Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2013, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from
Moe Bandy, which he submitted to this site on Tuesday 16 July 2013.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Moe Bandy who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.

Moe Bandy

Moe Bandy
This quote was submitted on Tuesday 16 July 2013.

'I think Gene Watson is one of the greatest singers of our time.

It's always a thrill to do shows with him.

He's a singers singer and also a great friend'

Thank you, Moe Bandy, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Moe Bandy...

Moe Bandy

Moe Bandy was born Marion Franklin Bandy Junior in Meridian, Mississippi on Saturday 12 February 1944.

Marion, who was nicknamed Moe by his father when he was a child, grew up in the hometown of the legendary Jimmie Rodgers (8 September 1897 - Friday 26 May 1933).

Moe Bandy later stated 'My grandfather worked on the railroads with Jimmie Rodgers.  He was the boss of the railway yard in Meridian and Jimmie Rodgers worked for him. He said that he played his guitar all the time between work'.

The Bandy family moved to San Antonio, Texas when Moe was six years old.  His mother played piano and sang.

Moe Bandy was taught to play the guitar by his father, but made little use of the ability until he was in his teens.  His father's wish that Moe Bandy also play the fiddle never materialised.

Moe Bandy made some appearances with his father's country band, The Mission City Playboys, but generally during his high school days, he showed little interest in music, but a great deal in rodeos.

Moe Bandy tried bronco-busting and bull-riding and, by the time he was sixteen years old, he was competing in rodeos all over Texas.

In 1962, tired of the bruises and fractured bones, Moe Bandy began to pursue a career in country music, and assembled a band that he called Moe & The Mavericks, finding work playing small beer joints, honky tonks and clubs over a wide area around San Antonio in Texas.

Although work was plentiful, the pay was poor and during the day Moe Bandy worked for his father as a sheet metal worker; this was to last for the next twelve years, during which time Moe Bandy made a few recordings for various small record labels.

In 1964, Moe Bandy saw the release of his first single, 'Lonely Lady', on Satin Records, but it made little impression.

Moe Bandy did, however, manage to get his band a residency on a local television program called 'Country Corner' and, in this capacity, he provided backing for several touring country music stars.

Moe Bandy: 1967

Moe Bandy & The Mavericks: 'Moe Bandy & The Mavericks' (Crazy Cajun Records, 1967)

In January 1967, Moe Bandy & The Mavericks saw the release of 'Moe Bandy & The Mavericks' (Crazy Cajun Records, 1967), which included the following tracks:

'One More Tomorrow'
'I Didn't Think I Loved You'
'Country Show'
'Pleading'
'As Long As There's A Chance'
'Playboy'
'My Heart Belongs To You'
'You're Part of Me'
'What Would You Do'
'Too Many Times'
'Anything For You'
'Lonely Girl'
'Still A Fool For You'
'Hey There, My Friend'

Moe Bandy: 1973

In 1973, Moe Bandy pursued a solo career when record producer Ray Baker, who had listened to Moe's demo recordings the previous year, suggested he come to Nashville.

Moe Bandy managed to obtain a loan and recorded a song called 'I Just Started Hatin' Cheatin' Songs Today', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019).

Initially released on Footprint Records, with a limited pressing of five hundred copies, 'I Just Started Hatin' Cheatin' Songs Today', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019), soon came to the attention of GRC Records, a record label based in Atlanta.

Moe Bandy: 1974

Moe Bandy: 'I Just Started Hatin' Cheatin' Songs Today' (GRC Records, 1974)

In July 1974, Moe Bandy's recording of 'I Just Started Hatin' Cheatin' Songs Today', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019), entered the Billboard country music singles chart, and eventually peaked at No.17; the track also became the title track of Moe Bandy's debut album.

Moe Bandy's debut album, 'I Just Started Hatin' Cheatin' Songs Today' (GRC Records, 1974), which was produced by Ray Baker, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I Just Started Hatin' Cheatin' Songs Today', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) (No.17, 1974)
'Honky Tonk Amnesia', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) (No.24, 1974)

Moe Bandy's debut album, 'I Just Started Hatin' Cheatin' Songs Today' (GRC Records, 1974), also included the following tracks:

'Cowboys & Playboys', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019)
'
How Long Does It Take (To Be A Stranger), which was written by Dallas Frazier and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019)
'
Get All Your love Together (& Come On Home)', which was written by Gene Vowell, Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'
How Far Do You Think We Would Go', which was written by Gene Vowell and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'
Smoke Filled Bar' (written by Ginger Boatwright)
'
This Time I Won't Cheat On Her Again', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) and Dallas Frazier
'
Home Is Where The Hurt Is', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'
I Wouldn't Cheat On Her If She Was Mine' (written by Paul Huffman, Joane Keller and Bucky Jones)

Moe Bandy's debut album, 'I Just Started Hatin' Cheatin' Songs Today' (GRC Records, 1974), reached No.11 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

Moe Bandy: 'It Was Always So Easy' (GRC Records, 1974)

In December 1974, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'It Was Always So Easy' (GRC Records, 1974), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'It Was Always So Easy (To Find An Unhappy Woman)', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) (No.7, 1974)
'Don't Anyone Make Love At Home Anymore' (written by Dallas Frazier) (No.13, 1975)

Moe Bandy's 'It Was Always So Easy' (GRC Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

'Somebody That's Good' (written by Eddy Raven and Ray Baker)
'How Can I Get You Out of My Heart (When I Can't Get You Off of My Mind)', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'
Loving You Was All I Ever Needed' (written by Stan Kesler and Bobby Wood) / this track was attributed to Dallas Frazier on the album cover, but to Stan Kesler and Bobby Wood on the record label
'Home In San Antone', which was written by Fred Rose (Floyd Jenkins) (24 August 1898 - Wednesday 1 December 1954)
'I'm Looking For A New Way To Love You', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Moe Bandy
'One Thing Leads To Another' (written by Eddy Raven)
It's Better Than Going Home Alone' (written by Truman Stearnes and Guy Coleman)
'I'm Gonna Listen To Me' (written by Dallas Frazier)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'It Was Always So Easy' (GRC Records, 1974) included the following:

Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle on all tracks) (mandolin on 'Home In San Antone')
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Kenny Malone (drums)
Bob Moore (bass)
Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) (guitar)
Chip Young, Ray Edenton and Bob Thompson (rhythm guitar)
Charlie McCoy (everything else)
The Jordanaires (backing vocals)

Moe Bandy's 'It Was Always So Easy' (GRC Records, 1974) reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

Moe Bandy: 1975

Moe Bandy: 'Bandy The Rodeo Clown' (GRC Records, 1975)

In August 1975, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Bandy The Rodeo Clown' (GRC Records, 1975), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Bandy The Rodeo Clown', which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) (No.7, 1975)

Moe Bandy's 'Bandy The Rodeo Clown' (GRC Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

'Somewhere There's A Woman', which was written by Rex Gosdin (1938 - Monday 23 May 1983) and Les Reed
'Give Me Liberty (Or Give Me All Your Love)' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'
Nobody's Waiting For Me', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Warren D. Robb
'
I Stop & Get Up (To Go Out of My Mind)' (written by Paul Huffman and Joanne Keller)
'
Oh, Lonesome Me', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'
I Sure Don't Need That Memory Tonight' (written by Eddy Raven)
'
Fais Do-Do' (written by Eddy Raven)
'
Goodbye On Your Mind' (written by Eddy Raven)
'
Signs of A Woman Gone', which was written by Rex Gosdin (1938 - Monday 23 May 1983) and Les Reed

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'Bandy The Rodeo Clown' (GRC Records, 1975) included the following:

Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Bob Moore (bass)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005), Leo Jackson, Jimmy Capps and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) (guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Kenny Malone (drums)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
The Jordanaires with Laverna Moore (Wednesday 9 February 1938 - Thursday 28 March 2013) (backing vocals)

Moe Bandy's 'Bandy The Rodeo Clown' (GRC Records, 1975) reached No.27 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

Moe Bandy: 1976

Moe Bandy: 'Hank Williams, You Wrote My Life' (Columbia Records, 1976)

In 1976, Moe Bandy met with immediate success when he signed a recording contract with Columbia Records, and saw the release, in February 1976, of 'Hank Williams, You Wrote My Life' (Columbia Records, 1976), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Hank Williams, You Wrote My Life', which was written by Paul Craft (Friday 12 August 1938 - Saturday 18 October 2014) (No.2, 1975)
'The Biggest Airport In The World', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) (No.27, 1976)

Moe Bandy's 'Hank Williams, You Wrote My Life' (Columbia Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

'I'm The Honky Tonk On Loser's Avenue', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019)
'
Ring Around Rosie's Finger' (written by Connie Smith and C. Manser)
'
The Lady's Got Pride', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019)
'
You've Got A Lovin' Comin', which was written by Roger D. Bowling (Sunday 3 December 1944 - Sunday 26 December 1982)
'
Hello Mary' (written by B. Bond)
'
The Hard Times' (written by E. Penney, T. Benjamin and Hugh Moffatt)
'I Think I've Got A Love On For You', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Larry Lee Favorite (Saturday 6 January 1940 - Saturday 26 May 2001)
'
I'm Not As Strong As I Used To Be' (written by K. P. Powell and D. Orender)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'Hank Williams, You Wrote My Life' (Columbia Records, 1976) included the following:

Bob Moore (bass)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) and Lloyd Green (steel guitar) / Lloyd Green appeared courtesy of Monument Records
Ray Edenton (rhythm guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005), Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004), Leo Jackson and Jimmy Capps (guitar)
Kenny Malone (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica) / Charlie McCoy appeared courtesy of Monument Records
The Jordanaires (backing vocals)

Moe Bandy's 'Hank Williams, You Wrote My Life' (Columbia Records, 1976) reached No.13 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.

Moe Bandy: 'Here I Am Drunk Again' (Columbia Records, 1976)

In September 1976, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Here I Am Drunk Again' (Columbia Records, 1976), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Here I Am Drunk Again', which was written by Robert Autry Inman (Sunday 6 January 1929 - Tuesday 6 September 1988) and Jack Kay (No.11, 1976)
'She Took More Than Her Share', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) (No.11, 1976)

Moe Bandy's 'Here I Am Drunk Again' (Columbia Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

'If I Had Someone To Cheat On' (writteen by J.R. Cochran)
'
What Happened To Our Love', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Moe Bandy
'
The Bottle's Holdin' Me', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019)
'
Please Take Her Home' (written by Eddy Raven)
'
Mind Your Own Business', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'
She's Got That Oklahoma Look', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019)
'
Then You Can Let Me Go (Out of Your Mind)' (written by S. Collom)
'
The Man That You Once Knew' (written by Dallas Frazier)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'Here I Am Drunk Again' (Columbia Records, 1976) included the following:

Bob Moore and Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) (bass)
Leo Jackson, Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (guitar)
Kenny Malone and Jerry Carrigan (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica) / Charlie McCoy appeared courtesy of Monument Records
Ray Edenton (rhythm guitar)
Leon Rhodes (Thursday 10 March 1932 - Saturday 9 December 2017) (lead guitar)
Shane Keister (keyboards)
The Jordanaires and The Nashville Edition (backing vocals)

Moe Bandy's 'Here I Am Drunk Again' (Columbia Records, 1976) reached No.17 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.

Moe Bandy: 1977

Moe Bandy: 'I'm Sorry For You, My Friend' (Columbia Records, 1977) Hank Williams: 'Memorial Album' (MGM Records, 1956) George Strait: 'Does Fort Worth Ever Cross Your Mind' (MCA Records, 1984)

In February 1977, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'I'm Sorry For You, My Friend' (Columbia Records, 1977), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I'm Sorry For You, My Friend', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) (No.9, 1977) / the original version of this track was recorded, in December 1951, by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953), and was subsequently included on Hank Williams' 'Memorial Album' (MGM Records, 1956)

Moe Bandy's 'I'm Sorry For You, My Friend' (Columbia Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

'Someone That I Can Forget', which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 - Sunday 24 October 2010) and Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 - Friday 29 July 1988)
'The Lady From The Country (of Eleven Hundred Springs)' (written by J. Jay and B. Evans)
'So Much For You, So Much For Me' (written by L. Anderson)
'All The Beer & All My Friends Are Gone' (written by Bill Anderson and Mary Lou Turner)
'A Four Letter Fool' (written by K. Jean)
'High Inflation Blues' (written by S. Collom)
'Does Fort Worth Ever Cross Your Mind', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Darlene Shafer / this track was recorded by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989) in 1984, and was released it as a non-album track, receiving moderate airplay on American country music radio, and by George Strait, who included it on 'Does Fort Worth Ever Cross Your Mind' (MCA Records, 1984); George Strait's version was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in January 1985
'She's An Angel', which was written by Harland Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) and Lola Jean Dillon
'She's Everybody's Woman, I'm Nobody's Man', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Moe Bandy

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'I'm Sorry For You, My Friend' (Columbia Records, 1977) included the following:

Leo Jackson, Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (guitar)
Bob Moore and Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) (bass)
Kenny Malone and Jerry Carrigan (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Charlie McCoy and Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Ray Edenton (rhythm guitar)
Leon Rhodes (Thursday 10 March 1932 - Saturday 9 December 2017) (lead guitar)
The Jordanaires and The Nashville Edition (backing vocals)

Moe Bandy's 'I'm Sorry For You, My Friend' (Columbia Records, 1977) reached No.18 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.

Moe Bandy: 'The Best of Moe Bandy' (Columbia Records, 1977)

In May 1977, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'The Best of Moe Bandy' (Columbia Records, 1977), which included the following tracks:

'Bandy The Rodeo Clown', which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) (No.7, 1975)
'Hank Williams, You Wrote My Life', which was written by Paul Craft (Friday 12 August 1938 - Saturday 18 October 2014) (No.2, 1975)
'One Thing Leads To Another' (written by Eddy Raven) / this track was an album track from 1974
'Cowboys & Playboys', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) / this track was an album track from 1974
'Somebody That's Good' (written by Eddy Raven and Ray Baker) / this track was an album track from 1974
'I Just Started Hatin' Cheatin' Songs Today', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) (No.17, 1974)
'Honky Tonk Amnesia', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) (No.24, 1974)
'The Biggest Airport In The World', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) (No.27, 1976)
'Don't Anyone Make Love At Home Anymore' (written by Dallas Frazier) (No.13, 1975)

Moe Bandy's 'The Best of Moe Bandy' (Columbia Records, 1977) reached No.18 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.

Moe Bandy: 'Cowboys Ain't Supposed To Cry' (Columbia Records, 1977)

In August 1977, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Cowboys Ain't Supposed To Cry' (Columbia Records, 1977), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Cowboys Ain't Supposed To Cry' (No.13, 1977)
'She Just Loved The Cheatin' Out of Me' (No.11, 1977)

Moe Bandy's 'Cowboys Ain't Supposed To Cry' (Columbia Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

'She Finally Rocked You Out of Her Mind'
'Up Till Now I've Wanted Everything But You'
'Misery Loves Company'
'Why Don't You Love Me'
'No Deal'
'All I Can Handle At Home'
'Til I Stop Needing You'
'I Could Never Be Ashamed of You'

Moe Bandy's 'Cowboys Ain't Supposed To Cry' (Columbia Records, 1977) reached No.22 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.

Moe Bandy: 1978

Moe Bandy: 'Soft Lights & Hard Country Music' (Columbia Records, 1978)

In February 1978, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Soft Lights & Hard Country Music' (Columbia Records, 1978), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Soft Lights & Hard Country Music', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) (No.13, 1978)
'That's What Makes The Jukebox Play' (written by Jimmy Work) (No.11, 1978)

Moe Bandy's 'Soft Lights & Hard Country Music' (Columbia Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

'Darling, Will You Marry Me Again', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Warren D. Robb
'
Paper Chains' (written by Steve Collom)
'
This Haunted House, which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'
If She Keeps Loving Me' (written by Glenn Martin)
'
There's Nobody Home On The Range Anymore' (written by Ed Penney and Robert Shaw Parsons)
'
Are We Making Love Or Just Making Friends' (written by Steve Collom)
'
A Wound Time Can't Erase' (written by Bill D. Johnson)
'
A Baby & A Sewing Machine' (written by Ken McDuffie)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'Soft Lights & Hard Country Music' (Columbia Records, 1978) included the following:

Charlie McCoy (harmonica) / Charlie McCoy appeared courtesy of Monument Records
Thomas Bailey ‘Bunky’ Keels (Thursday 11 January 1934 - Monday 29 November 2004) and Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano) / Hargus 'Pig' Robbins appeared courtesy of Elektra Records
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Ray Edenton (rhythm guitar)
Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004), Leo Jackson, Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 - Thursday 17 January 2019) and Tommy Allsup (Tuesday 24 November 1931 - Wednesday 11 January 2017) (guitar)
Kenny Malone (drums)
Bob Moore (bass)
The Jordanaires (backing vocals)

Moe Bandy's 'Soft Lights & Hard Country Music' (Columbia Records, 1978) reached No.34 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.

Moe Bandy: 'Love Is What Life's All About' (Columbia Records, 1978)

In September 1978, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Love Is What Life's All About' (Columbia Records, 1978), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Two Lonely People' (written by Tom Benjamin and Ed Penney) (No.7, 1978)

Moe Bandy's 'Love Is What Life's All About' (Columbia Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

'Love Is What Life's All About', which was written by Carl Robert Belew (Tuesday 21 April 1931 - Wednesday 31 October 1990), Van Givens and Moe Bandy
'A Ghost of A Chance' (written by Steve Collom)
'I Guess I Had A Real Good Time Last Night', which was written by Carl Robert Belew (Tuesday 21 April 1931 - Wednesday 31 October 1990) and Van Givens
'Big Flicking Baby', which was written by Carl Robert Belew (Tuesday 21 April 1931 - Wednesday 31 October 1990), Van Givens, Ramsey Kearney and Moe Bandy
'For The Tears To Come' (written by Steve Collom)
'Jambalaya (On The Bayou)', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'Mom & Dad's Waltz', which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975)
'I Never Miss A Day (Missing You)', which was written by Carl Robert Belew (Tuesday 21 April 1931 - Wednesday 31 October 1990), Van Givens and Moe Bandy
'Yippy Cry Yi' (written by Joe Allen and Buck Lindsey)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'Love Is What Life's All About' (Columbia Records, 1978) included the following:

Bob Moore (bass)
Tommy Allsup (Tuesday 24 November 1931 - Wednesday 11 January 2017),  Leo Jackson, Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 - Thursday 17 January 2019) (guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins and Chip Young (piano)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Jerry Carrigan (drums)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
The Jordanaires and The Nashville Edition (backing vocals)
Ron Reynolds, Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Lou Bradley (sound engineers)

Moe Bandy's 'Love Is What Life's All About' (Columbia Records, 1978) reached No.33 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.

Chris LeDoux: 'Cowboys Ain't Easy To Love' (Lucky Man Records, 1978)Chris LeDoux: 'Cowboys Ain't Easy To Love' (Lucky Man Records, 1978)

Chris LeDoux (Saturday 2 October 1948 - Wednesday 9 March 2005) recorded Moe Bandy's 'Chisum', which was co-written with Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019), and included the track on 'Cowboys Ain't Easy To Love' (Lucky Man Records, 1978).

Moe Bandy: 1979

Moe Bandy: 'It's A Cheating Situation' (Columbia Records, 1979)

In March 1979, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'It's A Cheating Situation' (Columbia Records, 1979), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'It's A Cheating Situation', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Sonny Throckmorton (No.2, 1979) / this track featured harmony vocals from Janie Fricke
'Barstool Mountain', which was written by Donn Tankersley and Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 - Monday 20 July 2015) (No.9, 1979)

Moe Bandy's 'It's A Cheating Situation' (Columbia Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

'Cheaters Never Win', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'
Conscience Where Were You (When I Needed You Last Night)', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Warren D. Robb
'
Try My Love On For Size', which was written by Herb McCollough (Thursday 18 May 1944 - Tuesday 5 May 2015)
'
To Cheat Or Not To Cheat' (written by Bobby P. Barker)
'
She Stays In The Name of Love', which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004)
'
It Just Helps To Keep The Hurt From Hurtin', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006)
'
When My Working Girl Comes Home (& Works on Me)', which was written by Carl Robert Belew (Tuesday 21 April 1931 - Wednesday 31 October 1990) and Van Givens
'
They Haven't Made The Drink (That Can Get Me Over You)', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'It's A Cheating Situation' (Columbia Records, 1979) included the following:

Bob Moore (bass)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) and Tommy Jackson (Wednesday 31 March 1926 - Sunday 9 December 1979) (fiddle)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano) / Hargus 'Pig' Robbins appeared courtesy of Elektra Records
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005), Leo Jackson, Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 - Thursday 17 January 2019), Tommy Allsup (Tuesday 24 November 1931 - Wednesday 11 January 2017) and Jimmy Capps (guitar)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Jerry Carrigan and Kenny Malone (drums)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica) / Charlie McCoy appeared courtesy of Monument Records
Ray Edenton (rhythm guitar)
The Jordanaires with Janie Fricke (backing vocals)
Ron Reynolds and Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) (sound engineers)

Moe Bandy's 'It's A Cheating Situation' (Columbia Records, 1979) reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1979.

Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley: 'Just Good Ol' Boys' (Columbia Records, 1979)

It was also in 1979, following an appearance at the Wembley Country Music Festival in London, England, when Moe Bandy teamed up with fellow country music artist Joe Stampley and saw the release, in September 1979, of 'Just Good Ol' Boys' (Columbia Records, 1979), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Just Good Ol' Boys' (written by Ansley Fleetwood - Joe Stampley's piano player) (No.1 for one week in September 1979)
'Holding The Bag' (written by Pat Bunch) (No.7, 1979)
'Tell Ole I Ain't Here, He Better Go On Home', which was written by Wayne Kemp (Sunday 1 June 1941 - Monday 9 March 2015) (No.11, 1980)

Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'Just Good Ol' Boys' (Columbia Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

'Make A Little Love Each Day' (written by Buck Moore)
'Honky Tonk Man', which was written by Johnny Horton (Thursday 30 April 1925 - Saturday 5 November 1960), Tillman Franks (Wednesday 29 September 1920 - Thursday 26 October 2006) and Howard Hausey
'Partners In Rhyme' (written by Bobby Fischer)
'Bye Bye Love', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) and Felice Bryant (Wednesday 7 August 1925 - Tuesday 22 April 2003)
'Only The Names Have Been Changed', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) and Doris Schaef
'When It Comes To Cowgirls (We Just Can't Say No)' (written by Jerry Abbott and Patty Jackson)
'Thank Goodness It's Friday' (written by Ansley Fleetwood - Joe Stampley's piano player)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'Just Good Ol' Boys' (Columbia Records, 1979) included the following:

Bob Moore (bass)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Chip Young and Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Tommy Allsup (Tuesday 24 November 1931 - Wednesday 11 January 2017), Jimmy Capps, Leo Jackson, Billy Sanford and Phil Baugh (Sunday 13 December 1936 - Sunday 4 November 1990) (guitar)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) and Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 - Wednesday 29 July 2015) (steel guitar)
Kenny Malone and Hayward Sherman Bishop Jr. (1946 - Wednesday 4 January 2017) (drums)
Charlie McCoy and Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
The Jordanaires with Laverna Moore (Wednesday 9 February 1938 - Thursday 28 March 2013)
Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Ron Reynolds (sound engineers)

Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'Just Good Ol' Boys' (Columbia Records, 1979) reached No.11 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1979.

Moe Bandy: 'One of A Kind' (Columbia Records, 1979)

In December 1979, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'One of A Kind' (Columbia Records, 1979), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I Cheated Me Right Out of You' (written by Bobby P. Barker) (No.1 for one week in December 1979) / this track was Moe Bandy's one and only solo No.1 single on the Billboard country music singles chart
'One of A Kind' (written by Sonny Throckmorton and Bobby Fischer) (No.13 in early 1980)

Moe Bandy's 'One of A Kind' (Columbia Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

'Gonna Honky Tonk Right Out On You' (written by H. Mundy)
'The Bitter With The Sweet' (written by Jim Mundy)
'We Start The Fire (But Somebody Else Puts It Out)' (written by Jim Mundy)
'In The Middle of Losing You' (written by Glenn Martin and G. Henry)
'Tell Her It's Over' (written by Glenn Martin)
'
Sweet Kentucky Woman', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'
Honky Tonk Merry Go Round' (written by Pearly Mitchell and Pat Bunch)
'
Man of Means', which was written by Herb McCollough (Thursday 18 May 1944 - Tuesday 5 May 2015)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'One of A Kind' (Columbia Records, 1979) included the following:

Bob Moore (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008), Kenny Malone and Hayward Sherman Bishop Jr. (1946 - Wednesday 4 January 2017) (drums)
Leo Jackson, Jimmy Capps, Tommy Allsup (Tuesday 24 November 1931 - Wednesday 11 January 2017) and Billy Sanford (guitar)
Chip Young and Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano) / Hargus 'Pig' Robbins appeared courtesy of Elektra Records
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica) / Charlie McCoy appeared courtesy of Monument Records
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
The Jordanaires, The Nashville Edition, and Janis Carnes (backing vocals)
Ron Reynolds and Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) (sound engineers)

Moe Bandy: 1980

Moe Bandy: 'The Champ' (Columbia Records, 1980)

In June 1980, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'The Champ' (Columbia Records, 1980), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Yesterday Once More' (written by Jimmy Mundy and Peggy White) (No.10, 1980)

Moe Bandy's 'The Champ' (Columbia Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

'The Champ', which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Warren D. Robb
'
The Cowboy's A Kitten At Home' (written by Jimmy Mundy and Peggy White)
'
The Wild Side of Life' (written by William Warren and Arlie A. Carter)
'
Beethoven Was Before My Time' (written by J. Dycks)
'
The Giver Took All She Could Stand' (written by Bobby P. Barker)
'
I Just Can't Leave Those Honky Tonks Alone' (written by Virgil Warner and Ernie Rowell)
'
She Took Out The Outlaw In Me' (written by Jimmy Mundy and Peggy White)
'
Like Some Good Ol' Boy' (written by Virgil Warner)
'
Accidentally On Purpose Tonight' (written by Pat Bunch and Peggy White)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'The Champ' (Columbia Records, 1980) included the following:

Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) and Bob Moore (bass)
Leo Jackson and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) (guitar)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) and Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Ray Edenton (rhythm guitar)
Kenny Malone (drums)
Leon Rhodes (Thursday 10 March 1932 - Saturday 9 December 2017) (lead guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Wayne Lamar Jackson (Monday 24 November 1941 - Tuesday 21 June 2016) (trumpet)
The Jordanaires with Laverna Moore (Wednesday 9 February 1938 - Thursday 28 March 2013) (backing vocals)
Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), Harold Lee and Les Ladd (sound engineers)

Moe Bandy's 'The Champ' (Columbia Records, 1980) reached No.57 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.

Moe Bandy: 'Following The Feeling' (Columbia Records, 1980)

In November 1980, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Following The Feeling' (Columbia Records, 1980), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Following The Feeling', which was written by Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011) (No.10, 1980) / this track was a duet with Judy Bailey
'My Woman Loves The Devil Out of Me' (No.15, 1980)

Moe Bandy's 'Following The Feeling' (Columbia Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

'Today I Almost Stopped Loving You' (written by Dan Mitchell)
'Would You Mind If I Just Call You Julie' (written by Warren D. Robb and Shirl Milete)
'Mexico Winter' (written by Buck Moore and Jim Mundy)
'Liquor Emotion' (written by Moe Bandy and R. Hill)
'
My Woman Loves The Devil Out of Me' (written by Bobby P. Barker)
'
It's You & Me Again' (written by D. Mitchell and J. McCollum) / this track was a duet with Judy Bailey
'I've Got Your Love All Over Me' (written by M. Lane)
'
If I Lay Down The Bottle, Would You Lay Back Down With Me', which was written by Warren D. Robb and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004)
'
It's Better Than Being Alone' (written by E. Penney)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'Following The Feeling' (Columbia Records, 1980) included the following:

Bob Moore and Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) (bass)
Kenny Malone and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Leo Jackson, Jimmy Capps, Pete Wade, Tommy Allsup (Tuesday 24 November 1931 - Wednesday 11 January 2017) and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) (guitar)
Ray Edenton (rhythm guitar)
Chip Young and Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Leon Rhodes (Thursday 10 March 1932 - Saturday 9 December 2017) (lead guitar)
Bob Wray (bass guitar)
Ricky Skaggs (mandolin)
The Jordanaires with Laverna Moore (Wednesday 9 February 1938 - Thursday 28 March 2013), and The Nashville Edition (backing vocals)
Ron Reynolds, Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Lou Bradley (sound engineers)

Moe Bandy's 'Following The Feeling' (Columbia Records, 1980) reached No.44 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.

Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley

Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley

The duo of Moe Bandy and Joe Stampley became affectionately known as 'Moe & Joe' and the result of their pairing was overwhelming.  In 1980, they won 'Vocal Duo of The Year' Awards from both the Academy of Country Music (ACM) and the Country Music Association (CMA).

Moe Bandy: 1981

Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley: 'Hey Joe, Hey Moe' (Columbia Records, 1981)

In March 1981, Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley saw the release of their second album, 'Hey Joe, Hey Moe' (Columbia Records, 1981), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Hey Joe, Hey Moe', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) (No.10, 1981)
'Honky Tonk Queen' (written by Robbie Lee Hicks) (No.12, 1981)

Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'Hey Joe, Hey Moe' (Columbia Records, 1981), also included the following tracks:

'The Girl Don't Ever Get Lonely' (written by Bobby Fischer and Christopher 'Sky Juice' Blake)
'I'd Rather Be A-Pickin' (written by Dan Darst)
'Drinkin', Dancin' (written by Warren D. Robb and Shirl Milete)
'Drunk Front', which was written by Paul Craft (Friday 12 August 1938 - Saturday 18 October 2014) and Tim Krekel (Tuesday 10 October 1950 - Wednesday 24 June 2009)
'Country Boys', which was written by Warren D. Robb and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004)
'Let's Hear It For The Workin' Man', which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004)
'Get Off My Case' (written by Dan Mitchell)
'Two Beers Away', which was written by Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'Hey Joe, Hey Moe' (Columbia Records, 1981) included the following:

Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Leo Jackson, Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Pete Wade (guitar)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) and Mike Leech (bass)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Jerry Carrigan (drums)
Ray Edenton (rhythm guitar)
Ray Norman
John Komrada and Wayne Harrison (trumpet)
The Jordanaires with Laverna Moore (Wednesday 9 February 1938 - Thursday 28 March 2013) (backing vocals)
Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), Lou Bradley and Ron Reynolds (sound engineers)

Moe Bandy: 'Encore' (Columbia Records, 1981)

In July 1981, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Encore' (Columbia Records, 1981), which included the following tracks:

'Yesterday Once More' (written by Jimmy Mundy and Peggy White) (No.10, 1980)
'One of A Kind' (written by Sonny Throckmorton and Bobby Fischer) (No.13 in early 1980)
'I Cheated Me Right Out of You' (written by Bobby P. Barker) (No.1 for one week in December 1979) / this track was Moe Bandy's one and only solo No.1 single on the Billboard country music singles chart
'Barstool Mountain', which was written by Donn Tankersley and Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 - Monday 20 July 2015) (No.9, 1979)
'Two Lonely People' (written by Tom Benjamin and Ed Penney) (No.7, 1978)
'It's A Cheating Situation', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Sonny Throckmorton (No.2, 1979) / this track featured harmony vocals from Janie Fricke
'Here I Am Drunk Again', which was written by Robert Autry Inman (Sunday 6 January 1929 - Tuesday 6 September 1988) and Jack Kay (No.11, 1976)
'I Just Can't Leave Those Honky Tonks Alone' (written by Virgil Warner and Ernie Rowell) / this track was an album track, which was originally included on Moe Bandy's 'The Champ' (Columbia Records, 1980)
'The Champ', which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Warren D. Robb / this track was an album track, which was originally included on Moe Bandy's 'The Champ' (Columbia Records, 1980)
'Soft Lights & Hard Country Music', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) (No.13, 1978)

Moe Bandy: 'Rodeo Romeo' (Columbia Records, 1981)

In November 1981, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Rodeo Romeo' (Columbia Records, 1981), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Rodeo Romeo' (written by D. Mitchell) (No.10, early 1982)
'Someday Soon' (written by Ian Tyson) (No.21, 1982)

Moe Bandy's 'Rodeo Romeo' (Columbia Records, 1981) also included the following tracks:

'She's Playin' Hard To Forget' (written by D. Mitchell)
'You've Still Got It' (written by C. Blake and B. Fischer)
'Daily Double' (written by B. Morris and D. W. Brewer)
'I Wonder Where My Wanting You Will End' (written by Warren D. Robb and Shirl Milete)
'A Loser & A Fool', which was written by Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011)
'There's Nothing More Desperate (Than An Old Desperado)' (written by D. Mitchell, Kent Blazy and M. Masson)
'The Photograph' (written by J. Anthony, D. Croft and P. White)
'Recycling Memories' (written by B. Fischer and C. Blake)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'Rodeo Romeo' (Columbia Records, 1981) included the following:

David Briggs (keyboards)
Leo Jackson, Jimmy Capps, Pete Wade and Tommy Coghill (Friday 8 April 1932 - Tuesday 7 December 1982) (guitar)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Ray Edenton (rhythm guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992), Jerry Kroon, Kenny Malone and Jerry Carrigan (drums)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) (bass)
Leon Rhodes (Thursday 10 March 1932 - Saturday 9 December 2017) (lead guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
The Jordanaires with Laverna Moore (Wednesday 9 February 1938 - Thursday 28 March 2013) and The Nashville Edition (backing vocals)

Moe Bandy's 'Rodeo Romeo' (Columbia Records, 1981) reached No.48 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1981.

Moe Bandy: 'Moe Bandy Sings Great American Cowboy Songs' (Warwick Records, 1981)

It was also in 1981 when Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Moe Bandy Sings Great American Cowboy Songs' (Warwick Records, 1981), which included the following tracks:

'When It's Springtime In The Rockies'
'Red River Valley'
'Take Me Back To Tulsa'
'Bury Me Not On The Lone Prairie'
'Don't Fence Me In'
'Tumbling Tumbleweeds'
'San Antonio Rose'
'I'm An Old Cowhand (From The Rio Grande)'
'Oklahoma Hills'
'Cool Water'
'Home On The Range'
'Sioux City Sue'
'Deep In The Heart of Texas'
'Old Faithful (Horse's Prayer)'
'Goodbye Old Paint'
'Back In The Saddle Again'
'Streets of Laredo'
'High Noon (Do Not Forsake Me)'
'Strawberry Roan'
'Chisholm Trail'

Moe Bandy: 1982

Moe Bandy: 'She's Not Really Cheating' (Columbia Records, 1982)

In April 1982, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'She's Not Really Cheating' (Columbia Records, 1982), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'She's Not Really Cheatin' (She's Just Gettin' Even)' (written by R. Shaffer) (No.4, 1982)
'Only If There Is Another You' (written by D. Mitchell) (No.12, 1982)

Moe Bandy's 'She's Not Really Cheating' (Columbia Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

'He's Taking My Place At Your Place' (written by J. Dickens)
'
Can I Pick You Up' (written by J. Koonse)
'
Hank & Lefty Raised My Country Soul', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'
The All American Dream' (written by D. Mitchell and Kent Blazy)
'
Our Love Could Burn Atlanta Down Again' (written by D. Mitchell)
'
Your Memory Is Showing All Over Me' (written by J. Dickens)
'
An Angel Like you' (written by Rory Bourke and L. Anderson)
'
Jesus In A Nashville Jail' (written by D. Crigger)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'She's Not Really Cheating' (Columbia Records, 1982) included the following:

David Briggs (keyboards)
Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) and Jerry Carrigan (drums)
Leo Jackson and Chip Young (guitar)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) and Harald 'Hal' Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 - Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) (bass)
Ray Edenton (rhythm guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) and Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 - Thursday 17 January 2019) (lead guitar)
The Jordanaires with Laverna Moore (Wednesday 9 February 1938 - Thursday 28 March 2013) (backing vocals)
Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), Ron Reynolds and Lou Bradley (sound engineers)

Moe Bandy's 'She's Not Really Cheating' (Columbia Records, 1982) reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.

Moe Bandy: 'I Still Love You In The Same Old Way' (Columbia Records, 1982)

In July 1982, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'I Still Love You In The Same Old Way' (Columbia Records, 1982), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I Still Love You In The Same Ol' Way' (written by V. Warner) (No.19, 1983)

Moe Bandy's 'I Still Love You In The Same Old Way' (Columbia Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

'I Took The Princess Home With Me' (written by J. Dickens and D. Whitaker)
'City Boy' (written by R. Roden, C. Blake and A. Pessis)
'One Lonely Heart Leads To Another' (written by S. Collom)
'Early Nancy' (written by D. Lee and M. Sameth)
'I Lost Her To A Dallas Cowboy' (written by L. Green and J. Green)
'What Chicago Took From Me' (written by J. Dickens and D. Whitaker)
'Leave The Honky Tonks Alone' (written by Shirl Milete and R. Wade)
'Drivin' My Love Back To You' (written byJ. Dickens and D. Whitaker)
'Monday Night Cheatin' (written by J.M. Roberson and A.R. Fleetwood)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'I Still Love You In The Same Old Way' (Columbia Records, 1982) included the following:

David Briggs (piano)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) and Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Gregg Galbraith (lead guitar)
Leo Jackson and Ray Edenton (rhythm guitar)
Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) and Jerry Kroon (drums)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) (bass)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) and Harald 'Hal' Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 - Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
The Jordanaires with Laverna Moore (Wednesday 9 February 1938 - Thursday 28 March 2013) (backing vocals)
Ron Reynolds and Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) (sound engineers)

Moe Bandy: 'Greatest Hits' (Columbia Records, 1982)

In September 1982, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Greatest Hits' (Columbia Records, 1982), which included the following tracks:

'Rodeo Romeo' (written by D. Mitchell) (No.10, early 1982)
'Following The Feeling', which was written by Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011) (No.10, 1980) / this track was a duet with Judy Bailey
'My Woman Loves The Devil Out of Me' (No.15, 1980)
'It Was Always So Easy (To Find An Unhappy Woman)', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) (No.7, 1974)
'I Cheated Me Right Out of You' (written by Bobby P. Barker) (No.1 for one week in December 1979) / this track was Moe Bandy one and only solo No.1 single on the Billboard country music singles chart
'Barstool Mountain', which was written by Donn Tankersley and Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 - Monday 20 July 2015) (No.9, 1979)
'In The Middle of Losing You' (written by Glenn Martin and G. Henry) / this track was an album track, and was originally included on Moe Bandy's 'One of A Kind' (Columbia Records, 1979)
'Hank Williams, You Wrote My Life', which was written by Paul Craft (Friday 12 August 1938 - Saturday 18 October 2014) (No.2, 1975)
'It's A Cheating Situation', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Sonny Throckmorton (No.2, 1979) / this track featured harmony vocals from Janie Fricke
'Someday Soon' (written by Ian Tyson) (No.21, 1982)

Moe Bandy's 'Greatest Hits' (Columbia Records, 1982) reached No.49 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.

Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley: 'Greatest Hits' (Columbia Records, 1982)

In September 1982, Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley saw the release of 'Greatest Hits' (Columbia Records, 1982), which included the following tracks:

'Just Good Ol' Boys' (written by Ansley Fleetwood - Joe Stampley's piano player) (No.1 for one week in September 1979)
'Let's Hear It For The Workin' Man', which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004) / this track was an album track, and was originally included on Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'Hey Joe, Hey Moe' (Columbia Records, 1981)
'Holding The Bag' (written by Pat Bunch) (No.7, 1979)
'Honky Tonk Queen' (written by Robbie Lee Hicks) (No.12, 1981)
'Two Beers Away', which was written by Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) / this track was an album track, and was originally included on Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'Hey Joe, Hey Moe' (Columbia Records, 1981)
'Hey Joe, Hey Moe', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) (No.10, 1981)
'The Girl Don't Ever Get Lonely' (written by Bobby Fischer and Christopher 'Sky Juice' Blake) / this track was an album track, and was originally included on Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'Hey Joe, Hey Moe' (Columbia Records, 1981)
'Tell Ole I Ain't Here, He Better Go On Home', which was written by Wayne Kemp (Sunday 1 June 1941 - Monday 9 March 2015) (No.11, 1980)
'When It Comes To Cowgirls (We Just Can't Say No)' (written by Jerry Abbott and Patty Jackson) / this track was an album track, and was originally included on Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'Just Good Ol' Boys' (Columbia Records, 1979)
'Thank Goodness It's Friday' (written by Ansley Fleetwood - Joe Stampley's piano player) / this track was an album track, and was originally included on Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'Just Good Ol' Boys' (Columbia Records, 1979)

Moe Bandy: 1983

Moe Bandy: 'Moe Bandy Sings The Songs of Hank Williams' (Columbia Records, 1983) Moe Bandy: 'I'm Sorry For You, My Friend' (Columbia Records, 1977) Hank Williams: 'Memorial Album' (MGM Records, 1956)

In June 1983, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Moe Bandy Sings The Songs of Hank Williams' (Columbia Records, 1983), which included the following tracks:

'Mind Your Own Business', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) / the original version of this track was recorded, on Wednesday 2 March 1949, by Hank Williams, and reached No.6 on the C&W Best Seller List in 1949
'I'm Sorry For You, My Friend', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) / this track, which reached No.9 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1977, was originally included on Moe Bandy's 'I'm Sorry For You, My Friend' (Columbia Records, 1977) / the original version of this track was recorded, in December 1951, by Hank Williams, and was subsequently included on Hank Williams' 'Memorial Album' (MGM Records, 1956)
'I Could Never Be Ashamed of You', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) / the original version of this track was recorded, on Tuesday 23 September 1952, by Hank Williams, and was subsequently included on Hank Williams' 'Memorial Album' (MGM Records, 1956)
'Why Don't You Love Me', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) / the original version of this track was recorded, on Monday 9 January 1950, by Hank Williams, reached No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1952, and was subsequently included on Hank Williams' 'Ramblin' Man' (MGM Records, 1955)
'Jambalaya (On The Bayou)', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) / the original version of this track was recorded, on Friday 13 June 1952, by Hank Williams, was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for fourteen non-consecutive weeks in 1952, and was subsequently included on Hank Williams' 'Honky Tonkin' (MGM Records, 1957)
'Your Cheatin' Heart', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) / the original version of this track was recorded, on Tuesday 23 September 1952, by Hank Williams, was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart in early 1953, and was subsequently included on Hank Williams' 'Memorial Album' (MGM Records, 1956)
'You Win Again', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) / the original version of this track was recorded, on Friday 11 July 1952, by Hank Williams, reached No.10 on the Most Played in C&W Juke Boxes Chart in 1952, and was subsequently included on Hank Williams' 'Memorial Album' (MGM Records, 1956)
'House of Gold' / the original version of this track was recorded by Hank Williams and was released by MGM Records in 1954, as the B-side of 'How Can You Refuse Him Now', and was subsequently included on Hank Williams' 'I Saw The Light' (MGM Records, 1955)
'Mansion On The Hill', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) and Fred Rose (Floyd Jenkins) (24 August 1898 - Wednesday 1 December 1954) / the original version of this track was recorded, on Friday 17 November 1947, by Hank Williams, reached No.12 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1949, and was subsequently included on Hank Williams' 'Sing Me A Blue Song' (MGM Records, 1957)
'Move It On Over', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) / the original version of this track was recorded, on Monday 21 April 1947, by Hank Williams, reached No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1947, and was subsequently included on Hank Williams' 'Memorial Album' (MGM Records, 1956)

Moe Bandy: 'Devoted To Your Memory' (Columbia Records, 1983)

In August 1983, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Devoted To Your Memory' (Columbia Records, 1982), which was produced by Ray Baker, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Let's Get Over Them Together', which was written by Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011) and Keith Stegall (No.10, 1983) / this track was a duet with Becky Hobbs
'You're Gonna Lose Her Like That' (written by Peggy Forman and Wayne Forman) (No.34, 1983)

Moe Bandy's 'Devoted To Your Memory' (Columbia Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

'One More Port' (written by Dan Mitchell)
'Devoted To Your Memory' (written by Dan Mitchell and Larry Shell)
'Don't Sing Me No Songs About Texas', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Leona Williams / this track was a duet with Merle Haggard
'That's As Close To Cheatin' As I Came' (written by Dan Mitchell)
'The Barroom Is My Battleground Tonight' (written by Tony Austin, Gene Dobbins and Johnny Wilson)
'Country Side' (written by Thom Schuyler) / this track was a duet with Becky Hobbs
'Someone Like You' (written by Dan Mitchell and D. Lee)
'She's Looking Good' (written by Justin Dickens and Rodger Collins)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'Devoted To Your Memory' (Columbia Records, 1982) included the following:

Bobby Wood and Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Kenny Malone and Jerry Carrigan (drums)
Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 - Thursday 17 January 2019) and Gregg Galbraith (electric guitar)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Leo Jackson, Ray Edenton and Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) and Mike Leech (bass)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 - Saturday 9 May 2015) and Hoot Hester (Monday 13 August 1951 - Tuesday 30 August 2016) (fiddle)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
The Nashville String Machine (strings)
Bergen White (String Arrangements)
The Jordanaires with Laverna Moore (Wednesday 9 February 1938 - Thursday 28 March 2013) (backing vocals)

Moe Bandy's 'Devoted To Your Memory' (Columbia Records, 1982) reached No.41 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.

Moe Bandy: 1984

Moe Bandy: 'Motel Matches' (Columbia Records, 1984) Gene Watson: 'Heartaches, Love & Stuff' (MCA Records, 1984)

In March 1984, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Motel Matches' (Columbia Records, 1984), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'It Took A Lot of Drinkin' (To Get That Woman Over Me)' (No.31, 1984)
'Woman, Your Love Keeps My Love Off The Street' (No.12, 1984)

Moe Bandy's 'Motel Matches' (Columbia Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

'Motel Matches'
'Beauty Lies In The Eyes of The Beholder'
'Don't Start Me Cheatin' Again'
'That Horse That You Can't Ride'
'Lovin' It Up (Livin' It Down)'
'In Mexico'
'Your Memory Always Finds Its Way Back Home'
'Texas Saturday Night', which was written by Warren D. Robb and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) / this track was also recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on his 'Heartaches, Love & Stuff' (MCA Records, 1984)

Moe Bandy's 'Motel Matches' (Columbia Records, 1984) reached No.45 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.

Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley: 'The Good Ol' Boys: Alive & Well' (Columbia Records, 1984) Gene Watson: 'Uncharted Mind' (Step One Records, 1993))

In June 1984, Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley saw the release of 'The Good Ol' Boys: Alive & Well' (Columbia Records, 1984), which was produced by Blake Mevis, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Where's The Dress' (written by T. Stampley, B. Lindsey and G. Cummings) (No.8, 1984) / this track was a style parody of 'Karma Chameleon' by Culture Club
'The Boy's Night Out' (written by Joe Stampley, T. Stampley and D. Rosson) (No.36, 1984)
'Daddy's Honky Tonk' (written by Bunky Keel and B. Moore) (No.48, 1984)
'Still On A Roll' (written by J. Greenbaum, Becky Hobbs and Blake Mevis) (No.58, 1984)

Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'The Good Ol' Boys: Alive & Well' (Columbia Records, 1984), also included the following tracks:

'He's Back In Texas Again' (written by Troy Seals and Wayne Newton) / this track was also recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on 'Uncharted Mind' (Step One Records, 1993)
'Honky Tonk Money' (written by M. Garvin, Ron Hellard and Bucky Jones)
'Wild & Crazy Guys' (written by B. Lindsey, J. Carter and O.J. Christopher)
'We've Got Our Moe-Joe Working' (written by P. Foster)
'Wildlife Sanctuary' (written by Byron Gallimore, Blake Mevis, B. Shore and D. Wills)
'Alive & Well' (written by T. Stampley, D. Rosson and S. McComb)

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'The Good Ol' Boys: Alive & Well' (Columbia Records, 1984), included the following:

Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Fred Newell and Brent Rowan (lead guitar)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) and Chip Young (rhythm guitar)
Larry Paxton and Bob Wray (bass guitar)
Curtis Young (backing vocals)
Gary Prim and Bobby Ogdin (keyboards)
Jerry Kroon (drums)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)

Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'The Good Ol' Boys: Alive & Well' (Columbia Records, 1984), reached No.21 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.

Moe Bandy: 1985

Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley: 'Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley: Live From Bad Bob's, Memphis' (Columbia Records, 1985)

In February 1985, Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley saw the release of 'Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley: Live From Bad Bob's, Memphis' (Columbia Records, 1985), which included the following tracks:

'We've Got Our Moe-Joe Working' (written by P. Foster) / this track was an album track, and was originaly included on 'The Good Ol' Boys: Alive & Well' (Columbia Records, 1984)
'Hey Joe, Hey Moe', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) (No.10, 1981)
'Daddy's Honky Tonk' (written by Bunky Keel and B. Moore) (No.48, 1984)
'Holding The Bag' (written by Pat Bunch) (No.7, 1979)
'The Boy's Night Out' (written by Joe Stampley, T. Stampley and D. Rosson) (No.36, 1984)
'Tell Ole I Ain't Here, He Better Go On Home', which was written by Wayne Kemp (Sunday 1 June 1941 - Monday 9 March 2015) (No.11, 1980)
'Where's The Dress' (written by T. Stampley, B. Lindsey and G. Cummings) (No.8, 1984) / this track was a style parody of 'Karma Chameleon' (written by Boy George, Jon Moss, Mikey Craig, Roy Hay and Phil Pickett) by Culture Club
'Your Cheatin' Heart', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'Still On A Roll' (written by J. Greenbaum, Becky Hobbs and Blake Mevis) (No.58, 1984)
'Just Good Ol' Boys' (written by Ansley Fleetwood - Joe Stampley's piano player) (No.1 for one week in September 1979)

Moe Bandy: 'Barroom Roses' (Columbia Records, 1985) John Schneider: 'A Memory Like You' (MCA Records, 1986)

In November 1985, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Barroom Roses' (Columbia Records, 1985), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Barroom Roses' (No.45, 1985)

Moe Bandy's 'Barroom Roses' (Columbia Records, 1985) also included the following tracks:

'Tonight She Went Crazy Without Me'
'I'll Let Go'
'After Losing You'
'Ex In Texas'
'Settlin' Up With My Heart'
'He's Got Her (Right Where I Wanted Her Tonight)'
'That's All She Needs To Hear'
'What's A Memory Like You (Doing In A Love Like This)', which was written by Charles Quillen and John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 - Thursday 1 February 2001) / this track was also recorded by John Schneider, who included it on 'A Memory Like You' (MCA Records, 1986); John Schneider's version was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in March 1986
'When It Comes To Lovin'

Moe Bandy: 1986

Moe Bandy: 'Keepin' It Country' (Columbia Records, 1986)

In January 1986, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Keepin' It Country' (Columbia Records, 1986), which included the following tracks:

'Just Can't Leave That Woman Alone'
'I Wouldn't Do'
'All Over Me'
'Our Time'
'Where Do You Take A Broken Heart'
'I Wonder Who Taught Her That Honky Tonk Song'
'If The Love Ain't Right At Home'
'Do My Dyin' Well'
'What Makes You Treat Me Like You Do'
'Was It As Good For You'

In 1986, Moe Bandy departed Columbia Records.

Moe Bandy: 1987

Moe Bandy: 'You Haven't Heard The Last of Me' (MCA Records, 1987))

In 1987, Moe Bandy joined the roster at MCA Records and saw the release, in February 1987, of 'You Haven't Heard The Last of Me' (MCA Records, 1987), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'One Man Band' (No.42, 1986)
'Till I'm Too Old To Die Young' (written by Scott Dooley, John Hadley and Kevin Welch) (No.6, 1987)
'You Haven't Heard The Last of Me' (written by Eric Kaz and Tom Snow) (No.11, 1987)

Moe Bandy's 'You Haven't Heard The Last of Me' (MCA Records, 1987) also included the following tracks:

'I Forgot That I Don't Live Here Anymore'
'Sunny Side of You'
'Times I Tried To Love You'
'You Can't Straddle The Fence Anymore'
'Ridin' Her Memory Down'
'Between Us'
'Rodeo Song'

Moe Bandy's 'You Haven't Heard The Last of Me' (MCA Records, 1987) reached No.10 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1987.

Moe Bandy: 1988

Moe Bandy: 'No Regrets' (Curb Records, 1988)

In 1988, Moe Bandy joined the artist roster at Curb Records, and saw the release, in February 1988, of 'No Regrets' (Curb Records, 1988), which included four tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Americana', which was written by Richard Fagan (Thursday 24 April 1947 - Friday 5 August 2016), Larry Alderman and Patti Ryan (No.8, 1988)
'Ashes In The Wind' (No.47, 1988)
'I Just Can't Say No To You' (written by Jerry Parker McGee) (No.21, 1988)
'Nobody Gets Off In ThisTown' / this track was released as a single in 1990, but it did not chart

Moe Bandy's 'No Regrets' (Curb Records, 1988) also included the following tracks:

'Beauty of Love'
'Just Fine With Me'
'No Regrets'
'What Goes Around'
'Champion'
'Hittin' Close To Home'

Moe Bandy's 'No Regrets' (Curb Records, 1988) reached No.28 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988.

Moe Bandy: 'Many Mansions' (Curb Records, 1988) Earl Thomas Conley: 'Yours Truly' (RCA Records, 1991)

Keith Whitley: 'Kentucky Bluebird' (RCA Records, 1991) Billy Dean: 'Young Man' (Capitol Nashville Records, 1990)

In April 1988, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Many Mansions' (Curb Records, 1988), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Many Mansions' (written by Carol Ann Etheridge, Alice Randall and Mark D. Sanders) (No.34, 1988)
'Brotherly Love' (written by Tim Nichols and Jimmy Alan Stewart)
(No.53, 1988) / this track was recorded, as a duet, by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989) & Earl Thomas Conley in 1987, and was included on Earl Thomas Conley's 'Yours Truly' (RCA Records, 1991) and Keith Whitley's 'Kentucky Bluebird' (RCA Records, 1991); Earl Thomas Conley & Keith Whitley's recording of 'Brotherly Love' reached No.2 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1991 / 'Brotherly Love' (written by Tim Nichols and Jimmy Alan Stewart) was also recorded by Billy Dean, who included it on 'Young Man' (Capitol Nashville Records, 1990)
'This Night Won't Last Forever' (written by Bill LaBounty and Roy Freeland) (No.49, 1988)

Moe Bandy's 'Many Mansions' (Curb Records, 1988) also included the following tracks:

'Long Way From Lonely'
'Rarest Flowers'
'My Wish For You' (written by Moe Bandy and Rick Peoples)
'Ain't Nothin' Gonna Slow This Train Down'
'Yuppie Love'
'Charlie'
'Goin' Through The Motions'

Moe Bandy's 'Many Mansions' (Curb Records, 1988) reached No.48 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988.

Moe Bandy: 1990 - 1991

Moe Bandy: 'Greatest Hits' (Curb Records, 1990) Gene Watson: 'Little By Little' (MCA Records, 1984)

In February 1990, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Greatest Hits' (Curb Records, 1990), which included the following tracks:

'Till I'm Too Old To Die Young' (written by Scott Dooley, John Hadley and Kevin Welch) (No.6, 1987)
'Back In My Roarin' 20's' / this track was new to this collection
'You Haven't Heard The Last of Me' (written by Eric Kaz and Tom Snow) (No.11, 1987)
'One Man Band' (No.42, 1986)
'Many Mansions' (No.34, 1988)
'Pardon Me (Haven't We Loved Somewhere Before)' / this track, which was new to this collection, did not chart on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 1990, but it did reach No.2 on the Billboard Hot Country Radio Breakouts Chart in 1990
'Americana', which was written by Richard Fagan (Thursday 24 April 1947 - Friday 5 August 2016), Larry Alderman and Patti Ryan (No.8, 1988)
'She Has No Memory of Me', which was written by Billy Troy and Randy Lynn Scruggs (Monday 3 August 1953 - Tuesday 17 April 2018) / this track, which was new to this collection, was also recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on 'Little By Little' (MCA Records, 1984)
'Brotherly Love' (written by Tim Nichols and Jimmy Alan Stewart) (No.53, 1988)
'I Just Can't Say No To You' (written by Jerry Parker McGee) (No.21, 1988)

It was in 1990 when Moe Bandy departed Curb Records.  In 1991, Moe Bandy saw the opening of his Americana Theatre in Branson, Missouri.

Moe Bandy: 1993

Moe Bandy: 'Moe Bandy: Live In Branson' (Laserlight Records, 1993)

In February 1993, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Moe Bandy: Live In Branson' (Laserlight Records, 1993), which included the following 'live' tracks:

'Another Day Another Dollar', which was written by Wynn Stewart (Thursday 7 June 1934 - Wednesday 17 July 1985)
'Someday Soon' (written by Ian Tyson)
'Hey Joe', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987)
'It's A Cheating Situation', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Sonny Throckmorton (No.2, 1979) / the original version of this track, which featured harmony vocals from Janie Fricke, was included on 'It's A Cheating Situation' (Columbia Records, 1979), and reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1979
'Rodeo Romeo' (written by D. Mitchell) / the original version of this track was included on 'Rodeo Romeo' (Columbia Records, 1981), and reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart in early 1982
'Many Mansions' (written by Carol Ann Etheridge, Alice Randall and Mark D. Sanders) / the original version of this track was included on 'Many Mansions' (Curb Records, 1988), and reached No.34 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1988
'That Horse That You Can't Ride'
/ the original version of this track was included on 'Motel Matches' (Columbia Records, 1984), and was not released as a single
'Hank Williams, You Wrote My Life', which was written by Paul Craft (Friday 12 August 1938 - Saturday 18 October 2014) / the original version of this track was included on 'Hank Williams, You Wrote My Life' (Columbia Records, 1976), and reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1975
'My Wish For You' (written by Moe Bandy and Rick Peoples) / the original version of this track was included on 'Many Mansions' (Curb Records, 1988), and was not released as a single
'You Haven't Heard The Last of Me' (written by Eric Kaz and Tom Snow) / the original version of this track was included on 'You Haven't Heard The Last of Me' (MCA Records, 1987), and reached No.11 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1987
'Bandy The Rodeo Clown', which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) / the original version of this track was included on 'Bandy The Rodeo Clown' (GRC Records, 1975), and reached No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1975
'Til I'm Too Old To Die Young' (written by Scott Dooley, John Hadley and Kevin Welch) / the original version of this track was included on 'You Haven't Heard The Last of Me' (MCA Records, 1987), and reached No.6 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1987
'Americana', which was written by Richard Fagan (Thursday 24 April 1947 - Friday 5 August 2016), Larry Alderman and Patti Ryan (No.8, 1988)

Moe Bandy: 1995

Moe Bandy: 'Picture In A Frame' (Intersound Records, 1995)

In January 1995, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Picture In A Frame' (Branson Entertainment, 1995), which included the following tracks:

'Picture In A Frame', which was written by Dennis Knutson (1949 - Saturday 1 September 2018)
'Bandy The Rodeo Clown', which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) / the original version of this track was included on 'Bandy The Rodeo Clown' (GRC Records, 1975), and reached No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1975
'It's A Cheating Situation', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Sonny Throckmorton (No.2, 1979) / the original version of this track, which featured harmony vocals from Janie Fricke, was included on 'It's A Cheating Situation' (Columbia Records, 1979), and reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1979
'Soft Lights & Hard Country Music', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) / the original version of this track was included on 'Soft Lights & Hard Country Music' (Columbia Records, 1978), and reached No.13 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978
'When Staying Together Hurt More Than Feeling Apart'
'Love Never Sleeps'
'Don't Leave Me In The Night-time'
'Americana', which was written by Richard Fagan (Thursday 24 April 1947 - Friday 5 August 2016), Larry Alderman and Patti Ryan / the original version of this track was included on 'No Regrets' (Curb Records, 1988), and reached No.8 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1988
'Beauty Lies In The Eyes of The Beholder'
'When A Heart Will Fall'
'Someday Soon' (written by Ian Tyson) (No.21, 1982) / the original version of this track was included on 'Rodeo Romeo' (Columbia Records, 1981), and reached No.21 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1982
'Til I'm Too Old To Die Young' (written by Scott Dooley, John Hadley and Kevin Welch) / the original version of this track was included on 'You Haven't Heard The Last of Me' (MCA Records, 1987), and reached No.6 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1987

Moe Bandy: 'Gospel Favourites' (Branson Entertainment, 1995)

In May 1995, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Gospel Favourites' (Branson Entertainment, 1995), which included the following tracks:

'How Great Thou Art'
'Will The Circle Be Unbroken'
'Amazing Grace'
'Wonderful Time Up There'
'Softly & Tenderly'
'I Saw The Light'
'I'll Fly Away'
'Farther Along'
'Just A Closer Walk With Thee'
'Turn Your Radio On'
'House of Gold'
'Old Rugged Cross'

Moe Bandy: 1996

Moe Bandy: 'Honky Tonk Amnesia: The Hard Country Sound of Moe Bandy' (Razor & Tie Records, 1996)

On Tuesday 20 February 1996, Razor & Tie Records released a highly acclaimed compilation album, 'Honky Tonk Amnesia: The Hard Country Sound of Moe Bandy' (Razor & Tie Records, 1996), which highlighted twenty tracks from Moe Bandy's illustrious career in country music:

'I Just Started Hatin' Cheatin' Songs Today', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) (No.17, 1974)
'Honky Tonk Amnesia', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) (No.24, 1974)
'It Was Always So Easy (To Find An Unhappy Woman)', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) (No.7, 1974)
'Don't Anyone Make Love At Home Anymore' (written by Dallas Frazier) (No.13, 1975)
'Bandy The Rodeo Clown', which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) (No.7, 1975)
'Hank Williams, You Wrote My Life', which was written by Paul Craft (Friday 12 August 1938 - Saturday 18 October 2014) (No.2, 1975)
'She Took More Than Her Share', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) (No.11, 1976)
'I'm Sorry For You, My Friend', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) (No.9, 1977)
'Soft Lights & Hard Country Music', which was written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) (No.13, 1978)
'That's What Makes The Jukebox Play' (written by Jimmy Work) (No.11, 1978)
'It's A Cheating Situation', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Sonny Throckmorton (No.2, 1979) / this track featured harmony vocals from Janie Fricke
'Two Lonely People' (written by Tom Benjamin and Ed Penney) (No.7, 1978)
'Barstool Mountain', which was written by Donn Tankersley and Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 - Monday 20 July 2015) (No.9, 1979)
'I Cheated Me Right Out of You' (written by Bobby P. Barker) (No.1 for one week in December 1979) / this track was Moe Bandy's one and only solo No.1 single on the Billboard country music singles chart
'One of A Kind' (written by Sonny Throckmorton and Bobby Fischer) (No.13 in early 1980)
'Yesterday Once More' (written by Jimmy Mundy and Peggy White) (No.10, 1980)
'Following The Feeling', which was written by Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011) (No.10, 1980) / this track was a duet with Judy Bailey
'Rodeo Romeo' (written by D. Mitchell) (No.10, early 1982)
'She's Not Really Cheatin' (She's Just Gettin' Even)' (written by R. Shaffer) (No.4, 1982)
'Let's Get Over Them Together', which was written by Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011) and Keith Stegall (No.10, 1983) / this track was a duet with Becky Hobbs

Moe Bandy: 'Cowboy Christmas' (Branson Entertainment, 1996)

On Monday 4 March 1996, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Cowboy Christmas' (Branson Entertainment, 1996), which included the following tracks:

'Cowboy Christmas'
'Winter Wonderland'
'O, Holy Night'
'Rudolph, The Red Nosed Reindeer'
'I'll Be Home For Christmas'
'Santa Claus Is Comin' To Town'
'Christmas At The Jersey Lilly Lounge'
'Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow'
'Christmas Song'
'Holly Jolly Christmas'
'White Christmas'
'Silent Night'

Moe Bandy: 1997

Moe Bandy: 'Act Naturally' (Branson Entertainment, 1997)

In November 1997, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Act Naturally' (Branson Entertainment, 1997), which included the following tracks:

'Act Naturally', which was written by Johnny Russell (Tuesday 23 January 1940 - Tuesday 3 July 2001) and Voni Morrison
'Borrowed Angel', which was written by Mel Street (Saturday 21 October 1933 - Saturday 21 October 1978)
'If We're Not Back In Love By Monday' (written by Sonny Throckmorton and Glenn Martin)
'Lyin' Eyes', which was written by Don Henley and Glenn Frey (Saturday 6 November 1948 - Tuesday 19 January 2016)
'Lovesick Blues', which was written by Cliff Friend (1 October 1893 - Thursday 27 June 1974) and Irving Mills (16 January 1894 - Sunday 21 April 1985)
'She's All I Got' (written by Gary U.S. Bonds and Jerry Williams Jr.)
'Crazy' (written by Willie Nelson)
'Amarillo By Morning' (written by Terry Stafford and Paul Fraser)
'That's The Way Love Goes', which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019)
'Ragged Old Flag'

Moe Bandy: 1999

Moe Bandy: 'The Crazy Cajun Recordings' (Edsel Records, 1999)

In January 1999, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'The Crazy Cajun Recordings' (Edsel Records, 1999), which included the following tracks:

'As Long As There's A Chance'
'Playboy'
'My Heart Belongs To You'
'You're Part of Me'
'What Would You Do'
'Pleading'
'Too Many Times Before'
'Anything For You'
'Lonely Girl'
'Still A Fool For You'
'Hey There, My Friend'

Moe Bandy: 2000

Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley: 'Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley: Live At Billy Bob's, Texas' (Smith Music, 2000)

In May 2000, Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley saw the release of 'Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley: Live At Billy Bob's, Texas' (Smith Music, 2000), which included the following tracks:

'All These Things' (written by Naomi Neville) / the original version of this track was recorded by Joe Stampley, who included it on 'If You Touch Me' (Dot Records, 1972); Joe Stampley's version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in 1972
'Everyday I Have To Cry Some' (written by Arthur Alexander) / the original version of this track was recorded by Joe Stampley, who included it on 'Saturday Nite Dance' (Epic Records, 1977); Joe Stampley's version of this track reached No.14 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1977
'Do You Ever Fool Around' (written by Jerry Strickland and Don Griffin) / the original version of this track was recorded by Joe Stampley, who included it on 'Red Wine & Blue Memories' (Epic Records, 1978); Joe Stampley's version of this track reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978
'Whiskey Chasin' / the original version of this track was recorded by Joe Stampley, who included it on 'I'm Gonna Love You Back' (Epic Records, 1981); Joe Stampley's version of this track reached No.18 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1981
'Penny' (written by Steve Davis and Grace Lane) / the original version of this track was recorded by Joe Stampley, who included it on 'Take Me Home To Somewhere' (Dot Records, 1974); Joe Stampley's version of this track reached No.8 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1974
'Roll On, Big Mama' (written by Danny Darst) / the original version of this track was recorded by Joe Stampley, who included it on 'Joe Stampley' (Epic Records, 1975); Joe Stampley's version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in May 1975
'Just Because' / 'My Window Faces The South'
'Following The Feeling', which was written by Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011) / this track, which was originally included on Moe Bandy's 'Following The Feeling' (Columbia Records, 1980), reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1980, and was a duet with Judy Bailey
'Bandy The Rodeo Clown', which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 - Saturday 12 January 2019) / this track, which was originally included on Moe Bandy's 'Bandy The Rodeo Clown' (GRC Records, 1975), reached No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1975
'Here I Am Drunk Again', which was written by Robert Autry Inman (Sunday 6 January 1929 - Tuesday 6 September 1988) and Jack Kay (No.11, 1976) / this track, which was originally included on Moe Bandy's 'Here I Am Drunk Again' (Columbia Records, 1976), reached No.11 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1976
'Americana', which was written by Richard Fagan (Thursday 24 April 1947 - Friday 5 August 2016), Larry Alderman and Patti Ryan / this track, which was originally included on Moe Bandy's 'No Regrets' (Curb Records, 1988), reached No.8 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1988
'Hey Joe, Hey Moe', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) / this track, which was originally included on Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'Hey Joe, Hey Moe' (Columbia Records, 1981), reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1981
'Tell Ole I Ain't Here, He Better Go On Home', which was written by Wayne Kemp (Sunday 1 June 1941 - Monday 9 March 2015) / this track, which was originally included on Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'Just Good Ol' Boys' (Columbia Records, 1979), reached No.11 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1980
'Honky Tonk Queen' (written by Robbie Lee Hicks) / this track, which was originally included on Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'Hey Joe, Hey Moe' (Columbia Records, 1981), reached No.12 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1981
'Good Ol' Men'
'Holding The Bag' (written by Pat Bunch) / this track, which was originally included on Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'Just Good Ol' Boys' (Columbia Records, 1979), reached No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1979
'Where's The Dress' (written by T. Stampley, B. Lindsey and G. Cummings) / this track, which was originally included on Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'The Good Ol' Boys: Alive & Well' (Columbia Records, 1984), reached No.8 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1984
'Just Good Ol' Boys' (written by Ansley Fleetwood - Joe Stampley's piano player) / this track, which was originally included on Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley's 'Just Good Ol' Boys' (Columbia Records, 1979), was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in September 1979

Moe Bandy: 2007

Texas Rodeo Cowboy Hall of Fame, Cowtown Coliseum, Fort Worth Stockyards Historic District, Fort Worth, Texas

In 2007, Moe Bandy, along with his brother, Mike Bandy, a six time NFR bull riding qualifier, were inducted into the Texas Rodeo Cowboy Hall of Fame, which was located at Cowtown Coliseum, in the Fort Worth Stockyards Historic District of Fort Worth in Texas.

Moe Bandy: 2008

Moe Bandy: 'Legendary Country' (Sweet Songs Nashville, 2008)

In April 2008, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Legendary Country' (Sweet Song Nashville, 2008), which included the following tracks:

'Long Shadow'
'Half A Mind'
'Waitin' For My Angel To Show'
'Blue Collar Holler'
'This Memory Is Mine'
'He Ain't No Hank'
'Sometimes'
'Mr. Jukebox'
'Only Time Will Tell'
'You Won't Mind The Rain'
'Few Stars Short of The Moon'
'Something's Really Wrong This Time'

Moe Bandy: 'Gospel: Songs My Mama Sang' (Sweet Song Nashville, 2008)

On Tuesday 6 May 2008, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'Gospel: Songs My Mama Sang' (Sweet Song Nashville, 2008), which included the following tracks:

'Just A Closer Walk With Thee'
'The Uncloudy Day'
'Farther Along'
'Everybody's Gonna Have Religion In Glory'
'Peace In The Valley'
'When The Roll Is Called Up Yonder'
'The Old Rugged Cross'
'I Am A Wayfaring Stranger'
'I Saw The Light', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'In The Garden'
'I'll Fly Away'

Moe Bandy: 2016

Moe Bandy: 'Lucky Me' (Moe Bandy Music, 2016) Moe Bandy: 'Motel Matches' (Columbia Records, 1984) Moe Bandy: 'Many Mansions' (Curb Records, 1988)

On Friday 29 July 2016, Moe Bandy ‎saw the release of 'Lucky Me' (Moe Bandy Music, 2016), which was produced by Jimmy Capps, and included the following tracks:

'Lucky Me' (written by Ernie Rowell and Dave Lindsey)
'Everything Hank Williams Did, But Die', which was written by Bill Anderson and Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'Hell Stays Open (All Night Long)', which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 - Tuesday 30 May 2006)/ this track featured guest vocals from The Oak Ridge Boys
'Long Live The Cowboys' (written by Dennis Cooper and Tony Ramey) / this track featured guest vocals from Riders In The Sky
'It Was Me', which was written by Buddy Cannon and Randy 'Tiny' Hardison (Saturday 11 March 1961 - Tuesday 4 June 2002)
'It's Written All Over Your Face' (written by Moe Bandy and Steve Sechler)
'The Rarest Flowers', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Don Cook / this track, which featured guest vocals from Ricky Skaggs, was originally recorded by Moe Bandy, who included it on 'Many Mansions' (Curb Records, 1988)
'Old Frame of Mine', which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 - Tuesday 30 May 2006) and Eva Harden
'That Horse That You Can't Ride' (written by Blake Mevis) / this track was originally recorded by Moe Bandy, who included it on 'Motel Matches' (Columbia Records, 1984)
'That's What I Get For Loving You' (written by Bubba Strait, Wil Nance and Brice Long)

'A Place To Hang My Hat' (written by Shawn Camp, Byron Hill and Brice Long) / this track featured guest vocals from The Oak Ridge Boys
'Honky Tonk Moon'
'Broken Bones'
'Things To Do'

Personnel involved in the recording of Moe Bandy's 'Lucky Me' (Moe Bandy Music, 2016), which was produced by Jimmy Capps, and included the following:

Moe Bandy (lead vocals)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Hoot Hester (Monday 13 August 1951 - Tuesday 30 August 2016) (fiddle)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)

Moe Bandy: 'Lucky Me: The Autobiography' (written with Scot England) (released on Friday 29 July 2016 to coincide with the release of Moe Bandy's 'Lucky Me' on Moe Bandy Music) (foreword by former First Lady, Barbara Bush (née Pierce) (Monday 8 June 1925 - Tuesday 17 April 2018)

On Friday 29 July 2016, to coincide with the release of Moe Bandy's 'Lucky Me' (Moe Bandy Music, 2016), Moe Bandy saw the release of his autobiography, 'Lucky Me', which was written with Scot England, and included a foreword by former First Lady, Barbara Bush (née Pierce) (Monday 8 June 1925 - Tuesday 17 April 2018).


Moe Bandy

• Visit Moe Bandy's Official Site
at moebandy.com

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