• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

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  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

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  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

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College Grove, TN
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office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.

Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted during 2013, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Marty Raybon, which he submitted to this site on Saturday 14 September 2013.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Marty Raybon who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Marty Raybon
This quote was submitted on Saturday 14 September 2013.

'I would love to give a quote about Gene Watson!

I have been a tremendous fan of this guy's singing for years.

His delivery and tone is the heart of who he is and the songs he sings'.

Thank you, Marty Raybon, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Martt Raybon...

Marty Raybon was born on Tuesday 8 December 1959 in Greenville, Alabama and is known primarily for his role as the lead singer of the band Shenandoah, a role which he held from 1985 until 1997.

Lead guitarist Jim Seales and drummer Mike McGuire formed Shenandoah in 1984 as a house band in Muscle Shoals, Alabama with bass guitarist Ralph Ezell (1953 - Friday 30 November 2007) and keyboardist Stan Thorn, as well as lead singer Marty Raybon, who had been a member of his father's bluegrass band since childhood.

Mike McGuire invited songwriting friend Robert Byrne to one of the session band's shows. Robert then invited them into his recording studio to record a demo, which he then pitched to Columbia Records' CBS Records division. The band first wanted to assume the name The MGM Band, a name which was rejected for legal reasons. CBS suggested Rhythm Rangers and Shenandoah as possible names; Marty Raybon chose the latter name because he thought that the name Rhythm Rangers 'sounded like an amateur band'.

In 1987, Shenandoah saw the release of their self-titled debut album, 'Shenandoah' (Columbia Records, 1987), which was produced by Robert Byrne and Rick Hall and which two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'They Don't Make Love Like We Used To' (written by J.R. Adkins, Billy Henderson and G. Rogers) (No.54, 1987)
'Stop The Rain' (written by Wayland Holyfield) (No.28, 1987)
'She Doesn't Cry Anymore' (written by Robert Byrne and Will Robinson) (No.9, 1988)

Shenandoah's self-titled debut album, 'Shenandoah' (Columbia Records, 1987), also included the following tracks:

'It Ain't Love Til It Hurts' (written by W. Caylor and Billy Henderson)
'The Show Must Go On' (written by Steven Dale Jones and Mike McGuire)
'What She Wants' (written by B. Garfrerick, Billy Maddox and Billy Henderson)
'She's Still Here' (written by Jim Seales)
'I'm Gonna Hurt Her On The Radio' (written by Tom Brasfield and Mac McAnally)
'Lily Of The Alley' (written by Steven Dale Jones, Mike McGuire and Marty Raybon)
'Can't Stop Now' (written by Gary Nicholson and Wendy Waldman)

On Tuesday 31 January 1989, Shenandoah saw the release of 'The Road Not Taken' (Columbia Records, 1989), their most successful album, which included six tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'She Doesn't Cry Anymore' (written by Robert Byrne and Will Robinson) (No.9, 1988)
'Mama Knows' (written by Tony Haselden and Tim Mensy) (No.5, 1988)
'The Church On Cumberland Road' (written by Bob DiPiero, John Scott Sherrill and Dennis Robbins) (No.1 for two weeks in April/May 1989)
'Sunday In The South' (written by Jay Booker) (No.1 for one week in August 1989)
'Two Dozen Roses' (written by Robert Byrne and Mac McAnally) (No.1 for one week in December 1989)
'See If I Care' (written by Walt Aldridge and Robert Byrne) (No.6, 1990) / this track also reached No.1 on the Gavin Report Chart in 1990

Shenandoah's 'The Road Not Taken' (Columbia Records, 1989) also included the following tracks:

'The Road Not Taken' (written by Rick Bowles and Robert Byrne)
'Changes' (written by Billy Henderson and Billy Maddox)
'She's All I've Got Going' (written by Mac McAnally)
'Hard Country' (written by Rick Bowles and Robert Byrne)

The track 'She Doesn't Cry Anymore' (written by Robert Byrne and Will Robinson), which reached No.9 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1988, was previously included on 'Shenandoah' (Columbia Records, 1987).

The track 'The Church On Cumberland Road' (written by Bob DiPiero, John Scott Sherrill and Dennis Robbins), with its two-week run at No.1 (No.1 for two weeks in April/May 1989), marked the first time in country music history that a country music band's first No.1 single spent more than one week at the top of the Billboard country music singles chart.

On Tuesday 22 January 1991, Shenandoah's 'The Road Not Taken' (Columbia Records, 1989) earned a 'Gold' certification from the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for shipments of 500,000 copies in the United States.

In the wake of the success of 'The Road Not Taken' (Columbia Records, 1989), Shenandoah played three hundred shows in 1989.

On Wednesday 2 May 1990, Shenandoah saw the release of 'Extra Mile (Columbia Records, 1990), their final album for Columbia Records, which included five tracks which were hit songs on the Billboard country music singles charts:

'Next To You, Next To Me' (written by Robert Ellis Orrall and Curtis Wright) (No.1 for three weeks in 1990)
'Ghost In This House' (written by Hugh Prestwood) (No.6, 1990)
'I Got You' (written by Robert Byrne, Teddy Gentry and Greg Fowler) (No.7, 1991) / this track reached No.1 on the Gavin Report Chart in 1991
'The Moon Over Georgia' (written by Mark Narmore) (No.9, 1991) / this track reached No.1 on the Gavin Report Chart in 1991
'When You Were Mine' (written by Robert Byrne and Gene Nelson) (No.38, 1991)

Shenandoah's 'Extra Mile (Columbia Records, 1990) also included the following tracks:

'She Makes The Coming Home (Worth The Being Gone)' (written by Rory Bourke and Mike Reid)
'She's A Natural' (written by Lionel Cartwright)
'Puttin' New Roots Down' (written by Larry Cordle and Larry Shell)
'Goin' Down With My Pride' (written by Robert Byrne and Susan Longacre)
'Daddy's Little Man' (written by Billy Maddox and Mike McGuire)

Other personnel, apart from Shenandoah, who were involved in the recording of Shenandoah's 'Extra Mile (Columbia Records, 1990) included the following:

Mickey Buckins
Robert Byrne
Bill Darnell
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Owen Hale (drums)
Rick Hall
Carl Jackson
Lenny LeBlanc
Mac McAnally (acoustic guitar)
Steve Nathan (keyboards)
Mark O'Connor (fiddle)
John Willis

Shenandoah's 'Extra Mile (Columbia Records, 1990) was certified 'Gold' by the Recording Industry Associatio of America (RIAA).

In 1991, Shenandoah won the (ACM) Academy of Country Music's 'Vocal Group of the Year' Award.

Following the release of Shenandoah's 'Extra Mile (Columbia Records, 1990), a band from Tennessee threatened to sue them over the use of the name Shenandoah. After a financial settlement was made with the Tennessee band, four other bands all filed lawsuits over Shenandoah's name. The lawsuits depleted the money earned by Shenandoah on the road, which led to Marty Raybon asking Columbia Records to pay one-third of their legal costs.

Columbia Records refused to do so; Shenandoah subsequently filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in early 1991 after paying more than $200,000 on court settlements.

Although the lawsuits allowed Shenandoah to keep its name, the bankruptcy filing terminated the contract with Columbia Records after the release, on Tuesday 31 March 1992, of the compilation album 'Greatest Hits' (Columbia Records, 1992), which included two brand new tracks:

'Any Ole Stretch Of Blacktop' (written by Frank J. Myers and Bernie Nelson) / this track was previously recorded by Collin Raye, who included the track on his debut album, 'All I Can Be' (Epic Records, 1991)
'(It's Hard To Live Up To) The Rock' (written by Steve Baccus, Steve Dukes, Stan Munsey and Russ Zavitson) / Stan Munsey later became Shenandoad's keyboard player

Columbia Records officials then filed a lawsuit against Shenandoah, claiming that it had tried to void its agreement with the label. Following the departure of Shenandoah, there were no other bands on Columbia Records' Nashville division.

As a result, producer Larry Strickland assembled three musicians to create a new band called Matthews, Wright & King in an attempt to keep a commercially successful band on the label.

On Tuesday 12 May 1992, following a move to RCA Records, Shenandoah saw the release of 'Long Time Comin' (RCA Records, 1992); the album was produced by Robert Byrne and Keith Stegall and included three tracks which were hit songs on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Rock My Baby' (written by Curtis Wright, Bill Spencer and Phil Whitley) (No.2, 1992) / this track also reached No.2 on Radio & Records Chart and No.1 on Gavin Report Chart
'Hey Mister (I Need This Job)' (written by Renée Armand and Kerry Chater) (No.28, 1992)
'Leavin's Been A Long Time Comin', which was written by Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011), Stowe Dailey and Mike McGuire (No.15, 1992) / the music video for this track featured a guest appearance by Eddy Arnold (Wednesday 15 May 1918 - Thursday 8 May 2008)

Shenandoah's 'Long Time Comin' (RCA Records, 1992) also included the following tracks:

'Same Old Heart' (written by Mac McAnally)
'Right Where I Belong' (written by Rick Bowles and Josh Leo)
I Was Young Once Too' (written by Richard Leigh and Robert Byrne)
'Give Me Five Minutes' (written by Robert Ellis Orrall)
'Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting' (written by Billy Maddox and Paul Thorn)
'Rattle The Windows' (written by Troy Seals, Eddie Setser and Jerry Phillips)
'There Ain't No Beverly Hills In Tennessee' (written by Mike McGuire and Marty Raybon)

Other personnel, apart from Shenandoah, who were involved in the recording of Shenandoah's 'Long Time Comin' (RCA Records, 1992) included the following:

Bruce Bouton (pedal steel guitar, slide guitar)
Robert Byrne
Duncan Cameron
Stuart Duncan (mandolin)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Owen Hale and Roger Hawkins (drums)
Lenny LeBlanc (bass guitar, background vocals)
Mac McAnally (acoustic guitar)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Steve Nathan (keyboards, piano)
Matt Rollings (piano)
Jerry Salley (guitar)
Keith Stegall (acoustic guitar)
Billy Joe Walker Junior (acoustic guitar)
Biff Watson (bass guitar)
John Willis
Curtis Young (background vocals)

In 1992, Shenandoah was nominated as 'Vocal Group of the Year' at the Academy of Country Music (ACM).

On Tuesday 27 July 1993, Shenandoah saw the release of 'Under The Kudzu' (RCA Records, 1993), which included four tracks which were hit songs on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Janie Baker's Love Slave', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006) (No.15, 1993)
'I Want To Be Loved Like That', which was written by Phil Barnhart, Sam Hogin (1950 - Monday 9 August 2004) and Bill LaBounty (No.3, 1993)
'If Bubba Can Dance (I Can Too)' (written by Marty Raybon, Mike McGuire and Bob McDill) (No.1, 1994)
'I'll Go Down Loving You', which was written by Chapin Hartford, Sam Hogin (1950 - Monday 9 August 2004) and Monty Powell (No.46, 1994)

Shenandoah's 'Under The Kudzu' (RCA Records, 1993) also included the following tracks:

'One Kind Of Woman I Like' (written by Marty Raybon, Mike McGuire and Don Cook)
'Under The Kudzu', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006)
'Nickel In The Well' (written by Chris Waters and Lonnie Wilson)
'If It Takes Every Rib I Got' (written by Marty Raybon, Bud McGuire and Troy Seals)
'The Blues Are Comin' Over To Your House' (written by Don Cook and Kix Brooks)
'Just Say The Word' (written by Mike McGuire)

Other personnel, apart from Shenandoah, who were involved in the recording of Shenandoah's 'Under The Kudzu' (RCA Records, 1993) included the following:

Lonnie Wilson (drums, percussion)
Brent Mason (guitar)
Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar)
Dennis J. Burnside (piano)
Bruce Bouton (steel guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Tommy White
John Wesley Ryles and Dennis Wilson (background vocals)

On Tuesday 31 May 1994, Columbia Records' parent company, Sony Music Entertainment, released ten of Shenandoah's Columbia songs in a 'Super Hits' (Columbia Records, 1994) compilation album, which was certified 'Gold' (sales of 500,000 copies) in 2002; the 'Super Hits' compilation album was re-issued, with a different cover, in 2007.

It was also in 1994 that Shenandoah collaborated with Ricky Skaggs on a tribute album to Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989), recording a cover version of Keith Whitley's 'All I Ever Loved Was You'.

On Tuesday 15 November 1994, Shenandoah saw the release of 'In The Vicinity Of The Heart' (Liberty Records, 1994), which included four tracks which were hit songs on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Somewhere In The Vicinity Of The Heart' (written by Bill LaBounty and Rick Chudacoff) (this track featured duet vocals from Alison Krauss and was her first Billboard Top 40 country hit, and helped to boost sales of her album 'Now That I've Found You: A Collection' (Rounder Records, 1994) (No.7, 1994)
'Darned If I Don't (Danged If I Do)' (written by Dean Dillon and Ronnie Dunn) (No.4, 1995)
'Heaven Bound (I'm Ready)', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006) (No.24, 1995) / (this track was previously recorded by The Oak Ridge Boys and included on 'Unstoppable' (RCA Records, 1991)
'Always Have, Always Will' (written by Larry Boone, Paul Nelson and Woody Lee) (No.40, 1995)

Shenandoah's 'In The Vicinity Of The Heart' (Liberty Records, 1994) also included the following tracks:

'Cabin Fever' (written by Marty Raybon, Bud McGuire and Lonnie Wilson)
'I Wouldn't Know' (written by Marc Beeson, Robert Byrne and Mike McGuire) / this track was later included on Reba McEntire's 'If You See Him' (MCA Records, 1998)
'Call It Love' (written by Tony Haselden)
'You Can Say That' (written by Mike McGuire and Curtis Wright)
'Every Fire' (written by Cathy Majeski and John Scott Sherrill) / this track was later included on Jason Sellers' 'A Matter Of Time' (BNA Records, 1999), Restless Heart's 'Still Restless' (Koch Records, 2004) and Neal McCoy's 'XII' (Blaster Records, 2012)
'She Could Care Less' (written by Billy Lawson) / this track was later included on Joe Nichols' self-titled debut 'Joe Nichols' (Intersound Records, 1996)

Other personnel, apart from Shenandoah, who were involved in the recording of Shenandoah's 'In The Vicinity Of The Heart' (Liberty Records, 1994) included the following:

Bruce Bouton (pedal steel guitar, slide guitar)
Dennis Burnside (piano, Hammond B-3 organ)
Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar, ukulele)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
John Barlow Jarvis (piano, synthesizer)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
John Wesley Ryles and Dennis Wilson (background vocals)
Lonnie Wilson (drums, percussion)

Shenandoah's 'In The Vicinity Of The Heart' (Liberty Records, 1994) became the band's fastest-selling album; the first 175,000 copies were distributed with prepaid telephone cards, which included an 800 number that could be called to receive a greeting from the band members.

'Somewhere In The Vicinity Of The Heart' won Shenandoah and Alison Krauss won the 1995 Grammy Award for 'Best Country Vocal Collaboration' and the Country Music Association (CMA) Award for 'Vocal Event', while 'Darned If I Don't' was nominated for a Grammy Award for 'Best Country Vocal by a Duo or Group the same year.

In July 1995, Marty Raybon saw the release of a solo gospel music album for Sparrow Records, and in October 1995, Sparrow Records released a multi-artist country-gospel album, 'Amazing Grace - A Country Salute To Gospel' (Sparrow Records, 1995), to which Shenandoah contributed a rendition of 'Beulah Land'.


Shenandoah also covered The Beatles' 'Can't Buy Me Love' for inclusion on the mid-1995 various artists compilation album 'Come Together: America Salutes The Beatles' (Liberty Records, 1995), the cover artwork of which was drawn by John Lennon (Wednesday 9 October 1940 - Monday 8 December 1980).

In late 1995, Stan Thorn left Shenandoah, whie Ralph Ezell () left the band in early 1996, with Rocky Thacker unofficially replacing Ralph Ezell on bass guitar. It was during this time that Liberty Records was renamed Capitol Records Nashville.

On Tuesday 2 April 1996, Shenandoah saw the release of their first album for Capitol Records, 'Now And Then' (Capitol Records, 1996), comprised re-recordings of eight Columbia Records singles, the original recording of 'Somewhere In The Vicinity Of The Heart' and five new songs. Among these new songs was the album's only single, 'All Over But The Shouting', which peaked at No.43 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1996.

On Tuesday 17 September 1996, Shenandoah saw the release of their first Christmas music album, 'Shenandoah Christmas' (Capitol Records, 1996); except for the original song 'There's A Way In The Manger', the album comprised acoustic renditions of popular Christmas songs.

In 1997, Marty Raybon and his brother Tim formed The Raybon Brothers, and saw the release, on Tuesday 26 August 1997, of 'The Raybon Brothers' (Capitol Records, 1997), which included two tracks which were hit songs on the Billboard country musc singles chart:

'Butterfly Kisses' (written by Bob Carlisle and Randy Thomas) (No.37, 1997) / the track also reached No.22 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles charts
'The Way She's Looking' (written by Don Cook and Billy Lawson) (No.64, 1997)

Marty Raybon and Tim Raybon's 'The Raybon Brothers' (Capitol Records, 1997) also included the following tracks:

'Falling' (written by Lenny LeBlanc and Eddie Struzick) / this track featured guest vocals from Olivia Newton-John
'Gettin' Ready For The World To End' (written by Bill LaBounty and Randy Goodrum)
'Baby Blue' (written by Don Cook and Al Anderson)
'Your Love' (written by Tim Raybon, Marty Raybon and Mike Curtis)
'Every Fire' (written by John Scott Sherrill and Cathy Majeski)
'Hello Love', which was written by Tim Raybon, Lewis Anderson and Sam Hogin (1950 - Monday 9 August 2004)
'Just Tryin' To Keep The Woman I Got' (written by Don Cook and Anderson)
'Tangled Up In Love' (written by Vernon Rust and Keith Urban)

Personnel involved in the recording of Marty & Tim Raybon's 'The Raybon Brothers' (Capitol Records, 1997) included the following:

Al Anderson (acoustic guitar)
Bruce Bouton (steel guitar, dobro)
Dennis Burnside (piano)
Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Larry Franklin (fiddle, mandolin)
David Hungate (acoustic bass, tic-tac bass)
John Barlow Jarvis (piano, B3 organ)
Brent Mason (electric guitar, gut string guitar)
Steve Nathan (piano, keyboards)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar, six-string bass)
John Wesley Ryles (background vocals)
Mike Severs (electric guitar)
Lonnie Wilson (drums, percussion)
Glenn Worf (bass guitar)

With the disbandment of The Raybon Brothers in 1997, Marty Raybon assumed a solo recording career.

Marty Raybon continued to tour with Shenandoah until the end of 1997, when the remaining members disbanded and he sold the naming rights.

In 2000, Marty Raybon saw the release of a second solo album and charted his only solo Billboard country music chart hit, 'Cracker Jack Diamond' (No.63, 2000).

It was also in 2000 that Jim Seales, Mike McGuire and Rocky Thacker reunited as Shenandoah, with three new members, lead singer Brent Lamb, songwriter/keyboardist Stan Munsey and guitarist/vocalist Curtis Wright who, before joining Shenandoah, had been a member of the Super Grit Cowboy Band in the 1980s, then a solo artist and one-half of the duo Orrall & Wright with Robert Ellis Orrall.


In September 2000, Shenandoah saw the release of 'Shenandoah 2000' (Free Falls Records, 2000), which included the band's last chart single on the Billboard country music singles chart, 'What Children Believe' (No.65, 2000). The band toured small venues in 2001 in order to promote the album.

Brent Lamb left Shenandoah in 2002, with Curtis Wright succeeding him on lead vocals and original bassist Ralph Ezell later re-joining.

In 2003, Marty Raybon saw the release of 'Full Circle' (Doobie Shea Records, 2003); the album was subsequently re-issued by Rural Rhythm Records on Tuesday 11 March 2006.


On Tuesday 17 January 2006, Shenandoah saw the release of 'Journeys' (Cumberland Road Records, 2006).

On Monday 14 August 2006, Marty Raybon saw the release of 'The Grass I Grew Up On' (Rural Rhythm Records, 2006).

On Tuesday 21 November 2006, Marty Raybon saw the release of 'When The Sand Runs Out' (Rural Rhythm Records, 2006).

On Friday 30 November 2007, Ralph Ezell, of Shenandoah, died of a heart attack, and Mike Folsom succeeded him on bass guitar. Curtis Wright left Shenandoah to join a re-established Pure Prairie League, and songwriter Jimmy Yeary took over as lead singer.

In April 2009, the Shenandoah lineup of Jimmy Yeary, Mike Folsom, Mike McGuire, Stan Munsey and Jim Seales performed a benefit concert in Muscle Shoals, Alabama in which CW and Marty Raybon also participated.


Mike McGuire, Jimmy Yeary and Billy Ryan co-wrote a song called 'You Never Know' as a tribute to Ralph, which Darryl Worley recorded and included on 'Sounds Like Life' (Stroudavarious Records, 2009).

Shenandoah continued to tour in 2009 and 2010 with Jimmy Yeary on lead vocals, mostly playing at community festivals and county fairs. Jimmy Yeary engaged country-gospel singer Sonya Isaacs (of The Isaacs) in November 2009.

In 2009, Marty Raybon took part in the Rhonda Vincent Bluegrass Cruise.

On Thursday 30 April 2009, Marty Raybon saw the release of 'This, That & The Other' (Rural Rhythm Records, 2009).

On Monday 26 March 2012, Marty Raybon saw the release of 'Hand To The Plow' (Rural Rhythm Records, 2012).

On Tuesday 10 April 2012, Marty Raybon saw the release of 'Southern Roots & Branches (Yesterday & Today)' (Rural Rhythm Records, 2012).

On Tuesday 26 March 2013, Marty Raybon saw the release of 'Back Forty' (Rural Rhythm Records, 2013).


Connect with Marty Raybon at martyraybon.com
Find Marty Raybon on Facebook

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