• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Webster PR



Webster Public Relations
, PO Box 23015, Nashville, TN 37202

Contact Scott Adkins
Telephone 615-777-6995

Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted during 2013, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Rob Hajacos, which he submitted to this site on Monday 25 March 2013.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Rob Hajacos who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Rob Hajacos
This quote was submitted on Monday 25 March 2013.

'A 'singers' singer' is not a phrase you hear much anymore, but that is truly who Gene Watson is!

From the first time we heard Gene, we knew he was the real deal!

As a musician, you can't play with him and not feel as though his vocal is taking your skills to another level.

He has that 'thing', much like Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 - Monday 16 December 2013), that makes you want to dig deeper...to play better than ever!  It's the inspiration we all look for every time we set up to play.

On top of all that, Gene is one of the kindest and most gracious artists I've ever had the pleasure of recording with!

I feel truly blessed to have been so inspired by him over the years!'

Thank you, Rob Hajacos, for your support of Gene Watson.


About Rob Hajacos...


Rob Hajacos has something in common with George Strait, Garth Brooks, Brooks & Dunn (Kix Brooks and Ronnie Dunn) and Taylor Swift. Aside from being some of country music’s most successful artists, these iconic stars' albums have all benefited from the masterful fiddle playing of Rob Hajacos.

Rob Hajacos is one of Nashville’s most in-demand studio musicians and has performed on an endless stream of hits, from Brooks & Dunn’s 'Boot Scootin’ Boogie' and Taylor Swift’s 'Love Story' to Shania Twain’s 'Any Man Of Mine' and Kenny Chesney’s 'No Shoes, No Shirt, No Problems'.

It is nearly impossible to listen to country music radio for an extended amount of time without hearing at least one song that features Rob Hajacos’ indelible sound.

Rob Hajacos' unique blend of country and rock sets him apart from fellow fiddlers. While others are often steeped in the traditions of bluegrass, Rob Hajacos found inspiration in two very different artists: the classic country music of Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 - Monday 16 December 2013) and the seminal rock and roll of The Beatles.

Rob Hajacos' Dad was a fiddle player and was a huge fan of Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 - Monday 16 December 2013). And Rob's sister loved The Beatles. Rob received his first fiddle from his parents when he was four years old. It wasn’t until he entered junior high school and joined the school orchestra that he really took to the instrument.

It wasn't long before Rob was bowing the strings in smoky clubs throughout his native Virginia, interpreting country hits with a group of wizened yet encouraging musicians. He performed everywhere from beer joints to WWVA’s Wheeling Jamboree; it was these experiences that prepared him for playing on records, because he had to learn the different styles of all those cover songs'.

It was during that time that the already well-respected fiddler received a call that would forever change his fortune - the offer to move to Nashville and join the band of Grand Ole Opry legend Little Jimmy Dickens. Rob Hajacos was nineteen years old.

For six months, he refined his craft while backing up Little Jimmy Dickens, impressing both crowds and fellow artists with his deft, evocative playing.

Steady tours with other stars of the time quickly followed, culminating with Rob’s dream gig: traveling the country with Mel Tillis.

Eventually, Rob Hajacos decided to put down roots in Nashville and focus his efforts on becoming a session player. It turned out to be a wise decision - one that would lead the fiddle phenom off the bus, into the studio and onto the debut album of an artist by the name of George Strait.

It’s Rob Hajacos’ honky-tonk intro on first track, first single 'Unwound', which was written by Dean Dillon and Frank Dycus (Tuesday 5 December 1939 - Friday 23 November 2012), that announced 'Strait Country' (MCA Records, 1981) to the world; 'Unwound' reached No.6 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1981.

Rob Hajacos brought something uniquely modern to the booth: a love of the guitar. The guitar players in the studio were using these huge sounds, so Rob felt the need to try and compete with that. He developed a way to record his fiddle directly and use an overhead microphone.

The technique quickly landed him session work with Alabama, Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989) and Clint Black and, as the 1990s dawned, Rob found his name atop every producer’s wish list.

 

Rob Hajacos' fiddle style helped define the decade and anchored career-making albums, such as Garth Brooks’ 'No Fences' (Capitol Records, 1989), Alan Jackson’s 'Don’t Rock The Jukebox' (Arista Records, 1990) and Shania Twain’s 'Come On Over' (Mercury Records, 1997).

In 1993, Rob Hajacos' playing netted him one of Music Row magazine’s 'All-Star Awards', an honor presented to musicians who have appeared on the most Bilboard Top 10-selling albums of the previous year; Rob played on fifteen, half of the thirty albums that year to go Top 10. Rob had the most Billboard Top 10 album credits of any musician in 1993 and went on to repeat that feat in the fiddle category in 1994 and 1997.

However, it is Rob Hajacos' work with Brooks & Dunn (Kix Brooks and Ronnie Dunn) that afforded him the greatest chance to shine; not only did Rob and his fiddle supplement the Brooks & Dunn soundscape, but in some cases, he even came up with the songs’ memorable hooks. Playing on Brooks & Dunn albums is one of Rob's proudest moments.

Rob Hajacos helped give the powerhouse duo a signature sound, further raising his profile on Music Row in Nashville and cementing his place as one of country music’s most influential fiddle and violin players. He has appeared on all of Taylor Swift’s albums, rosined up the bow for records by Kenny Chesney and Sugarland and toured England, Ireland and Australia with no less than Neil Diamond.

Most recently, Rob has worked with artists as varied as Lionel Richie, Luke Bryan, Colt Ford and The Band Perry and is happy to help take the fiddle into the 21st century.

Many would agree that Rob Hajacos is responsible for the fiddle’s staying power. By constantly revolutionizing his sound, mixing weeping country with a rock rhythm, Rob has helped the instrument evolve and carve out its place in contemporary country.

In the process, Rob Hajacos unintentionally became one of the 'heroes' he looked up to all those years ago.

Rob Hajacos played fiddle on George Strait's debut album, 'Strait Country' (MCA Records, 1981), which included the following tracks:

'Unwound', which was written by Dean Dillon and Frank Dycus (Friday 5 December 1939 - Friday 23 November 2012) (No.6, 1981)
'If You're Thinking You Want A Stranger (There's One Coming Home)' (written by Blake Mevis and David Wills) (No.3, 1982)
'Honky Tonk Upstairs' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'I Get Along With You', which was written by Dean Dillon, Frank Dycus (Friday 5 December 1939 - Friday 23 November 2012) and Buddy Cannon
'Down And Out', which was written by Dean Dillon and Frank Dycus (Friday 5 December 1939 - Friday 23 November 2012) (No.16, 1981)
'Friday Night Fever', which was written by Dean Dillon, Blake Mevis and Frank Dycus (Friday 5 December 1939 - Friday 23 November 2012)
'She's Playing Hell (Trying To Get Me To Heaven)' (written by Dean Dillon, David Wills and Charles Quillen)
'Her Goodbye Hit Me In The Heart', which was written by Dean Dillon and Frank Dycus (Friday 5 December 1939 - Friday 23 November 2012)

Rob Hajacos played fiddle on George Strait's 'Strait From the Heart' (MCA Records, 1982), which included the following tracks:

'Fool Hearted Memory' (written by Byron Hill and Alan R. Mevis) (No.1 for one week in August/September 1982)
'Honky Tonk Crazy', which was written by Dean Dillon and Frank Dycus (Friday 5 December 1939 - Friday 23 November 2012)
'Marina del Rey, which was written by Dean Dillon and Frank Dycus (Friday 5 December 1939 - Friday 23 November 2012) (No.6, 1982)
'Lover In Disguise' (written by Blake Mevis and Jim Dowell)
'Amarillo By Morning' (written by Terry Stafford and Paul Fraser) (No.4, 1983)
'A Fire I Can't Put Out' (written by Darryl Staedtler) (No.1 for one week in September 1983)


Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Alabama's 'The Touch' (RCA Records, 1986), which reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1986. The album included two No.1 singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Touch Me When We're Dancing' (No.1 for one week in November/December 1986)
'You've Got The Touch' (No.1 for one week in April 1987)

Alabama's 'The Touch' (RCA Records, 1986) also included 'Pony Express' (written by Teddy Gentry, Ken Lambert, Buddy Cannon and Dean Dillon).

Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Keith Whitley's 'Don't Close Your Eyes' (RCA Records, 1988), which reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988 and which included the following tracks:

'Flying Colors' (written by Kim Morrison and Gary Talley)
'It's All Coming Back To Me Now', which was written by Don Cook, Curly Putman and Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989)
'Lucky Dog' (written by Bill Caswell and Verlon Thompson)
'Don't Close Your Eyes' (written by Bob McDill) (No.1 for one week in August 1988)
'The Birmingham Turnaround' (written by Warren Robb and Sanger D. Shafer)
'Some Old Side Road' (written by Roger Ferris)
'Would These Arms Be In Your Way', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010), Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009) and Red Lane)
'I'm No Stranger To The Rain' (written by Sonny Curtis and Ron Hellard) (No.1 for two weeks in April 1989)
'I Never Go Around Mirrors (I've Got A Heartache To Hide)', which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975) and Sanger D. Shafer)
'When You Say Nothing At All' (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz) (No.1 for two weeks in December 1988/January 1989)
'A Day In The Life Of A Fool' (written by Mike Dekle and Byron Hill)
'Honky Tonk Heart' (written by Johnny Neel and Lonnie Wilson)


Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Keith Whitley's 'I Wonder Do You Think Of Me' (RCA Records, 1989), which reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1989 and which included the following tracks:

'Talk To Me Texas' (written by Don Cook, Bucky Jones and Curly Putman)
'Between An Old Memory And Me', which was written by Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011) and Keith Stegall
'It Ain't Nothing' (written by Tony Haselden) (No.1 for one week in early 1990)
'I'm Over You' (written by Tim Nichols and Zack Turner) (No.1 for one week in 1990)
'Turn This Thing Around' (written by Gary Harrison and Gene Nelson)
'Lady's Choice' (written by Bill Rice and Mary Sharon Rice)
'Brother Jukebox' (written by Paul Craft)
'Tennessee Courage', which was written by Louis Brown, Rex Gosdin and Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009) and Red Lane)
'Heartbreak Highway' (written by Brent Mason, Don Pfrimmer and Lonnie Wilson)
'I Wonder Do You Think Of Me' (written by Sanger D. Shafer) (No.1 for one week in September 1989)


Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Suzy Bogguss' 'Somewhere Between' (Liberty Records, 1989), which was released on Tuesday 21 March 1989 and included the following tracks:

'Somewhere Between' (written by Merle Haggard)
'Guilty As They Come' (written by Susanna Clark and Rodney Crowell)
'I'm At Home On The Range' (written by Suzy Bogguss, Doug Crider and Verlon Thompson)
'My Sweet Love Ain't Around', which was written by Bunny Biggs, Fred Rose (24 August 1898 - Wednesday 1 December 1954) and Honey Wilds)
'Handyman's Dream' (written by Gary Nicholson and Pam Tillis)
'I Want To Be A Cowboy's Sweetheart', which was written by Patsy Montana (Friday 30 October 1908 - Friday 3 May 1996)
'Cross My Broken Heart' (written by Kye Fleming and Verlon Thompson)
'Take It Like A Man' (written by Suzy Bogguss and Gary Scruggs)
'Hopeless Romantic' (written by Doug Crider)
'Night Rider's Lament' (written by Michael Burton)

Following the success of 'Somewhere Between' (Liberty Records, 1989), Suzy Bogguss was named the Academy of Country Music's 'Top New Female Vocalist'.


Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Garth Brooks' self-titled debut album, 'Garth Brooks' (Capitol Records, 1989), which was released on Wednesday 12 April 1989. The album was both a critical and chart success, peaking at No.13 on the Billboard Top 200 pop music album chart and No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart. The album was certified Diamond status by the RIAA for the sale of ten million copies in the United States.

Garth Brooks' self-titled debut album, 'Garth Brooks' (Capitol Records, 1989), included the following tracks:

'Not Counting You' (written by Garth Brooks)
'I've Got A Good Thing Going' (written by Larry Bastian, Sandy Mahl and Garth Brooks)
'If Tomorrow Never Comes' (written by Kent Blazy and Garth Brooks)
'Everytime That It Rains' (written by Charlie Stefl, Ty England and Garth Brooks)
'Alabama Clay' (written by Larry Cordle and R. Scaife)
'Much Too Young (To Feel This Damn Old)' (written by Randy Taylor and Garth Brooks)
'Cowboy Bill' (written by Larry Bastian and Ed Berghoff)
'Nobody Gets Off In This Town' (written by Larry Bastian and DeWayne Blackwell)
'I Know One', which was written by 'Cowboy' Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013)
'The Dance' (written by Tony Arata)

Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Clint Black's debut album, 'Killin' Time' (RCA Records, 1989), was released on Tuesday 2 May 1989.

'Killin' Time' (RCA Records, 1989) was a critical and commercial success, reaching No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart and was certified platinum in 1990. The first single, 'A Better Man', reached No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in early June 1989. This marked the first time in fourteen years that a debut single by a male artist had peaked at the top of the chart.

In total, four singles on Clint Black's debut album reached No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart; 'A Better Man' (No.1, 1989), 'Killin' Time' (No.1, 1989), 'Nobody's Home' (No.1, 1990) and 'Walkin' Away' (No.1, 1990); this was the first time any country artist had accomplished this feat. A fifth single, 'Nothing's News', reached No.3 in 1990.

Clint Black swept the Country Music Association (CMA) Awards in 1989, winning in six different categories, including the 'Horizon Award' for best newcomer. At the end of 1989, his singles, 'A Better Man' and 'Killin' Time' were the No.1 and No.2 songs on the year-end Billboard country music singles charts. It had been thirty-six years since another artist had claimed both top spots in a single year.


Rob Hajacos played fiddle and provided background vocals on Garth Brooks' 'No Fences' (Capitol Records, 1990), which was released on Monday 27 August 1990 and which reached No.3 on the Billboard Top 200 pop music album chart, and No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart.

'No Fences' (Capitol Records, 1990) remains Garth Brooks' best-selling studio album to date with seventeen million copies sold in the United States and is the album that made him an international star and was his first album issued in the UK (the original release in that country contained four bonus tracks, the singles from his previous United States debut).

Garth Brooks' 'No Fences' (Capitol Records, 1990), included the following tracks:

'The Thunder Rolls' (written by Pat Alger and Garth Brooks) (No.1, 1991)
'New Way To Fly' (written by Kim Williams and Garth Brooks)
'Two Of A Kind, Workin' On A Full House' (written by Bobby Boyd, Warren Haynes and Dennis Robbins) (No.1, 1991)
'Victim Of The Game' (written by Mark D. Sanders and Garth Brooks)
'Friends In Low Places' (written by DeWayne Blackwell and Earl 'Bud' Lee) (No.1, 1990)
'Wild Horses' (written by Bill Shore and David Wills)
'Unanswered Prayers' (written by Pat Alger, Larry Bastian and Garth Brooks) (No.1, 1990)
'Same Old Story' (written by Tony Arata)
'Mr. Blue' (written by DeWayne Blackwell)
'Wolves' (written by Stephanie Davis)

Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Tanya Tucker's 'What Do I Do With Me' (Capitol Records, 1991), which was released on Tuesday 2 July 1991; the album included the following hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles and Tracks Chart:

'(Without You) What Do I Do With Me' (written by Royce Porter, L. David Lewis and David Chamberlain) (No.2, 1991)
'Down To My Last Teardrop', which was written by Paul Davis (Wednesday 21 April 1948 - Tuesday 22 April 2008) (No.2, 1991)
'Some Kind Of Trouble' (written by Mike Reid, Brent Maher and Don Potter) (No.3, 1992)
'If Your Heart Ain't Busy Tonight' (written by Tom Shapiro and Chris Waters) (No.4, 1992)

Personnel involved in the recording of Tanya Tucker's 'What Do I Do With Me' (Capitol Records, 1991) included the following:

Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar)
Beth Nielsen Chapman, Paul Davis (Wednesday 21 April 1948 - Tuesday 22 April 2008) and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Steve Gibson (acoustic and electric guitar)


Rob Hajacos played fiddle on the tracks 'A Gifted Hand' (written by Doug Crider) and 'She's Leaving Lookin' Good' (written by Lewis Anderson), both of which were included on Gene Watson's 'At Last' (Warner Bros. Records, 1991).

Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Garth Brooks' 'Ropin' The Wind' (Liberty Records, 1991), which was released on Tuesday 10 September 1991 and was Garth Brooks' first studio album to debut at No.1 on both the Billboard 200 pop music album chart and the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart.

Garth Brooks' 'Ropin' The Wind' (Liberty Records, 1991) enjoyed four runs at No.1 between Saturday 28 September 1991 and Friday 3 April 1992, spending a combined eighteen weeks at No.1, eventually being certified for shipments of 14xPlatinum by the RIAA in 2010.

In the UK, Garth Brooks' 'Ropin' The Wind' (Liberty Records, 1991) reached the Top 50 pop albums list and went to No.1 for several months on the country charts. Garth Brooks' 'Ropin' The Wind' (Liberty Records, 1991) went on to sell seventeen million copies world wide.

Garth Brooks' 'Ropin' The Wind' (Liberty Records, 1991) included the following tracks:

'Against The Grain' (written by Bruce Bouton, Larry Cordle and Carl Jackson)
'Rodeo' (written by Larry Bastian)
'What She's Doing Now' (written by Pat Alger and Garth Brooks)
'Burning Bridges' (written by Stephanie C. Brown and Garth Brooks)
'Which One Of Them' (written by Garth Brooks)
'Papa Loved Mama' (written by Kim Williams and Garth Brooks)
'Shameless' (written by Billy Joel)
'Cold Shoulder' (written by Kent Blazy, Kim Williams and Garth Brooks)
'We Bury The Hatchet' (written by Royal Wade Kimes and Garth Brooks)
'In Lonesome Dove' (written by Cynthia Limbaugh and Garth Brooks)
'The River' (written by Victoria Shaw and Garth Brooks)

Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Keith Whitley's 'Kentucky Bluebird' (RCA Records, 1991), which was his fifth studio album. His first posthumous album, it was released via RCA Records Nashville on Tuesday 10 September 1991 and consisted of four previously-released songs, re-orchestrated demos and other previously unreleased songs, as well as snippets from live performances that predate Keith Whitley's professional music career.

Keith Whitley's 'Kentucky Bluebird' (RCA Records, 1991), which reached No.45 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1991, included the following tracks:

'Buddy Starcher Show' (from Charleston, West Virginia, ca. 1962)
'Going Home' (written by Troy Seals and John Schneider)
'Lucky Dog' (written by Verlon Thompson and Bill Caswell)
'That's Where I Want To Take Our Love', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010) and Dean Dillon
'Somebody's Doin' Me Right' (written by J. Fred Knobloch, Paul Overstreet and Dan Tyler) (No.15, 1991)
'American Country Countdown' (interview excerpt)
'I Never Go Around Mirrors', which was written by Sanger D. Shafer and Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975)
'Lonesome Mountain Boys Radio Show' (circa 1972) / 'American Country Countdown' (interview excerpts)
'Brotherly Love' (written by Jimmy Stewart and Tim Nichols) (duet with Earl Thomas Conley) (No.2, 1991)
'Backbone Job', which was written by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989) and Kix Brooks
'Would These Arms Be In Your Way', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010), Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009) and Red Lane
'Between An Old Memory And Me', which was written by Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011) and Keith Stegall
'Ralph Emery' (interview excerpt, January 1989)
'I Want My Rib Back', which was written by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989) and Fred Koller
'Kentucky Bluebird' (written by Don Cook and Wally Wilson)


Rob Hajacos played fiddle, on all tracks, on Gene Watson's 'In Other Words' (Broadland International Records/Mercury Canada, 1992).

Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Clint Black's third album, 'The Hard Way' (RCA Records, 1992), which was released on Tuesday 14 July 1992.

'The Hard Way' (RCA Records, 1992) was Clint Black's first album that he co-produced with James Stroud. It reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart and three singles were released from it; 'We Tell Ourselves' (No.2, 1992), 'Burn One Down' (No.4, 1992) and 'When My Ship Comes In' (No.1, 1993).

'The Hard Way' (RCA Records, 1992) also included 'A Woman Has Her Way', which was co-written by Clint Black, David Bellamy and Jerry Lynn Williams.

Rob Hajacos played fiddle, on all tracks, on Gene Watson's 'Uncharted Mind' (Step One Records, 1993).


Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Keith Whitley's 'Wherever You Are Tonight' (BNA Records, 1995), which was released on Tuesday 24 October 1995 and was his sixth and final studio album release.

Keith Whitley's 'Wherever You Are Tonight' (BNA Records, 1995) was the second posthumous album of his career and consisted of ten demos which Keith Whitley recorded, backed with new musical arrangements. The album was released via BNA Records, the label to which Keith Whitley's widow, Lorrie Morgan, was signed at the time.

Keith Whitley's 'Wherever You Are Tonight' (BNA Records, 1995) included the following tracks:

'I'm Losing You All Over Again', which was written by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989) and Bill Caswell)
'Daddy Loved Trains', which was written by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989) and Don Cook
'Tell Me Something I Don't Know', which was written by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989), Don Cook and Gary Nicholson)
'Blind And Afraid Of The Dark', which was written by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989) and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004)
'Buck', which was written by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989)
'Light At The End Of The Tunnel', which was written by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989) and Don Cook
'I'm Not That Easy To Forget', which was written by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989), Don Cook and Curly Putman
'Just How Bad Do You Wanna Feel Good', which was written by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989) and Bill Caswell
'Leave Well Enough Alone', which was written by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989) and Bill Caswell
'Wherever You Are Tonight', which was written by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 - Tuesday 9 May 1989), Don Cook and Gary Nicholson (No.75, 1995)


Rob Hajacos played fiddle, on all tracks, on Gene Watson's 'The Good Ole Days' (Step One Records, 1996).


Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Trace Adkins' debut album, 'Dreamin' Out Loud' (Capitol Nashville Records, 1996), which was released on Tuesday 25 June 1996.

Trace Adkins' debut album, 'Dreamin' Out Loud' (Capitol Nashville Records, 1996) included the following Billboard Hot Country Singles and Tracks Chart releases:

'There's a Girl in Texas' (No.20, 1996)
'Every Light In The House' (No.3, 1996)
'(This Ain't) No Thinkin' Thing' (written by Tim Nichols and Mark D. Sanders) (No.1, 1997)
'I Left Something Turned On At Home' (written by Billy Lawson and John Schweers) (No.2, 1997)

Trace Adkins' debut album, 'Dreamin' Out Loud' (Capitol Nashville Records, 1996) was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for United States shipments of one million copies.

Rob Hajacos played fiddle, on all tracks, on Gene Watson's 'A Way to Survive' (Step One Records, 1997).


Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Trace Adkins' 'Big Time' (Capitol Nashville Records, 1997), which was released on Tuesday 21 October 1997 and included the following Billboard Hot Country Singles and Tracks Chart releases:

'The Rest Of Mine' (No.4, 1997)
'Lonely Won't Leave Me Alone' (No.11, 1998)
'Big Time' (No.27, 1998)

Trace Adkins' 'Big Time' (Capitol Nashville Records, 1997) also included 'Took Her To The Moon' (written by Mark Nesler and Byron Hill).

Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Craig Morgan's self titled debut album, 'Craig Morgan' (Atlantic Records, 2000), which was produced by Buddy Cannon and Norro Wilson.

'Craig Morgan' (Atlantic Records, 2000) included the following tracks:

'Paradise', which was written by Harley Allen (Monday 23 January 1956 - Wednesday 30 March 2011) and Craig Morgan (No.46, 2000)
'I Want Us Back' (written by Maria Cannon-Goodman, Buddy Cannon and Dean Dillon) (No.51, 2001)
'Something To Write Home About' (written by Craig Morgan and Tony Ramey) (No.38, 2000)
'302 South Maple Avenue' (written by Paul Harrison and Craig Morgan)
'It's Me' (written by Steve Dean, Wil Nance and Craig Morgan)
'When A Man Can't Get A Woman Off His Mind' (written by Bill Anderson and Sharon Vaughn)
'Everything's A Thing' (written by Steve Dean, Wil Nance and Joe Nichols)
'Walking In My Father's Shoes' (written by Jeff Knight and Craig Morgan)
'Hush' (written by Bill Anderson, Buddy Cannon and Craig Morgan)
'Everywhere I Go' (written by Maria Cannon-Goodman and Craig Morgan)
'I Wish I Could See Bakersfield' (featuring Merle Haggard) (written by Buddy Cannon)

Personnel involved in the recording of 'Craig Morgan' (Atlantic Records, 2000) included the following:

Melonie Cannon (background vocals)
Steve Cropper (electric guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Randy Hardison (drums, percussion)
Ted Hewitt (background vocals)
John Hobbs (keyboards)
Jim Horn (baritone saxophone)
John Jorgenson (electric guitar)
B. James Lowry (electric guitar, acoustic guitar)
Larry Paxton (bass guitar)
Charles Rose (trombone)


Rob Hajacos played fiddle, on all tracks on Gene Watson's 'Gene Watson...Sings' (Intersound Records, 2003).

Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Craig Morgan's 'I Love It' (Broken Bow Records, 2003), which included the following tracks:

'I Love It' (written by Philip Douglas, Ron Harbin and Jimmy Yeary)
'Almost Home' (written by Craig Morgan and Kerry Kurt Phillips) (No.6, 2002)
'Look At Us' (written by Larry Bastian, Buddy Cannon and Craig Morgan) (No.27, 2004)
'In The Dream' (written by Don Koch and Craig Morgan)
'You Never Know' (written by Chris Bain, Phil O'Donnell and Craig Morgan)
'What You Do To Me' (written by Steve Dean and Wil Nance)
'Every Friday Afternoon' (written by Jimmy Melton and Neal Coty) (No.25, 2003)
'Where Has My Hometown Gone' (written by Craig Morgan, Phil O'Donnell and Jeff Carson)
'Always Be Mine' (written by Jeremy Campbell and Noah Gordon)
'Money' (written by Jeremy Campbell, Phil O'Donnell and Noah Gordon)
'God, Family And Country' (written by Lance McDaniel, Craig Morris and Craig Morgan) (No.49, 2002)


Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Craig Morgan's 'My Kind Of Living' (Broken Bow Records, 2005), which included the following tracks, which were all hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

'That's What I Love About Sunday' (No.1, 2004)
'Redneck Yacht Club' (No.2, 2005)
'I Got You' (No.12, 2005)

Craig Morgan's 'My Kind Of Living' (Broken Bow Records, 2005) also included 'Blame Me', which featured Brad Paisley and John Conlee; Brad Paisley also played electric guitar on the track.

Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Taylor Swift's self-titled debut album, 'Taylor Swift' (Big Machine Records, 2006), which reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2006 and No.5 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart.

Five hit singles were released from 'Taylor Swift' (Big Machine Records, 2006) and included the following:

'Tim McGraw' (No.40 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2006 / No.6 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2006)
'Teardrops On My Guitar' (No.13 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2007 / No.2 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2007)
'Our Song' (No.16 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2007 / No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2007)
'Picture To Burn' (No.28 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2008 / No.3 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2008)
'Should've Said No' (No.33 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2008 / No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2008)


Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Taylor Swift's 'Fearless' (Big Machine Records, 2008), which reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2008 and No.1 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart.

'Love Story' (No.4 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2008 / No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2008)
'White Horse' (No.13 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2008 / No.2 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2008)
'You Belong With Me' (No.2 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2009 / No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2009)
'Fifteen' (No.23 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2009 / No.7 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2009)
'Fearless' (No.9 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2010 / No.10 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2010)


Rob Hajacos played fiddle on Taylor Swift's 'Speak Now' (Big Machine Records, 2010), which reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2008 and No.1 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart.

'Mine' (No.3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2010 / No.2 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2010)
'Back To December' (No.6 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2010 / No.3 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2010)
'Mean' (No.11 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2011 / No.2 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2011)
'The Story Of Us' (No.41 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2011)
'Sparks Fly' (No.17 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2011 / No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2011)
'Ours' (No.13 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2011 / No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2011)

The exemplary fiddle playing of Rob Hajacos can be heard on a number of albums from the following extraordinary list of artists:

Shania Twain
Sugarland
The Band Perry
Faith Hill
Kenny Chesney
Blake Shelton
Alan Jackson
Jewel
Reba McEntire
Luke Bryan
John Michael Montgomery
Faron Young (Thursday 25 February 1932 - Tuesday 10 December 1996)
Buddy Emmons and Ray Pennington
Olivia Newton John
Doug Stone
Chris LeDoux (Saturday 2 October 1948 - Wednesday 9 March 2005)
Hank Williams III
Brooks & Dunn (Kix Brooks and Ronnie Dunn)
Trisha Yearwood
Sammy Kershaw
Joe Diffie
Rodney Atkins
Tanya Tucker
Chris Young
Glen Campbell
Travis Tritt
Lonestars
Mark Chesnutt
The Mavericks
Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 - Monday 16 December 2013)
Mel Tillis
Joe Nichols
George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013)
Lari White
John Conlee
Asleep At The Wheel
Jack Ingram
James House
Martina McBride
Willie Nelson with Curtis Potter
Honky Tonk Angles, consisting of Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998)
Toby Keith
Barbara Mandrell
Charley Pride
Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001)
Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 - Saturday 5 June 1993)
K.D. Lang
Aaron Tippin
Rodney Crowell
Crystal Gayle
Collin Raye
Billy Dean
Marty Stuart
Don Edwards
Lee Greenwood
Porter Wagoner (Friday 12 August 1927 - Sunday 28 October 2007)
Pam Tillis
The Kendalls
Larry Stewart
Paul Overstreet
Trick Pony
David Ball
Linda Davis
Ronnie McDowell
Shelby Lynne
Mark Collie
David Frizzell
Kathy Mattea
Wade Hayes
Ricky Van Shelton
Holly Dunn
Tracy Lawrence
Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009)
Chad Brock
Matraca Berg
Shenandoah
Hal Ketchum
Paul Brandt
Mindy McCready (Sunday 30 November 1975 - Sunday 17 February 2013)
Skip Ewing
Sons of the San Joaquin
Chely Wright
Johnny Rodriquez
Rhonda Vincent
The Forrester Sisters
Michael Johnson
Johnny Lee
Craig Morgan


Rob Hajacos' Honours include the following:

1993
Music Row Magazine’s Top Ten Album All-Star Wins

1994
Music Row Magazine’s Top Ten Album All-Star Wins

1996
ACM Fiddle Player of the Year

1997
Music Row Magazine’s Top Ten Album All-Star Wins (tied with Stuart Duncan)


Visit Rob Hajacos' Official Site

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