• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted during 2012, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Joe Bonsall & The Oak Ridge Boys, from which they submitted to this site on Thursday 23 August 2012.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Joe Bonsall & The Oak Ridge Boys who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.

The Oak Ridge Boys

Joe Bonsall & The Oak Ridge Boys
This quote was submitted on Thursday 23 August 2012.

'Thank you for asking!

All of The Oak Ridge Boys think the world of Gene Watson.

He is one of the true, one of a kind, country music legends!

His voice is as pure as it gets and his songs are timeless!

God bless Gene Watson!'

Thank you, Joe Bonsall and The Oak Ridge Boys, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Joe Bonsall and The Oak Ridge Boys...

The Oak Ridge Boys

The Oak Ridge Boys
are an American country and gospel vocal quartet.

The Oak Ridge Boys were founded in the 1940s as The Oak Ridge Quartet.  They became popular in southern gospel during the 1950s.  Their name was officially changed to The Oak Ridge Boys in the early 1960s and they remained a gospel-oriented group until the mid-1970s, when they changed their image and concentrated on country music.

The lineup which produced their most well-known country and crossover hit single, including 'Elvira', 'Bobbie Sue' and 'American Made', consisted of Duane Allen (born in Taylortown, Texas on 29 April 1943) (lead), Joe Bonsall (born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 18 May 1948) (tenor), William Lee Golden (born in Brewton, Alabama on 12 January 1939) (baritone) and Richard Sterban (born in Camden, New Jersey on 24 April 1948) (bass).

William Lee Golden and Duane Allen joined the group in the mid-1960s, while Richard Sterban and Joe Bonsall joined in the early 1970s.  Aside from a seven-year gap between 1987 and 1995, when William Lee Golden left the group and was replaced, this lineup had been together since 1973 and continued to tour and record.

The Oak Ridge Quartet
The core group which would eventually lead to The Oak Ridge Boys was a country group called Wally Fowler & The Georgia Clodhoppers, which was formed in Knoxville, Tennessee in 1943.  They were requested to perform to staff members and their families restricted during World War II at the nuclear research plant in nearby Oak Ridge, Tennessee (the birthplace of the atom bomb).  They were asked to sing there so often that eventually they changed their name to The Oak Ridge Quartet.

And, because their most popular songs were gospel, Wally Fowler decided to focus solely on southern gospel music.  At the time, the quartet was made up of Wally Fowler, Lon 'Deacon' Freeman, Curly Kinsey and Johnny New.  This group began recording in 1947.  Wally Fowler & The Oak Ridge Quartet were members of The Grand Ole Opry in the 1940s.

In 1949, the other three men split from Wally Fowler to form a new group, Curley Kinsey & The Tennessee Ridge Runners, so Wally Fowler hired an existing group, The Calvary Quartet, to re-form The Oak Ridge Quartet.

In 1957, Wally Fowler sold the rights to 'The Oak Ridge Quartet' name to group member Smitty Gatlin in exchange for forgiveness of a debt.  As a result of more personnel changes, the group lost its tenor, so they lowered their arrangements and had Smitty Gatlin sing tenor while the pianist, Tommy Fairchild, sang lead.

They recorded an album for Cadence Records, then in 1958 they hired Willie Wynn to sing the tenor part, Fairchild moved back exclusively to the piano.  At this point, the group consisted of Tommy Fairchild at the piano, Willie Wynn, Smitty Gatlin (singing lead), baritone Ron Page, and bass Herman Harper.

They recorded an album for Checker Records, an album for Starday Records and three albums for Skylite Records.

In 1961, Smitty Gatlin changed the group's name to 'The Oak Ridge Boys' because their producer, Bud Praeger, thought 'Oak Ridge Quartet' sounded too old-fashioned for their contemporary sound.

1962 - 1973
In 1962, Ron Page left and the group hired Gary McSpadden, who had filled in for Jake Hess in the Statesmen Quartet, as baritone with the understanding from Jake Hess that when he was ready to start a group, he would recruit McSpadden.

They then recorded another album for Skylite Records and then two groundbreaking albums for Warner Bros. Records after which Gary McSpadden quit when Jake Hess followed through on his promise to hire Gary McSpadden and invited him to join a new group he was forming, The Imperials.

Jim Hammill, who later became a mainstay in The Kingsmen Quartet, was chosen to be his replacement.  They made one album for Festival Records, one for Stateswood Records (Skylite Records' budget label) and two albums for Skylite Records.

Jim Hammill did not get along with the rest of the group, and a fan named William Lee Golden felt that Jim Hammill was hurting the group and asked the group if he could be Jim Hammil's replacement.  After Jim Hammil's retirement from the group in 1964, William Lee Golden joined as baritone.

The group recorded another album for Starday Records and another on Skylite Records in 1965.

In 1966, Smitty Gatlin left the group to become a minister of music and, on William Lee Golden's recommendation, Duane Allen, formerly of Southernairs Quartet (and more recently baritone of Prophets Quartet), was hired to replace him.

With Willie Wynn still singing tenor and Herman Harper as bass, the group made another album for Skylite Records, one album for United Artists Records, and then began recording for Heart Warming Records.

Between 1966 and 1973, they made twelve albums with Heart Warming Records, and the company also released several compilation albums on which they were included during those years.

The group also saw the release of an album on Vista Records (Heart Warming Records' budget label) which included unreleased songs from previous sessions.

In 1968, Herman Harper left the group to join Don Light Talent Agency, before starting his own company, The Harper Agency, which remains one of the most highly-reputable booking agencies in gospel music.

Noel Fox, formerly of The Tennesseans and The Harvesters, took over the bass part.

In 1970, The Oak Ridge Boys earned their first Grammy award for 'Talk about The Good Times'.

In late October 1972, Richard Sterban, the bass with J.D. Sumner & The Stamps Quartet left that group and joined The Oak Ridge Boys.  This closely followed what was possibly The Stamps Quartet's most famous moment, backing Elvis Presley (Tuesday 8 January 1935 - Tuesday 16 August 1977) in his Saturday 10 June 1972 concert at Madison Square Garden.

Joe Bonsall, a Philadelphia native, who was a member of Keystone Quartet and was recording for Duane Allen's Superior Records, joined in October 1973 (coincidentally, both Richard Sterban and Joe Bonsall had been members of The Keystones during the late 1960s, recording much of the Oak Ridge Boys' material).

 It was also in 1973 when The Oak Ridge Boys recorded a single with Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) & The Carter Family, 'Praise the Lord & Pass the Soup', which put them on the Billboard country music singles chart for the first time.  The group's lineup would remain consistent for the next fifteen years.

1974 - 1986
After opening a series of shows for Roy Clark, The Oak Ridge Boys moved in 1973 to Columbia Records, for whom they made three albums and several singles.

In early 1976, they toured Russia for three weeks with Roy Clark.  They went from being one of the top acts on Heart Warming Records to nearly the bottom on Columbia Records in terms of promotion.

Columbia Records did not service the gospel radio stations like Heart Warming Records did, leaving the impression that The Oak Ridge Boys were leaving gospel music, which hurt the group's popularity among its core fan demographic.

While promoting the single 'Heaven Bound', The Oak Ridge Boys made appearances on The Mike Douglas Show and The Merv Griffin Show, both nationally syndicated in the United States and Canada.

In 1976, despite having been picked by Paul Simon to sing backup on 'Slip Slidin' Away', the group asked to be released from its contract with Columbia Records after its single, 'Family Reunion', was only a lukewarm success.

Columbia Records complied with the request, and the band immediately made a live album which was a mix of gospel music and country music on their own record label.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Y'All Come Back Saloon' (ABC / Dot Records, 1977)

In 1977, The Oak Ridge Boys secured a recording contract with ABC / Dot Records and worked with producer Ron Chancey; they saw the release, on Friday 2 September 1977, of their debut album for the label, 'Y'All Come Back Saloon' (ABC / Dot Records, 1977).

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Y'All Come Back Saloon' (ABC / Dot Records, 1977) included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Y'All Come Back Saloon' (written by Sharon Vaughn) (No.3, 1977)
'You're The One' (written by Bob Morrison) (No.2, 1977)
'I'll Be True to You' (written by Alan Rhody) (No.1 for one week in June / July 1978)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Y'All Come Back Saloon' (ABC / Dot Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

'An Old Time Family Bluegrass Band' (written by Mike Hufman)
'Didn't She Really Thrill Them (back in 1924)' (written by Allan Chapman)
'Old Time Lovin' (written by Gerry House)
'Freckles' (written by Sterling Whipple)
'Let Me Be the One' (written by Jimbeau Hinson)
'Easy' (written by Chick Rains)
'Emmylou' (written by Buzz Cason)

Shortly after 'I'll Be True to You' (written by Alan Rhody) (No.1 for one week in June / July 1978) became their first No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart, The Oak Ridge Boys ascended to elite status within the country music community.

In 1978, The Country Music Association (CMA) named The Oak Ridge Boys 'Vocal Group of the Year'.

In the spring of 1979, the Academy of Country Music (ACM) accorded The Oak Ridge Boys similar honours and named 'Y'All Come Back Saloon' (ABC / Dot Records, 1977) as 'Album of the Year'.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Room Service' (ABC Records, 1978)

On Thursday 25 May 1978, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Room Service' (ABC Records, 1978), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Cryin' Again' (written by Don Cook and Rafe VanHoy) (No.3, 1978)
'Come On In' (written by Michael Clark) (No.3, 1979)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Room Service' (ABC Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

'If You Can't Find Love' (written by Pete McCann)
'But I Do' (written by Dave Parkinson and Troy Seals)
'Callin' Baton Rouge', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006)
'It Could Have Been Ten Years Ago' (written by Dennis Wilson)
'Lots of Matchbooks' (written by Harry Middlebrooks)
'If There were Only Time For Love' (written by Wayne Moss)
'I'll Be True to You' (written by Alan Rhody)
'Lay Down Your Sword & Shield' (written by James S. Wetherington)
'I Can Love You' (written by Gary Scruggs)

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'The Oak Ridge Boys Have Arrived' (MCA Records, 1979)

In May 1979, following the merger of ABC / Dot Records with MCA Records, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release, on Friday 30 March 1979, of 'The Oak Ridge Boys Have Arrived' (MCA Records, 1979), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Sail Away' (written by Rafe VanHoy) (No.2, 1979)
'Dream On' (written by Dennis Lambert and Brian Potter) (No.7, 1979)
'Leaving Louisiana in The Broad Daylight' (written by Donivan Cowart and Rodney Crowell) (No.1 for one week in February 1980)

Emmylou Harris: 'Quarter Moon in a Ten Cent Town' (Warner Bros. Records, 1978) Rodney Crowell: 'Ain't Living Long Like This' (Warner Bros. Records, 1978)

'Leaving Louisiana in The Broad Daylight' (written by Donivan Cowart and Rodney Crowell) was originally included on Emmylou Harris' 'Quarter Moon in a Ten Cent Town' (Warner Bros. Records, 1978), and on Rodney Crowell's 'Ain't Living Long Like This' (Warner Bros. Records, 1978); Rodney Crowell had been a member of Emmylou Harris' Hot Band in the 1970s.

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'The Oak Ridge Boys Have Arrived' (MCA Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

'There Must be Something about Me That She Loves' (written by Sonny Throckmorton)
'Sometimes the Rain Won't Let Me Sleep' (written by Pat Bunch, Dan Mitchell and James Price)
'I Gotta Get Over This' (written by Don White)
'My Radio Sure Sounds Good to Me' (written by Larry Graham)
'Every Now & Then' (written by Shayne Dolan and Rock Killough)
'Dig a Little Deeper in The Well' (written by Roger Bowling and Jody Emerson)
'Dancing the Night Away' (written by J. Brown and Russell Smith)

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Together' (MCA Records, 1980)

On Sunday 30 March 1980, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Together' (MCA Records, 1980), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Trying to Love Two Women' (written by Sonny Throckmorton) (No.1 for one week in June / July 1980)
'Heart of Mine' (written by Michael Foster) (No.3, 1980)
'Beautiful You' (written by Dave Hanner) (No.3, 1980)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Together' (MCA Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

'Whiskey Lady' (written by Glenn Ashworth, Gregg Owen, Dana Sigmon and Jack Watts)
'Ready to Take My Chances' (written by Helen Cornelius and DeWayne Orender)
'Take This Heart' (written by Robin Batteau)
'Love Takes Two', which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 - Wednesday 1 July 2015) and Danny Morrison (Sunday 22 April 1945 - Tuesday 14 February 2012)
'A Little More Like Me (The Crucifixion)' (written by Sonny Throckmorton)
'I Can't Imagine Laying Down (with anyone but you)' (written by Don Schlitz)
'Holdin' on to You', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006) and Alan Rush

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Together' (MCA Records, 1980) reached No.10 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1980.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Greatest Hits' (MCA Records, 1980)

On Thursday 30 March 1980, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Greatest Hits' (MCA Records, 1980), which included the following tracks:

'You're The One' (written by Bob Morrison) (No.2, 1977)
'I'll Be True to You' (written by Alan Rhody) (No.1 for one week in June / July 1978)
'Trying to Love Two Women' (written by Sonny Throckmorton) (No.1 for one week in June / July 1980)
'Cryin' Again' (written by Don Cook and Rafe VanHoy) (No.3, 1978)
'Dream On' (written by Dennis Lambert and Brian Potter) (No.7, 1979)
'Leaving Louisiana in The Broad Daylight' (written by Donivan Cowart and Rodney Crowell) (No.1 for one week in February 1980)
'Heart of Mine' (written by Michael Foster) (No.3, 1980)
'Come On In' (written by Michael Clark) (No.3, 1979)
'Sail Away' (written by Rafe VanHoy) (No.2, 1979)
'Y'All Come Back Saloon' (written by Sharon Vaughn) (No.3, 1977)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Greatest Hits' (MCA Records, 1980) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980, and No.13 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1980.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Fancy Free' (MCA Records, 1981)

On Thursday 26 March 1981, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Fancy Free' (MCA Records, 1981), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Elvira' (written by Dallas Frazier) (No.1 for one week in May / June 1981) / this track also reached No.5 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in Summer 1981 / By August 1981, 'Elvira' had sold more than one million copies / The Country Music Association (CMA) and the Academy of Country Music (ACM) both named 'Elvira' as 'Single of the Year' and the song also netted The Oak Ridge Boys their only Grammy Award as a country music act
'(I'm Settin') Fancy Free' (written by Roy August and Jimbeau Hinson) (No.1 for one week in November 1981)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Fancy Free' (MCA Records, 1981) also included the following tracks:

'Somewhere in the Night' (written by Don Cook and Rafe VanHoy)
'She's Gone to L.A. Again' (written by Mickey Clark)
'When I'm with You' (written by Mitch Humphries and Jerry Michael)
'Another Dream Just Came True' (written by Don Schlitz)
'Dream of Me' (written by Buddy Cannon, Jimmy Darrell and Raleigh Squires)
'When Love Calls You' (written by Michael Foster)
'How Long Has it Been' (written by Michael Foster and Marshall Morgan)
'I Would Crawl All The Way (To The River)', which was written by Bucky Jones, Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Dan Wilson

Personnel involved in the recording of The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Fancy Free' (MCA Records, 1981) included the following:

The Oak Ridge Boys
Joe Bonsall, Duane Allen, Richard Sterban and William Lee Golden (vocals)

The Band
Kenneth A. Buttrey and Jerry Carrigan (drums, percussion)
John C. Williams (bass)
Barry Burton, Jimmy Capps, Chip Young, Billy Sanford and Reggie Young (acoustic guitar, electric guitars)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Ron Oates (keyboards)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (banjo)
Harrison Calloway Junior (trumpet)
Charles Rose (trombone)
Ronnie Eades and Harvey Thompson (saxophone)
Bobby G. Taylor (oboe)
John David Boyle, Marvin Chantry, Roy Christensen, Connie Ellison, Carl Gorodetzky, Lennie Haight, Sheldon Kurland, Dennis Molchan, Samuel Terranova, Gary VanOsdale and Stephanie Woolf (strings)
D. Bergen White (string arrangements)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Fancy Free' (MCA Records, 1981) reached No. 1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1981, and No.46 on the Canadian RPM Top Albums Chart in 1981.

George Jones: 'Still The Same Ole Me' (Epic Records, 1981)

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded 'Same Ole Me' (written by Paul Overstreet) and included the track on 'Still The Same Ole Me' (Epic Records, 1981); the track reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1982 and featured guest vocals from The Oak Ridge Boys.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Bobbie Sue' (MCA Records, 1982)

On Wednesday 10 February 1982, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Bobbie Sue' (MCA Records, 1982), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Bobbie Sue' (written by Dan Tyler, Adele Tyler and Wood Newton) (No.1 for one week in April 1982)
'So Fine' (written by Johnny Otis) (No.22, 1982)
'I Wish You Could Have Turned My Head (& Left My Heart Alone)' (written by Sonny Throckmorton) (No.2, October 1982)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Bobbie Sue' (MCA Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

'I Wish You were Here (Oh, My Darlin')' (written by Michael Foster)
'Doctor's Orders' (written by Rory Bourke, Bruce Channel and Kieran Kane)
'Old Kentucky Song' (written by Kix Brooks and Ed Hunnicutt)
'Back in Your Arms Again' (written by Rusty Golden)
'Up on Cripple Creek' (written by Robbie Robertson)
'Until You' (written by William Lee Golden and Jimbeau Hinson)
'Would They Love Him Down in Shreveport?' (written by Bobby Braddock)

Personnel involved in the recording of The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Bobbie Sue' (MCA Records, 1982) included the following:

The Oak Ridge Boys
Joe Bonsall, Duane Allen, Richard Sterban and William Lee Golden (vocals)

Musicians
Jimmy Capps and Chip Young (acoustic guitar)
Jerry Carrigan and Gene Chrisman (drums, percussion)
Farrell Morris (percussion)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Ron Oates (keyboards)
Billy Sanford (lead guitar, acoustic guitar)
Jack Williams (bass guitar)
Reggie Young (lead guitar)

The Muscle Shoals Horns
Harrison Calloway (trumpet)
Ronnie Eades (baritone saxophone)
Charles Rose (trombone)
Harvey Thompson (tenor saxophone, alto saxophone)
D. Bergen White (strings arrangement)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Bobbie Sue' (MCA Records, 1982) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982, and No.27 on the Canadian RPM Top Albums Chart in 1982.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Christmas' (MCA Records, 1982)

On Thursday 23 September 1982, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Christmas' (MCA Records, 1982), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Thank God For Kids' (written by Eddy Raven) (No.3, 1982)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Christmas' (MCA Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

'Jesus is Born Today (it is His Birthday)'
'Christmas is Paintin' the Town'
'Christmas Carol'
'Silver Bells'
'Santa's Song' (based on 'Dead Man's Chest')
'White Christmas'
'Happy Christmas Eve'
'Silent Night'
'Little One'
'Mary Christmas'
'Oh, Holy Night'

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Christmas' (MCA Records, 1982) reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'American Made' (MCA Records, 1983)

On Thursday 20 January 1983, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'American Made' (MCA Records, 1983), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'American Made' (written by Bob DiPiero and Pat McManus) (No.1 for one week in April 1983)
'Love Song' (written by Steven Runkle) (No.1 for one week in August 1983)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'American Made' (MCA Records, 1983) also included the following tracks:

'She's Not Just Another Pretty Face' (written by Sam Lorber and J.D. Martin)
'Amity' (written by Doug Fleet and Guy Fletcher)
'You're The One' (written by Rock Killough and Bob Morrison)
'Down The Hall' (written by Mike Reid and Troy Seals)
'Any Old Time You Choose' (written by Ken Bell, Terry Skinner and J.L. Wallace)
'Heart on The Line (Operator, Operator)' (written by Janet Willoughby and Larry Willoughby)
'You Made it Beautiful' (written by Richard Kerr and Troy Seals)
'I'm so Glad I'm Standing Here Today' (written by Will Jennings and Joe Sample)

Personnel involved in the recording of The Oak Ridge Boys' 'American Made' (MCA Records, 1983) included the following:

The Oak Ridge Boys
Duane Allen, Joe Bonsall, William Lee Golden and Richard Sterban (vocals)

Musicians
Barry Beckett and Ron Oates (keyboards)
Mickey Buckins (percussion)
Jimmy Capps and Chip Young (acoustic guitar)
Eugene Chrisman (drums, percussion)
Lloyd Green (steel guitar)
Roger Hawkins (drums)
David Hood and Jack William (bass guitar)
Jimmy Johnson and Reggie Young (lead guitar)
Kenneth Lovelace (fiddle)
Steve Nathan (keyboards, synthesizer)
Wayne Perkins (lead guitar, acoustic guitar)
Billy Sanford (lead guitar, mandolin)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (banjo)
The Nashville Hornworks (horns)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'American Made' (MCA Records, 1983) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Deliver' (MCA Records, 1983)

On Thursday 20 October 1983, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Deliver' (MCA Records, 1983), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Ozark Mountain Jubilee' (written by Roger Murrah and Scott Anders) (No.5, 1983)
'I Guess It Never Hurts to Hurt Sometimes', which was written by Randy Van Warmer (Wednesday 30 March 1955 - Monday 12 January 2004) (No.1 for one week in May 1984)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Deliver' (MCA Records, 1983) also included the following tracks:

'When You Get to The Heart' (written by Tony Brown, Wayland Holyfield and Norro Wilson)
'Alice is in Wonderland' (written by Brenda Barnett, Charles Chalmers and Sandra Rhodes)
'Ain't No Cure for the Rock 'n' Roll' (writtenn by Walter Carter)
'In The Pines' (traditional)
'Through My Eyes' (written by Doc James)
'Break My Mind', which was written by John D. Loudermilk (Saturday 31 March 1934 - Wednesday 21 September 2016)
'Still Holding On' (written by Bob Corbin)
'Down Deep Inside' (written by Michael Foster and Jimbeau Hinson)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Deliver' (MCA Records, 1983) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Greatest Hits 2' (MCA Records, 1984)

On Saturday 7 July 1984, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Greatest Hits 2' (MCA Records, 1984), which included the following tracks:

'Elvira' (written by Dallas Frazier) (No.1 for one week in May / June 1981) / this track also reached No.5 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in Summer 1981
'Ozark Mountain Jubilee' (written by Roger Murrah and Scott Anders) (No.5, 1983)
'Love Song' (written by Steven Runkle) (No.1 for one week in August 1983)
'(I'm Settin') Fancy Free' (written by Dan August and Jimbeau Hinson) (No.1 for one week in November 1981)
'Everyday' (written by JD Martin and Dave Loggins) (No.1 for one week in October 1984) / this track was a new song, which was previously unreleased
'Beautiful You' (written by Dave Hanner) (No.3, 1980)
'Thank God For Kids' (written by Eddy Raven) (No.3, 1982)
'American Made' (written by Bob DiPiero and Pat McManus) (No.1 for one week in April 1983)
'Make My Life with You' (written by Gary Burr) (No.1 for one week in February 1985) / this track was a new song, which was previously unreleased
'I Guess It Never Hurts to Hurt Sometimes', which was written by Randy Van Warmer (Wednesday 30 March 1955 - Monday 12 January 2004) (No.1 for one week in May 1984)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Greatest Hits 2' (MCA Records, 1984) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.

Ray Charles: 'Friendship' (Columbia Records, 1984 & Columbia Records / Legacy Records, 2005)

In August 1984, The Oak Ridge Boys were guest duet partners on the track 'This Old Heart (is Gonna Rise Again)' (written by J. Martin Johnson and Bucky Jones), which was included on Ray Charles' 'Friendship' (Columbia Records, 1984); the album was re-issued by Columbia Records / Legacy Records in 2005.

• Ray Charles (Tuesday 23 September 1930 - Thursday 10 June 2004)

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Step On Out' (MCA Records, 1985)

On Wednesday 6 March 1985, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Step On Out' (MCA Records, 1985), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Little Things' (written by Billy Barber) (No.1 for one week in June 1985)
'Touch a Hand, Make a Friend' (written by Homer Banks, Raymond Jackson and Carl Hampton) (No.1 for one week in October / November 1985)
'Come On In (You Did The Best You Could Do)' (written by Rick Giles and George Green) (No.3, 1985)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Step On Out' (MCA Records, 1985) also included the following tracks:

'Ophelia' (written by Robbie Robertson)
'Love is Everywhere', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006)
'Only One I Love' (written by Michael Foster and Jimbeau Hinson)
'Roll Tennessee River' (written by Russell Smith and Dave Loggins)

'Class Reunion' (written by
Don Henry and Craig Morris)

John Conlee: 'Harmony' (Columbia Records, 1986)

John Conlee recorded 'Class Reunion' (written by Don Henry and Craig Morris) and included the track on 'Harmony' (Columbia Records, 1986).

Gene Watson: 'In Other Words' (Broadland International Records / Mercury Canada, 1992)

Gene Watson recorded 'Class Reunion' (written by Don Henry and Craig Morris) and included the track on 'In Other Words' (Broadland International Records / Mercury Canada, 1992).

'Staying Afloat' (written by J. D. Martin and Don King)
'Step On Out' (written by Chris Hillman and Peter Knobler)

Personnel involved in the recording of The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Step On Out' (MCA Records, 1985) included the following:

The Oak Ridge Boys
Duane Allen and William Lee Golden (baritone vocals)
Joe Bonsall (tenor vocals)
Richard Sterban (bass vocals)

Additional musicians
Barry Beckett, Clayton Ivey, Steve Nathan and Ron Oates (keyboards)
Mickey Buckins (percussion)
Harrison Calloway, Ronnie Eades, Jim Horn, Charles Rose, Dennis Solee and Harvey Thompson (horns)
Duncan Cameron and Billy Sanford (lead guitar, acoustic guitar)
Jimmy Capps (acoustic guitar)
Jerry Carrigan and Roger Hawkins (drums)
Lloyd Green (steel guitar)
David Hood and Jack Williams (bass guitar)
Jimmy Johnson (electric guitar)
Kenneth Lovelace (fiddle)
Nashville String Machine (string section)
Wayne Perkins (lead guitar)
Brent Rowan and Reggie Young (lead guitar)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Step On Out' (MCA Records, 1985) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Seasons' (MCA Records, 1986)

On Tuesday 25 March 1986, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Seasons' (MCA Records, 1986), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Juliet' (written by John Hall and Larry Hoppen) (No.15, 1986)
'You Made a Rock of a Rolling Stone' (written by Kix Brooks and Chris Waters) (No.24, 1986)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Seasons' (MCA Records, 1986) also included the following tracks:

'Seasons' (written by Jimbeau Hinson and Jack Williams)
'What Are You Doing in My Dream' (written by Steve Diamond and Bill LaBounty)
'Bedtime' (written by Charlie Black and Austin Roberts)
'Hidin' Place' (written by Ray Stevens)
'Don't Break The Code' (written by John Hall and Johanna Hall)
'Take a Step (Yesterday Waltz)' (written by Bill LaBounty and Jay Senter)
'What You Do to Me' (written by John Hall and Johanna Hall)
'Everybody Wins' (written by Duane Allen and Jimbeau Hinson)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Seasons' (MCA Records, 1986) reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1986.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Where The Fast Lane Ends' (MCA Records, 1987)

On Tuesday 10 February 1987, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Where The Fast Lane Ends' (MCA Records, 1987), which was the group's last release before William Lee Golden left the group, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'It Takes a Little Rain (to Make Love Grow)' (written by James Dean Hicks, Roger Murrah and Steve Dean) (No.1 for one week in May / June 1987)
'This Crazy Love' (written by Roger Murrah and James Dean Hicks) (No.1 for one week in September 1987)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Where The Fast Lane Ends' (MCA Records, 1987) also included the following tracks:

'A Little Love Can Go a Long Way'
'Whatever it Takes'
'Love Has a Mind of Its Own' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Is This Any Way for Us to Say Goodbye'
'Where the Fast Lane Ends' (written by Fred Koller and Sonny Throckmorton)
'Looking for Love'
'A Little Late to Say Goodbye'
'Rainbow at Midnight' (written by John Miller) / this track featured guest vocals from Patti LaBelle

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Where The Fast Lane Ends' (MCA Records, 1987) reached No.14 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1987.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Heartbeat' (MCA Records, 1987)

On Wednesday 30 September 1987, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Heartbeat' (MCA Records, 1987), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Time In' (written by Rich Alves, Roger Murrah and James Dean Hicks) (No.17, 1987)
'True Heart' (written by Michael Clark and Don Schlitz) (No.5, 1987)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Heartbeat' (MCA Records, 1987) also included the following tracks:

'Come by Here' (written by Paul Kelly)
'All I Need' (written by Steve Bogard and Rick Giles)
'Don't Turn Around' (written by Gary Burr)
'A Little More Coal on The Fire' (written by Dave Loggins)
'Love Without Mercy', which was written by Mike Reid and Don Pfrimmer (Thursday 9 September 1937 - Monday 7 December 2015)
'Hear My Heart Beat', which was written by Jim Casey and Danny 'Bear' Mayo (Monday 2 October 1950 - Saturday 2 October 1999)
'One Love, One You' (written by Lisa Palas and Mark D. Sanders)
'New Way Out' (written by Randy Sharp)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Heartbeat' (MCA Records, 1987) reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1987.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Monongahela' (MCA Records, 1988)

On Wednesday 10 August 1988, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Monongahela' (MCA Records, 1988), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Gonna Take a Lot of River (Mississippi, Monongahela, Ohio)' (written by Mark Henley and John Kurhajetz) (No.1 for one week in October / November 1988)
'Bridges & Walls', which was written by Roger Murrah and Randy Van Warmer (Wednesday 30 March 1955 - Monday 12 January 2004) (No.10, 1988)
'Beyond Those Years' (written by Troy Seals and Eddie Setser) (No.7, 1989)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Monongahela' (MCA Records, 1988) also included the following tracks:

'I Can Count on You', which was written by Roger Murrah and Randy VanWarmer (Wednesday 30 March 1955 - Monday 12 January 2004)
'Never Together (But Close Sometimes)' (written by Rodney Crowell)
'No Way Out' (written by Steve Bogard and Rick Giles)
'Private Lives' (written by Troy Seals and Mentor Williams)
'Too Many Heartaches' (written by Jerry G. Hludzik and Mark Wanko)
'When Karen Comes Around' (written by Dewayne Blackwell, Bobby Fischer, Earl Bud Lee and Robert Ellis Orrall)
'Taking One Heartbeat (at a time)' (written by Walker Igleheart)

Personnel involved in the recording of The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Monongahela' (MCA Records, 1988) included the following:

The Oak Ridge Boys
Duane Allen (lead vocals)
Joe Bonsall (tenor vocals)
Steve Sanders (Wednesday 17 September 1952 - Wednesday 10 June 1998) (baritone vocals)
Richard Sterban (bass vocals)

Musicians
Dewey Dorough, Bessyl Duhon (saxophone)
John Jarvis (piano, synthesizer)
Wade Benson Landry (fiddle)
Mike Lawler (synthesizer)
Rick Marotta (drums)
Leland Sklar (bass guitar)
Billy Joe Walker Junior (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Reggie Young (electric guitar)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Monongahela' (MCA Records, 1988) reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Greatest Hits 3' (MCA Records, 1989)

On Monday 28 April 1989, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Greatest Hits 3' (MCA Records, 1989), which included the following tracks:

'Gonna Take a Lot of River (Mississippi, Monongahela, Ohio)' (written by Mark Henley and John Kurhajetz) (No.1 for one week in October / November 1988)
'True Heart' (written by Michael Clark and Don Schlitz) (No.5, 1987) / the vocals on this track were re-recorded to match the live rendition more closely / this alternate version is exclusive to this album and has never been included on any other releases
'Little Things' (written by Billy Barber) (No.1 for one week in June 1985)
'This Crazy Love' (written by Roger Murrah and James Dean Hicks) (No.1 for one week in September 1987)
'Come On In (You Did The Best You Could Do)' (written by Rick Giles and George Green) (No.3, 1985)
'Bobbie Sue' (written by Dan Tyler, Adele Tyler and Wood Newton) (No.1 for one week in April 1982)
'It Takes a Little Rain (to Make Love Grow)' (written by James Dean HicksRoger Murrah and Steve Dean) (No.1 for one week in May / June 1987)
'Touch a Hand, Make a Friend' (written by Homer Banks, Raymond Jackson and Carl Hampton) (No.1 for one week in October / November 1985) / Although Steve Sanders (Wednesday 17 September 1952 - Wednesday 10 June 1998) is featured on the cover of the album, several tracks include William Lee Golden on vocals, most notably this track, which includes a solo by William Lee Golden
'Bridges & Walls', which was written by Roger Murrah and Randy Van Warmer (Wednesday 30 March 1955 - Monday 12 January 2004) (No.10, 1988)
'Take Pride in America' (written by David Bracken and Clyde Otis) / this track was previously released as a promotional single and video in 1987, and was included as a 'bonus track' for this compilation

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Greatest Hits 3' (MCA Records, 1989) reached No.22 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1989.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'American Dreams' (MCA Records, 1989)

On Wednesday 30 August 1989, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'American Dreams' (MCA Records, 1989), the cover of which showed The Oak Ridge Boys standing in the seats along the left field line of Nashville's Herschel Greer Stadium; Richard Sterban was a minority shareholder of Nashville Sounds, who played their home games at Herschel Greer Stadium Greer.

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'American Dreams' (MCA Records, 1989) included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'An American Family' (written by Bob Corbin) (No.4, 1989)
'No Matter How High' (written by Joey Scarbury and Even Stevens) (No.1 for one week in March 1990)
'Baby, You'll Be My Baby' (written by Gene Pistilli and Troy Seals) (No.71, 1990)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'American Dreams' (MCA Records, 1989) also included the following tracks:

'Cajun Girl' (written by Martin Kibbee and William Payne)
'If I was to Start Crying' (written by Michael Smotherman)
'Turning For Home' (written by Mike Reid) / this track served as the title track of Mike Reid's debut album, 'Turning For Home' (Columbia Records, 1991)
'In My Own Crazy Way' (written by Troy Seals, Eddie Setser and Rod Stewart)
'Don't Give Up' (written by Jerry Hludzik and Rick Manwiller)
'Bed of Roses' (written by Rex Benson and Steve Gillette)
'The American Dream' (written by Gary Harrison and Keith Stegall)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'American Dreams' (MCA Records, 1989) reached No.24 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1989.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Unstoppable' (RCA Records, 1991)

On Tuesday 9 April 1991, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Unstoppable' (RCA Records, 1991), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Lucky Moon' (written by Mark Wright and Doug Johnson) (No.7, 1990)
'Change My Mind', which was written by A.J. Masters (Wednesday 20 December 1950 - Monday 12 January 2015) and Jason Blume (No.70, 1991)
'Baby on Board' (written by Jeff Silbar and J.C. Crowley) (No.44, 1991)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Unstoppable' (RCA Records, 1991) also included the following tracks:

'Heaven Bound (I'm Ready)', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006)
'When it Comes to You' (written by Mike Geiger, Woody Mullis and Johnny Neel)
'Your Love Made Me This Way', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006)
'If I were You' (written by Billy Dean and Verlon Thompson)
'Walkin' After Midnight' (written by Alan Block and Donn Hecht)
'In a Tender Moment' (written by Reed Nielsen and Monty Powell)
'Love This Cat' (written by Larson Paine and Bobby Paine)
'Our Love is Here to Stay', which was written by J.D. Martin and John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 - Thursday 1 February 2001)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Unstoppable' (RCA Records, 1991) reached No.41 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1991.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'The Long Haul' (RCA Records, 1992)

On Tuesday 23 June 1992, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'The Long Haul' (RCA Records, 1992), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Fall' (No.69, 1992)

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Voices' (Intersound Records, 1999)

On Tuesday 27 July 1999, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Voices' (Intersound Records, 1999), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard Hot Country Singles Chart:

'Ain't No Short Way Home' (written by Bob DiPiero and Jim Photoglo) (No.71, 1999)

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Voices' (Intersound Records, 1999) also included the following tracks:

'Baby, When Your Heart Breaks Down' (written by Kix Brooks)
'Where The Sun Always Shines' (written by Bill Anderson and Tommy Douglas)
'Deep in Louisana', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006)
'Lady My Love' (written by Doug Gill and Tony Laiolo)
'What'll I Do' (written by Skip Ewing and Roger Murrah)
'New Orleans' (written by Bob DiPiero, Mark D. Sanders and Steve Seskin)
'Perfect Love' (written by Troy Seals, Joe Williams and Craig Wiseman)
'I'd Still Be Waiting' (written by Gary Burr and Michael McDonald)
'Old Hearts' (written by Daniel Darst and Ron Reynolds)
'If I Had Left' (written by Rory Bourke and Mike Reid)

After spending many years dealing with problems, including record labels which did not seem to want to promote them, studio breakdowns, and record companies going out of business, the fortunes of The Oak Ridge Boys changed when they signed with Spring Hill Records in 2000.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'From The Heart' (Spring Hill Records, 2001)

On Tuesday 22 May 2001, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'From The Heart' (Spring Hill Records, 2001), which included the following tracks:

'I'm Working on a Building', which was written by Alvin Pleasant (A.P.) Delaney Carter (15 December 1891 - Monday 7 November 1960)
'Show Me the Way to Go' (written by Jeffrey M. Tweel)
'I Know What Lies Ahead' (written by Jean Canter)
'Fall to Fly' (written by Kyle Matthews and Steve Siler)
'Write Your Name Across My Heart', which was written by Tony Harrell and Randy VanWarmer (Wednesday 30 March 1955 - Monday 12 January 2004)
'The First Step to Heaven' (written by Emory Gordy and Jim Rushing)
'A Manison There for You' (written by Shirley Hutchins)
'If Not for the Love of Christ' (written by Jeff Silvey and Tony Wood)
'Angels Watching Over Me' (traditional)
'Then You'll See' (written by Garland Craft)
'Loving God, Loving Each Other' (written by Gloria Gaither and William Gaither)

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Inconvenient Christmas' (EMI CMG / Word Distribution, 2002)

On Tuesday 15 October 2002, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Inconvenient Christmas' (EMI CMG / Word Distribution, 2002), which included the following tracks:

'Winter Wonderland' (written by Felix Bernard and Dick Smith)
'I Pray on Christmas' (written by Harry Connick Junior)
'A Christmas Love Song', which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 - Wednesday 25 May 2005) and Jim Weatherly
'It Came Upon a Midnight Clear' (written by Edmund Hamilton Sears and Richard Storrs Willis)
'My Son' (written by John McElroy and Dottie Moore)
'Beautiful Star of Bethlehem' (written by R. Fisher Boyce and Adger M. Pace)
'The Most Inconvenient Christmas' (written by Kyle Matthews)
'The Christmas Song' (written by Mel Tormé and Robert Wells)
'Beneath The Christmas Tree' (written by Sarah Higgins, Jeffrey Pearson and Billy Thomas)
'Just a Simple Christmas Song', which was written by Randy VanWarmer (Wednesday 30 March 1955 - Monday 12 January 2004)
'The Hallelujah Chorus' (traditional)

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Colors' (Word Distribution / Spring Hill Records, 2003)

On Tuesday 20 May 2003, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Colors' (Word Distribution / Spring Hill Records, 2003), which included the following tracks:

'Colors' (written by Rocko Heermance and Jimbeau Hinson)
'The Absence of Love' (written by Rock Killough)
'The Home Stretch' (written by Rock Killough and Craig Morris)
'American Beauty', which was written by Rich Alves and Randy VanWarmer (Wednesday 30 March 1955 - Monday 12 January 2004)
'This Is America' (written by Norah Lee Allen)
'An American Family' (written by Bob Corbin)
'Let It Ride' (written by John Hiatt)
'Sincerely, I Remain' (written by Troy Seals and Eddie Setser)
'G.I. Joe & Lillie' (written by Joe Bonsall)
'Glory Bound' (written by Buzz Cason and Anthony Crawford)
'Thank God for Kids' (written by Eddy Raven)
The Star Spangled Banner' (written by Francis Scott Key and John Stafford Smith)

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'The Journey' (Word Distribution / Spring Hill Records, 2004)

On Tuesday 27 July 2004, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'The Journey' (Word Distribution / Spring Hill Records, 2004), which included the following tracks:

'Train, Train' (written by Bennie Boling, Dusty Drake and Jerry Vandiver)
'Someplace Green' (written by Pat Terry)
'Bad Case of Missing You' (written by Al Anderson, Bob DiPiero and Jeffrey Steele)
'Saving Grace' (written by Jerry Salley and Charles A. Wilburn)
'You Don't Have to Go Home (But You Can't Stay Here)' (written by Larry Cordle, Jerry Salley and Larry Shell)
'Old Familiar Love' (written by Tom Fisch and Roy Hurd)
'Goin' Against the Grain' (written by Bruce C. Bouton, Larry Cordle and Carl Jackson)
'I Love You So Much It Hurts', which was written by Floyd Tillman (Tuesday 8 December 1914 - Friday 22 August 2003)
'My Girl Friday' (written by Carl Jackson and Curtis Wright)
'That Ole Gravel Road was Easy Street' (written by Billy Lawson and Roger Murrah)
'The Journey' (written by Joe Bonsall)

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'From The Heart' (Spring Hill Records, 2001)

In 2004, The Oak Ridge Boys also recorded gospel songs, which were added to a special edition of 'From The Heart' (Spring Hill Records, 2004), which was available only from Feed The Children.

Later, to recoup some of the costs of making the album for Feed the Children, Spring Hill Records took those new songs, two from 'The Journey', along with freshly cut versions of some of their previous gospel hits, to make up their 'Common Thread' (Word Distribution, 2005).

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Christmas Cookies' (Spring Hill Records / Word Distribution, 2005)

On Tuesday 11 October 2005, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Christmas Cookies' (Spring Hill Records / Word Distribution, 2005), which included the following tracks:

'Hark! The Herald Angels Sing' (written by Felix Mendelssohn and Charles Wesley)
'Christmas Cookies' (written by Aaron Barker)
'From Love to Love' (written by Leslie Satcher)
'Away in a Manger' (arranged by Duane Allen, Joe Bonsall, William Lee Golden, Richard Sterban and Mike Sykes)
'Hay Baby' (written by James Elliot, Brent Lamb and Jerry Salley)
'Little Annie's Christmas Wish' (written by Larry Holden and Billy Yates)
'I'll Be Home for Christmas' (written by Kim Gannon, Walter Kent and Buck Ram)
'Blessed Be The Day (of Our Saviour's Birth)' (written by Jamie O'Hara)
'Jingle Bells' (arranged by Duane Allen, Joe Bonsall, William Lee Golden, Richard Sterban and Mike Sykes)
'Ordinary Days' (written by Steve Bogard and Rick Giles)
'Uncle Luther Made The Stuffin' (written by Joe Bonsall)
'Back to Tennessee' (written by Shelton Feazell and Carl Jackson)
'The Warmest Night of The Year' (written by Gary Harrison and J.D. Martin)
'O, Come All Ye Faithful' (written by Frederick Oakeley and John Francis Wade) (traditional)

The Oak Ridge Boys had plans to record 'Fresh Cuts', which would have contained some new songs and some newly recorded versions of some of their hits.  These plans were stalled by MCA Records, who released some of their country hits on a new compilation.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Front Row Seats' (Spring Hill Records, 2006)

On Tuesday 26 September 2006, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'Front Row Seats' (Spring Hill Records, 2006), which was a return to mainstream country music with modern arrangements and song selection, and included the following tracks:

'Hard to be Cool (in a minivan)' (written by Tony Villanueva)
'Heaven's a Small Town' (written by Byron Hill and Billy Lawson)
'Dream on Me' (written by Willie Mack and Fred Wilhelm)
'Smaller' (written by Chapin Hartford)
'Something in the Water' (written by Roger Brown and Billy Yates)
'Jonah, Job & Moses' (written by Bill Anderson)
'Crazy Not To' (written by Phil Douglas, Rob Harbin and Richie McDonald)
'A Feeling Like That' (written by Bobby Tomberlin)
'Heaven on Earth'
'Closer to Home' (written by John Tirro and Tony Wood)
'Didn't It Rain' (written by Bill Emerson and Jody Emerson)
'Compared to You' (written by Bobby Taylor)
'Until You Get There' (written by Paul Overstreet)
'Did I Make a Difference' (written by Bill Anderson and Rob Crosby)

Shooter Jennings: 'The Wolf' (Universal South Records, 2007)

On Tuesday 23 October 2007, Shooter Jennings, the son of Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002), saw the release of 'The Wolf' (Universal South Records, 2007); one of the included tracks was 'Slow Train' (written by Leroy Powell), which featured guest vocals from The Oak Ridge Boys.

In mid-2008, lead singer Duane Allen announced that The Oak Ridge Boys would be releasing a new album project in mid-2009.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'The Boys are Back' (Christian Records / Spring Hill Records, 2009)

On Tuesday 19 May 2009, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'The Boys are Back' (Christian Records / Spring Hill Records, 2009), which included the following tracks:

'The Boys are Back' (written by Shooter Jennings)
'Hold Me Closely' (written by Brent Cobb)
'Hold You in My Arms' (written by Ethan Johns and Ray LaMontagne)
'Seven Nation Army' (written by Jack White)
'Mama's Table' (written by Jamey Johnson and George Teren)
'Boom Boom' (written by John Lee Hooker)

'You Ain't Gonna Blow My House Down' (written by Glenn Ashworth and Dallas Frazier)
'Beautiful Bluebird' (written by Neil Young)
'God's Gonna Ease My Troublin' Mind'
'Live with Jesus' (written by Paul Kennerley)

In addition to touring extensively throughout 2009, playing over one hundred and fifty dates, The Oak Ridge Boys frequently performed at Oak Ridge Boys Theatre in Branson, Missouri which was a renovated venue, which was formerly owned by Glen Campbell.

On Monday 13 December 2010, The Oak Ridge Boys made a cameo appearance on History Channel show 'Pawn Stars' episode 'Packing Heat'.

During the Friday 8 July 2011 performance of 'Friday Night Opry', Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 - Friday 2 January 2015) announced that The Oak Ridge Boys would be the newest members of The Grand Ole Opry, effective as of Saturday 6 August 2011.

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'It's Only Natural' (Cracker Barrel Old Country Store, 2011)

On Monday 19 September 2011, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of 'It's Only Natural' (Cracker Barrel Old Country Store, 2011), which debuted at No.16 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart and stayed in the Billboard Top 40 for nearly two months.

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'It's Only Natural' (Cracker Barrel Old Country Store, 2011) included the following tracks:

'What’cha Gonna Do?' (written by Sherrié Austin and Wil Nance)
'True Heart' (written by Don Schlitz)
'Before I Die' (written by Trey Matthews and Woody Mullis)
'Gonna Take a Lot of River' (written by Mark Henley and John Kurhajetz)
'No Matter How High' (written by Joey Scarbury and Even Stevens)
'The Shade' (written by Shane Decker and Troy Jones)
'Elvira' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Louisiana Red Dirt Highway' (written by Vernon Rust)
'Beyond Those Years' (written by Troy Seals)
'Wish You Could Have Been There' (written by Casey Marshall)
'Lucky Moon' (written by Doug Johnson and Mark Wright)
'Sacrifice…For Me' (written by Joe Bonsall)

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Back Home Again: Gospel Favourites' (Gaither Music Group, 2012)

In May 2012, The Oak Ridge Boys made a return to their southern gospel roots with the release of 'Back Home Again' (Gaither Music Group, 2012).  Along with some gospel standards, The Oak Ridge Boys covered John Denver's 'Back Home Again' and Dolly Parton's 'Coat of Many Colours'.

The Oak Ridge Boys' 'Back Home Again' (Gaither Music Group, 2012), which featured arrangements more in the acoustic vein and was produced by Ben Isaacs of The Isaacs, included the following tracks:

'Lead Me to That Rock'
'Back Home Again', which was written by John Denver (Friday 31 December 1943 - Sunday 12 October 1997)
'Led Out of Bondage' (written by Robert L. Prather)
'I Get To' (written by Sherrié Austin, Wil Nance and Steven J. Williams)
'In That Great Gettin' Up Mornin'
'Why Me' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Standing in the Need of Prayer'
'Coat of Many Colors' (written by Dolly Parton)
'The Love of God' (written by Frederick M. Lehman)
'River of Jordan' (written by Hazel Houser)
'If We Ever Needed the Lord Before, We Sure Do Need Him Now' (written by Rev. Thomas A. Dorsey)
'Heaven Bound' (written by Bobby Springfield)

Moe Bandy: 'Lucky Me' (Spur Records, 2016)

On Friday 29 July 2016, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Lucky Me' (Spur Records, 2016); one of the included tracks was 'A Place to Hang My Hat' (written by Byron Hill, Shawn Camp and Brice Long), which featured guest vocals from The Oak Ridge Boys.

The Oak Ridge Boys

• Visit The Oak Ridge Boys' Official Site at oakridgeboys.com

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