• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Webster PR



Webster Public Relations
, PO Box 23015, Nashville, TN 37202

Contact Scott Adkins
Telephone 615-777-6995

Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted during 2013, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Joe Stampley, which he submitted to this site on Thursday 12 December 2013.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Joe Stampley who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.

Sean Brady would also like to say 'thank you' to Areeda Stampley, without whom this Gene Watson 'Peer's Quote' from Joe Stampley would not have been possible.



Joe Stampley
This quote was submitted on Thursday 12 December 2013.

'I've known Gene since the early 1970's, and have worked several shows with him.

While working with Gene, I always heard a voice that was as pure as a mountain stream.

Gene Watson is one of the great singers of country music.



When he does the ending to 'Farewell Party', you realize that this is the real thing!

I'm proud to claim him as a dear friend'.

Thank you, Joe Stampley, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Joe Stampley...

Joe Stampley was one of the first artists to build a bridge between rock'n’roll, rhythm & blues and country music; Joe Stampley pioneered what came to be known as 'new country' a decade or more before that marketing niche had been given a name.

Joe Stampley was born on Sunday 6 June 1943 in Springhill, Webster Parish, Louisiana (just a mile from the Arkansas borderline) to R.C. Stampley Junior (1920 - 2000) and Mary E. Stampley (1924 - 2004).

Joe Stampley grew up on a steady diet of country music and, for several years, his family live in Texas. It was while he was living in Texas, at the age of seven, that Joe met the legendary Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) in Baytown.

Joe Stampley lived just down the road from a country music radio station in Baytown, Texas where both Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) and Johnny Horton (Thursday 30 April 1925 - Saturday 5 November 1960) were appearing on a promotional visit. Joe informed Hank Williams that he knew all his songs and could imitate him rather well, but Hank advised him that he should develope his own style.

In 1958, Joe Stampley moved back to Louisiana, where Springhill disc jockey Merle Kilgore (Thursday 9 August 1934 - Sunday 6 February 2005) helped him to secure his first recording contract with Imperial Records.

In the 1960s, Joe Stampley was the lead singer for the pop/rock group The Uniques, who were based out of Shreveport, the largest city near Springhill. They began performing in Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas, soon finding themselves in great demand.

In 1965, The Uniques recorded 'Not Too Long Ago', which was the first national hit for Paula Records. One year later, in 1966, The Uniques followed with the classic 'All These Things', which is still regarded as one of rock music’s sentimental favorites in the Deep American South; the song is considered part of the essence of the 1960s.

The Uniques saw the release of four original albums, along with one greatest hits compilation, between 1965 and their 1970 breakup. Most of The Uniques' material was rooted in rhythm and blues, rock, pop and swamp pop genres.

In 1961, Joe Stampley moved onto Chicago's Chess Records, but it would be another nine years before he finall made connections with Nashville. He sent songs to publisher Al Gallico, who lined up a recording contract for Joe with Paramount Records; Joe's first single was 'Quonette McGraw From Smackover, Arkansas'.

Jody Miller recorded Joe Stampley's 'Week And A Day' and included the track on 'Look At Mine' (Epic Records, 1970).

Dot Records subsequently bought out Paramount Records; on Saturday 20 February 1971, Joe Stampley made his debut on the Billboard country music singles chart with 'Take Time To Know Her' (written by Steve Davis), which reached No.74.

It was also in 1971 that Joe Stampley signed with ABC-Dot Records.

In September 1972, Joe Stampley saw the release of his debut album, 'If You Touch Me' (Dot Records, 1972), which was produced by Norro Wilson and included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Take Time To Know Her' (written by Steve Davis) (No.74, 1971)
'Hello Operator', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Joe Stampley (No.75, 1972)
'If You Touch Me (You've Got To Love Me)', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Joe Stampley (No.9, 1972)

Joe Stampley's debut album, 'If You Touch Me' (Dot Records, 1972), also included the following tracks:

'Two Weeks And A Day' (written by Joe Stampley)
'Quonette McGraw (From Smackover, Arkansas)' (written by Norro Wilson and Dottie Bruce)
'All The Praises', which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Jenny Strickland
'Real Woman', which was written by Norro Wilson and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)
'Cry Like A Baby' (written by Dan Penn and Spooner Oldham)
'Everything I Own' (written by David Gates)
'Your Love's Been A Long Time Coming', which was written by Norro Wilson and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)
'All These Things' (written by Naomi Neville)

Joe Stampley's debut album, 'If You Touch Me' (Dot Records, 1972), reached No.17 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.


In October 1972, Tanya Tucker saw the release of her debut album, 'Delta Dawn' (Columbia Records, 1972), which was produced by Billy Sherrill and reached No.32 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.

Tanya Tucker's debut album, 'Delta Dawn' (Columbia Records, 1972), included the tracks 'If You Touch Me (You've Got To Love Me)', which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986), Norro Wilson and Joe Stampley, and 'Soul Song', which was written by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010), Norro Wilson and Billy Sherrill.

Tanya Tucker's version of 'Soul Song', which was written by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010), Norro Wilson and Billy Sherrill, was released as a single, but failed to chart, so Joe Stampley decided to record it.

'Soul Song' was conceived by keyboard player George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010), who developed the chorus, while Norro Wilson and Billy Sherrill filled out the verses.

Joe Stampley's version of 'Soul Song' made its debut on the Billboard country music singles chart, on Saturday 11 November 1972, at No.44. Ten weeks later, in late January 1973, the single brought Joe Stampley to No.1 for the first time; the single also reached No.37 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1973.

In February 1973, Joe Stampley saw the release of his second album, 'Soul Song' (Dot Records, 1973), which was produced by Norro Wilson and included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Soul Song', which was written by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010), Billy Sherrill and Norro Wilson (No.1 for one week in late January 1973) / this track also reached No.37 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1973
'Bring It On Home (To Your Woman)', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Joe Stampley (No.7, 1973)
'Too Far Gone' (written by Billy Sherrill) (No.12, 1973)

Joe Stampley's second album, 'Soul Song' (Dot Records, 1973), also included the following tracks:

'Clinging Vine' (written by Earl Shuman, Leon Carr and Grace Lane)
'Night-time And My Baby', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Joe Stampley
'My Louisiana Woman', which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Joe Stampley
'She's A Lady' (written by Paul Anka)
'The Most Beautiful Girl' (written by Norro Wilson, Billy Sherrill and Rory Bourke)
'I'm Still Loving You', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010)
'You Make Life Easy', which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Joe Stampley

Charlie Rich (Wednesday 14 December 1932 - Tuesday 25 July 1995) recorded 'The Most Beautiful Girl' (written by Norro Wilson, Billy Sherrill and Rory Bourke) and included the track on 'Behind Closed Doors' (Epic Records, 1973); the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for three weeks in November/December 1973, No.1 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart and had sold more than two million copies by the end of 1974.

Joe Stampley's second album, 'Soul Song' (Dot Records, 1973), reached No.13 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.

In January 1974, Joe Stampley saw the release of his third album, 'I'm Still Loving You' (Dot Records, 1974), which was produced by Norro Wilson and included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I'm Still Loving You', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) (No.3, 1973)
'How Lucky Can One Man Be' (written by Joe Stampley) (No.11, 1974)

Joe Stampley's third album, 'I'm Still Loving You' (Dot Records, 1974), also included the following tracks:

'Too Far Gone' (written by Billy Sherrill)
'Weatherman', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010)
'I Live Just To Love You', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'All The Good Is Gone' (written by Norro Wilson and Dottie Bruce)
'Strong Comeback', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Bill Lancaster
'Hello Charlie' (written by Bobby Bond)
'Night Of Loving', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Bill Lancaster
'Can You Imagine How I Feel' (written by Lonnie Weiss and Joe Stampley
'Not Too Long Ago', which was written by Merle Kilgore (Thursday 9 August 1934 - Sunday 6 February 2005) and Joe Stampley

Joe Stampley's third album, 'I'm Still Loving You' (Dot Records, 1974), reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

In September 1974, Joe Stampley saw the release of his fourth album, 'Take Me Home To Somewhere' (Dot Records, 1974), which was produced by Norro Wilson and included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Take Me Home To Somewhere', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) (No.5, 1974)
'Penny' (written by Steve Davis and Grace Lane) (No.8, 1975)

Joe Stampley's fourth album, 'Take Me Home To Somewhere' (Dot Records, 1974), also included the following tracks:

'Dallas Alice' (written by Steve Davis, Mark Sherrill and Joe Stampley)
'Who Will I Be Loving Now', which was written by Norro Wilson and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)
'Backtracking', which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986), Bill Lancaster and Joe Stampley
'Try A Little Tenderness' (written by Harry Woods, Jimmy Campbell and Red Connelly)
'Good Things', which was written by Billy Sherrill, Norro Wilson and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)
'Unchained Melody' (written by Hy Zaret and Alex North)
'Soft As A Rose', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Mark Sherrill
'Hall Of Famous Losers', which was written by Norro Wilson and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)

Joe Stampley's fourth album, 'Take Me Home To Somewhere' (Dot Records, 1974), reached No.16 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

In June 1975 and July 1976, Joe Stampley saw the release of two compilation albums of his greatest hits: 'Joe Stampley's Greatest Hits' (Dot Records, 1975) and 'All These Things' (Dot Records, 1976).

Joe Stampley's greatest hits compilation, 'All These Things' (Dot Records, 1976), included the following hit singles from the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Unchained Melody' (written by Hy Zaret and Alex North) (No.41, 1975)
'Cry Like A Baby' (written by Dan Penn and Spooner Oldham) (No.70, 1975)
'You Make Life Easy', which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Joe Stampley (No.61, 1976)
'All These Things' (written by Naomi Neville) (No.1 for one week in July 1976)
'Night Time And My Baby', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Joe Stampley (No.16, 1976)
'Everything I Own' (written by David Gates) (No.12, 1976)

Joe Stampley's greatest hits compilation, 'All These Things' (Dot Records, 1976), also included the following tracks:

'Real Woman', which was written by Norro Wilson and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)
'Soft As A Rose', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Mark Sherrill
'I Can't Help Myself', which was written by Eddie Rabbitt (Thursday 27 November 1941 - Thursday 7 May 1998) and Even Stevens
'Night Of Loving', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Bill Lancaster
'All The Praises', which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Jenny Strickland

'Joe Stampley's Greatest Hits' (Dot Records, 1975) reached No.28 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975, while Joe Stampley's 'All These Things' (Dot Records, 1976) reached No.4 in 1976.

Joe Stampley had recorded 'All These Things' (written by Naomi Neville) with his group, The Uniques, in 1966, for the Shreveport, Louisiana-based Paula Records; the track made an appearance on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart.

Paula Records re-issued the single in 1972, complete with additional strings. Joe Stampley, however, recut the track as a country song in 1976, when it was voted the 'No.1 two-step dance song of the Year' in Texas, along with reaching No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart (No.1 for one week in July 1976).

Joe Stampley re-recorded 'All These Tings' as a ballad for Epic Records in 1981, but the single only reached No.62.

After seeing the release of six Billboard Top 10 country music hit singles from 1972 to 1975 for ABC/Dot Records, Joe Stampley moved to Epic Records, where he quickly achieved the second No.1 Billboard country music hit of his career, 'Roll On Big Mama' (No.1 for one week in May 1975), along with the release of thirteen albums for the label.

In March 1975, Joe Stampley saw the release of his self-titled debut album for Epic Records, 'Joe Stampley' (Epic Records, 1975), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Roll On Big Mama' (written by Danny Darst) (No.1 for one week in May 1975)
'Dear Woman' (written by Steve Davis, Mark Sherrill and Joe Stampley) (No.11, 1975)

Joe Stampley's self-titled debut album for Epic Records, 'Joe Stampley' (Epic Records, 1975), also included the following tracks:

'Get On My Love Train', which was written by Norro Wilson and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)
'The Grand Tour', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010)
'Tear Me Up' (written by Steve Davis, Mark Sherrill and Sammy Lyons)
'Laura (What's He Got That I Ain't Got)', which was written by Leon Ashley and Margie Singleton
'I've Never Loved Anyone More' (written by Linda Hargrove and Michael Nesmith)
'The Letter' (written by Wayne C. Thompson)
'Love's Running Through My Veins', which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986), Bill Lancaster and Joe Stampley
'From A Jack To A King' (written by Ned Miller)

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded 'The Grand Tour', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) and included the track on 'The Grand Tour' (Epic Records, 1974); the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in August/September 1974.

Joe Stampley's self-titled debut album for Epic Records, 'Joe Stampley' (Epic Records, 1975), reached No.24 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

In September 1975, Joe Stampley saw the release of his second album for Epic Records, 'Billy, Get Me A Woman' (Epic Records, 1975), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Billy, Get Me A Woman', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Joe Stampley (No.12, 1975)
'She's Helping Me Get Over You', which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Dan Darst (No.25, 1975)

Joe Stampley's second album for Epic Records, 'Billy, Get Me A Woman' (Epic Records, 1975), also included the following tracks:

'Down Home Girl' (written by Steve Davis and Sammy Lyons)
'Love That Feeling' (written by Norro Wilson, Steve Davis and Sammy Lyons)
'She Gives Her Love' (written by Steve Davis and Mark Sherrill)
'I'd Rather Be A Picking' (written by Dan Darst)
'Ray Of Sunshine' (written by Steve Davis, Sammy Lyons and Joe Stampley)
'I Was Keeping Her Warm For You' (written by Johnny Christopher and Kermit Goell)
'She Has Love' (written by Norro Wilson, Dan Darst and Linda Kimbell)
'Almost Persuaded', which was written by Billy Sherrill and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)

David Houston (Monday 9 December 1935 - Tuesday 30 November 1993) recorded 'Almost Persuaded', which was written by Billy Sherrill and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included the track on 'Almost Persuaded' (Epic Records, 1966); the track was No.1 on the country music singles chart for nine weeks in August/September/October 1966.

Joe Stampley's second album for Epic Records, 'Billy, Get Me A Woman' (Epic Records, 1975), reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

In February 1976, Joe Stampley saw the release of his third album for Epic Records, 'The Sheik Of Chicago' (Epic Records, 1976), which included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'The Sheik Of Chicago' (written by Tom Wheeler) (No.43, 1976)
'Was It Worth It' (written by Marvin Moore and Bernie Wayne) (No.43, 1976)
'Whiskey Talking', which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986), Dan Darst and Joe Stampley (No.18, 1976)

Joe Stampley's third album for Epic Records, 'The Sheik Of Chicago' (Epic Records, 1976), also included the following tracks:

'One Final Stand', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010)
'Hey Baby' (written by Bruce Channel and Margaret Cobb)
'Live It Up' (written by Norro Wilson, Russ Faith and Pal Rakes)
'Shoot Low Sheriff', which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Monroe Fields
'Why Not Tonight' (written by Gene Rowe and Patti Ferguson)
'My Eyes Adored You' (written by Bob Crewe and Kenny Nolan)
'Darlin' Raise The Shade', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Claude King (Monday 5 February 1923 - Thursday 7 March 2013)

Joe Stampley's third album for Epic Records, 'The Sheik Of Chicago' (Epic Records, 1976), reached No.38 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.

In October 1976, Joe Stampley saw the release of his fourth album for Epic Records, 'Ten Songs About Her' (Epic Records, 1976), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'There She Goes Again' (written by Lane Caudell and John Wesley Ryles) (No.11, 1976)
'She's Long Legged' (written by Norro Wilson and Dan Darst) (No.26, 1977)

Joe Stampley's fourth album for Epic Records, 'Ten Songs About Her' (Epic Records, 1976), also included the following tracks:

'Apartment No.4 6th Street And Cincinnati' (written by Bobby Braddock)
'Backside Of Thirty' (written by John Conlee)
'Better Part Of Me' (written by Ansley Fleetwood and Joe Stampley)
'Take Me Back' (written by Teddy Randazzo)
'You Lift Me Up' (written by Chris Eaton and Cindy Morgan)
'That Same Ol' Look Of Love', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010)
'Funny How Time Slips Away' (written by Willie Nelson)
'Country's Gonna Do It Again', which was written by Norro Wilson and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)

Joe Stampley's fourth album for Epic Records, 'Ten Songs About Her' (Epic Records, 1976), reached No.38 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.

In 1976, Joe Stampley had eight singles chart on the Billboard country muisc singles chart and was awarded Billboard’s 'Single Artist of the Year' for that accomplishment.

In March 1977, Joe Stampley saw the release of his fifth album for Epic Records, 'Saturday Night Dance' (Epic Records, 1977), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Baby I Love You So' (written by Billy Sherrill and Norro Wilson) (No.15, 1977)
'Everyday I Have To Cry More' (written by Arthur Alexander) (No.14, 1977)

Joe Stampley's fifth album for Epic Records, 'Saturday Night Dance' (Epic Records, 1977), also included the following tracks:

'Saturday Night Dance', which was written by Billy Sherrill and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)
'What Would I Do Then', which was written by Norro Wilson and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)
'So Sick', which was written by Norro Wilson and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)
'Backside Of Thirty' (written by John Conlee)
'Pour The Wine', which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Linda Kimball
'Afraid To Be A Woman' (written by Ben Raleigh and Robert Gibney)
'It Isn't You' (written by Marvin Moore and Bernie Wayne)
'What A Night', which was written by Norro Wilson and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)

Joe Stampley's fifth album for Epic Records, 'Saturday Night Dance' (Epic Records, 1977), reached No.48 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.

In July 1978, Joe Stampley saw the release of his sixth album for Epic Records, 'Red Wine And Blue Memories' (Epic Records, 1978), which included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Red Wine And Blue Memories', which was written by Billy Sherrill, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and Mark Sherrill (No.6, 1978)
'If You've Got Ten Minutes (Let's Fall In Love)' (written by Michael Dukes and Jerry Penrod) (No.6, 1978)
'Do You Ever Fool Around' (written by Jerry Strickland and Don Griffin) (No.5, 1978)

Joe Stampley's sixth album for Epic Records, 'Red Wine And Blue Memories' (Epic Records, 1978), also included the following tracks:

'Hey Barnum And Bailey' (written by Jerry Abbott, Charles Stewart and Kenneth Hagler)
'I'll Marry You Tomorrow (But Let's Honeymoon Tonight)' (written by Hobson Smith and J.D. Rose)
'She's My Woman' (written by Jerry VanTassell)
'We Got A Love Thing' (written by Norro Wilson and Steve Davis)
'Please Don't Throw Your Love Away', which was written by Norro Wilson and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)
'If This Is Freedom' (written by Jerry Abbott and Charles Stewart)
'Houston Treat My Lady Good' (written by Jerry Strickland and Don Griffin)

Gene Watson recorded 'Hey Barnum And Bailey' (written by Jerry Abbott, Charles Stewart and Kenneth Hagler) and included the track on 'Beautiful Country' (Capitol Records, 1977).

Joe Stampley's sixth album for Epic Records, 'Red Wine And Blue Memories' (Epic Records, 1978), reached No.42 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.

In May 1979, Joe Stampley saw the release of his seventh album for Epic Records, 'I Don't Lie' (Epic Records, 1979), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I Don't Lie' (written by Darrell Puett and David Rosson) (No.12, 1979)
'Put Your Clothes Back On' (written by Billy Sherrill and Steve Davis) (No.9, 1979)

Joe Stampley's seventh album for Epic Records, 'I Don't Lie' (Epic Records, 1979), also included the following tracks:

'Sharing' (written by Steve Pippin and Johnny Slate)
'Tonight She's Givin' Her Love To Him' (written by Jerry Abbott and Patty Jackson)
'Please Don't Play A Love Song' (written by Billy Sherrill and Steve Davis)
'Front Door Lady' (written by Carlton Collins)
'I Could Be Persuaded' (written by Carlton Collins)
'Thanks To You I Finally Done Something Right' (written by Billy Sherrill and Steve Davis)
'So Close To Home' (written by Jerry Strickland, Don Griffin and Omega Brown)
'Draggin' Main' (written by David Huff and Robert Stampley)

Joe Stampley's seventh album for Epic Records, 'I Don't Lie' (Epic Records, 1979), reached No.42 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1979.

In 1979, following an appearance at Wembley Country Music Festival in London, England, Joe Stampley augmented his solo career by teaming up with Moe Bandy, and recording three duet albums with him for Columbia Records.

In September 1979, Moe Bandy and Joe Stampley saw the release of 'Just Good Ole Boys - Holding The Bag' (Columbia Records, 1979), which included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Just Good Ole Boys' (written by Ansley Fleetwood - Joe Stamplay's piano player) (No.1 for one week in September 1979)
'Holding The Bag' (written by Buck Moore and Pat Bunch) (No.7, 1979)
'Tell Ole I Ain't Here He Better Go On Home' (written by Wayne Kemp) (No.11, 1980)

Moe Bandy and Joe Stampley's first duet album, 'Just Good Ole Boys - Holding The Bag' (Columbia Records, 1979), also included the following tracks:

'Make A Little Love Each Day' (written by Buck Moore)
'Honky Tonk Man', which was written by Johnny Horton (Thursday 30 April 1925 - Saturday 5 November 1960), Tillman Franks (Wednesday 29 September 1920 - Thursday 26 October 2006) and Howard Hausey
'Partners In Rhyme' (written by Bobby Fisher)
'Bye Bye Love', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) and Felice Bryant (Wednesday 7 August 1925 - Tuesday 22 April 2003)
'Only The Names Have Been Changed', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) and Doris Shaaf
'When It Comes To Cowgirls (We Just Can't Say No)' (written by Jerry Abbott and Patty Jackson
'Thank Goodness It's Friday' (written by Ansley Fleetwood)

The pairing of Moe Bandy and Joe Stampley became affectionately known as 'Moe & Joe' and the result of their pairing was overwhelming; they won 'Vocal Duo of the Year' Awards in 1980 from both the Academy of Country Music (ACM) and the Country Music Association (CMA).

In June 1980, Joe Stampley saw the release of his eighth album for Epic Records, 'After Hours' (Epic Records, 1980), which included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'After Hours' (No.17, 1980)
'Haven't I Loved You Somewhere Else' (No.32, 1980)
'There's Another Woman' (No.18, 1980)

Joe Stampley's eighth album for Epic Records, 'After Hours' (Epic Records, 1980), also included the following tracks:

'Come As You Were'
'One Of Those Cheatin' Songs'
'Whiskey Fever'
'No Love At All'
'This Should Go On Forever'
'How Many Love Songs'
'I'm Afraid To Know You That Well'

Joe Stampley's eighth album for Epic Records, 'After Hours' (Epic Records, 1980), reached No.60 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.

In March 1981, Joe Stampley saw the release of his ninth album for Epic Records, 'I'm Gonna Love You Back To Loving Me Again' (Epic Records, 1981), which included four tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I'm Gonna Love You Back To Loving Me Again' (No.9, 1981)
'Whiskey Chasing' (No.18, 1981)
'All These Things' (written by Naomi Neville) (No.62, 1981) / this was a re-recording of a track which had been No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in July 1976
'Let's Get Together And Cry' (No.41, 1981)

Joe Stampley's ninth album for Epic Records, 'I'm Gonna Love You Back To Loving Me Again' (Epic Records, 1981), also included the following tracks:

'Give Me The Green Light'
'It's Written All Over Your Face'
'Home Sweet Home'
'Back On The Road Again'
'Fool'
'Message'

Joe Stampley's ninth album for Epic Records, 'I'm Gonna Love You Back To Loving Me Again' (Epic Records, 1981), reached No.33 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1981.

In March 1981, Moe Bandy and Joe Stampley saw the release of their second duet album, 'Hey Joe, Hey Moe' (Columbia Records, 1981), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Hey Joe, Hey Moe', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) (No.10, 1981)
'Honky Tonk Queen' (written by Bobby Hicks) (No.12, 1981)

Moe Bandy and Joe Stampley's second duet album, 'Hey Joe, Hey Moe' (Columbia Records, 1981), also included the following tracks:

'Girl, Don't Ever Get Lonely' (written by Bobby Fisher and Chris Blake)
'I'd Rather Be A Picking' (written by Dan Darst)
'Drinkin' Dancing' (written by Shirl Milete and Warren Robb)
'Drunk Front' (written by Paul Craft and Tim Krekel)
'Country Boys', which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Warren Robb
'Let's Hear It For The Workin' Man', which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004)
'Get Off My Case' (written by Larry Cheshier and Dan Mitchell)
'Two Beers Away' (written by Johnny Gimble)

In May 1982, Joe Stampley saw the release of his tenth album for Epic Records, 'I'm Goin' Hurtin' (Epic Records, 1982), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I'm Goin' Hurting' (No.18, 1982)
'I Didn't Know You Could Break A Broken Heart' (No.20, 1982)

Joe Stampley's tenth album for Epic Records, 'I'm Goin' Hurting' (Epic Records, 1982), also included the following tracks:

'I'm Willing To Try'
'This Time Last Year'
'Mandy'
'She Hurt Me Back To Drinkin' Again'
'I Almost Said It Again'
'I Just Can't Get Over You'
'Now More Than Ever'
'Baby I'm A Want You'

In December 1982, Joe Stampley saw the release of his eleventh album for Epic Records, 'Backslidin' (Epic Records, 1982), which included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Backslidin' (written by Paul Craft and Lewis Anderson) (No.25, 1982)
'Finding You' (written by Ansley Fleetwood and Justin Dickens) (No.24, 1983)
'Poor Side Of Town' (written by Johnny Rivers and Lou Adler) (No12, 1983)

Joe Stampley's eleventh album for Epic Records, 'Backslidin' (Epic Records, 1982), also included the following tracks:

'I'm Just Crazy Enough' (written by Steve Collom)
'Everything But The Lady' (written by Carlton Collins)
'It's Over' (written by Tony Stampley and David Rosson)
'Southern Comfort' (written by Chester Lester and Tim DuBois)
'I've Done All That I Can Do' (written by Dan Mitchell and Joe Stampley)
'How When Where' (written by Justin Dickens and Jim Lance)
'I Found You' (written by Justin Dickens and Bud Lee)

In December 1983, Joe Stampley saw the release of his twelfth album for Epic Records, 'Memory Lane' (Epic Records, 1983), which included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Double Shot (Of My Baby's Love)' (No.8, 1983)
'Brown Eyed Girl' (written by Van Morrison) (No.29, 1984)
'Memory Lane' (No.39, 1984) / this track was a duet with Jessica Boucher

Joe Stampley's twelfth album for Epic Records, 'Memory Lane' (Epic Records, 1983), also included the following tracks:

'Winner Never Quits'
'Put Your Hand On My Shoulder'
'Doctor's Orders' / this track was a duet with Tony Stampley
'Poor Side Of Town'
'Could It Wait Until Tomorrow'
'Hot Women, Cold Beer'
'Penny'

In 1984, Moe Bandy and Joe Stampley saw the release of their third, and final, duet album, 'Alive & Well' (Columbia Records, 1984), which included four tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Where's The Dress' (written by Tony Stampley, Hoy Lindsey and George Cummings) (No.8, 1984)
'Boy's Night Out' (written by Joe Stampley, Tony Stampley and David Rosson) (No.36, 1984)
'Daddy's Honky Tonk' (written by Bobby Keel, Buck Moore and Gordon Evans) (No.48, 1985)
'Still On A Roll' (written by Blake Mevis, John Greenbaum and Becky Hobbs) (No.58, 1985)

Moe Bandy and Joe Stampley's third, and final, duet album, 'Alive & Well' (Columbia Records, 1984), also included the following tracks:

'He's Back In Texas Again' (written by Troy Seals and Wood Newton)
'Honky Tonk Money' (written by Michael Garvin, Bucky Jones and Ron Hellard)
'Wild And Crazy Guys' (written by Johnny Christopher, Jim Carter and Hoy Lindsey)
'We've Got Our Moe-Joe Workin' (written by Preston Foster and Morganfield McKinley)
'Wildfire Sanctuary' (written by Blake Mevis and Byron Gallimore)
'Alive And Well' (written by Tony Stampley, David Rosson and David McComb)

Gene Watson recorded 'He's Back In Texas Again' (written by Troy Seals and Wood Newton) and incuded the track on 'Uncharted Mind' (Step One Records, 1993).

Moe Bandy and Joe Stampley's third, and final, duet album, 'Alive & Well' (Columbia Records, 1984), reached No.21 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.

For their take-off on Boy George, 'Where’s The Dress' (written by Tony Stampley, Hoy Lindsey and George Cummings), Moe Bandy and Joe Stampley won the American Video Association’s Award for 'Video of the Year' in 1984.

In 1985, Moe Bandy and Joe Stampley saw the release of a 'live' album of their greatest hits, 'Live From Bad Bob's, Memphis' (Columbia Records, 1985), which included the following tracks:

'We've Got Our Moe-Joe Workin'(written by Preston Foster and Morganfield McKinley)
'Hey Joe, Hey Moe', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987)
'Daddy's Honky Tonk' (written by Bobby Keel, Buck Moore and Gordon Evans)
'Holding The Bag' (written by Buck Moore and Pat Bunch)
'Boy's Night Out' (written by Joe Stampley, Tony Stampley and David Rosson)
'Tell Ole I Ain't Here, He Better Go On Home' (written by Wayne Kemp)
'Where's The Dress' (written by Tony Stampley, Hoy Lindsey and George Cummings)
'Your Cheatin' Heart', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'Still On A Roll' (written by Blake Mevis, John Greenbaum and Becky Hobbs)
'Just Good Ole Boys' (written by Ansley Fleetwood)

In 1985, Joe Stampley saw the release of 'I'll Still Be Loving You' (Epic Records, 1985), which included the following tracks:

'When Something Is Wrong With My Baby'
'I'll Still Be Loving You'
'Hello From The One Who Said Goodbye'
'If She Were Mine'
'When You Were Blue And I Was Green'
'Why Can't We Just Fall In Love'
'There's No You Left In Us Anymore'
'Say Like You Mean It'
'How Do I Break It To My Heart'
'Heart Troubles'

Randy Travis recorded Joe Stampley's ‘If It Ain't One Thing It's Another’ (co-written with Bobby Carmichael and Tony Stampley) and included the track on 'Full Circle' (Warner Bros. Records, 1996).

In October 2001, Joe Stampley saw the release of 'Somewhere Under The Rainbow' (Critter Records, 2001), which included the following tracks:

'Somewhere Under The Rainbow' (written by Scott Blackwell, Jerry Laseter and Kerry Phillips)
'Woman Of Mine' (written by Tony Stampley and Wayne Tester)
'Bonnie Moronie' (written by Larry Williams)
'If You Don't Know Me By Now' (written by Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff)
'All These Things' (written by Naomi Neville)
'Brand New Song' (written by Tony Stampley and Wayne Turner)
'How Lucky Can One Man Be' (written by Joe Stampley)
'You're What Love's All About' (written by Ken Bell, Joe Stampley and Tony Stampley) / this track was a duet with Rocki Rachal
'If Money Talks (All Mine Says Is Goodbye)' (written by Tony Stampley)
'Knock Down, Drag Out' (written by Bobby Carmichael, Joe Stampley and Tony Stampley)
'If It Ain't One (It's Another)' (written by Bobby Carmichael, Joe Stampley and Tony Stampley / this track was a duet with Tony Stampley

On Saturday 1 October 2005, The Uniques reunited for a special show at Piney Woods Palace in Joe Stampley’s hometown of Springhill, Louisiana. The occasion was to commemorate the fortieth anniversary of the band’s recording session for 'Not Too Long Ago', still considered a classic of the Southern rock music sound.

On their 45th Anniversary Reunion in 2010 in Springhill, Louisiana Joe Stampley, along with The Uniques were inducted into The Louisiana Music Hall of Fame.

On Thursday 13 May 2010, Randy Travis, Gene Watson and Joe Stampley participated in a recording session for Randy Travis' '25th Anniversary Celebration' (Warner Bros. Records, 2011) and recorded the track 'Didn't We Shine' (written by Don Schlitz).

Randy Travis' '25th Anniversary Celebration' (Warner Bros. Records, 2011) was officially released on Tuesday 7 June 2011.

Randy Travis with Connie Smith, Joe Stampley and Gene Watson performing 'Didn't We Shine' (written by Don Schlitz) on the hallowed stage of The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville; the track was included on Randy Travis' '25th Anniversary Celebration' (Warner Bros. Records, 2011).

During the course of his highly successful country music career, Joe Stampley achieved over sixty charted records to his credit, which ranks him 30th in Radio & Records' 'Twenty Years of Excellence' magazine. Joel Whitburn’s Billboard Top Country Singles rank Joe Stampley 52nd among all country music artists between 1944 and 1993 for charted singles.

A versatile entertainer and singer, Joe Stampley can liven up any crowd with a rowdy, honky-tonk number or move an audience with the feeling he puts into a love song. His high-energy concert style often involves the audience in his performances with sing-a-longs, hand-clapping and dancing in the aisles.

At the time of the acquisition of this Gene Watson 'Peer's Quote', in December 2013, Joe Stampley was playing concert halls, casinos, clubs and festivals, giving his fans a taste of the hits that have made him a household name for over four decades.


Connect with Joe Stampley at joestampley.com
Connect with Areeda Stampley and Areeda's Southern Cooking at areedasoutherncooking.com

CMP



Country Music People is Europe’s number one country music magazine.

Country Music People is the specialist expert on country music - past, present and future.

Hux Records



Since February 1998, England-based Hux Records have been specialists in releasing classic archive recordings.

Gene Watson Fan Site