• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Webster PR



Webster Public Relations
, PO Box 23015, Nashville, TN 37202

Contact Scott Adkins
Telephone 615-777-6995

Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted during 2013, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Glenn Douglas Tubb, which he submitted to this site on Tuesday 30 April 2013.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Glenn Douglas Tubb who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Glenn Douglas Tubb
This quote was submitted on Tuesday 30 April 2013.

'I'm not as familiar with Gene as Dave Lindsey is, because they became good friends over the years.

I am familiar with his music and his talent.

He still sings true country, which to me is the most important thing any singer in our business can do.

Gene has one of the most powerful voices, ever.



When he does 'Farewell Party', I am always afraid he will not hit that note, but he always does.

I am a fan of his and an admirer, from among his peers.

I consider him one of the greats in our business and I hope he continues to bless us with his music for many more years'.

Thank you, Glenn Douglas Tubb, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Glenn Douglas Tubb...

Glenn Douglas Tubb was born on Porter Street in San Antonio, Texas and grew up in a duplex, which was shared by his Uncle Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 - Thursday 6 September 1984).

In 1952, Glenn Douglas Tubb wrote a hit song for his Uncle, Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 - Thursday 6 September 1984).

Glenn Douglas Tubb began his career as Glenn Douglas, dropping the Tubb name, to escape the shadow of his uncle.

Glenn gained a recording deal with Decca Records, which would later become MCA Records. While with Decca Records, Glenn Douglas saw the release of his first album, 'Heartbreak Alley' (Decca Records, 1958) in 1958.

Glenn Douglas' greatest success would come with his songwriting, including such classic country songs as 'Home Of The Blues', recorded by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003), 'Tell Her So', recorded by The Wilburn Brothers, and 'Skip A Rope', recorded by Henson Cargill (Wednesday 5 February 1941 - Saturday 24 March 2007), the latter track earning a Grammy nomination.

In 1980, Glenn Douglas co-wrote 'Two Story House', with Dave Lindsey, which was a hit for George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998).

On Tuesday 29 April 2008, Glenn Douglas Tubb saw the release of 'New Country Psalms' (Porter Street Records, 2008).

On Monday 30 November 2009, Jennifer Brantley the release of 'Heartbroken Forsaken And Alone', a previously unreleased track which had been co-written by Glenn Douglas Tubb and the legendary Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953).

The story behind the song began when Glenn was approached in 1958 by Hank Williams' first wife, Audrey, who told him that she had found some old lyrics written by Hank that he never finished writing. Audrey asked Glenn, who was a big fan of Hank Williams, to finish writing the lyrics and to come up with a Hank Williams’ style melody for the song.

Although Glenn Douglas Tubb was young at the time, he had already written songs for Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003), Kitty Wells (Saturday 30 August 1919 - Monday 16 July 2012), Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 - Thursday 6 September 1984), Hawkshaw Hawkins (Thursday 22 December 1921 - Tuesday 5 March 1963) and others. George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) had also recorded two of Glenn's songs. But the main reasons Audrey Williams chose Glenn were because she knew that Glenn sang a lot of Hank's songs on his personal appearances and that he would probably come closer to finishing the song as Hank would have wanted.

Glenn Douglas Tubb waited until he had written more songs for Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003), George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013), Bob Dylan, Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998), Tennessee Ernie Ford (Thursday 13 February 1919 - Thursday 17 October 1991) and many others before he attempted to finish writing the song Hank Williams had started.

In 1974, while Glenn was living in Tucson, Arizona he completed the song and mailed it to Acuff-Rose, Hank Williams' publisher. Glenn sent them a copy of the original Hank Williams lyrics, along with a demo of the song. They had the handwriting checked by a hand writing expert, who concluded that it was indeed Hank Williams' handwriting.

In June 1974, Fred Rose Music issued a publishing contract on the song, showing the writers as Hank Williams and Glenn Douglas Tubb. Before Glenn moved back to Nashville, Audrey Williams died in November 1975. Glenn does not know if Audrey Williams ever heard the finished product.

After Glenn Douglas Tubb returned to Nashville, he went to Acuff-Rose and had a meeting about the song. Because of some disagreements, the song was essentially buried until 2009.

Glenn Douglas Tubb met Jennifer Brantley in August 2009 at a guitar pull dinner party in Nashville. After Jennifer Brantley heard the song and Glenn heard her voice, it was decided that Jennifer Brantley should record the song.

On Tuesday 9 November 2010, Glenn Douglas Tubb saw the release of 'Half & Half' (CD Baby, 2010).

At the time of the acquisition of this Gene Watson 'Peer's Quote', in April 2013, Glenn Douglas Tubb was still writing and recording great country and Gospel music in the same award-winning fashion he has for the previous sixty years.

Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'Home Of The Blues' (co-written with Johnny Cash and Lily McAlpin) and included the track on 'Johnny Cash Sings The Songs That Made Him Famous' (Sun Records, 1958); the track reached No.3 on the country musc singles chart, and No.88 on the pop music singles chart, in 1958.

Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 - Wednesday 26 January 2011) recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'I Don't Want It' and included the track on 'Less And Less / I Don't Love You Anymore' (Capitol Records, 1964).

Kitty Wells (Saturday 30 August 1919 - Monday 16 July 2012) recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'You Don't Love Me (But You're Afraid Somebody Will)' (co-written with Bob Gallion) and included the track on 'Burning Memories' (Decca Records, 1965).

Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 - Wednesday 26 January 2011) recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'Month Of Sundays' and included the track on 'The Many Moods Of Charlie Louvin' (Capitol Records, 1965).

Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 - Wednesday 26 January 2011) recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'Sunday Morning' and included the track on 'I Forgot To Cry' (Capitol Records, 1967).

Henson Cargill (Wednesday 5 February 1941 - Saturday 24 March 2007) recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'Skip A Rope' (co-written with Jack Moran) and included the track on 'Skip A Rope' (Monument Records, 1968); the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for five weeks in February/March 1968.

'Skip A Rope' (written by Glenn Douglas Tubb and Jack Moran), which sold more than 500,000 copies, also reached No.25 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1968.

Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988) recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'Mr. America' (co-written with Jack Moran) and included the track on 'Nat Stuckey Sings' (RCA Records, 1968).

Check out Ann M. Stuckey's 'Peer's Quote' about Gene Watson, which was submitted on Saturday 25 January 2014

Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 - Saturday 5 June 1993) recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'Skip A Rope' (co-written with Jack Moran) and included the track on 'Here's Conway Twitty' (Decca Records, 1968).

Bobby Bare recorded recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'Skip A Rope' (co-written with Jack Moran) and included the track on 'Margie's At The Lincoln Park Inn' (RCA Victor Records, 1969).

B.J. Thomas recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'Skip A Rope' (co-written with Jack Moran) and included the track on 'BJ Thomas Country' (Scepter Records, 1972).

Charley Pride recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'Mr. Joe Henry's Happy Hand Clappin' Open Air Rhythm Band' (co-written with Larry Lee) and included the track on 'Amazing Love' (RCA Victor Records, 1973).

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'Two Storey House' (co-written with Tammy Wynette and Dave Lindsey) and included the track on 'Together Again' (Epic Records, 1980); the track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in early 1980.

George Jones and Tammy Wynette's 'Together Again' (Epic Records, 1980) reached No.26 on the Billboard Top Country Music Albums Chart in 1980; in 2012, the recording of 'Two Storey House' was used in an American television commercial for GMC Trucks.

Gene Watson recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'This Torch That I Carry For You' (co-written with Dave Lindsey) and included the track on 'This Dream's On Me' (MCA Records, 1982).

Dwight Yoakam recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'Home Of The Blues', which was co-written with Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) and Lily McAlpin, and included the track on 'Buenas Noches From A Lonely Room' (Reprise Records, 1988).

The Kentucky Headhunters recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'Skip A Rope' (co-written with Jack Moran) and included the track on 'Pickin' On Nashville' (Mercury Records, 1989).

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Glenn Douglas Tubb's 'Skip A Rope' (co-written with Jack Moran) and included the track on 'Hits I Missed...And One I Didn't' (Bandit Records, 2005), which was produced by Keith Stegall.


Glenn Douglas Tubb's recognition of achievement includes the following:

1968
'Grammy Award Nomination' for 'Skip A Rope' (written by Glenn Douglas Tubb and Jack Moran)
2009
'Gospel Artist of The Year' (Europe)
2010
'Gospel Artist of The Year' (Europe)
2011
'Gospel Artist of The Year' (Europe)
2012
'Diamond Award for Lifetime Achievement' (USAGEM)
'Acoustical Songwriter of The Year' (USAGEM)
2013
'Independent Country Music Hall of Fame' Winner

Visit Glenn Douglas Tubb's Official Site

CMP



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Hux Records



Since February 1998, England-based Hux Records have been specialists in releasing classic archive recordings.

Gene Watson Fan Site