• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Webster PR



Webster Public Relations
, PO Box 23015, Nashville, TN 37202

Contact Scott Adkins
Telephone 615-777-6995

Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted during 2014, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Ann M. Stuckey, which she submitted to this site on Saturday 25 January 2014.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Ann M. Stuckey who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Ann M. Stuckey
This quote was submitted on Saturday 25 January 2014.

'I always knew Gene Watson had an amazing voice.

I have been listening to him for many years.

Nat (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988) was very complimentary of Gene's vocal abilities.

However, this past August (2013), I got to see Gene perform in Carthage, Texas and ever since that show, I have become a bigger fan.

His show is terrific, his performance is incredible.  His rapport with his band was excellent.



I have viewed Gene and Rhonda Vincent performing Nat's song 'Sweet Thang' on YouTube so many times.

They are the perfect duet.

Thanks so much for keeping this song alive'.

Thank you, Ann M. Stuckey, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Ann M. Stuckey...

Ann M. Stuckey is the widow of Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988), who was a true Texas gentleman.

Nat and Ann Stuckey were basically retired when Nat died from cancer on Wednesday 24 August 1988. The country music business was very good to both Nat and Ann, and continues to be for Ann M. Stuckey.

Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988)

Nat Stuckey was born Nathan Wright 'Nat' Stuckey II on Sunday 17 December 1933 and was reared in Atlanta in Cass County, Texas where he attended Arlington State College, now The University of Texas at Arlington, from which he earned a radio and television degree.

Nat Stuckey established himself as a radio announcer, first at KALT in Atlanta, Texas and then at KWKH in Shreveport, Louisiana, where he worked alongside legendary announcer Frank Page.

At KWKH, Nat Stuckey, along with Jim Reeves (Monday 20 August 1923 - Friday 31 July 1964), became a member of the former country music show known as The Louisiana Hayride.

In 1965, Nat Stuckey saw the release, on Paula Records, of the non-album single 'Hurting Again', but it did not chart.

In August 1966, Nat Stuckey saw the release of his debut album, 'Nat Stuckey Really Sings' (Paula Records, 1966); the album was produced by Nat Stuckey and Frank Page, was recorded at Brian's Studio in Tyler, Texas in July 1966 and included two tracks which were hit singles on the country music singles chart:

'Sweet Thang' (written by Nat Stuckey) (No.4, 1966)
'Oh, Woman' (written by Nat Stuckey) (No.17, 1967)

Nat Stuckey's debut album, 'Nat Stuckey Really Sings' (Paula Records, 1966), also included the following tracks:

'Don't You Believe Her' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'I Wonder (Where The Bird Flies)' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Wall Climber' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Sadness Follows Me Home' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Tears Tears' (written by Robin Hood Brians)
'On The Other Hand' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Paralyze My Mind' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Just Leave The Door Open' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Round And Round' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Pop A Top' (written by Nat Stuckey)

Nat Stuckey's debut album, 'Nat Stuckey Really Sings' (Paula Records, 1966), reached No.6 on the country albums chart in 1966.

On Tuesday 27 December 1966, Buck Owens & The Buckaroos saw the release of 'Open Up Your Heart' (Capitol Records, 1966), which included 'Waitin' In Your Welfare Line', which was written by Nat Stuckey, Don Rich (Friday 15 August 1941 - Wednesday 17 July 1974) and Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 - Saturday 25 March 2006); the single was Buck Owens' tenth No.1 on the country music singles chart, spent seven weeks at the top and a total of eighteen weeks on the country chart.

Jim Ed Brown recorded Nat Stuckey's 'Pop A Pop' and included the track on 'Just Jim' (RCA Victor Records, 1967); the track reached No.3 on the country music singles chart in 1967.

In May 1967, Nat Stuckey saw the release of 'All My Tomorrows' (Paula Records, 1967); the album was produced by Stan Lewis, was recorded at Starday Sound Studio in Nashville in January 1967 and included three tracks which were hit singles on the country music singles chart:

'All My Tomorrows' (written by Nat Stuckey) (No.27, 1967)
'You're Putting Me On' (written by Nat Stuckey) (No.67, 1967)
'Adorable Women' (written by Nat Stuckey) (No.41, 1967)

Nat Stuckey's 'All My Tomorrows' (Paula Records, 1967) also included the following tracks:

'Waitin' In Your Welfare Line', which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 - Saturday 25 March 2006), Don Rich (Friday 15 August 1941 - Wednesday 17 July 1974) and Nat Stuckey
'All My Good Times Are Gone' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Will's Crossing' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Anywhere I Am' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Walk Through This World With Me' (written by Sandy Seamons and Kaye Savage)
'I Knew Her When' (written by George Woodland)
'Social Obligations' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'I Can't Stop Loving You', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'There's A Lot More' (written by Nat Stuckey)

Mel Tillis recorded Nat Stuckey's 'Sweet Thang' and included the track on 'Life Turned Her That Way' (Kapp Records, 1967).

Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 - Thursday 6 September 1984) & Loretta Lynn recorded Nat Stuckey's 'Sweet Thang' and included the track on 'Singin' Again' (Decca Records, 1967); the track reached No.45 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1967.

Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 - Monday 16 December 2013) recorded Nat Stuckey's 'Don't You Believe Her' and included the track on 'Take Me As I Am' (Columbia Records, 1968).

Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 - Monday 14 August 2006) & June Stearns recorded Nat Stuckey's 'Sweet Thang' and included the track on 'Back To Back' (Columbia Records, 1969).

Jimmy Dean (Friday 10 August 1928 - Sunday 13 June 2010) & Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991) recorded Nat Stuckey's 'Sweet Thang' and included the track on 'Country Boy & Country Girl' (RCA Records, 1970).
In late 1968, Nat Stuckey saw the release of the non-album single, 'Leave This One Alone', which reached No.63 on the Billboard country music singles chart.

In January 1969, Nat Stuckey saw the release of 'Stuckey Style' (Paula Records, 1969), which was produced by Stan Lewis and included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'My Can Do Can't Keep Up With My Want To' (written by Nat Stuckey) (No.17, 1968)

Nat Stuckey's 'Stuckey Style' (Paula Records, 1969), also included the following tracks:

'Welcome To My World', which was written by Ray Winkler (Wednesday 13 October 1920 - Saturday 9 May 1998) and John Hathcock / Although the song is credited to Ray Winkler and John Hathcock, the melody was likely written by Eddie McDuff rather than Winkler; a traditional love song, the bridge includes lyrics taken from Matthew 7:7-8 ('Knock and the door will open; seek and you will find; ask and you'll be given...', from the Sermon on the Mount)
'Gentle On My Mind', which was written by John Hartford (Thursday 30 December 1937 - Monday 4 June 2001)
'That's All That Matters', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010)
'Together Again', which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 - Saturday 25 March 2006)
'With Pen In Hand' (written by Bobby Goldsboro)
'Son Of Hickory Holler's Tramp' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'By The Time I Get To Phoenix' (written by Jim Webb)
'Oh, Lonesome Me', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'She Thinks I Still Care' (written by Dickey Lee and Steve Duffy)

In late 1968, Nat Stuckey signed with RCA Records and saw the release of 'Nat Stuckey Sings' (RCA Records, 1968), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Plastic Saddle' (written by Vic McAlpin) (No.9, 1968)
'Joe & Mabel's 12th Street Bar & Grill' (written by Bobby Braddock) (No.13, 1969)

Nat Stuckey's 'Nat Stuckey Sings' (RCA Records, 1968) also included the following tracks:

'Folsom Prison Blues', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)
'Lookin' In A Mirror' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'She Just Wrote Me From Atlanta', which was written by Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 - Saturday 22 November 2003)
'To My Sorrow' (written by Vic McAlpin)
'What Made Milwaukee Famous', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'Mr. America' (written by Jack Moran and Glenn Douglas Tubb)
'No One Will Ever Know I Lied (But Me)' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Harper Valley PTA' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'Dreams Of The Everyday Housewife' (written by Chris Gantry)
'Woman Of Hurt' (written by Nat Stuckey)

In April 1969, Nat Stuckey saw the release of 'Keep 'Em Country' (RCA Victor Records, 1969), which was produced by Felton Jarvis and included the following tracks:

'House Of The Rising Sun' (written by Alan Price)
'Weren't The Roses Beautiful In May' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Letter To Shirley' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Gardener For Her Roses' (written by Roland Pike and Johnny Whitehead)
'Don't You Ever Get Tired (Of Hurtin' Me)', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010)
'Loving You', which was written by Jerry Leiber (Tuesday 25 April 1933 - Monday 22 August 2011) and Mike Stoller
'Always Late (With Your Kisses)', which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975) and Blackie Crawford
'Son Of A Bum' (written by Mel Tillis)
'First Day' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'One Mile More' (written by Ann Monkhouse)
'Wine In The Celler' (written by Jim Robinson and Johnny Wilson)
'Sock It To Me Country Style' (written by Nat Stuckey)

In July 1969, Connie Smith & Nat Stuckey saw the release of 'Young Love' (RCA Victor Records, 1969), which was produced by Bob Ferguson & Felton Jarvis and included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Young Love' (written by Carole Joyner and Rick Cartey) (No.20, 1969)

Connie Smith & Nat Stuckey's 'Young Love' (RCA Victor Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

'Even The Bad Times Are Good' (written by Carl Belew and Clyde Pitts)
'Two Together' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Whispering Hope' (written by Alice Hawthorne and Alton Howard) / Connie Smith & Nat Stuckey were in the final nominations for a Grammy Award for their version of this track
'I'll Share My World With You' (written by Ben Wilson)
'I Got You' (written by Ricci Mareno and Gordon Galbraith)
'Together Alone' (written by Bruce Cockburn)
'Something Pretty' (written by Charles Williams and Wayne Stokes)
'Yours Love', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'Stand Beside Me', which was written by Tompall Glaser (Sunday 3 September 1933 - Tuesday 13 August 2013)
'Rings Of Gold' (written by Gene Thomas)
'Let It Be Me' (written by Mike Curtis, Pierre Delanoe and Gilbert Becaud)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith & Nat Stuckey's 'Young Love' (RCA Victor Records, 1969) included the following:

Grady Martin, Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001), Pete Wade, Fred Carter and Chip Young (guitar)
Weldon Myrick (steel guitar)
Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) and Bobby Dyson (bass)
Jerry Carrigan and James Isbell (drums)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins and David Briggs (piano)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica/vibes)
Bill Walker (vibes)

In November 1969, Nat Stuckey saw the release of 'New Country Roads' (RCA Victor Records, 1969), which was produced by Felton Jarvis and included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Cut Across Shorty', which was written by Marijohn Wilkin (Wednesday 14 July 1920 - Saturday 28 October 2006) and Wayne P. Walker (No.15, 1969)

Nat Stuckey's 'New Country Roads' (RCA Victor Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

'In The Year 2525' (written by Rick Evans
'The Letter' (written by Wayne C. Thompson)
'In The Ghetto' (written by Mac Davis)
'These Eyes' (written by Burton Cummings and Randall Bachman)
'Bad Moon Rising' (written by John C. Fogerty)
'Listen To The Band' (written by Michael Nesmith)
'This Guy's In Love With You', which was written by Hal David (Wednesday 25 May 1921 - Monday 1 September 2012) and Burt Bacharach
'Clean Up Your Own Backyard' (written by Mac Davis and Billy Strange)
'Roll Over Beethoven' (written by Chuck Berry)
'Hound Dog', which was written by Jerry Leiber (Tuesday 25 April 1933 - Monday 22 August 2011) and Mike Stoller

Personnel involved in the recording of Nat Stuckey's 'New Country Roads' (RCA Victor Records, 1969) included the following:

Wayne Moss, Pete Wade, Dale Sellers, Harold Bradley and Chip Young (guitar)
Lloyd Green, Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 - Friday 29 July 1988) and Hal Rugg (steel guitar)
Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997), Joe Zinkan and Henry Strzelecki (bass)
Jerry Carrigan, Kenneth Buttrey and Willie Ackerman (drums)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins, David Briggs and Jerry Smith (piano)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (banjo/six-string dobro)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica/vibes/organ)
Vocals: Dorothy Dillard, Priscilla Hubbard, Louis Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012), William Wright and The Jordanaires

In early 1970, Nat Stuckey saw the release of the non-album single, 'Sittin' In Atlanta Station', which reached No.33 on the Billboard country music singles chart.

In January 1970, Connie Smith & Nat Stuckey saw the release of 'Sunday Morning with Nat Stuckey & Connie Smith' (RCA Victor Records, 1970), which was produced by Bob Ferguson & Felton Jarvis and included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'If God Is Dead (Who's This Living In My Soul)' (written by Lawrence Reynolds) (No.59, 1970)

Connie Smith & Nat Stuckey's 'Sunday Morning with Nat Stuckey & Connie Smith' (RCA Victor Records, 1970), also included the following tracks:

'Sunday Morning' (written by Van Trevor and Dick Heard)
'Love Takes Care Of Me' (written by Jimmy Peppers)
'Crumbs From The Table' (written by Barbara Miller)
'Daddy Sang Bass', which was written by Carl Perkins (Saturday 9 April 1932 - Monday 19 January 1998)
'Now Lord, What Can I Do For You', which was written by Ira Louvin (Monday 21 April 1924 - Sunday 20 June 1965) and Anne Young
'Well, It's All Right', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006)
'He Turned The Water Into Wine', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)
'Way Up On The Mountain', which was written by Ira Louvin (Monday 21 April 1924 - Sunday 20 June 1965) and Anne Young
'God Will', which was written by John D. Loudermilk and Marijohn Wilkin (Wednesday 14 July 1920 - Saturday 28 October 2006)
'Did You Let Your Light Shine' (written by Barbara Miller)

Personnel involved in the recording of Connie Smith & Nat Stuckey's 'Sunday Morning with Nat Stuckey & Connie Smith' (RCA Victor Records, 1970) included the following:

Fred Carter, Dean Porter, Ray Edenton, Jerry Shook and Chip Young (guitar)
Weldon Myrick (steel guitar)
Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (bass)
Jerry Carrigan and James Isbell (drums)
David Briggs and Jerry Whitehurst (piano)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica/organ)
Bill Walker (vibes)

In March 1970, Nat Stuckey saw the release of 'Old Man Willis' (RCA Victor Records, 1970), which was produced by Felton Jarvis and included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Old Man Willis' (written by Tony Joe White) (No.31, 1970)

Nat Stuckey's 'Old Man Willis' (RCA Victor Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

'Life' (written by Shirl Milete)
'Talk Back' (written by Bill Dees and Larry Henley)
'Little Tin God' (written by Myra Smith and Margaret Lewis)
'Lookin' For A Soul Mate' (written by Steve Bare and Mike Bare)
'Least That You Could Do Is Wash Your Hands' (written by Paul Craft)
'Whole Lot Of Lonesome Ago', which was written by Johnny MacRae (1929 - Wednesday 3 July 2013)
'When A Kiss Really Is A Kiss' (written by Alex Harvey and Elkin Rippy)
'Mississippi Hippie' (written by Bob Leftridge)
'It Takes Me All Night Long', which was written by Bill Eldridge and Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003)

In September 1970, Nat Stuckey saw the release of 'Country Fever' (RCA Victor Records, 1970), which was produced by Felton Jarvis and included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Sweet Thang & Cisco', which was written by Bill Eldridge and Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003) (No.8, 1970)
'Whiskey, Whiskey' (written by Tom Ghent) (No.31, 1971)

Nat Stuckey's 'Country Fever' (RCA Victor Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

'When Ole Goin' Gets A Goin' (written by Eddie Miller)
'Caffeine Nicotine Benzedrine (And Wish Me Luck)' (written by Bill Hayes, Bill Howard and Betty Mackey)
'Rany Night In Georgia' (written by Tony Joe White)
'What Am I Doing In LA' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Mean Old Frisco Blues', which was written by Arthur Crudup (Thursday 24 August 1905 - Thursday 28 March 1974)
'Soul Fever' (written by Sonny Curtis)
'My Protest Song' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Cullman, Alabama' (written by Roger Sovine)

Jimmy Dean (Friday 10 August 1928 - Sunday 13 June 2010) & Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991) recorded Nat Stuckey's 'Sweet Thang' and included the track on 'Country Boy And Country Girl' (RCA Victor Records, 1970).

In February 1971, Nat Stuckey saw the release of 'She Wakes Me With A Kiss Every Morning' (RCA Victor Records, 1971), which was produced by Jerry Bradley and included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'She Wakes Me With A Kiss Every Morning (And She Loves Me To Sleep Every Night)', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) (No.11, 1971)

Nat Stuckey's 'She Wakes Me With A Kiss Every Morning' (RCA Victor Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

'Sunday Morning Coming Down' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'I'm So Afraid Of Losing You Again', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'For The Good Times' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Before I Found The Wine' (written by Jimmy Peppers)
'Hello Darlin', which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 - Saturday 5 June 1993)
'Half The Love' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Snuff Queen', which was written by Bill Eldridge and Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003)
'Statue Of A Fool', which was written by Jan Crutchfield (Saturday 26 February 1938 - Thursday 1 November 2012)
'Devil Made Me Do That', which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 - Saturday 25 March 2006)

In June 1971, Nat Stuckey saw the release of 'Only A Woman Like You' (RCA Victor Records, 1971), which was produced by Jerry Bradley and included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Only A Woman Like You', which was written by Bill Eldridge and Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003) (No.24, 1971)

Nat Stuckey's 'Only A Woman Like You' (RCA Victor Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

'Last One To Touch Me' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Help Me Make It Through The Night' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Ruby, Don't Take Your Love To Town' (written by Mel Tillis)
'How Much More Can She Stand' (written by Harry Compton)
'You Make Me Feel Like A Man' (written by Warner McPherson)
'Raining In My Heart', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) and Felice Bryant (Wednesday 7 August 1925 - Tuesday 22 April 2003)
'He's Got The Whole World In His Hands' (Traditional)
'Is Anybody Goin' To San Antone', which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Glenn Martin
'When You're Hot, You're Hot', which was written by Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Sunday 31 August 2008)

In January 1972, Nat Stuckey saw the release of 'Forgive Me For Calling You Darling' (RCA Victor Records, 1972), which was produced by Jerry Bradley and included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I'm Gonna Act Right' (written by Mel Tillis) (No.17, 1972)
'Forgive Me For Calling You Darling', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) (No.16, 1972)

Nat Stuckey's 'Forgive Me For Calling You Darling' (RCA Victor Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

'Take Me Home Country Roads', which was written by John Denver (Friday 31 December 1943 - Sunday 12 October 1997), Bill Danoff and Taffy Nivert
'Easy Lovin' (written by Freddie Hart)
'Here I Go Again' (written by Ted Harris)
'Don't Pay The Ransom' (written by Dalton Roberts and Jack Shoemake)
'It's Impossible' (written by Sid Wayne)
'Sweet Mercy Brown' (written by Jim Owen)
'Never Ending Song Of Love' (written by Delaney Bramlett)
'Lookin' For A Way' (written by Jimmy Peppers)

Personnel involved in the recording of Nat Stuckey's 'Forgive Me For Calling You Darling' (RCA Victor Records, 1972) included the following:

Pete Wade, Dale Sellers and Jimmy Capps (electric guitar)
Chip Young (rhythm guitar)
Jimmy Wilkerson and Jerry Bradley (bass guitar)
Lloyd Green and Hal Rugg (steel guitar)
Bob Moore, Bobby Dyson and Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (bass)
David Briggs and Jerry Smith (piano)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008), Willie Ackerman and Jerry Carrigan (drums)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica/organ)
The Jordanaires and The Nashville Edition (vocals)

In August 1972, Nat Stuckey saw the release of 'Is It Any Wonder That I Love You' (RCA Victor Records, 1972), which was produced by Jerry Bradley and included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Is It Any Wonder That I Love You' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.26, 1972)
'Don't Pay The Ransom' (written by Dalton Roberts and Jack Shoemake) (No.18, 1972)

Nat Stuckey's 'Is It Any Wonder That I Love You' (RCA Victor Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

'Good Hearted Woman', which was written by Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002) and Willie Nelson
'Carolyn', which was written by Tommy Collins (Sunday 28 September 1930 - Tuesday 14 March 2000)
'Delta Dawn' (written by Alex Harvey and Larry Collins)
'She's All I Got' (written by Gary Bonds and Jerry Williams)
'I Never Once Stopped Loving You' (written by Bill Anderson and Jan Howard)
'Got It Comin' Day' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'I Sure Do Enjoy Loving You' (written by Bill Anderson)
'There's Still You' (written by Nat Stuckey)

Personnel involved in the recording of Nat Stuckey's 'Is It Any Wonder That I Love You' (RCA Victor Records, 1972) included the following:

Pete Wade, Dale Sellers and Jimmy Capps (electric guitar)
Chip Young (rhythm guitar)
Jimmy Wilkerson and Jerry Bradley (bass guitar)
Lloyd Green and Hal Rugg (steel guitar)
Bob Moore, Bobby Dyson and Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (bass)
David Briggs and Jerry Smith (piano)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008), Willie Ackerman and Jerry Carrigan (drums)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica/organ)
The Jordanaires and The Nashville Edition (vocals)

In April 1973, Nat Stuckey saw the release of 'Take Time To Love Her' (RCA Victor Records, 1973), which was produced by Jerry Bradley and included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Take Time To Love Her' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.10, 1973)
'I Used It All On You' (written by Tom Crum) (No.22, 1973)

Nat Stuckey's 'Take Time To Love Her' (RCA Victor Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

'Baby Don't Get Hooked On Me' (written by Mac Davis)
'Crystal Chandeliers' (written by Ted Harris)
'Good Time Charlie's Got The Blues' (written by Danny O'Keefe)
'Lovin' On Backstreets' (written by Hugh King)
'Now Lonely Is Only A Word' (written by Rory Bourke and Gayle Barnhill)
'Man That I Am' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Love Me' (written by Jeannie Pruett)
'Alabama Wild Man', which was written by Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Sunday 31 August 2008)

Between late 1973 and 1975, Nat Stuckey enjoyed a number of hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart, including the following:

'Leaving On Her Mind' (No.14, 1973)
'You Never Say You Love Me Anymore' (No.31, 1974)
'It Hurts To Know The Feeling's Gone' (No.42, 1974)
'You Don't Have To Go Home' (No.36, 1974)
'Boom Boom Barroom Man' (No.85, 1975)

In April 1974, Nat Stuckey saw the release of 'The Best of Nat Stuckey' (RCA Victor Records, 1974), which was produced by Jerry Bradley and Felton Jarvis and which included the following tracks:

'Take Time To Love Her' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.10, 1973)
'Is It Any Wonder That I Love You' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No. 26, 1972)
'She Wakes Me With A Kiss Every Morning', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) (No.11, 1971)
'Only A Woman Like You', which was written by Bill Eldridge and Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003) (No.24, 1971)
'Forgive Me For Calling You Darling', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) (No.16, 1972)
'Sweet Thang & Cisco', which was written by Bill Eldridge and Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 - Tuesday 16 December 2003) (No.8, 1969)
'Cut Across Shorty', which was written by Marijohn Wilkin (Wednesday 14 July 1920 - Saturday 28 October 2006) and Wayne P. Walker (No.15, 1969)
'Joe & Mabel's 12th Street Bar & Grill' (written by Bobby Braddock) (No.13, 1969)
'I'm Gonna Act Right' (written by Mel Tillis) (No.17, 1971)
'Plastic Saddle' (written by Vic McAlpin) (No.9, 1968)

In October 1974, Nat Stuckey saw the release of (the compilation album) 'In The Ghetto' (RCA Camden Records, 1974), which included the following tracks:

'In The Ghetto' (written by Mac Davis)
'Folsom Prison Blues', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)
'Alabama Wild Man', which was written by Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Sunday 31 August 2008)
'Hound Dog', which was written by Jerry Leiber (Tuesday 25 April 1933 - Monday 22 August 2011) and Mike Stoller
'House Of The Rising Sun' (written by Alan Price)
'Plastic Saddle' (written by Vic McAlpin)
'Good Hearted Woman', which was written by Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002) and Willie Nelson
'This Guy's In Love With You', which was written by Hal David (Wednesday 25 May 1921 - Monday 1 September 2012) and Burt Bacharach
'Loving You', which was written by Jerry Leiber (Tuesday 25 April 1933 - Monday 22 August 2011) and Mike Stoller

After seven years with RCA Records, Nat Stuckey signed with MCA Records.

In February 1976, Nat Stuckey saw the release of his first album for MCA Records, 'Independence' (MCA Records, 1976), which was produced by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 - Saturday 5 June 1993) and David Barnes, included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Sun Comin' Up' (written by Nat Stuckey) (No.13, 1976)
'The Way He's Treated You' (written by Gary Price) (No.46, 1976)
'That's All She Ever Said Except Goodbye' (written by Nat Stuckey) (No.42, 1976)

Nat Stuckey's first album for MCA Records, 'Independence' (MCA Records, 1976), also included the following tracks:

'Lyin' Eyes' (written by Don Henley and Glenn Frey)
'At Least One Time' (written by Jack Dunham and Galen Raye)
'After The Lovin' Has Passed' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Walk On' (written by Jason Barnes)
'Linda On My Mind', which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 - Saturday 5 June 1993)
'Honky Tonk Dreams', which was written by Troy Seals and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004)
'She Stays In The Name Of Love' (written by David Barnes)

Personnel involved in the recording of Nat Stuckey's first album for MCA Records, 'Independence' (MCA Records, 1976), included the following:

Grady Martin, Pete Wade, Steve Gibson and John Christopher (guitar)
John Hughey (steel guitar)
Mike Leech (bass)
Jerry Carrigan (drums/percussion)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins and David Briggs (piano)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)

The Sheldon Kurland Strings
Byron Bach and Roy Christensen (cello)
Gary Vanosdale and Marvin Chantry (viola)
Sheldon Kurland, Stephanie Woolf, Carl Gorodetzky, Brenton Banks, Lennie Haight and George Binkley (violin)

The Lea Jane Singers
Lea Jane Berinati, Janie Fricke, Tom Brannon and Duane West

In 1977 and 1978, Nat Stuckey saw the the release of a number of non-album singles on the Billboard country music singles chart, including the following:

'The Shady Side Of Charlotte' (No.48, 1977)
'Fallin' Down' / this track was released in 1977, but it did not chart
'Buddy, I Lied' (No.63, 1977)
'I'm Coming Home To Face The Music' (No.62, 1977)
'That Lucky Old Sun (Just Rolls Around Heaven All Day)', which was written by John Beasley Smith (1901 - 1968) and James 'Haven' Lamont Gillespie (6 February 1888 - Friday 14 March 1975) (No.66, 1978)
'The Days Of Sand And Shovels' (written by Doyle Marsh and George Reneau) (No.26, 1978)

Nat Stuckey made his last chart appearance on the Billboard country music singles chart with 'The Days Of Sand And Shovels' (written by Doyle Marsh and George Reneau), which reached No.26 in 1978.

Nat Stuckey also went on to direct in producing sessions, along with announcing and singing jingles on hundreds of regional and national commercials. Nat wrote two jingles for Coca-Cola in the 1970s, recorded twenty-two spots of McDonald's, and was the singing voice on the last Spuds MacKenzie commercial for Budweiser. Nat continued recording jingles into the 1980s.

After Nat and Ann Stuckey moved to Nashville, they established a booking agency, Music Row Talent, Inc. Nat also bought and sold land in Tennessee and Texas through his Texas Promised Land Development Company.

Despite the demands of his businesses, touring schedule, recording sessions and songwriting, Nat Stuckey found time to pursue a variety of personal interests. He rode motorcycles and was a bass fisherman of sufficient skill to be invited to Bass Master Tournaments. A dog lover, Nat sometimes was allowed to assist in veterinary surgery; the vet was a business partner.

When Ann Stuckey took charge of her husband's fan club, she happily distributed badges which declared that the wearer was 'Stuck on Stuckey' Fans were indeed 'Stuck on Stuckey' because of Nat's enormous versatility. During a career which spanned more than three decades, Nat Stuckey was a singer, songwriter, disc jockey, record producer, music publisher, owner of a booking agency and the voice of hundreds of commercials.

In 1982, Nat Stuckey saw the release of his self-titled 'Nat Stuckey' (51 West Records, 1982), which was produced by Nat Stuckey and which included the following tracks:

'Can't You See' (written by Toy T. Caldwell)
'Lucille' (written by Roger Bowling and Hal Bynum)
'Loving Her Was Easier' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Margaritaville' (written by Jimmy Buffett)
'Brown Eyed Handsome Man' (written by Chuck Berry)
'I Believe in You', which was written by Roger Cook and Sam Hogin (1950 - Monday 9 August 2004)
'Mamas, Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys' (written by Ed Bruce and Patsy Bruce)
'Sunday Morning Coming Down' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Amanda' (written by Bob McDill)
'Good Hearted Woman', which was written by Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002) and Willie Nelson

Randy Travis recorded Nat Stuckey's 'Diggin' Up Bones' (co-written with Paul Overstreet and Al Gore) and included the track on 'Storms Of Life' (Warner Bros. Records, 1986).

Nat Stuckey's carpentry skills inspired him to start a woodworking and furniture-making enterprise at his home on Center Hill Lake in Tennessee. But his latest venture was cut short by the discovery of lung cancer. Within two months of diagnosis, the fifty-four-year-old entertainer died on Wednesday 24 August 1988. His ashes were scattered over Center Hill Lake in Tennessee.

A memorial service for Nat Stuckey was held on Friday 26 August 1988 at Brentwood United Methodist Church in Nashville.

In 1998, under the guidance of Ann M. Stuckey, Music Row Talent Records released 'Pop A Top' (Music Row Talent Records, 1998), which included the following tracks:

'Pop a Top' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Living in Love' (written by Nat Stuckey and J. Martin Johnson)
'Only Oklahoma Away' (written by Curly Putman and Ken Jones)
'43 & Only' (written by Nat Stuckey and Ann M. Stuckey)
'Sittin' & Thinkin', which was written by Charlie Rich (Wednesday 14 December 1932 - Tuesday 25 July 1995)
'Rose Ellen' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Fallen Angel' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Lover to Lover' (written by Jerry Fuller and John Hobbs)
'Texas Promise' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Best is Yet To Go' (written by Bobby Fisher and Anna Garrott)
'The Days of Sand & Shovels' (written by Doyle Marsh and Bud Reneau) / this track reached No.26 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978
'Fool' (written by Nat Stuckey)
'Rebel' (written by Larry Shell and Gary Gentry)
'Why You Been Gone So Long', which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 - Sunday 29 September 2002)
'Night Lies' (written by Nat Stuckey and Ann M. Stuckey)
'One More Time' (written by Nat Stuckey and Bob McCracken)

On Tuesday 26 October 1999, Alan Jackson saw the release of 'Under The Influence' (Arista Nashville Records, 1999), which was produced by Keith Stegall and included Nat Stuckey's 'Pop a Top'; Alan Jackson's version of the song reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Songs Chart in 1999, No.2 on the Canadian RPM Magazine Chart in 1999, and No.43 on the Billboard Top 200 pop music singles chart in 1999.

On Monday 23 July 2001, Music Row Talent Records released Nat Stuckey & Connie Smith's 'God Will' (Music Row Talent Records, 2001), which was a re-issue of their duet album, 'Sunday Morning with Nat Stuckey & Connie Smith' (RCA Victor Records, 1969).

Nat Stuckey & Connie Smith were awarded 'Most Promising Duo' in 1969, while their song 'Whispering Hope' was a finalist Grammy Award nominee in the 'Best Sacred Song Performance'.

Nat Stuckey & Connie Smith's 'God Will' (Music Row Talent Records, 2001) included the following tracks:

'God Will'
'Now Lord, What Can I Do For You?'
'Well It's All Right'
'Crumbs From The Table'
'Did You Let Your Light Shine?'
'Sunday Morning'
'Daddy Sang Bass'
'Way Up On The Mountain'
'His Love Takes Care Of Me'
'He Turned The Water Into Wine'
'If God Is Dead (Who's This Living In My Soul)?'
'Whispering Hope'

In June 2002, Orchard Records re-issued Nat Stuckey's 'Pop a Top', which had previously been released by Music Row Talent Records in 1998.
Texas Country Music Hall of Fame
On Saturday 17 August 2002, Nat Stuckey was inducted into the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame.

On Saturday 17 August 2002, Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988) was inducted into the Texas Country Music Hall of FameOn Saturday 17 August 2002, Gene Watson was inducted into the Texas Country Music Hall of FameOn Saturday 17 August 2002, Tanya Tucker was inducted into the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame

It was also on Saturday 17 August 2002 that Nat Stuckey's fellow country music artists Tanya Tucker and Gene Watson were inducted into the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame.

Gene Watson & Rhonda Vincent recorded Nat Stuckey's 'Sweet Thang' and included the track on 'Your Money And My Good Looks' (Upper Management Music, 2011).

Gene Watson recorded Nat Stuckey's 'Don't You Believe Her' and included the track on 'My Heroes Have Always Been Country' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2014).

Gene Watson re-recorded Nat Stuckey's 'All My Tomorrows' and included the track on 'Real.Country.Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016).

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