Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted during 2013, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Little Jimmy Dickens, which he submitted to this site on Thursday 4 April 2013.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Little Jimmy Dickens who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.

Third Coast Talent, Kingston Springs, Tennessee

Sean Brady would also like to say 'thank you' to Carrie Moore-Reed at Third Coast Talent in Kingston Springs, Tennessee, without whom this Gene Watson 'Peer's Quote' from Little Jimmy Dickens would not have been possible.

On the evening of Tuesday 2 April 2013, Carrie Moore-Reed actually traveled to Little Jimmy Dickens' home and this 'Peer's Quote' was the result of her visit!
Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 - Friday 2 January 2015)

Little Jimmy Dickens
This quote was submitted on Thursday 4 April 2013.

'Gene Watson has been one of my favourites from the start of his illustrious career.

Nobody sings a song better than Gene Watson'.

Thank you, Little Jimmy Dickens, for your support of Gene Watson.


About Little Jimmy Dickens...

Gene Watson and Little Jimmy Dickens backstage at The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville on Tuesday 26 August 2009

Gene Watson and Little Jimmy Dickens backstage at The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville on Tuesday 26 August 2009

Little Jimmy Dickens
was born James Cecil Dickens in Bolt, West Virginia on Sunday 19 December 1920 and was famous for his humorous novelty songs, his small size (4'11"/150 cm) and his rhinestone-studded outfits.

Little Jimmy Dickens was a member of The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville for sixty-four years and was a member of The Country Music Hall of Fame (his induction took place in 1983).

Born in Bolt, West Virginia, Little Jimmy Dickens began his musical career in the late 1930s, performing on a local radio station while attending West Virginia University.

Little Jimmy Dickens soon quit school to pursue a full-time music career, and travelled the United States performing on various local radio stations under the name 'Jimmy The Kid'.

In 1944, Little Jimmy Dickens married Connie Chapman; the marriage ended in divorce in 1955.  Later that year (1955), Little Jimmy Dickens married Ernestine Jones; she died in 1968 in an automobile accident while traveling in Texas.  Little Jimmy Dickens married Mona Evans in 1971.

In 1948, Roy Acuff (Tuesday 15 September 1903 - Monday 23 November 1992) heard Little Jimmy Dickens performing on a radio station in Saginaw, Michigan; it was Roy Acuff who introduced Little Jimmy Dickens to Arthur Edward 'Art' Satherley (19 October 1889 - Monday 10 February 1986) at Columbia Records and officials from The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville.

In August 1948, Little Jimmy Dickens joined The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville.

In September 1948, Little Jimmy Dickens signed a recording contract with Columbia Records.

It was around this time when Little Jimmy Dickens began using the nickname, 'Little Jimmy Dickens', inspired by his short stature.

In 1950, Little Jimmy Dickens formed The Country Boys with musicians Jabbo Arrington, Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 - Monday 3 December 2001), Bob Moore and Thumbs Carllile.

Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982)

It was also during this time that Little Jimmy Dickens discovered future Hall of Famer Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) at a Phoenix, Arizona television station while on tour with The Grand Ole Opry road show.

Lefty Frizzell: 'Columbia Historic Edition' (Columbia Records, 1981)

In 1951, Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975) recorded Little Jimmy Dickens' 'Cold Feet' (co-written with Thelma Blackmon); the track was subsequently included on 'Columbia Historic Edition' (Columbia Records, 1981).

Little Jimmy Dickens: 'The Old Country Church' (Columbia Records, 1954)

In 1954, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release of 'The Old Country Church' (Columbia Records, 1954), which included four tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Take Up Thy Cross' / this track was released as a single in 1952, but it did not chart
'No Tears in Heaven' (written by Robert Arnold) / this track was released as a single in 1952, but it did not chart
'I Shall Not Be Moved' (written by Homer Morris) / this track was released as a single in 1953, but it did not chart
'That Little Old Country Church House' / this track was released as a single in 1954, but it did not chart

Little Jimmy Dickens' 'The Old Country Church' (Columbia Records, 1954) also included the following tracks:

'He Spoke Not a Word' (written by Johnnie Masters)
'Just a Closer Walk With Thee' (traditional)
'Old Country Preacher' (written by Fred Kirby)
'Take My Hand, Precious Lord' (written by Rev. Thomas A. Dorsey)
'Alone With God', which was written by Danny Dill (Friday 19 September 1924 - Thursday 23 October 2008)
'Brother, Do You Take Time To Pray'

In 1957, Little Jimmy Dickens left The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, so that he could tour with The Philip Morris Country Music Show.

Little Jimmy Dickens: 'Raisin' The Dickens' (Columbia Records, 1957)

In November 1957, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release of 'Raisin' The Dickens' (Columbia Records, 1957), which included five tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Take An Old Cold Tater (& Wait)' (No.7, 1949) / the 'B' side of this track, 'Pennies For Papa', reached No.12 in 1949
'Country Boy' (No.7, 1949)
'A-Sleepin' At The Foot of The Bed' (No.6, 1949)
'Out Behind The Barn' (No.9, 1954)
'I'm Little, But I'm Loud', which was written by Little Jimmy Dickens and Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) / this track was released as a single in 1960, but it did not chart

Little Jimmy Dickens' 'Raisin' The Dickens' (Columbia Records, 1957) also included the following tracks:

'I Can't Help It (If I'm Still in Love With You)', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'We Could'
'Raisin' The Dickens'
'Jambalaya (On The Bayou)'
'Wabash Cannonball'
'Tramp On The Street'
'Red Wing'

Little Jimmy Dickens' recording of 'Take An Old Cold Tater (& Wait)' (No.7, 1949) inspired Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) to nickname him 'Tater'.

Later, telling Little Jimmy Dickens that he needed a hit, Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) penned 'Hey Good Looking' specifically for Jimmy in only twenty minutes while on a Grand Ole Opry tour bus.

A week later, Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) recorded the song himself, jokingly telling Little Jimmy Dickens, 'That song's too good for you!'

Hank Williams: 'Memorial Album' (MGM Records, 1956)

Hank Williams' recording of 'Hey Good Looking' was subsequently included on 'Memorial Album' (MGM Records, 1956), which was released in January 1956.

Little Jimmy Dickens: 'Big Songs By Little Jimmy Dickens' (Columbia Records, 1960)

In September 1960, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release of 'Big Songs By Little Jimmy Dickens' (Columbia Records, 1960), which included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'My Heart's Bouquet' (No.10, 1949)
'Fireball Mail' / this track was released as a single in 1960, but it did not chart

Little Jimmy Dickens' 'Big Songs By Little Jimmy Dickens' (Columbia Records, 1960) also included the following tracks:

'John Henry'
'I Cried Again'
'Tomorrow Never Comes'
'Singing Waterfall'
'Careless Darlin'
'We Could'
'Have I Told You Lately That I Love You'
'Pins & Needles (in My Heart)'
'Tomorrow's Just Another Day To Cry'
'Petal From a Faded Rose'

In May 1961, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release, on Columbia Records, of 'FareLawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 - Thursday 26 July 2007)

Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 - Thursday 26 July 2007)

In May 1961, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release, on Columbia Records, of 'Farewell Party', which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 - Thursday 26 July 2007); the track had a catalogue number of 4-42013.

Little Jimmy Dickens was the first artist to record Lawton Williams' 'Farewell Party'; the track was the 'B' side of Little Jimmy Dickens' 'Talking To The Wall' single, which featured Walter Haynes (Friday 14 December 1928 - Thursday 1 January 2009) on steel guitar.

Gene Watson: 'Reflections' (Capitol Records, 1978)

Gene Watson recorded Lawton Williams' 'Farewell Party' and included the track on 'Reflections' (Capitol Records, 1978); when released as a single (Capitol 4680), Gene's Watson's version of 'Farewell Party' reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1979 and featured Lloyd Green on steel guitar.

The Wilburn Brothers (Doyle Wilburn & Teddy Wilburn): 'Sing' (Decca Records, 1961)

The Wilburn Brothers - Doyle Wilburn (Monday 7 July 1930 - Saturday 16 October 1982) and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 - Monday 24 November 2003) - recorded Little Jimmy Dickens' 'It's Gonna Take a Little Time' (co-written with Larry Kirby) and included the track on 'The Wilburn Brothers Sing' (Decca Records, 1961).

The Wilburn Brothers (Doyle Wilburn & Teddy Wilburn): 'City Limits' (Decca Records, 1962)

The Wilburn Brothers - Doyle Wilburn (Monday 7 July 1930 - Saturday 16 October 1982) and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 - Monday 24 November 2003) - recorded Little Jimmy Dickens' 'I'm Beginning To Know About Me' (co-written with Larry Kirby) and included the track on 'City Limits' (Decca Records, 1962).

In SepteLittle Jimmy Dickens: 'Out Behind The Barn' (Columbia Records, 1962)

In September 1962, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release of 'Out Behind The Barn' (Columbia Records, 1962), which included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Twenty Cigarettes', which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 - Sunday 19 November 2017) and Aubrey Ross 'Buck' Peddy (Thursday 23 April 1908 - Tuesday 13 March 1990) / this track was released as a single in 1962, but it did not chart
'The Violet & The Rose', which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 - Sunday 19 November 2017), Bud Auge and John Reinfield (No.10, 1962) / the 'B' side of this track, 'Honky Tonk Troubles', reached No.25 in 1962

Little Jimmy Dickens' 'Out Behind The Barn' (Columbia Records, 1962) also included the following tracks:

'Out Behind The Barn'
'It's Me That Hurts The Most'
'Night Train To Memphis'
'I'm Making Love To a Stranger'
'Slowly'
'Whole World Seems Different'
'Honky Tonk Troubles'
'String Eraser & Blotter'
'Before I Met You'
'Best Years of Your Life'

During 1964, Little Jimmy Dickens became the first country music artist to circle the globe while on tour, and also made numerous television appearances, including 'The Tonight Show' with Johnny Carson.

Little Jimmy Dickens: 'Little Jimmy Dickens' Best' (Harmony Records, 1964)

In April 1964, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release of 'Little Jimmy Dickens' Best' (Harmony Records, 1964), which included the following tracks:

'Take An Old Cold Tater (And Wait)' (No.7, 1949)
'My Heart's Bouquet' (No.10, 1949)
'A-Sleepin' At The Foot of The Bed' (No.6, 1949)
'Be Careful of Stones That You Throw' / this track was previously unreleased
'Hillbilly Fever' / this track was originally released, as a non-album single on Columbia Records, in 1950, when it reached No.3
'I Got a Hole in My Pocket' / this track, which was originally released, as a non-album single on Columbia Records, in 1958, did not chart
'Where's Willie' / this track was previously unreleased
'Cornbread & Buttermilk' / this track, which was originally released, as a non-album single on Columbia Records, in 1956, did not chart
'Jambalaya (On The Bayou)'
'Wabash Cannonball'

 Little Jimmy Dickens: 'Alone With God' (Harmony Records, 1964)

In December 1964, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release of 'Alone With God' (Harmony Records, 1964), a collection of religious material, which included the following tracks:

'No Tears in Heaven'
'He Spoke Not a Word'
'That Little Old Country Church House' / this track was released as a single in 1954, but it did not chart
'Take Up Thy Cross' / this track was released as a single in 1952, but it did not chart
'Just a Closer Walk With Thee'
'Old Country Preacher'
'Take My Hand, Precious Lord'
'I Shall Not Be Moved'
'Alone With God'
'Brother, Do You Take Time To Pray'

Little Jimmy Dickens: 'Handle With Care' (Columbia Records, 1965)

In February 1965, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release of 'Handle With Care' (Columbia Records, 1965), which included four tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Another Bridge To Burn' (No.28, 1963)
'I Leaned Over Backwards For You' / this track was released as a single in 1964, but it did not chart
'Is Goodbye That Easy To Say' / this track was released as a single in 1965, but it did not chart
'He Stands Real Tall' (No.21, 1965)

Little Jimmy Dickens' 'Handle With Care' (Columbia Records, 1965) also included the following tracks:

'Watching The Fire Go Down'
'I'll Sit This One Out'
'Sorrow's Tearing Down The House', which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 - Sunday 19 November 2017) and Kent Westberry
'Stepping Stone'
'She's Not Forgotten Yet'
'Things Have Gone To Pieces'
'Life Turned Her That Way', which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 - Sunday 19 November 2017)
'Handle With Care'

Little Jimmy Dickens: 'May The Bird of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose' (Columbia Records, 1965), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:  'May The Bird of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose' (written by Neal Merritt) (No.1 for two weeks in November 1965) / this track, which was Little Jimmy Dickens' biggest hit song, also reacheLittle Jimmy Dickens: 'May The Bird of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose' (Columbia Records, 1965) Gene Watson: 'Gene Watson' (Wide World Records, 1969 / Stoneway Records, 1973)

In November 1965, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release of 'May The Bird of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose' (Columbia Records, 1965), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'May The Bird of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose' (written by Neal Merritt) (No.1 for two weeks in November 1965) / this track, which was Little Jimmy Dickens' biggest hit song, also reached No.15 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1965

Little Jimmy Dickens' 'May The Bird of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose' (Columbia Records, 1965) also included the following tracks:

'I Can't Get Over Me (Not Getting Over You)'
'My Eyes Are Jealous', which was written by Jimmy Day (Tuesday 9 January 1934 - Friday 22 January 1999) / Gene Watson recorded this track and included it on 'Gene Watson' (Wide World Records, 1969 / Stoneway Records, 1973)
'Honky Tonk Troubles'
'Collection of Failures'
'Call Him Me'
'Twice The Fool'
'Back of My Hand'
'He Knocked Me Right Out of The Box'
'Make Me An Offer'
'Halfway Loved'
'Rose From The Bride's Bouquet'

Little Jimmy Dickens' 'May The Bird of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose' (Columbia Records, 1965) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1965.

Little Jimmy Dickens: 'Little Jimmy Dickens' Greatest Hits' (Columbia Records, 1966)

In September 1966, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release of 'Little Jimmy Dickens' Greatest Hits' (Columbia Records, 1966), which included the following tracks:

'Take An Old Cold Tater (And Wait)' (No.7, 1949)
'May The Bird of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose' (written by Neal Merritt) (No.1 for two weeks in November 1965) / this track, which was Little Jimmy Dickens' biggest hit song, also reached No.15 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1965
'He Knocked Me Right Out of The Box' / this track was an album track from 1965
'When The Ship Hit The Sand' (No.27, 1966) / this track also reached No.103 on the Billboard Hot 200 pop music singles chart in 1966
'Truck Load of Starvin' Kangaroos' / this track was previously unreleased
'A-Sleepin' At The Foot of The Bed' (No.6, 1949)
'Out Behind The Barn' (No.9, 1962)
'Night Train To Memphis' / this track was an album track from 1965
'Fireball Mail' / this track was released as a single in 1960, but it did not chart
'Wabash Cannonball' / this track was an album track from 1957
'Y'all Come' / this track was previously unreleased

Little Jimmy Dickens' Greatest Hits' (Columbia Records, 1966) reached No.39 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1966.

Connie Smith: 'Connie In The Country' (RCA Camden Records, 1967)

Connie Smith recorded Little Jimmy Dickens' 'I'm Little, But I'm Loud', which was co-written with Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987), and included the track on 'Connie in The Country' (RCA Camden Records, 1967).

Little Jimmy Dickens: 'Ain't It Fun' (Harmony Records, 1967)

In April 1967, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release of 'Ain't It Fun' (Harmony Records, 1967), which included the following tracks:

'It May Be Silly, But Ain't It Fun'
'Pennies For Papa'
'I'm in Love Up To My Ears'
'If It Ain't One Thing, It's Another'
'Cold Feet'
'Galvanized Washing Tub'
'Bessie The Heifer'
'Out of Business'
'Walk, Chicken, Walk (Cause You're Too Fat To Fly)'
'Waitress, Waitress'

Little Jimmy Dickens: 'Jimmy Dickens Sings' (Decca Records, 1968)

In March 1968, Little Jimmy Dickens, having left the roster at Columbia Records and moved to Decca Records, saw the release of 'Jimmy Dickens Sings' (Decca Records, 1968), which included the following tracks:

'They're Gonna Have Me Committed'
'I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry'
'I Love Lucy Brown'
'You Wouldn't Cross The Street To Say Goodbye'
'I Came So Close To Living Alone'
'I Can't Help It (If I'm Still in Love With You)', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'There'll Be No Teardrops Tonight'
'Daddy & The Wine'
'It Didn't Take Me Long'
'Heartbreak Avenue'
'I Wear It Well'

Little Jimmy Dickens: 'Big Man in Country Music' (Columbia Records, 1968)

In April 1968, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release of 'Big Man in Country Music' (Columbia Records, 1968), which included four tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Who Licked The Red Off Your Candy' (No.41, 1966)
'Where The Buffalo Trud' / this track was released as a single in 1966, but it did not chart
'Country Music Lover' (written by Bobby Braddock) (No.23, 1968)
'Jenny Needs a G-String (For Her Old Guitar)' / this track was released as a single in 1967, but it did not chart

Little Jimmy Dickens' 'Big Man in Country Music' (Columbia Records, 1968) also included the following tracks:

'Doggone It'
'Possum Holler'
'Police, Police'
'Your Little Red Riding Hood'
'Where There's a Will'
'Big John, Don't Forget Your Hat'
'I Just Had a Bar of Soap'

In February 1969,Little Jimmy Dickens: 'Little Jimmy Dickens Comes Calling' (Decca Records, 1969)

In February 1969, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release of 'Little Jimmy Dickens Comes Calling' (Decca Records, 1969), which included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'How To Catch An African Skeeter Alive' (No.69, 1968)
'Someday You'll Call My Name' / this track was released as a single in 1968, but it did not chart

Little Jimmy Dickens' 'Little Jimmy Dickens Comes Calling' (Decca Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

'Release Me (& Let Me Love Again)'
'Making Believe'
'Wabash Cannonball'
'We Could'
'They've Stole My Steel Guitar'
'When a House is Not a Home'
'Walking The Floor Over You'
'Lonely People'
'Can You Build Your House (On Another Man's Grave)', which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 - Sunday 19 November 2017)

Little Jimmy Dickens: 'Greatest Hits' (Decca Records, 1969)

In June 1969, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release of 'Greatest Hits' (Decca Records, 1969), which included the following tracks:

'I'm Little, But I'm Loud', which was written by Little Jimmy Dickens and Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) / this track was released as a single in 1960, but it did not chart
'Another Bridge To Burn' (No.28, 1963)
'Out Behind The Barn' (No.9, 1954)
'When You're Seventeen' (No.55, 1968)
'Waitress, Waitress' / this track was released as a non-album single, on Columbia Records, in 1952, but it did not chart
'Take Me As I Am (Or Let Me Go)' / this track was previously unreleased
'Country Boy' (No.7, 1949)
'Ribbon & a Rose' / this track was previously unreleased
'A-Sleepin' At The Foot of The Bed' (No.6, 1949)
'She Never Likes Nothing For Long' / this track was previously unreleased
'Take An Old Cold Tater (& Wait)' (No.7, 1949)

In 1971, Little Jimmy Dickens moved to United Artists Records.  It was also in 1971 when Little Jimmy Dickens married his wife, Mona Evans; he had previously been married to Connie Chapman (1944 - 1955) and Ernestine Jones (1955 - 1968).

In 1975, Little Jimmy Dickens returned to The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, where he continued to be an enduring favourite; he often joked about his size, referring to himself as 'Mighty Mouse in his pyjamas'.

Little Jimmy Dickens: 'Country Music Hall of Fame' (King Records, 1982) Gene Watson: 'Gene Watson' (Wide World Records, 1969 / Stoneway Records, 1973)

In 1982, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release of 'Country Music Hall of Fame' (King Records, 1982), which was produced by Jeannie Seely, and included the following tracks:

'She Always Got What She Wanted' (written by Jeannie Seely)
'Geraldine' (written by Jack Adams)
'My Eyes Are Jealous', which was written by Jimmy Day (Tuesday 9 January 1934 - Friday 22 January 1999) / Gene Watson recorded this track and included it on 'Gene Watson' (Wide World Records, 1969 / Stoneway Records, 1973)
'She'll Party At The Drop of a Hat' (written by Jerry Chesnut)
'Raggedy Ann', which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 - Wednesday 1 July 2015)
'Shopping For Dresses', which was written by Little Jimmy Dickens and Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'Wrong Woman Blues', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) and Ron Peterson
'Holding On To Life', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010)
'Mem'ries of The Mountains' (written by Little Jimmy Dickens)
'A Little Bit of Jesus' (written by Hal Bynum)

Personnel involved in the recording of Little Jimmy Dickens' 'Country Music Hall of Fame' (King Records, 1982) included the following:

Mike Wilson (bass guitar)
Rick Vanough (drums)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle, strings)
Willie Rainsford (keyboards)
Jimmy Capps and Leon Rhodes (Thursday 10 March 1932 - Saturday 9 December 2017) (lead guitar)
Mark Casstevens (rhythm guitar, banjo, harmonica)
Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 - Wednesday 29 July 2015) (steel guitar, Dobro)
Calvin Crawford, Diane Berry, Mike Wilson and Tommy Holland (guest vocalists)

The liner notes on Little Jimmy Dickens' 'Country Music Hall of Fame' (King Records, 1982) were written by Porter Wagoner (Friday 12 August 1927 - Sunday 28 October 2007).

Merle Haggard: 'Going Where The Lonely Go' (Epic Records, 1982)

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) recorded Little Jimmy Dickens' 'Shopping For Dresses' (co-written with Merle Haggard) and included the track on 'Going Where The Lonely Go' (Epic Records, 1982).

In 1983, Little Jimmy Dickens was inducted into The Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville.

Little Jimmy Dickens: 'Historic Edition' (Columbia Records, 1984)

In 1984, Little Jimmy Dickens saw the release of 'Historic Edition' (Columbia Records, 1984), which included the following tracks:

'Take An Old Cold Tater (& Wait)' (No.7, 1949)
'I'll Be Back On Sunday' / this track was previously unreleased
'I'm Little, But I'm Loud' / this track was released as a single in 1960, but it did not chart
'Last Time' / this track was previously unreleased
'It May Be Silly, But Ain't It Fun' / this track was previously unreleased
'Out Behind The Barn' (No.9, 1954)
'Slow Suicide' / this track was previously unreleased
'I Wish You Didn't Love Me So Much' / this track was previously unreleased
'Tramp On The Street'
'John Henry'
'Salty Boogie' / this track was previously unreleased

Randy Travis: 'Heroes & Friends' (Warner Bros. Records, 1990)

Randy Travis recorded Little Jimmy Dickens' 'Shopping For Dresses', which was co-written with Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016), and included the track on 'Heroes & Friends' (Warner Bros. Records, 1990); the track featured guest vocals from Loretta Lynn.

Various Artists: 'Christmas Time’s A-Comin: In The Heat of The Night Cast & Friends' (Crimson Records / Sonlite Records, 1991)

In 1991, producers Randall Franks and Alan Autry saw the release of the (various artists compilation) 'In The Heat of The Night' cast album, 'Christmas Time’s A-Comin: In The Heat of The Night Cast & Friends' (Crimson Records / Sonlite Records, 1991); one of the included tracks was 'Jingle Bells', which featured Little Jimmy Dickens, Ken Holloway, Pee Wee King (Wednesday 18 February 1914 - Tuesday 7 March 2000), Marksmen Quartet, Kitty Wells (Saturday 30 August 1919 - Monday 16 July 2012), Bobby Wright & Johnnie Wright (Wednesday 13 May 1914 - Tuesday 27 September 2011).

Martina McBride: 'Evolution' (RCA Nashville Records, 1997)

Martina McBride recorded Little Jimmy Dickens' 'I'm Little, But I'm Loud', which was co-written with Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987), and included the track on 'Evolution' (RCA Nashville Records, 1997).

Merle Haggard: 'Roots, Volume 1' (ANTI-Epitaph Records, 2001)

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) recorded Little Jimmy Dickens' 'Look What Thoughts Will Do', which was co-written with Jim Beck, Dub Dickerson, Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975) and Richard Duncan James, and included the track on 'Roots, Volume 1' (ANTI-Epitaph Records, 2001).

Brad Paisley: 'Mud On The Tires' (Arista Records, 2003)

On Tuesday 22 July 2003, Brad Paisley (a fellow country music artist and musician, and a native of West Virginia) saw the release of 'Mud On The Tires' (Arista Records, 2003); one of the included tracks was 'Kung Pao', a hidden track, which featured The Kung Pao Buckaroos, a group that consisted of Bill Anderson, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Little Jimmy Dickens.

Brad Paisley: 'Time Well Wasted' (Arista Records, 2005)

On Tuesday 16 August 2005, Brad Paisley saw the release of 'Time Well Wasted' (Arista Records, 2005); one of the included tracks was 'Cornography', a comedy sketch, which featured James Burton and The Kung Pao Buckaroos, a group that consisted of Bill AndersonGeorge Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Little Jimmy Dickens.

Brad Paisley: 'Brad Paisley Christmas' (Arista Records, 2006)

On Tuesday 10 October 2006, Brad Paisley saw the release of 'Brad Paisley Christmas' (Arista Records, 2006); one of the included tracks was 'Kung Pao Buckaroo Holiday' (written by Brad Paisley and Frank Rogers), a track which featured The Kung Pao Buckaroos, a group consisting of Bill Anderson, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Little Jimmy Dickens.

Brad Paisley: '5th Gear' (Arista Records, 2007)

On Tuesday 19 June 2007, Brad Paisley saw the release of '5th Gear' (Arista Records, 2007); one of the included tracks was 'Previously', which featured The Kung Pao Buckaroos, a group that consisted of Bill Anderson, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Little Jimmy Dickens.

Brad Paisley's '5th Gear' (Arista Records, 2007) also included 'Bigger Fish To Fry' (written by Steve Bogard and Jeff Stevens), a track which featured The Kung Pao Buckaroos, a group that consisted of Bill Anderson, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Little Jimmy Dickens.

Hank Locklin (Friday 15 February 1918 - Sunday 8 March 2009)

With the passing of Hank Locklin (Friday 15 February 1918 - Sunday 8 March 2009) in March 2009, Little Jimmy Dickens became the oldest living member of The Grand Ole Opry at the age of ninety.  Little Jimmy Dickens made regular appearances as a host at the Opry, often with the self-deprecating joke that he was also known as 'Willie Nelson after taxes'.

Little Jimmy Dickens and Donnie 'Drop' Watson backstage at The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville on Friday 15 May 2009

Little Jimmy Dickens and Donnie 'Drop' Watson backstage at The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville on Friday 15 May 2009

Gene Watson and Little Jimmy Dickens backstage at The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville on Tuesday 26 August 2009

Gene Watson and Little Jimmy Dickens backstage at The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville on Tuesday 26 August 2009

Gene Watson and Little Jimmy Dickens backstage at The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville on Friday 6 November 2009


Gene Watson and Little Jimmy Dickens backstage at The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville on Friday 6 November 2009

Little Jimmy Dickens

During the course of his country music career, Little Jimmy Dickens also enjoyed the release of a number of non-album singles, including the following:

'A Rose From The Bride's Bouquet' / this track was released as a non-album single in 1950, but it did not chart
'Hillbilly Fever' (No.3, 1950)
'F-o-o-l-i-sh Me' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1950, but it did not chart
'Walk, Chicken, Walk' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1950, but it did not chart
'Out of Business' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1950, but it did not chart
'Cold Feet' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1951, but it did not chart
'What About You' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1951, but it did not chart
'Sign of The Highway' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1951, but it did not chart
'Poor Little Darlin' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1951, but it did not chart
'Old Rugged Cross' () / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1951, but it did not chart / this track featured The Johnson Family Singers)
'They Locked God Outside The Iron Curtain' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1952, but it did not chart
'Lola Lee' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1952, but it did not chart
'Hot Diggity Dog' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1952, but it did not chart
'Waitress, Waitress' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1952, but it did not chart
'Wedding Bell Waltz' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1952, but it did not chart
'Sidemeat & Cabbage' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1953, but it did not chart
'I'm Making Love To a Stranger' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1953, but it did not chart
'Thick & Thin' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1953, but it did not chart
'No Place Like Home On Christmas' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1953, but it did not chart
'Y'All Come Home' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1954, but it did not chart
'You Better Not Do That' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1954, but it did not chart
'Blackeyed Joe's' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1954, but it did not chart
'Stinky, Pass The Hat Around' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1954, but it did not chart
'Salty Boogie' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1955, but it did not chart
'We Could' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1955, but it did not chart
'I'm Braver Now' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1955, but it did not chart
'Hey Worm (You Wanna Wiggle)' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1956, but it did not chart
'Big Sandy' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1956, but it did not chart
'Country Boy Bounce' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1956, but it did not chart / this track featured The Country Boys
'Cornbread & Buttermilk' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1956, but it did not chart
'Say It Now' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1956, but it did not chart
'Raisin' The Dickens' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1956, but it did not chart / this track featured The Country Boys
'I Never Had The Blues' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1957, but it did not chart
'Makin' The Rounds' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1957, but it did not chart
'Family Reunion' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1957, but it did not chart
'(I Got a) Hole in My Pocket' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1958, but it did not chart
'When Your House is Not a Home' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1959, but it did not chart
'Hannah' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1959, but it did not chart
'Hey Ma (Hide The Daughter)' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1959, but it did not chart
'We Lived It Up' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1960, but it did not chart
'Talking To The Wall' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1961, but it did not chart
'Police, Police' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1962, but it did not chart
'Times Are Gonna Get Better' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1969, but it did not chart
'(You've Been Quite A Doll) Raggedy Ann' (No.75, 1970)
'Everyday Family Man' (No.70, 1970)
'Here It Comes Again' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1971, but it did not chart
'You Only Want Me For My Body' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1971, but it did not chart
'Try It, You'll Like It' (No.61, 1972)
'Alabam' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1972, but it did not chart
'Dear Skunk' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1973, but it did not chart
'Preacherman' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1976, but it did not chart
'How Much is That Picture of Jesus?' / this track was released as a non-album single, in 1978, but it did not chart

On Thursday 25 December 2014, Little Jimmy Dickens was hospitalised after a stroke, days after his last appearance on The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville to mark his birthday.

Little Jimmy Dickens died of cardiac arrest on Friday 2 January 2015, at the age of 94.; he was survived by his wife, Mona Dickens, whom he married in 1971, and two daughters, Pamela Detert and Lisa King.

After his funeral on Thursday 8 January 2015 at The Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville, Little Jimmy Dickens was entombed in Cross Mausoleum at Woodlawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Nashville.

Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 - Friday 2 January 2015)

Visit Little Jimmy Dickens' Country Music Hall of Fame Profile
Visit Little Jimmy Dickens' Grand Ole Opry Profile

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