• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Webster PR



Webster Public Relations
, PO Box 23015, Nashville, TN 37202

Contact Scott Adkins
Telephone 615-777-6995

Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted during 2014, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Bobby Braddock, which he submitted to this site on Sunday 7 September 2014.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Bobby Braddock who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Bobby Braddock
This quote was submitted on Sunday 7 September 2014.

'I think Gene Watson is a great talent and I rate him up there with singing legends like George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009).



'Farewell Party' and 'Love in the Hot Afternoon' are two of my favourite country records of all time'.

Thank you, Bobby Braddock, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Bobby Braddock...

Bobby Braddock was born Robert Valentine (Bobby) Braddock on Monday 5 August 1940 in Lakeland, Florida to a father who was a citrus grower.

Bobby Braddock spent his youth in Auburndale, Florida where he learned to play piano and saxophone. Bobby toured Florida and the South with rock 'n' roll bands in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Bobby Braddock attended (Grade School) Auburndale Florida Elementary between 1946 and 1954, Auburndale High School between 1954 and 1958, and Florida Southern College between 1961 and 1962.

In 1964, when he was twenty-four years old, Bobby Braddock moved to Nashville in order to pursue a career in country music.

iN fEBRUARY 1965, upon arriving in Nashville, Bobby Braddock joined Marty Robbins' band as a pianist.

In January 1966, a song Bobby Braddock wrote for Marty Robbins, 'While You're Dancing', became Bobby's first record to appear on the country music charts.

Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 - Wednesday 8 December 1982) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'While You're Dancing' in 1966; the track reached No.21 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1966 and was subsequently included on 'No Signs of Loneliness Here' (Columbia Records, 1975), which was released in November 1975.

In 1967, Bobby Braddock signed with Tree Publishing in Nashville, and one of the first songs he composed was 'I L-O-V-E Y-O-U (Do I Have to Spell It Out For You)', which materialised into 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E'.

The Statler Brothers recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Ruthless' and included the track on 'The Statler Bothers Sing The Big Hits' (Columbia Records, 1967); the track reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1967.

The Statler Brothers recorded Bobby Braddock's 'You Can't Have Your Kate And Edith, Too', which was co-written with Curly Putman (), and included the track on 'The Statler Bothers Sing The Big Hits' (Columbia Records, 1967); the track reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1967.

Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 - Friday 2 January 2015) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Country Music Lover' and included the track on 'Big Man in Country Music' (Columbia Records, 1968); the track reached No.23 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1968.

In the early part of 1968, Tree Publishing song plugger Curly Putman () heard 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E' and noted that the track was too happy for such a sad song.  Curly Putman changed a line here and there and worked with Bobby on the melody.

Curly Putman didn't want any part of the royalties, but Bobby Braddock insisted that he share a part of the earnings.

On Thursday 29 February 1968, Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) earned a Grammy award for her performance of 'I Don't Wanna Play House' (No.1 in October 1967), which was written by Billy Sherrill () and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) and, that same night, Bobby Braddock told Billy Sherrill about his new song.

On Friday 1 March 1968, Curly Putman () and Bobby Braddock delivered the song personally to Billy Sherrill () at the Epic Records offices.

Billy Sherrill loved 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E', and so did Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998).

Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E' (co-written with Curly Putman) and included the track on 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E' (Epic Records, 1968), which was released in December 1968 and reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1969.

Tammy Wynette's version of Bobby Braddock's 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E', which was co-written with Curly Putman (), was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for three weeks in June / July 1968.

Tammy Wynette's version of Bobby Braddock's 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E' (co-written with Curly Putman) was also a minor US pop hit, reaching No.63 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1968.

Tammy Wynette's version of Bobby Braddock's 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E' (co-written with Curly Putman) was also included on 'Tammy's Greatest Hits' (Epic Records, 1969), which was released in August 1969.

In 1975, a Tammy Wynette 'Greatest Hits' album was released in the UK. Two of the songs from this album ascended the British pop music singles chart that year, with 'Stand By Your Man' reaching No.1 in April 1975 and 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E' climbing to a peak position of No.12 in July 1975.

Beginning in the late 1960s, Bobby Braddock recorded for various country music record labels and enjoyed modest sales results. Bobby Braddock enjoyed a number of hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart, including 'I Know How To Do It' (No.74, 1967), 'The Girls In Country Music' (No.62, 1969), 'Between The Lines' (No.58, 1979) and 'Nag, Nag, Nag' (No.87, 1980).

Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 - Wednesday 26 January 2011) & Melba Montgomery recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Something To Brag About' and included the track on 'Something To Brag About' (Capitol Records, 1971); the track reached No.18 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1970.

Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 - Wednesday 26 January 2011) & Melba Montgomery recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Did You Ever' and included the track on 'Baby You've Got What It Takes' (Capitol Records, 1971); the track reached No.26 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1971.

Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Revelation' and included the track on 'Ladies Love Outlaws' (RCA Records, 1972).

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Nothing Ever Hurt Me (Half As Bad As Losing You)' and included the track on 'Nothing Ever Hurt Me' (Epic Records, 1973); the track reached No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1973.

Tanya Tucker recorded Bobby Braddock's 'I Believe The South Is Gonna Rise Again' and included the track on 'Would You Lay With Me' (Columbia Records, 1973); the track reached No.18 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1974.

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'A Man I Always Wanted To Meet' (co-written with Curly Putman) and included the track on 'In A Gospel Way' (Epic Records, 1974).

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) & Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'We're Not The Jet Set' and included the track on 'We're Gonna Hold On' (Epic Records, 1974); the track reached No.15 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1974.

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'She Told Me So' and included the track on 'The Grand Tour' (Epic Records, 1974).

Tanya Tucker recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Leave Him Alone' (co-written with Curly Putman) and included the track on 'Lovin' And Learnin' (MCA Records, 1976).

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Her Name Is...' and included the track on 'Alone Again' (Epic Records, 1976); the track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1976.

Bill Anderson recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Peanuts And Diamonds' and included the track on 'Peanuts And Diamonds And Other Jewels' (MCA Records, 1976); the track reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1976.

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) & Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Golden Ring' (co-written with Rafe VanHoy) and included the track on 'Golden Ring' (Epic Records, 1976), which reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.

'Golden Ring', which was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in August 1976, featured George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) on piano and The Gatlin Brothers on backing vocals.

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) & Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Did You Ever' and included the track on 'Golden Ring' (Epic Records, 1976).

Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 - Monday 14 August 2006) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Thinkin' Of A Rendezvous' (co-written with Sonny Throckmorton) and included the track on 'Johnny Duncan' (Columbia Records, 1977); the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in December 1976.

Mary Kay Place recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Something To Brag About' and included the track on 'Aimin' To Please' (Columbia Records, 1977); the track, which featured guest vocals from Willie Nelson, reached No.9 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1977.

Jerry Lee Lewis recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Come On In (And Make Yourself At Home)' and included the track on 'Country Memories' (Mercury Records, 1977); the track reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978.

Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 - Wednesday 19 February 2003) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Georgia In A Jug' and included the track on 'Take This Job & Shove It' (Epic Records, 1977); the track reached No.17 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978.

Tommy Overstreet recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Fadin' In, Fadin' Out' (co-written with Sonny Throckmorton) and included the track on 'Better Me' (ABC/Dot Records, 1978); the track reached No.11 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978.

Sonny Throckmorton recorded Bobby Braddock's 'I Feel Like Loving You Again' (co-written with Sonny Throckmorton) and included the track on 'Last Cheater's Waltz' (Mercury Records, 1978).

Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Womanhood' and included the track on 'Womanhood' (Epic Records, 1978); the track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978.

Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'They Call It Making Love' and included the track on 'Just Tammy' (Epic Records, 1979); the track reached No.6 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1979.

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'He Stopped Loving Her Today' (co-written with Curly Putman) and included the track on 'I Am What I Am' (Epic Records, 1980); the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in July 1980.

Bobby Braddock and Curly Putman's 'He Stopped Loving Her Today' earned George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) a Grammy Award; the track also earned 'Single of the Year' Awards from the Country Music Association (CMA) in 1980 and 1981, the Academy of Country Music (ACM) and 'Music City News'.

Bobby Braddock and Curly Putman's 'He Stopped Loving Her Today' also won the 1981 'Song of the Year' from the Academy of Country Music (ACM). The song was voted 'Country Song of the Century' in a poll by Radio & Records magazine, as well as 'Best Country Song of All Time' in a poll conducted by the BBC and Country America Magazine.

Lacy J. Dalton recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Hard Times' and included the track on 'Hard Times' (Columbia Records, 1980); the track reached No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1980.

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) & Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'It's Not My Fault' and included the track on 'Together Again' (Epic Records, 1980).

T.G. Sheppard recorded Bobby Braddock's 'I Feel Like Loving You Again' (co-written with Sonny Throckmorton) and included the track on 'Smooth Sailin' (Warner Bros. Records/Curb Records, 1980); the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in January/February 1981.


In 1981, Bobby Braddock was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame.

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Together Alone' and included the track on 'Still The Same Ole Me' (Epic Records, 1981).

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Daddy Come Home (Georgette and Daddy)' and included the track on 'Still The Same Ole Me' (Epic Records, 1981).


John Anderson recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Would You Catch A Falling Star' and included the track on 'I Just Came Home To Count The Memories' (Warner Bros. Records, 1981); the track reached No.6 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1982, and was subsequently included on John Anderson's 'Greatest Hits' (Warner Bros. Records, 1984).

John Conlee recorded Bobby Braddock's 'I Don't Remember Loving You, which was co-written with Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002), and included the track on 'Busted' (MCA Records, 1982); the track reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1982.

Jerry Reed (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Sunday 31 August 2008) recorded 'The Bird' (written by Hal Coleman and Barry Etris) and included the track on 'The Bird' (RCA Records, 1982); this novelty song, which contained impressions of Willie Nelson's 'Whiskey River' and 'On The Road Again', along with George Jones' 'He Stopped Loving Her Today' (written by Bobby Braddock and Curly Putman), reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart prior to Christmas 1982.

T.G. Sheppard & Karen Brooks recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Faking Love' (co-written with Matraca Berg); the track was included on T.G. Sheppard's 'Perfect Stranger' (Warner Bros. Records, 1982) and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in February 1983.

Bobby Braddock's offbeat sense of humour was displayed on the RCA album 'Hardpore Cornography' (RCA Records, 1983), which was released in 1983.

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'She Hung The Moon' and included the track on 'Shine On' (Epic Records, 1983).

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'I'd Rather Have What We Had' and included the track on 'Shine On' (Epic Records, 1983).

Tanya Tucker recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Alien' and included the track on 'Love Me Like You Used To' (Capitol Records, 1987).

Bellamy Brothers (David Bellamy & Howard Bellamy) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Our Family' (co-written with David Bellamy) and included the track on 'Country Rap' (MCA Records, 1987).

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'I Want To Grow Old With You' and included the track on 'You Oughta Be Here With Me' (Epic Records, 1990).

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'A Cold Day in December' and included the track on 'You Oughta Be Here With Me' (Epic Records, 1990).

John Anderson recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Look Away' and included the track on 'Seminole Wind' (BNA Records, 1992).

Mark Chesnutt recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Old Flames Have New Names' (co-written with Rafe VanHoy) and included the track on 'Longnecks & Short Stories' (MCA Records, 1992); the track reached No.5 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1992.

Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Silent Partners' and included the track on 'Too Dumb For New York City, Too Ugly For L.A.' (Epic Records, 1992).

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Silent Partners' and included the track on 'High Tech Redneck' (MCA Records, 1993).

John Anderson recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Nashville Tears' and included the track on 'Solid Ground' (BNA Records, 1993).

Martina McBride recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Strangers' and included the track on 'The Way That I Am' (RCA Nashville Records, 1993); the track was subsequently included on Martina McBride's 'Greatest Hits' (RCA Nashville Records, 2001).

John Anderson recorded Bobby Braddock's 'The Good' and included the track on 'Country 'Til I Die' (BNA Records, 1994).

Tracy Lawrence recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Texas Tornado' and included the track on 'I See It Now' (Atlantic Records, 1995); the track was No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1995.

Tracy Lawrence recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Time Marches On' and included the track on 'Time Marches On' (Atlantic Records, 1996); the track was No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart for three weeks in mid-1996.

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Billy B. Bad' and included the track on 'I Lived To Tell It All' (MCA Records, 1996); the track was released as a single but it did not chart on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1996.

George Strait recorded Bobby Braddock's 'The Nerve' and included the track on 'Carrying Your Love With Me' (MCA Nashville Records, 1997).

In 1997, Blake Shelton moved to Nashville, where he obtained a job at a music publishing company; he was assisted by Bobby Braddock in order to get a production contract with Sony Music.

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Wild Irish Rose' and included the track on 'It Don't Get Any Better Than This' (MCA Records, 1998); the track was released as a single but it did not chart on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1998.

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Small Y'All' and included the track on 'It Don't Get Any Better Than This' (MCA Records, 1998).

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Over You' and included the track on 'It Don't Get Any Better Than This' (MCA Records, 1998).

Doug Stone recorded Bobby Braddock's 'The Difference Between A Man And A Woman' and included the track on 'Make Up In Love' (Atlantic Records, 1999).

Jason Sellers recorded Bobby Braddock's 'Golden Ring' (co-written with Rafe VanHoy) and included the track on 'A Matter Of Time' (BNA Records, 1999); the track was a duet with Pam Tillis.

After several years in Nashville, Blake Shelton signed to Giant Records in 2001. It was also in 2001 that Blake was slated to release Bobby Braddock's 'I Wanna Talk About Me' as a single. However, staff at Giant Records considered the song unsuitable for a lead-off single. The song was eventually recorded by Toby Keith, whose version was No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart for four weeks in November/December 2001.

On Tuesday 31 July 2001, Blake Shelton saw the release of his self-titled debut album, 'Blake Shelton' (Warner Bros. Records, 2001), which was produced by Bobby Braddock and included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Austin' (written by Kirsti Manna and David Kent) (No.1 for five weeks in August/September 2001)
'All Over Me' (written by Earl Thomas Conley, Blake Shelton and Mike Pyle) (No.18, 2001)
'Ol' Red' (written by James 'Bo' Bohan, Don Goodman and Mark Sherrill) (No.14, 2002)

Due to the closure of Giant Records in 2001, Blake Shelton was transferred to the Nashville division of Giant's parent label, Warner Bros. Records, which promoted and distributed the second and third singles.

Blake Shelton's self-titled debut album, 'Blake Shelton' (Warner Bros. Records, 2001), also included the following tracks:

'Every Time I Look At You' (written by Doug Johnson and Blake Shelton) / this track featured background vocals from Curtis Young
'She Doesn't Know She's Got It' (written by John Rich, Chris Waters and Tom Shapiro)
'I Thought There Was Time' (written by Bobby Braddock)
'Same Old Song' (written by Bobby Braddock)
'That's What I Call Home' (written by Richard Mainegra, Blake Shelton and Michael Kosser)
'Problems At Home' (written by Don Ellis, Billy Montana and Blake Shelton) / this track featured background vocals from Deborah Allen and Curtis Young
'If I Was Your Man' (written by Lauren Braddock and Don Henry) / this track featured background vocals from Curtis Young

Personnel involved in the recording of Blake Shelton's self-titled debut album, 'Blake Shelton' (Warner Bros. Records, 2001), included the following:

Bobby Braddock (synth strings)
Alison Brown (5-string banjo)
Chad Cromwell (drums)
Dan Dugmore (pedal steel guitar, lap steel guitar, Dobro)
Shannon Forrest (drums, percussion)
Steve Gibson (sitar)
Rob Hajacos and Andrea Zonn (fiddle)
Tim Lauer (accordion, keyboard, organ, piano, synthesizer)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica, Jew's harp)
Alison Prestwood (bass guitar)
Mike Rojas (piano)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar, sitar)
Scott Sanders (lap steel guitar)
John Willis (acoustic guitar)

Blake Shelton's self-titled debut album, 'Blake Shelton' (Warner Bros. Records, 2001), reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2001.

Toby Keith recorded Bobby Braddock's 'I Wanna Talk About Me' and included the track on 'Pull My Chain' (DreamWorks Records, 2001); the track was No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart for four weeks in November/December 2001, and was subsequently included on Toby Keith's 'Greatest Hits 2' (Dreamworks Records, 2004).

Bobby Braddock's 'I Wanna Talk About Me' was subsequently included on Toby Keith's 'Greatest Hits 2' (Dreamworks Records, 2004) and Toby Keith's '35 Biggest Hits' (Showdog Records/Universal Music Group Nashville, 2008); the track had been intended for Blake Shelton.

On Tuesday 4 February 2003, Blake Shelton saw the release of 'The Dreamer' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2003), which was produced by Bobby Braddock and included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'The Baby', which was written by Harley Allen (Monday 23 January 1956 - Wednesday 30 March 2011) and Michael White (No.1 for three weeks in early 2003)
'Heavy Liftin' (written by Boyd Houston Robert, George Teren and Rivers Rutherford) (No.32, 2003)
'Playboys Of The Southwestern World', which was written by Randy VanWarmer (Wednesday 30 March 1955 - Monday 12 January 2004) and Neal Coty (No.24, 2003)

Blake Shelton's 'The Dreamer' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2003) also included the following tracks:

'Asphalt Cowboy' (written by Jeff Stevens and Kenny West)
'In My Heaven' (written by Rivers Rutherford and Bobby Pinson)
'The Dreamer' (written by Blake Shelton)
'My Neck Of The Woods' (written by Don Ellis, Billy Montana and Blake Shelton)
'Underneath The Same Moon' (written by Sharon Vaughn Bellamy and John Rich)
'Georgia In A Jug' (written by Bobby Braddock)
'Someday' (written by Kathy Locke and Bobby Braddock)
Personnel involved in the recording of Blake Shelton's 'The Dreamer' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2003) included the following:

Bobby Braddock (keyboards)
Larry Cordle, Neal Coty, Melodie Crittenden, Wes Hightower, Blue Miller, Danny Myrick, John Rich, John Wesley Ryles, Leslie Satcher, Sharon Vaughn Bellamy and Dennis Wilson (background vocals)
Dan Dugmore and Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Shannon Forrest and Greg Morrow (drums)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Tim Lauer and Michael Rojas (keyboards)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, trumpet, vibraphone)
Russ Pahl (banjo)
Alison Prestwood and Michael Rhodes (bass guitar)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar, baritone guitar, Wurlitzer electric piano)
Blake Shelton (vocals, acoustic guitar)
John Willis (acoustic guitar)
Jonathan Yudkin (fiddle, mandolin)

Blake Shelton's 'The Dreamer' (Warner Bros. Records, 2003), reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2003.

Josh Turner recorded Bobby Braddock's 'The Difference Between a Man & a Woman' and included the track on 'Long Black Train' (MCA Nashville Records, 2003).

On Tuesday 26 October 2004, Blake Shelton saw the release of 'Blake Shelton's Barn & Grill' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2004), which was produced by Bobby Braddock and included it is his third consecutive album to achieve RIAA gold certification. The album produced four tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'When Somebody Knows You That Well', which was written by Jimmy Melton and Harley Allen (Monday 23 January 1956 - Wednesday 30 March 2011) (No.37, 2004) / String arrangements on this track by Bobby Braddock and Tim Lauer, conducted by Tim Lauer, and Michael Goode, copyist
'Some Beach' (written by Rory Lee Feek and Paul Overstreet) (No.1 for four weeks in late 2004/early 2005)
'Goodbye Time' (written by James Dean Hicks and Roger Murrah) (No.10, 2005)
'Nobody But Me' (written by Shawn Camp and Phillip White) (No.4, 2005)

Blake Shelton's 'Blake Shelton's Barn & Grill' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2004) also included the following tracks:

'Good Old Boy, Bad Old Boyfriend' (written by Bobby Braddock)
'Love Gets In The Way' (written by Scott Joyce and Blake Shelton)
'Cotton Pickin' Time' (written by Paul Overstreet and Even Stevens)
'What's On My Mind' (written by Leslie Satcher and Jim Lauderdale)
'On A Good Day' (written by Blake Shelton, Tom Shapiro and Tony Martin)
'The Bartender', which was written by Harley Allen (Monday 23 January 1956 - Wednesday 30 March 2011)'I Drink' (written by Mary Gauthier and Crit Harmon)

Personnel involved in the recording of Blake Shelton's 'Blake Shelton's Barn & Grill' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2004) included the following:

David Angell, David Davidson and Connie Ellisor (violin)
Bobby Braddock (Minimoog & Wurlitzer electric piano right hand and synthesizer)
Byrd Burton (acoustic guitar)
Frank DeBretti Junior (slide guitar)
Shannon Forrest (drums)
Paul Franklin (pedal steel guitar and lap steel guitar)
Sonny Garrish (pedal steel guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Scott Joyce (keyboards)
Tim Lauer (Hammond B-3 organ, Wurlitzer electric piano left hand and keyboards)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica, Jew's harp and whistling)
Gordon Mote and Mike Rojas (piano)
Alison Prestwood (bass guitar)
Carole Rabinowitz (cello)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar and bass guitar)
Ed Seay (additional crash cymbals)
Blake Shelton (acoustic guitar)
Shawn Simpson (shaker)
Bryan Sutton (acoustic guitar and 5-string banjo)
Kris Wilkinson (viola)
John Willis (acoustic guitar)
Glenn Worf (bass guitar)
Jonathan Yudkin (fiddle, backing fiddle, violin, viola and cello)

Backing vocalists involved in the recording of Blake Shelton's 'Blake Shelton's Barn & Grill' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2004) included Melodie Crittenden, Wes Hightower, Carl Jackson, Blue Miller, Danny Myrick, Paul Overstreet, Rachel Proctor, John Wesley Ryles, Leslie Satcher, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young.

Blake Shelton's 'Blake Shelton's Barn & Grill' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2004) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2005.

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) re-recorded Bobby Braddock's 'He Stopped Loving Her Today' (co-written with Curly Putman) and included the track on 'Hits I Missed...And One I Didn't' (Bandit Records, 2005); the track had origially been No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in July 1980.

George Strait recorded Bobby Braddock's 'She Told Me So' and included the track on 'It Just Comes Natural' (MCA Nashville Records, 2006).

On Tuesday 1 May 2007, Blake Shelton saw the release of 'Pure BS' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2007), which was produced by Bobby Braddock, Brent Rowan and Paul Worley and included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Don't Make Me' (written by Marla Cannon-Goodman, Deanna Bryant and Dave Berg) (No.12, 2007) / Produced by Brent Rowan
'The More I Drink' (written by David Lee Murphy, Chris DuBois and Dave Turnbull) (No.19, 2007) / Produced by Brent Rowan
'Home' (written by Michael Bublé, Alan Chang and Amy Foster-Gillies) (No.1, 2008) / Produced by Brent Rowan

Blake Shelton's 'Pure BS' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2007) also included the following tracks:

'This Can't Be Good' (written by Timothy DeArmitt and Blake Shelton) / Produced by Paul Worley
'I Don't Care' (written by Dean Dillon and Casey Beathard) / Produced by Bobby Braddock
'She Don't Love Me' (written by Casey Beathard and Jay Knowles) / Produced by Brent Rowan
'Back There Again' (written by Tom Douglas) / Produced by Paul Worley
'It Ain't Easy Bein' Me' (written by Chris Knight and Craig Wiseman) / Produced by Brent Rowan
'What I Wouldn't Give' (written by Charlie Brown, Tommy Karlas and Charley Stefl) / Produced by Paul Worley
'I Have Been Lonely' (written by Blake Shelton, Rachel Proctor and Michael Kosser) / Produced by Bobby Braddock
'She Can't Get That' (written by Billy Lawson and Wally Wilson) / Produced by Bobby Braddock
'The Last Country Song' (written by Bobby Braddock, Blake Shelton and Michael Kosser) / this track featured guest vocals from featuring John Anderson and George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) / Produced by Bobby Braddock

Blake Shelton's 'Pure BS' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2007) was re-released in May 2008 as 'Pure BS Deluxe Edition', which contained three bonus tracks, one of which, a cover of Michael Bublé's 'Home', was released as a single and became Blake Shelton's fourth No.1 country music hit on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart.

The other bonus tracks included on Blake Shelton's 'Pure BS Deluxe Edition' were 'Chances' and 'I Can't Walk Away', both of which were written by Blake Shelton; both tracks were produced by Bobby Braddock.

Blake Shelton's 'Pure BS' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2007) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2007.

The track, 'I Don't Care', which was written by Dean Dillon and Casey Beathard, and was produced by Bobby Braddock, was also included on Blake Shelton's 'Startin' Fires' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2008).

In March 2007, Bobby Braddock saw the release of a memoir which recounted his early life in pre-Disney World Central Florida; the memoir was called 'Down In Orbundale: A Songwriters Youth In Old Florida', which was published by Louisiana State University Press.

Billy Currington recorded Bobby Braddock's 'People Are Crazy' and included the track on 'Little Bit Of Everything' (Mercury Nashville Records, 2009); the track was No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart for one week in August 2009.

In 2011, Bobby Braddock was inducted into The Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville.

At the time of the acquisition of this 'Peer's Quote', in September 2014, Braddock Braddock was residing in Nashville and was writing songs for publishing company, Sony/ATV.

Connect with Bobby Braddock at bobbybraddock.com

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