and Jerry Gillespie)
 (No.5, 1971)
'I Don't Know You (Anymore)' (written by Ricci Mareno and Charlie Black) (No.15, 1971)
'Ann (Don't Go Runnin')' (written by Buzz Cason) (No.2, 1972) / this track was Tommy Overstreet's highest charting Billboard country music hit single
'A Seed Before The Rose' (written by Ricci Mareno and Jerry Gillespie) (No.16, 1972)
'Heaven is My Woman's Love' (written by Sharon Dobbins) (No.3, 1972)
'Send Me No Roses' (written by Ricci Mareno and Charlie Black) (No.7, 1973)
'I'll Never Break These Chains' (written by Ricci Mareno, Tommy Rocco and Charlie Black) (No.7, 1973)
'(Jeannie Marie) You were a Lady' (written by Charlie Black, Ricci Mareno and Tommy Rocco) (No.3, 1974)
'If I Miss You Again Tonight' (written by Ricci Mareno, Charlie Black and Marianne Mareno) (No.8, 1974)
'I'm a Believer' (written by Ricci Mareno and Tommy Rocco) (No.9, 1975)
'That's When My Woman Begins' (written by Jerry Gillespie) (No.6, 1975)
'From Woman to Woman' (written by Jerry Gillespie and Ricci Mareno) (No.16, 1975)
'Here Comes That Girl Again' (written by Rory Bourke, G. Dobbins and J. Wilson) (No.15, 1976)
'If Love was a Bottle of Wine' (written by Sterling Whipple) (No.11, 1977)
'Don't Go City Girl on Me' (written by Michael Kusser and Rafe Van Hoy) (No.5, 1977)
'This Time I'm in it for the Love' (written by Bob McDill) (No.16, 1975)
'Yes, Ma'am' (written by Sonny Throckmorton) (No.12, 1978)
'Better Me' (written by Sterling Whipple) (No.20, 1978)
'Fadin' In, Fadin' Out' (written by Bobby Braddock and Sonny Throckmorton) (No.11, 1978)
'Me & You & a Dog Named Boo' (written by Kent LaVoie) / this track was originally included on Tommy Overstreet's debut album, 'Gwen, Congratulations' (Dot Records, 1971)
'Help Me Make it Through The Night' (written by Kris Kristofferson) / this track was originally included on Tommy Overstreet's debut album, 'Gwen, Congratulations' (Dot Records, 1971)
'Behind Closed Doors' (written by Kenny O'Dell) / this track was originally included on Tommy Overstreet's 'My Friends Call Me T.O.' (Dot Records, 1973)
'Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round The Old Oak Tree', which was written by Irwin Jesse Levine (23 March 1938 - 21 January 1997) and Lawrence 'Larry' Russell Brown / this track was originally included on Tommy Overstreet's 'My Friends Call Me T.O.' (Dot Records, 1973)
'Ruby, Don’t Take Your Love to Town (written by Mel Tillis) / this track was originally included on Tommy Overstreet's 'Woman Your Name is My Song' (Dot Records, 1974)
'Sweet Caroline' (written by Neil Diamond) / this track was originally included on Tommy Overstreet's 'Woman Your Name is My Song' (Dot Records, 1974)
'Polk Salad Annie' (written by Tony Joe White) / this track was originally included on Tommy Overstreet's 'Woman Your Name is My Song' (Dot Records, 1974)

As a songwriter, Tommy Overstreet wrote over five hundred songs.  He remained active as a concert performer up until his death and was still an occasional recording artist, including recording gospel and big band music.

Tommy Overstreet was extremely popular in Europe and had toured there many times.

Sadly, Tommy Overstreet died at his home in Oregon on Monday 2 November 2015.

• Follow Tommy Overstreet on Facebook

CMP



Country Music People is Europe’s number one country music magazine.

Country Music People is the specialist expert on country music - past, present and future.

Hux Records



Since February 1998, England-based Hux Records have been specialists in releasing classic archive recordings.

Gene Watson Fan Site