• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.

Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted during 2014, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Bobby Bare, which he submitted to this site on Monday 16 June 2014.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Bobby Bare, who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Bobby Bare
This quote was submitted on Monday 16 June 2014.



'It doesn't get any better than hearing Gene Watson singing 'Farewell Party', which was written by Lawton Williams ().

Especially that last note!'

Thank you, Bobby Bare, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Bobby Bare...

Bobby Bare was born Robert Joseph 'Bobby' Bare Senior on Sunday 7 April 1935 and had many failed attempts to sell his songs in the 1950s.

Bobby Bare finally signed with Capitol Records and recorded a few rock 'n' roll songs without much chart success. Before he was drafted into the Army, Bobby Bare wrote a song called 'The All American Boy' and did a demo for his friend, Bill Parsons, to learn and record.
Instead of using the version Bill Parsons did later, the record company, Fraternity Records, decided to use the original demo recorded by Bobby Bare. The record reached No.2 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart, but an error was made; the singles' labels all credited the artist as being 'Bill Parsons'. The same track, with the same billing error, peaked at No.22 on the UK pop music singles chart in April 1959.

In the early 1960s, Bobby Bare starred in 'A Distant Trumpet', an American Western film, which was the last one directed by Raoul Walsh and which starred Troy Donahue, Suzanne Pleshette and Diane McBain; the film was released in 1964.

Bobby Bare also acted in a few episodes of the television series 'No Time For Sergeants'. However, he decided to turn his back on Hollywood in order to fully pursue a career in country music.

Bobby Bare's big break in country music came when RCA Records' Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001) signed him to the record label.

The first song Bobby Bare released on the RCA Records label was 'Shame On Me' in 1962, which reached No.18 on the country music singles chart; the track also reached No.23 on the pop muisc singles chart the same year.

Bobby Bare's second RCA release, 'Detroit City', which was written by Danny Dill (Friday 19 September 1924 - Thursday 23 October 2008) and Mel Tillis, reached No.6 on the country music singles chart in 1963 and No.16 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart the same year.

In 1964, 'Detroit City' earned Bobby Bare a Grammy Award for 'Best Country & Western Recording'.

In August 1963, Bobby Bare saw the release of his debut album, 'Detroit City' (RCA Victor Records, 1963), which included the three aforementioned hit singles:

'The All American Boy' (written and sung by Bobby Bare, but credited by Fraternity Records to Bill Parsons, with songwriting credit to Bill Parsons and Orville Lunsford) (No.2 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart, 1962) / the track also reached No.22 on the UK Singles Chart in April 1959
'Shame On Me' (No.18 on the country music singles chart, 1962) / the track also reached No.23 on the pop music singles chart in 1963
'Detroit City', which was written by Danny Dill (Friday 19 September 1924 - Thursday 23 October 2008) and Mel Tillis (No.6 on the country music singles chart, 1963) / the track also reached No.16 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1963

Bobby Bare's debut album, 'Detroit City' (RCA Victor Records, 1963), reached No.9 on the country music albums chart in 1963.

In December 1963, Bobby Bare saw the release of '500 Miles Away From Home' (RCA Victor Records, 1963), which included one track which was a hit single on the country music singles chart:

'500 Miles Away From Home', which was written by Hedy West (Wednesday 6 April 1938 - Sunday 3 July 2005) (No.5, 1963) / the track also reached No.10 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart, also in 1963

Bobby Bare's '500 Miles Away From Home' (RCA Victor Records, 1963), which reached No.9 on the country music albums chart in 1963, also included the track 'Jeannie's Last Kiss'.

In September 1964, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Travelin' Bare' (RCA Victor Records, 1964), which reached No.14 on the country music albums chart in 1964 and which included the following tracks:

'Down In Mexico'
'Sittin' And Thinkin'
'I've Lived A Lot In My Time'
'I'm Gettin' Lonely'
'Long Way To Tennessee'
'Sweeter Than The Flowers'
'I Was Coming Home To You'
'Long Black Limousine'
'Another Bridge To Burn'
'Lonely Town'
'Candy Coated Kisses'
'When I'm Gone'

In February 1965, Bobby Bare & Skeeter Davis (Wednesday 30 December 1931 - Sunday 19 September 2004) saw the release of 'Tunes For Two' (RCA Victor Records, 1965), which included one track which was a hit single on the country music singles chart:

'Dear John Letter' (written by Billy Barton, Fuzzy Owen and Lewis Talley) (No.11, 1965)

Bobby Bare & Skeeter Davis' 'Tunes For Two' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) also included the following tracks:

'Too Used To Being With You'
'In The Misty Moonlight'
'We'll Sing In The Sunshine'
'I Don't Care (Just As Long As You Love Me)'
'True Love'
'I Love You'
'We Must Have Been Out Of Our Minds'
'Let It Be Me'
'Together Again', which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 - Saturday 25 March 2006)
'That's All I Want From You'
'Invisible Tears'

In June 1965, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Constant Sorrow' (RCA Victor Records, 1965), which included three tracks which were hit singles on the country music singles chart:

'Times Are Gettin' Hard' (No.30, 1965)
'Don't Think Twice, It's All Right' (written by Bob Dylan) (No.7, 1965)
'Just To Satisfy You' (No.31, 1965)

Bobby Bare's 'Constant Sorrow' (RCA Victor Records, 1965) also included the following tracks:

'Man Of Constant Sorrow'
'Blowin' In The Wind'
'Lemon Tree'
'So Soon'
'One Day At A Time'
'Delia's Gone'
'I'm A Long Way From Home'
'Deepening Snow'
'Countin' The Hours, Countin' The Days'

In January 1966, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'The Best of Bobby Bare' (RCA Victor Records, 1966), which included the following tracks:

'Detroit City', which was written by Danny Dill (Friday 19 September 1924 - Thursday 23 October 2008) and Mel Tillis (No.6 on the country music singles chart, 1963) / the track also reached No.16 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1963
'Don't Think Twice, It's All Right' (written by Bob Dylan) (No.7, 1965)
'Four Strong Winds' (written by Ian Tyson) (No.3, 1964) / this track also reached No.60 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1964
'Miller's Cave', which was written by 'Cowboy' Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013) (No.4, 1964) / this track also reached No.33 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1964
'I'd Fight The World'
'Times Are Gettin' Hard' (No.30, 1965)
'All American Boy' (No.2 on the pop music singles chart in 1959)
'Shame On Me' (No.18, 1962) / this track also reached No.23 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1962
'500 Miles Away From Home', which was written by Hedy West (Wednesday 6 April 1938 - Sunday 3 July 2005) (No.5, 1963) / this track also reached No.10 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1963
'Dear Wastebasket'
'He Was A Friend Of Mine'
'When The Wind Blows In Chicago'

In 1965, Bobby Bare received two Grammy Award nominations, for 'Best Country & Western Vocal Performance' and 'Best Country & Western Single' for his rendition of Ian Tyson's 'Four Strong Winds'.

In February 1966, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Talk Me Some Sense' (RCA Victor Records, 1966), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the country music singles chart:

'Talk Me Some Sense' (No.26, 1965)
'Little Bit Later On Down The Line' (No.14, 1968)

Bobby Bare's 'Talk Me Some Sense' (RCA Victor Records, 1966) also included the following tracks:

'Passin' Through'
'You Can't Stop The Wild Wind From Blowing'
'Got Leavin' On Her Mind'
'Long Black Veil', which was written by Danny Dill (Friday 19 September 1924 - Thursday 23 October 2008) and Marijohn Wilkin (Wednesday 14 July 1920 - Saturday 28 October 2006)
'Heaven Help My Soul'
'It Ain't Me Babe'
'All The Good Times Are Past And Gone'
'What Color (Is A Man)'
'Salt Lake City'
'For A While We Helped Each Other Out'

Bobby Bare's 'Talk Me Some Sense' (RCA Victor Records, 1966) reached No.6 on the country music albums chart in 1966.

It was also in 1966 that Bobby Bare received a Grammy Award nomination for 'Best Country & Western Male Vocal Performance' for his rendition of 'Talk Me Some Sense'.

In September 1966, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'The Streets Of Baltimore' (RCA Victor Records, 1966), which included one track which was a hit single on the country music singles chart:

'Streets Of Baltimore', which was written by Tompall Glaser (Sunday 3 September 1933 - Tuesday 13 August 2013) and Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) (No.5, 1966)

Bobby Bare's 'The Streets Of Baltimore' (RCA Victor Records, 1966) also included the following tracks:

'Early Morning Rain'
'Houston'
'Saginaw, Michigan' (written by Bill Anderson)
'Take Me Home To Mama'
'Memphis, Tennessee'
'That's How I Wanted It To Be'
'Vincennes'
'Cold And Lonely City'
'Changin' My Mind'
'There Ain't No Fun In This Town'
'Green Green Grass Of Home'

Bobby Bare's 'The Streets Of Baltimore' (RCA Victor Records, 1966) reached No.7 on the country music albums chart in 1966.

In December 1966, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'This I Believe' (RCA Victor Records, 1966), an album of religious material, which included the following tracks:

'Less Of Me'
'Tall Oak Tree'
'When I've Learned Enough To Die'
'Family Bible'
'Lonesome Valley'
'When God Dips His Love In My Heart'
'Chicken Every Sunday'
'I Saw The Light'
'Steal Away'
'He's Got The Whole World In His Hands'
'Just A Closer Walk With Thee'
'I'll Fly Away'

Bobby Bare's 'This I Believe' (RCA Victor Records, 1966) reached No.17 on the country music albums chart in 1967.

In January 1967, Bobby Bare, Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 - Monday 31 October 2011) & Norma Jean saw the release of 'The Game Of Triangles' (RCA Victor Records, 1967), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the country music singles chart:

'Game Of Triangles' (No.5, 1966)
'Homesick' (No.38, 1966)

Bobby Bare, Liz Anderson & Norma Jean's 'The Game Of Triangles' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) also included the following tracks:

'One Among The Three Of Us'
'Wife Of The Party'
'Pursuing Happiness'
'Guess I'll Move On Down The Line'
'Bye Bye Love'
'Fairy Tale'
'Three Mixed Up Hearts'
'Don't Let That Doorknob Hit You'
'Which One Is To Blame'

Bobby Bare, Liz Anderson & Norma Jean's 'The Game Of Triangles' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) reached No.18 on the country music albums chart in 1967.

Bobby Bare, Liz Anderson & Norma Jean's rendition of 'The Game Of Triangles' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) earned the trio a Grammy Award nomination.

In June 1967, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'A Bird Named Yesterday' (RCA Victor Records, 1967), which included the following tracks:

'Somebody Bought My Old Hometown'
'Ode To The Little Brown Shack Out Back'
'Day The Saw Mill Closed Down'
'Air Conditioner Song'
'A Bird Named Yesterday'
'I've Got A Thing About Trains'
'Old Gang's Gone'
'They Covered Up The Old Swimmin' Hole'
'Church In The Wildwood'

Bobby Bare's 'A Bird Named Yesterday' (RCA Victor Records, 1967) reached No.20 on the country music albums chart in 1967.

In November 1967, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'The English Country Side' (RCA Victor Records, 1967), an album recorded with The Hillsiders, a Liverpool, England-based country music band, which included one track which was a hit single on the country music singles chart:

'Find Out What's Happening' (No.15, 1967)

Bobby Bare's 'The English Country Side' (RCA Victor Records, 1967), an album recorded with The Hillsiders, also included the following tracks:

'Y'all Come'
'Love's Gonna Live Here'
'I Love You Drops' (written by Bill Anderson)
'I Washed My Face In The Morning Dew' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'Goin' Home'
'Great Snowman'
'Blue Is My Lonely Room'
'Release Me (And Let Me Love Again)'
'Sweet Dreams'
'Six Days On The Road'

Bobby Bare's 'The English Country Side' (RCA Victor Records, 1967), an album recorded with The Hillsiders, reached No.29 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968.

In April 1968, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'The Best of Bobby Bare, Volume 2' (RCA Victor Records, 1968), which included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Charleston Railroad Tavern' (No.16, 1967)
'Come Kiss Me Love' (No.14, 1967)
'Piney Wood Hills' (No.15, 1967)

Bobby Bare's 'The Best of Bobby Bare, Volume 2' (RCA Victor Records, 1968) also included the following tracks:

'Houston'
'In The Same Old Way' (No.34, 1966) / this track was released originally in 1966 as a non-album single
'Guess I'll Move On Down The Line'
'Streets Of Baltimore', which was written by Tompall Glaser (Sunday 3 September 1933 - Tuesday 13 August 2013) and Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) (No.5, 1966)
'Delia's Gone'
'Game Of Triangles' (No.5, 1966)
'Find Out What's Happening' (No.15, 1968)
'They Covered Up The Old Swimmin' Hole'
'Vincennes'

Bobby Bare's 'The Best of Bobby Bare, Volume 2' (RCA Victor Records, 1968) reached No.33 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968.

In August 1968, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Folsom Prison Blues' (RCA Camden Records, 1968), which included the following tracks:

'Folsom Prison Blues'
'Autumn Of My Life'
'Abilene'
'Blowin' In The Wind'
'Lemon Tree'
'Try To Remember'
'Silence Is Golden'
'Gotta Travel On'
'When Am I Ever Gonna Settle Down'
'No Sad Songs For Me'

In May 1969, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Margie's At The Lincoln Park Inn' (RCA Victor Records, 1969), which included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'(Margie's At The) Lincoln Park Inn' (written by Tom T. Hall) (No.4, 1969)

Bobby Bare's 'Margie's At The Lincoln Park Inn' (RCA Victor Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

'Ruby, Don't Take Your Love To Town' (written by Mel Tillis)
'Son Of Hickory Hollow's Tramp' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Law Is For Protection Of The People'
'Cincinnati Jail'
'Watching The Trains Go By'
'Big Ben Colson'
'If There's Not A Hell (There Ought To Be)'
'Skip A Rope'
'Wild As The Wind'
'Drink Up And Go Home'
'Rainy Day In Richmond'

Bobby Bare's 'Margie's At The Lincoln Park Inn' (RCA Victor Records, 1969) reached No.39 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1969.

It was also in 1969 that Bobby Bare saw the release of the track 'God Bless America Again' (written by Bobby Bare and Boyce Hawkins), which reached No.16 on the Billboard country music singles chart; the track was subsequently included on 'This Is Bobby Bare' (RCA Victor Records, 1972), which was released in December 1972.

In March 1970, Bobby Bare & Skeeter Davis (Wednesday 30 December 1931 - Sunday 19 September 2004) saw the release of 'Your Husband, My Wife' (RCA Victor Records, 1970), which included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Your Husband, My Wife' (No.22, 1970)

Bobby Bare & Skeeter Davis' 'Your Husband, My Wife' (RCA Victor Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

'Before The Sunrise'
'I Got You'
'I'm So Afraid Of Losing You Again'
'Dream Baby (How Long Must I Dream)'
'My Elusive Dreams'
'Let's Make Love, Not War'
'Truer Love You'll Never Find'
'Jackson'
'There Never Was A Time'

It was also in 1970 that Bobby Bare moved from RCA Records to Mercury Records and immediately scored a Billboard Top 3 country music hit with 'That's How I Got To Memphis' (written by Tom T. Hall).

In July 1970, Bobby Bare saw the release of his first album for Mercury Records, 'This Is Bare Country' (Mercury Records, 1970), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'That's How I Got To Memphis' (written by Tom T. Hall) (No.3, 1970)
'Come Sundown' (written by Kris Kristofferson) (No.7, 1970)

Bobby Bare's 'This Is Bare Country' (Mercury Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

'I'm Her Hoss If I Never Win A Race'
'Mrs. Jones, Your Daughter Cried All Night' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'Fool'
'It's A Freezing In El Paso'
'Woman, You Have Been A Friend To Me' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'Don't It Make You Want To Go Home'
'I Took A Memory To Lunch' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'Leaving On A Jet Plane'
'Mary Ann Regrets'

Bobby Bare's 'This Is Bare Country' (Mercury Records, 1970) reached No.37 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1970.

In January 1971, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Where Have All The Seasons Gone' (Mercury Records, 1971), which included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Please Don't Tell Me How The Story Ends' (written by Kris Kristofferson) (No.8, 1971)

Bobby Bare's 'Where Have All The Seasons Gone' (Mercury Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

'Where Have All The Seasons Gone' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'Travelin' Minstrel Man'
'Hello Darlin'
'How About You'
'Dropping Out Of Sight' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'Mama, Bake A Pie (Daddy, Kill A Chicken)' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'Help Me Make It Through The Night'
'Roselee'
'For The Good Times'
'Waitress At Main Street Cafe' (written by Tom T. Hall)

Bobby Bare's 'Where Have All The Seasons Gone' (Mercury Records, 1971) reached No.44 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971.

In July 1971, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'I Need Some Good News Bad' (Mercury Records, 1971), which included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Short And Sweet' (No.57, 1971)

Bobby Bare's 'I Need Some Good News Bad' (Mercury Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

'West Virginia Woman'
'Don't You Ever Get Tired (Of Hurtin' Me)'
'Million Miles To The City' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'Jesus Is The Only One That Loves Us'
'New York City Snow'
'I Need Some Good News Bad'
'Me And Bobby McGee' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Good Christian Soldier'
'Just The Other Side Of Nowhere'
'Loving Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)' (written by Kris Kristofferson)

In April 1972, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'What Am I Gonna Do (Mercury Records, 1972), which included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'What Am I Gonna Do' (No.13, 1972)

Bobby Bare's 'What Am I Gonna Do (Mercury Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

'Darby's Castle'
'When Love Is Gone' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'Lot Of Soul'
'Jesus Christ, What A Man'
'Lonely Street'
'Just In Case (A Night Like This One Never Comes Again'
'Lorena'
'Roses Are Red (My Love)'
'Love Forever'
'When I Want To Love A Lady'

Bobby Bare's 'What Am I Gonna Do (Mercury Records, 1972) reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.

It was also in 1972 when Bobby Bare scored a No.12 Billboard country music hit with a version of Dr. Hook & The Medicine Show's pop music hit 'Sylvia's Mother', which was written by Shel Silverstein Thursday 25 September 1930 - Saturday 8/Sunday 9 May 1999); the track was subsequently included on 'The Very Best of Bobby Bare' (United Artist Records, 1975).

In 1973, after two years at Mercury Records, Bobby Bare returned to RCA Records and scored with Billy Joe Shaver's 'Ride Me Down Easy', which nearly made the Billboard country music Top 10 singles chart.

In March 1973, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'I Hate Goodbyes / Ride Me Down Easy' (RCA Records, 1973), which included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I Hate Goodbyes' (No.25, 1973)
'Ride Me Down Easy' (written by Billy Joe Shaver) (No.11, 1973)
'You Know Who' (No.30, 1973)

Bobby Bare's 'I Hate Goodbyes / Ride Me Down Easy' (RCA Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

'What's Your Mama's Name Child'
'Train That Never Runs'
'Offer She Couldn't Refuse'
'Restless Wind'
'Send Tomorrow To The Moon'
'Poison Red Berries'
'I'll Love The Hurt Out Of You'

Bobby Bare's 'I Hate Goodbyes / Ride Me Down Easy' (RCA Records, 1973) reached No.31 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.

In November 1973, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Lullabys, Legends & Lies' (RCA Victor Records, 1973), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Daddy, What If', which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 - Saturday 8/Sunday 9 May 1999) (No.2, 1974) / this track also reached No.41 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1974 and featured guest vocals from Bobby Bare Junior
'Marie Leveau', which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 - Saturday 8/Sunday 9 May 1999) and Baxter Taylor (No.1 for one week in 1974) / this track was Bobby Bare's only No.1 Billboard country music hit; songwriters Shel Silverstein and Baxter Taylor received a BMI Award for the song in 1975

Bobby Bare's 'Lullabys, Legends & Lies' (RCA Victor Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

'Lullabys, Legends & Lies'
'Paul'
'Wonderful Soup Stone'
'In The Hills Of Shiloh'
'She's My Ever Lovin' Machine'
'Mermaid'
'Rest Awhile'
'Bottomless Well'
'True Story'
'Sure Hit Songwriter's Pen'
'Rosalie's Good Eats Cafe'

Bobby Bare's 'Lullabys, Legends & Lies' (RCA Victor Records, 1973) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974 and was his most commercially successful album. As a consequence, Bobby Bare gained a new audience, with pop radio once again playing his songs, and a new following with college kids.

'Daddy, What If' and 'Marie Leveau', however, would become Bobby Bare's last Billboard country music Top 10 hits.

Bobby Bare: 'Singin' In The Kitchen' (RCA Victor Records, 1974)

In August 1974, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Singin' In The Kitchen' (RCA Victor Records, 1974), an album recorded with his family, which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Where'd I Come From' (No.41, 1974) / this track featured guest vocals from Bobby Bare Junior and 'Mama'
'Singin' In The Kitchen' (No.29, 1975) / this track featured guest vocals from Bobby Bare's Family

Bobby Bare's 'Singin' In The Kitchen' (RCA Victor Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

'Monkey And The Elephant'
'Lovin' You Anyway'
'Ricky Tic Song'
'Giving Tree'
'You Are'
'Unicorn'
'Cloudy Sky'
'She Thinks I Can'
'Scarlet Ribbons (For Her Hair)'
'See That Bluebird'

Bobby Bare's 'Singin' In The Kitchen' (RCA Victor Records, 1974) included songs which were written mainly by his very good friend Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 - Saturday 8/Sunday 9 May 1999) and was a very successful album, peaking at No.27 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

Bobby Bare's 'Singin' In The Kitchen' (RCA Victor Records, 1974) was nominated for a Grammy Award in the 'Best Group' category at the Grammy Awards, but it was declined by Bobby Bare himself. It was at this time, however, that Bobby Bare continued to record critically acclaimed albums and singles.

In April 1975, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Hard Time Hungrys' (RCA Victor Records, 1975), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Back Home In Huntsville Again' (No.23, 1975)
'Alimony' (No.18, 1975)

Bobby Bare's 'Hard Time Hungrys' (RCA Victor Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

'Hard Time Hungrys'
'Farmer Feeds Us All'
'Two For A Dollar'
'Daddy's Been Around The House Too Long'
'Warm And Free'
'Able Bodied Man'
'Ten Thousand Dollars In Pennies'
'Bottles And Boxes'
'Truck Driver Truck Driver'
'Unemployment Line'

Bobby Bare's 'Hard Time Hungrys' (RCA Victor Records, 1975) reached No.33 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

In November 1975, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Cowboys And Daddys' (RCA Victor Records, 1975), which included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Cowboys And Daddys' (No.29, 1975)

Bobby Bare's 'Cowboys And Daddys' (RCA Victor Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

'Cowboy And The Poet (Faster Horses)' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'High Plains Jamboree'
'Chester'
'Up Against The Wall Redneck Mother'
'Stranger'
'Amarillo Highway'
'Speckled Pony'
'Pretty Painted Ladies'
'He's A Cowboy'
'Calgary Snow'
'Last Dance At The Old Texas Moon'

Bobby Bare's 'Cowboys And Daddys' (RCA Victor Records, 1975) reached No.21 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

In June 1976, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'The Winner And Other Losers' (RCA Victor Records, 1976), which included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'The Winner' (No.13, 1976)
'Put A Little Lovin' On Me' (No.23, 1976)
'Dropkick Me Jesus' (No.17, 1976) / this track received a Grammy Award nomination in 1976

Bobby Bare's 'The Winner And Other Losers' (RCA Victor Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

'Climbin' The Ladder And Climbin' The Wall'
'Baby Wants To Boogie'
'Keeping Rosie Proud Of Me'
'Bald Headed Woman'
'Vince'
'Lost In Austin'
'Yes, Mr. Rogers'
'Brian Hennessey'
'My Better Half'

It was also in 1976 that Bobby Bare saw the release of 'This is Bare Country' (United Artists Records, 1976), which included the following tracks:

'When I Want To Love A Lady'
'Million Miles To The City'
'Darby's Castle'
'Jesus Christ, What A Man'
'Just In Case (A Night Like This One Never Comes Again)'
'City Boy Country Born'
'Roses Are Red (My Love)'
'Lorena'
'After The Divorce'
'Lonely Street'
'Short And Sweet' / this track reached No.57 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1971

In January 1977, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Me And McDill' (RCA Victor Records, 1977), an album celebrating the songwriting genius of Bob McDill, which included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Look Who I'm Cheating On Tonight' (No.21, 1977)

Bobby Bare's 'Me And McDill' (RCA Victor Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

'If You Think I'm Crazy Now (You Should Have Seen Me When I Was A Kid)'
'Hillbilly Hell'
'Don't Think You're Too Good For Country Music (Just Because You Can Rock And Roll)'
'Till I Get On My Feet'
'Don't Turn Out The Light'
'Wilma Lou'
'You Made A Believer Out Of Me'
'Woman In Every Man's Life'
'Can't Seem To Get Nowhere'
'Tired Of The Road, Joe'

Bobby Bare's 'Me And McDill' (RCA Victor Records, 1977) reached No.27 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.

In 1977, Bobby Bare saw the release of the track 'Vegas', which reached No.30 on the Billboard country music singles chart; the track was a duet with his wife Jeannie and was subsequently included on 'The Essential Bobby Bare' (RCA Records, 1997), which was released on Tuesday 11 February 1997.

It was also in 1977 when Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Redneck Hippie Romance', a non-album single which reached No.85 on the Billboard country music singles chart.

In 1978, Bobby Bare signed with Columbia Records and saw the release, in April 1978, of the critically acclaimed 'Bare' (Columbia Records, 1978), which included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Too Many Nights Alone' (No.29, 1978)

Bobby Bare's critically acclaimed 'Bare' (Columbia Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

'Big Dupree'
'Finger On The Button'
'Gambler'
'Yard Full Of Rusty Cars'
'Greasy Grit Gravy'
'Childhood Hero'
'February Snow'
'This Guitar Is For Sale'
'Sing For The Song'

Bobby Bare's critically acclaimed 'Bare' (Columbia Records, 1978) reached No.44 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.

In October 1978, Bobby Bare saw the release of the critically acclaimed 'Sleeper Wherever I Fall' (Columbia Records, 1978), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Sleep Tight Good Night Man' (No.11, 1978)
'Healin' (No.23, 1979)

Bobby Bare's critically acclaimed 'Sleeper Wherever I Fall' (Columbia Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

'Hot Afternoon (Arizona Desert)'
'What Did It Get Me'
'Goin' Up's Easy Comin' Down's Hard'
'Way I Feel Tonight'
'Love Is A Cold Wind'
'I'll Feel A Whole Lot Better'
'Last Time'
'On A Real Good Night' (written by Rodney Crowell)

In 1979, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Till I Gain Control Again' (written by Rodney Crowell), a non-album single, which reached No.42 on the Billboard country music singles chart.

In February 1980, Rosanne Cash saw the release of 'Right Or Wrong' (Columbia Records, 1980), which included 'No Memories Hangin' Round' (written by Rodney Crowell); the track reached No.17 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1980 and was subsequently included on Bobby Bare's 'Bare Tracks: The Columbia Years' (Koch Records, 1999).

In March 1980, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Down And Dirty' (Columbia Records, 1980), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Numbers' (No.11, 1980)
'Tequila Sheila' (No.31, 1980)

Bobby Bare's 'Down And Dirty' (Columbia Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

'Good For Nothing Blues'
'Some Days Are Diamonds (Some Days Are Stone)'
'Rock's Star Lament'
'Crazy Again'
'Tecumseh Valley'
'Blind Willie Harper'
'Rough On The Living'
'Down To My Last Come And Get Me'
'Qualudes Again'
'Goin' Back To Texas'
'I Can't Watch The Movie Anymore'

Bobby Bare's 'Down And Dirty' (Columbia Records, 1980) reached No.21 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.

In September 1980, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Drunk And Crazy' (Columbia Records, 1980), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Food Blues' (No.41, 1980)
'Willie Jones' (No.19, 1980) / this track featured guest vocals from Charlie Daniels

Bobby Bare's 'Drunk And Crazy' (Columbia Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

'Drunk And Crazy'
'World's Last Truck Drivin' Man'
I Can Almost See Houston From Here'
'If That Ain't Love'
'Rock And Roll Hotel'
'Song Of The South'
'Appaloosa Rider'
'Bathroom Tissue Paper Letter'
'Gotta Get Rid Of This Band'
'Drinkin' And Druggin' And Watchin' TV'
'Your Credit Card Won't Get You Into Heaven'
'I've Never Gone To Bed With An Ugly Woman'
'Desperados Waiting For A Train'

Bobby Bare's 'Drunk And Crazy' (Columbia Records, 1980) reached No.47 on the Billboard Top Country albums Chart in 1980.

In June 1981, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'As Is' (Columbia Records, 1981), which was produced by Rodney Crowell and included four tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Learning To Live Again' (No.28, 1981)
'Take Me As I Am (Or Let Me Go)' (No.28, 1981)
'Dropping Out Of Sight' (written by Tom T. Hall) (No.35, 1981)
'New Cut Road' (No.18, 1982)

Bobby Bare's 'As Is' (Columbia Records, 1981) also included the following tracks:

'Dollar Pool Fool'
'Call Me The Breeze'
'Let Him Roll'
'She Is Gone'
'Summer Wages'
'White Freight Liner Blues'

Bobby Bare's 'As Is' (Columbia Records, 1981) reached No.43 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1981.

In March 1982, Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Ain't Got Nothin' To Lose' (Columbia Records, 1982), which included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'If You Ain't Got Nothin' (You Ain't Got Nothin' To Lose)' (No.31, 1982)
'I'm Not A Candle In The Wind' (No.37, 1982)
'Praise The Lord And Send Me The Money' (No.83, 1982)

Bobby Bare's 'Ain't Got Nothin' To Lose' (Columbia Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

'They Covered Up The Old Swimmin' Hole'
'Isn't That Just Like Love'
'Goodnight Irene'
'Golden Memories' (written by Lacy J. Dalton and John Fitzgerald)
'I've Been Rained On Too'
'Cold Day In Hell'
'So Good To So Bad'

Bobby Bare's 'Ain't Got Nothin' To Lose' (Columbia Records, 1982) reached No.29 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.

In 1983, Bobby Bare saw the release of the single 'It's A Dirty Job', which was a duet with Lacy J. Dalton and which reached No.30 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1983; the track was subsequently included on Lacy J. Dalton's 'Blue Eyed Blues' (Columbia Records, 1987) and Bobby Bare's 'Bare Tracks: The Columbia Years' (Koch Records, 1999).

It was also in 1983 when Bobby Bare saw the release of 'Drinkin' From The Bottle' (Columbia Records, 1983), which included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'The Jogger' (No.29, 1983) / this track was Bobby Bare's last Billboard Top 30 country music hit single
'Diet Song' (No.69, 1983)

Bobby Bare's 'Drinkin' From The Bottle' (Columbia Records, 1983) also included the following tracks:

'Easy As Dreaming'
'Rodeo Queen'
'Me And Jimmie Rodgers'
'Three Legged Man'
'Jennifer Johnson And Me'
'Drinkin' From The Bottle (Singin' From The Heart)'
'Someplace To Come When It Rains'
'Stacy Brown Got Two'
'Time'

In 1985, Bobby Bare signed a recording contract with EMI America Records where he scored three Billboard country music charted singles, but none of these reached the upper regions of the charts.

Between 1983 and 1988, Bobby Bare hosted 'Bobby Bare & Friends' on The Nashville Network (TNN), which featured him interviewing songwriters who sang their hit songs on the show.

In 1998, Bobby Bare formed the band, Old Dogs, with his friends Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002), Mel Tillis and Jerry Reed (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Sunday 31 August 2008).

Signed in 1998 to Atlantic Records, Bobby Bare, Waylon Jennings, Mel Tillis and Jerry Reed (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Sunday 31 August 2008) recorded a self-titled studio album, 'Old Dogs' (Atlantic Records, 1998) for the label that year.

The album's content was written primarily by author, poet and songwriter Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 - Saturday 8/Sunday 9 May 1999). Most of the group's songs were based on the realisation of aging, after Bobby Bare told Shel Silverstein that there were 'no good songs about growing old'.

'Old Dogs' (Atlantic Records, 1998) was recorded live in studio, so audience applause can be heard between the tracks. The two discs came in different cases, and had different album art for them. The album was also issued as a single disc.

Bobby Bare, Waylon Jennings, Mel Tillis and Jerry Reed's 'Old Dogs' (Atlantic Records, 1998), included the following tracks:

Disc 1
'Old Dogs' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Come Back When You're Younger' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'I Don't Do It No More' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'She'd Rather Be Homeless' (written by Shel Silverstein and Anne Dailey)
'Cut The Mustard' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Young Man's Job' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'When I Was' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Couch Potato' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Hard When It Ain't' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Jittabug' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Me And Jimmie Rodgers' (written by Shel Silverstein)

Disc 2
'Elvis Has Left The Building' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Wait Until Tomorrow' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'I Never Expected' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Ever Lovin' Machine' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Slap My Face' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Old Man Blues' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Rough On The Livin' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Alimony' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Still Gonna Die' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Time' (written by Shel Silverstein)

Single Disc Version
'Old Dogs' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'I Don't Do It No More' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'She'd Rather Be Homeless' (written by Shel Silverstein and Anne Dailey)
'Cut The Mustard' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Young Man's Job' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Me And Jimmie Rodgers' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Elvis Has Left The Building' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Rough On The Livin' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Still Gonna Die' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'I Never Expected' (written by Shel Silverstein)
'Time' (written by Shel Silverstein)

Personnel involved in the recording of Bobby Bare, Waylon Jennings, Mel Tillis and Jerry Reed's 'Old Dogs' (Atlantic Records, 1998), included the following:

Bobby Bare, Waylon Jennings, Mel Tillis and Jerry Reed (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Sunday 31 August 2008) (vocals)
Pete Wade (electric guitar)
Thom Bresh (guitar)
Mike Leech (bass)
Fred Newell (guitar, steel guitar)
Bobby Emmons (electronic keyboard)
Jamey Whiting (keyboard)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Jay Vern (organ)
Eddy Anderson and Michael Clarke (drums)
Jonathan Yudkin (fiddle)
Ron De La Vega (cello)
David L. Schnaufer (Jew's Harp)
Gary Kubal (percussion)
Robert Lovett (bass, dobro)
Jessi Colter, Shel Silverstein and Bobby Bare Junior (backing vocals)

On Tuesday 1 November 2005, Bobby Bare saw the release of his first new album in over twenty years, 'The Moon Was Blue' (Dualtone Music Group Records, 2005), which was produced by his son, indie rock and Bloodshot Records recording artist Bobby Bare Junior, as well as Mark Nevers, who worked with groups Lambchop and Calexico.

Bobby Bare's first new album in over twenty years, 'The Moon Was Blue' (Dualtone Music Group Records, 2005), included the following tracks:

'Are You Sincere'
'I Am An Island'
'Everybody's Talkin'
'Yesterday When I Was Young'
'Love Letters In The Sand'
'The Ballad Of Lucy Jordan'
'My Heart Cries For You'
'It's All In the Game'
'Shine On Harvest Moon'
'Am I That Easy To Forget'
'Fellow Travelers'

Jamey Johnson recorded Bobby Bare's 'Cover Your Eyes' (co-written with Wayd Battle and Jamey Johnson) and included the track on 'CD1: The Black Album' of the 2-CD set 'The Guitar Song (Mercury Nashville Records, 2010 / HumpHead Country Records, 2010).

On Saturday 4 February 2012, Bobby Bare joined up with Petter Øien at The 2012 Melodi Grand Prix to choose the song for Norway's entry to the 2012 Eurovision Song Contest to be held in Baku, Azerbaijan in May of that year. Bobby Bare's song, 'Things Change', got through to the Norwegian final, which was held on Saturday 11 February 2012. In the final, Bobby Bare finished in third place.

On Tuesday 16 October 2012, Jamey Johnson saw the release of his album 'Living For A Song: A Tribute To Hank Cochran (Mercury Nashville Records, 2012); on the album, Bobby Bare performed a duet of the song 'I'd Fight The World'.

On Tuesday 13 November 2012, Plowboy Records released Bobby Bare's 'Darker Than Light' (Plowboy Records, 2012), his first album since 2005.

Bobby Bare's ‘Darker Than Light’ (Plowboy Records, 2012) was produced by Plowboy Records co-founder Don Cusic and tracked at the famed RCA Studio B in Nashville, with a band which included Buddy Miller and Randy Scruggs on guitar, Byron House on bass, Marco Giovino on drums and other members of Robert Plant’s Band of Joy.

‘Darker Than Light’ (Plowboy Records, 2012) was Bobby Bare’s first release in seven years and featured his inspired interpretations of songs by Bob Dylan, Alejandro Escovedo (who also made a guest appearance), Lead Belly and others, plus new originals.

It was also in 2012 when Bobby Bare appeared on 'Music City Roots', The Grand Ole Opry and, in March 2013, South by Southwest.

On Wednesday 10 April 2013, the Country Music Association (CMA) announced that Bobby Bare would be a 2013 inductee into The Country Music Hall of Fame. Other 2013 Inductees included 'Cowboy' Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013) and Kenny Rogers.

In nearly fifty years of making country music, Bobby Bare achieved many firsts in country music and is credited for introducing Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002) to RCA Records.

Bobby Bare was also one of the first artists to record songs from many well known songwriters, including such as 'Cowboy' Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013), Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002), Billy Joe Shaver, Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 - Sunday 29 September 2002), Tom T. Hall, Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 - Saturday 8/Sunday 9 May 1999), Baxter Taylor and Kris Kristofferson.

Connect with Bobby Bare at bobbybaredarkerthanlight.com
Connect with Bobby Bare at plowboyrecords.com

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