Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted during 2018, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Jerry Lee Lewis, which he submitted to this site on Sunday 26 August 2018.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Jerry Lee Lewis who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Judith Coghlan Lewis, without whom this Gene Watson 'Peer's Quote' from Jerry Lee Lewis would not have been possible.

Jerry Lee Lewis

Jerry Lee Lewis
This quote was submitted on Sunday 26 August 2018.

'Keep rockin', Gene!

Love your music, my friend.

God bless you.

Your friend,
Jerry Lee Lewis!'


Thank you, Jerry Lee Lewis, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Jerry Lee Lewis...

Jerry Lee Lewis

Jerry Lee Lewis
was born in Ferriday, Louisiana, on Sunday 29 September 1935, and began playing the piano at the age of nine, copying the styles of preachers and black musicians that traveled through the area.

In 1958, Jerry Lee Lewis signed with Sun Records and quickly became a star.

In 1986, Jerry Lee Lewis was the first person inducted into the first class of The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

With his innovative and flamboyant piano playing style, Jerry Lee Lewis emerged as one of rock music’s early showman in the 1950s.

Jerry Lee Lewis' musical talents became apparent early on in life; he taught himself to play piano and sang in church growing up.

Jerry Lee Lewis listened to a number of radio shows, including The Grand Ole Opry and Louisiana Hayride.

Jimmie Rodgers (8 September 1897 - Friday 26 May 1933), Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) and Al Jolson (26 May c.1886 - Monday 23 October 1950) were some of Jerry Lee Lewis' early influences.

When he was ten years old, Jerry Lee Lewis’ father mortgaged the family farm to buy Jerry Lee his first piano.

Jerry Lee Lewis gave his first public performance at the age of fourteen, wowing the crowd gathered for the opening of a local car dealership with his piano prowess.  With little formal education, Jerry Lee Lewis basically gave up on school around this time to focus on his music.

Jerry Lee Lewis eventually ended up in Memphis, Tennessee, where he found work as a studio musician for Sun Studios.

In 1956, Jerry Lee Lewis recorded his first single, a cover of Ray Price’s 'Crazy Arms', which was written by Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 - Sunday 20 March 2011) and Charles Seals; the track did well locally.

Jerry Lee Lewis also worked on some recording sessions with Carl Perkins (Saturday 9 April 1932 - Monday 19 January 1998).

While working at Sun Records, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins (Saturday 9 April 1932 - Monday 19 January 1998) jammed with Elvis Presley (Tuesday 8 January 1935 - Tuesday 16 August 1977) and Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003).  This session by the 'Million Dollar Quartet' was recorded at the time, but it was not released until much later.

In 1957, Jerry Lee Lewis became a star with his unique piano-driven sound.  'Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On', which was written by Dave 'Curlee' Williams and James Faye 'Roy' Hall (Sunday 7 May 1922 - Saturday 3 March 1984), became a hit single on the Billboard pop music singles chart (No.3, 1957), Billboard country music singles chart (No.1, 1957) and Billboard R&B chart (No.1, 1957); the track also reached No.8 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1957, and No.13 on the pop music singles chart in Belgium in 1957.

By this time, Jerry Lee Lewis had also developed some of his famous stage antics, including playing standing up and even lighting the occasional piano on fire.

Jerry Lee Lewis had such energy and enthusiasm in his performances that he earned the nickname 'The Killer' for the way he knocked out his audiences.

Jerry Lee Lewis was on a roll with his next single, 'Great Balls of Fire', which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002) and Earl Solomon Burroughs (Jack Hammer) (Wednesday 16 September 1925 - Friday 8 April 2016), proving to be another big hit single in December 1957, reaching No.2.

In March 1958, Jerry Lee Lewis struck again with 'Breathless', which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002); the track became a hit single on the Billboard pop music singles chart (No.7, 1958), Billboard country music singles chart (No.4, 1958) and Billboard R&B chart (No.3, 1958); the track also reached No.8 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1958.

In the 1960s, Jerry Lee Lewis returned to the music of his youth and found a new career as a country music artist, scoring a hit single with 'Another Place, Another Time' (No.4, 1968).

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Ole Tyme Country Music' (Sun Records, 1970) Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Boogie Woogie Country Man' (Mercury Records, 1975)

Jerry Lee Lewis recorded several country music albums over the next few years, including 'Olde Tyme Country Music' (Sun Records, 1970) and 'Boogie Woogie Country Man' (Mercury Records, 1975).

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'The Session' (Mercury Records, 1973)

Jerry Lee Lewis never left the rock world completely.  In 1973, Jerry Lee Lewis did well on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart with 'The Session' (Mercury Records, 1973), on which he revisited some of his older songs, as well as the works of Chuck Berry and John Fogerty.

When he was inducted into The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame’s first class in 1986, there was a strong resurgence in Jerry Lee Lewis' rock & roll career and music.  A new generation of listeners got introduced to Jerry Lee Lewis through the 1989 biopic 'Great Balls of Fire”, when Jerry Lee Lewis was played by actor Dennis Quaid.

This nearly lifelong musician and singer continues to record new music and perform around the world.

For 'Last Man Standing' (Artists First / Shrangri-La Music, 2006), Jerry Lewis sang a number of rock, blues and country music classics, with some help from such famous admirers as Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Kris Kristofferson, Willie Nelson and Buddy Guy.

Collaborator Kris Kristofferson described Jerry Lee Lewis as 'one of the few who can do rock ‘n’ roll, country or soul, and every song is authentic'.  Kris Kristofferson told 'USA Today' that Jerry Lee Lewis was 'one of the best American voices ever'.

Jerry Lee Lewis & Various Artists: 'Mean Old Man' (Verve Records, 2010)

Jerry Lee Lewis and Kris Kristofferson worked together again on Jerry Lee Lewis’ 'Mean Old Man' (Verve Records, 2010); the all-star guests on this album included Eric Clapton, Tim McGraw, Sheryl Crow, Kid Rock and John Fogerty, among others.

In April 2013, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the opening of Jerry Lee Lewis’ Café & Honky Tonk on historic Beale Street in Memphis, Tennessee; it was filled with one of The Killer’s pianos, a motorcycle, photos, and memorabilia, along with great food and live music.

2014 kicked off Jerry Lee Lewis’ '80th Birthday Tour' with shows across the United States, from California to Tennessee to New York.  The Killer also travelled to Europe.

In October 2014, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of his first ever biography with Pulitzer Prize winning author Rick Bragg.  'Jerry Lee Lewis - His Own Story' was released to wide critical acclaim.

It was also in October 2014 when Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Rock & Roll Time' (Vanguard Records, 2014).  Jerry Lee Lewis told 'Rolling Stone' magazine: 'This is a rock & roll record…That’s just the way it came out'.

Jerry Lee Lewis spends most of his time-off at The Lewis Ranch in Nesbit, Mississippi, where he is happily married to his wife, Judith, since 9 March 2012.

Jerry Lee Lewis Discography: 1958

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Jerry Lee Lewis' (Sun Records, 1958)

In May 1958, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of his self-titled debut album, 'Jerry Lee Lewis' (Sun Records, 1958), which included three tracks, which were released as singles:

'Crazy Arms', which was written by Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 - Sunday 20 March 2011) and Charles Seals / this track was released as a single in 1956, but it did not chart nationally in the United States, but it did well locally in Tennessee
'High School Confidential' (written by Jerry Lee Lewis and Ron Hargrave) (No.9 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1958, No.21 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1958, No.5 on the Billboard R&B Chart in 1958, and No.12 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1958)
'Fools Like Me', which was written by 'Cowboy' Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013) and Murphy Maddux (No.11 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1958)

Jerry Lee Lewis' self-titled debut album, 'Jerry Lee Lewis' (Sun Records, 1958), also included the following tracks:

'Don't Be Cruel', which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002) and Elvis Presley (Tuesday 8 January 1935 - Tuesday 16 August 1977)
'Goodnight Irene' (written by Huddie Ledbetter and John Lomax)
'Put Me Down' (written by Roland Janes)
'It All Depends On You' (written by Billy Mize)
'Ubangi Stomp' (written by Charles Underwood)
'Jambalaya (On The Bayou)', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'When The Saints Go Marching In'
'Matchbox', which was written by Carl Perkins (Saturday 9 April 1932 - Monday 19 January 1998)
'It'll Be Me', which was written by 'Cowboy' Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013)

Jerry Lee Lewis Discography: 1962

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Jerry Lee's Greatest' (Sun Records, 1962)

In March 1962, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Jerry Lee's Greatest' (Sun Records, 1962), which included five tracks, which were released as singles:

'Great Balls of Fire', which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002) and Earl Solomon Burroughs (Jack Hammer) (Wednesday 16 September 1925 - Friday 8 April 2016) (No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart in December 1957 / No.2 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in December 1957 / No.1 on the Billboard R&B Chart in December 1957 / No.1 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in December 1957, and No.16 on the pop music singles chart in Belgium in December 1957)
'
Break Up' (No.52 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1958)
'Let's Talk About Us' / this track was released as a single in 1959, but it did not chart on any chart
'What'd I Say', which was written by Ray Charles (Tuesday 23 September 1930 - Thursday 10 June 2004) (No.30 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1961 / No.27 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1961 / No.10 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1961)
'
Cold, Cold Heart', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) (No.22 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1961)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Jerry Lee's Greatest' (Sun Records, 1962) also included the following tracks:

'
Money (That's All I Want)'
'As Long As I Live'
'Hillbilly Music'
'Hello, Hello, Baby'
'Home'
'Frankie & Johnny'
'Hello, Josephine'

Jerry Lee Lewis Discography: 1964

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'The Golden Hits of Jerry Lee Lewis' (Smash Records, 1964)

On Wednesday 1 January 1964, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'The Golden Hits of Jerry Lee Lewis' (Smash Records, 1964), which included the following tracks:

'Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On', which was written by Dave 'Curlee' Williams and James Faye 'Roy' Hall (Sunday 7 May 1922 - Saturday 3 March 1984) (No.3 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1957) / No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1957) / No.1 on the Billboard R&B Chart in 1957); the track also reached No.8 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1957, and No.13 on the pop music singles chart in Belgium in 1957
'Fools Like Me' (No.11 on the Billboard R&B Chart in 1958)
'Great Balls of Fire', which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002) and Earl Solomon Burroughs (Jack Hammer) (Wednesday 16 September 1925 - Friday 8 April 2016) (No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart in December 1957 / No.2 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in December 1957 / No.1 on the Billboard R&B Chart in December 1957 / No.1 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in December 1957, and No.16 on the pop music singles chart in Belgium in December 1957)
'I'll Make It All Up To You'
(No.19 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1958, and No.85 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1958)
'Down The Line'
'End of The Road' (written by Jerry Lee Lewis)
'Breathless', which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002) (No.7 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1958, No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1958, and No.3 on the Billboard R&B Chart in 1958); the track also reached No.8 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1958
'Crazy Arms', which was written by Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 - Sunday 20 March 2011) and Charles Seals (this track was released as a single in 1956, but it did not chart nationally in the United States, but it did well locally in Tennessee)
'You Win Again', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
(No.4 on the Billboard country music singles in 1957 / No.95 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1957)
'High School Confidential' (written by Jerry Lee Lewis and Ron Hargrave) (No.9 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1958, No.21 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1958, No.5 on the Billboard R&B Chart in 1958, and No.12 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1958)
'Break Up' (No.52 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1958)
'Your Cheatin' Heart', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'The Golden Hits of Jerry Lee Lewis' (Smash Records, 1964) reached No.116 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1964.

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'The Greatest Live Show On Earth' (Smash Records, 1964)

In November 1964, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'The Greatest Live Show On Earth' (Smash Records, 1964), which reached No.32 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1964.

Jerry Lee Lewis Discography: 1965

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'The Return of Rock' (Smash Records, 1965)

In May 1965, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'The Return of Rock' (Smash Records, 1965), which included one track, which was released as a single:

'Baby, Hold Me Close' (written by Jerry Lee Lewis and Bob Tubert) / this track reached No.129 on the Billboard Hot 200 pop music singles chart in 1965

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'The Return of Rock' (Smash Records, 1965) also included the following tracks:

'I Believe in You' (written by Frank Brunson)
'Maybelline' (written by Chuck Berry)
'Flip Flop & Fly' (written by Chuck Calhoun and Lou Willie Turner)
'Don't Let Go' (written by Jesse Stone)
'Roll Over Beethoven' (written by Chuck Berry)
'Herman The Hermit' (written by R. Hardin and M. Turner)

'You Went Back On Your Word' (written by B. Benton and B. Stevenson)
'Corrine, Corrina' (written by B. Chatmon, M. Parish and J. Williams)
'Sexy Ways' (written by Hank Ballard)
'Johnny B. Goode' (written by Chuck Berry)
'Got You On My Mind' (written by H. Biggs and J. Thomas)

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Country Songs For City Folks' (Smash Records, 1965)

In November 1965, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Country Songs For City Folks' (Smash Records, 1965), which included one track, which was released as a single:

'Green, Green Grass of Home', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) / this track was released as a single in 1965, but it did not chart on any Billboard chart

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Country Songs For City Folks' (Smash Records, 1965) also included the following tracks:

'Wolverton Mountain', which was written by Merle Kilgore (Thursday 9 August 1934 - Sunday 6 February 2005) and Claude King (Monday 5 February 1923 - Thursday 7 March 2013)
'Funny How Time Slips Away' (written by Willie Nelson)
'North To Alaska' (written by Mike Phillips) / this track featured guest vocals from Linda Gail Lewis
'Wild Side of Life', which was written by Alvin Pleasant (A.P.) Delaney Carter (15 December 1891 - Monday 7 November 1960) and William Warren
'Walk Right In' (written by Gus Cannon and Hosea Woods)
'City Lights' (written by Bill Anderson)
'Ring of Fire', which was written by June Carter Cash (Sunday 23 June 1929 - Thursday 15 May 2003) and Merle Kilgore (Thursday 9 August 1934 - Sunday 6 February 2005)
'Detroit City', which was written by Danny Dill (Friday 19 September 1924 - Thursday 23 October 2008) and Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 - Sunday 19 November 2017)
'Crazy Arms', which was written by Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 - Sunday 20 March 2011) and Charles Seals (this track was released as a single in 1956, but it did not chart nationally in the United States, but it did well locally in Tennessee)
'King of The Road', which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 - Sunday 25 October 1992)
'Seasons of My Heart', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Darrell Edwards

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Country Songs For City Folks' (Smash Records, 1965) reached No.39 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1965.

Jerry Lee Lewis Discography: 1966

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Memphis Beat (Smash Records, 1966)

In March 1966, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Memphis Beat (Smash Records, 1966), which included the following tracks:

'Sticks & Stones' (written by Titus Turner) / this track was released as a single in 1966, but it did not appear on any Billboard chart
'Memphis Beat' (written by M. Haddington, Dickey Lee and A. Reynolds) / this track was released as a single in 1966, but it did not appear on any Billboard chart

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Memphis Beat (Smash Records, 1966) also included the following tracks:

'Mathilda' (written by G. Khoury and H. Thierry)
'Drinkin' Wine Spo-dee-o-dee Drinkin' Wine' (written by S. McGhee and J. Williams)
'Hallelujah, I Love Her So', which was written by Ray Charles (Tuesday 23 September 1930 - Thursday 10 June 2004)
'She Thinks I Still Care' (written by Dickey Lee and Steve Duffy)
'Just Because' (written by S. Robin, B. Shelton and J. Shelton)
'Whenever You're Ready' (written by Cecil Harrelson)
'Lincoln Limousine' (written by Jerry Lee Lewis)
'Big Boss Man' (written by Luther Dixon and Al Smith)
'Too Young' (written by S. Dee and S. Lippman)
'Urge' (written by Donnie Fritts)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Memphis Beat (Smash Records, 1966) reached No.145 on the Billboard Hot 200 Albums Chart in 1966.

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'By Request: More of The Greatest Live Show On Earth' (Smash Records, 1966) Jerry Lee Lewis: 'The Greatest Live Show On Earth' (Smash Records, 1964)

In November 1966, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'By Request: More of The Greatest Live Show On Earth' (Smash Records, 1966), which was a sequel to Jerry Lee Lewis' 1964 recording 'The Greatest Live Show On Earth' (Smash Records, 1964) and was recorded at Panther Hall in Fort Worth, Texas on Saturday 20 August 1966.

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'By Request: More of The Greatest Live Show On Earth' (Smash Records, 1966), which was produced by Shelby Singleton, included the following tracks:

'Queenie' (written by Chuck Berry)
'How's My Ex Treating You', which was written by Vic McAplin (Monday 4 February 1918 - Friday 18 January 1980)
'Johnny B. Goode' (written by Chuck Berry)
'Green, Green Grass of Home', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016)
'What'd I Say', which was written by Ray Charles (Tuesday 23 September 1930 - Thursday 10 June 2004)
'You Win Again', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'I'll Sail My Ship Alone', which was written by Moon Mulligan (Monday 29 March 1909 - Sunday 1 January 1967)
'Crying Time', which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 - Saturday 25 March 2006)
'Money (That's All I Want)' (written by Gordy Junior and Bradford)
'Roll Over Beethoven' (written by Chuck Berry)

Jerry Lee Lewis Discography: 1967

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Soul My Way' (Smash Records, 1967)

In November 1967, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Soul My Way' (Smash Records, 1967), which included two tracks, which were released as singles:

'It's a Hang Up Baby' (written by Eddie Reeves) / this track was released as a single in 1967, but it did not chart
'Turn On Your Love Light' (written by Deadric Malone and Joseph Scott) / this track was released as a single in 1967, but it did not chart

Jerry Lee Lewis' '
Soul My Way' (Smash Records, 1967) also included the following tracks:

'Dream Baby (How Long Must I Dream)', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006)
'Just Dropped In', which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 - Sunday 29 September 2002)
'Wedding Bells' (written by Claude Boone)
'He Took It Like a Man' (written by Jerry Lee Lewis)
'Hey, Baby' (written by Bruce Channel and Margaret Cobb)
'Treat Her Right' (written by Roy Head)
'Holdin' On' (written by Majorie Barton and Bobby Dyson)
'Shotgun Man' (written by Cecil Harrelson)
'I Betcha Gonna Like It', which was written by Buddy Killen (Sunday 13 November 1932 - Wednesday 1 November 2006) and Robert Riley

Jerry Lee Lewis Discography: 1968

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Another Place Another Time' (Smash Records, 1968)

In June 1968, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Another Place Another Time' (Smash Records, 1968), which included two tracks, which were released as singles:

'Another Place, Another Time' (written by Jerry Chesnut) (No.4 on the Billboard country music singles in 1968, and No.97 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1968)
'What's Made Milwaukee Famous (Made a Fool Out of Me)', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.2 on the Billboard country music singles in 1968, No.94 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1968, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1968)

Jerry Lee Lewis' '
Another Place Another Time' (Smash Records, 1968) also included the following tracks:


'Play Me a Song I Can Cry To' (written by Jerry Chesnut)
'On The Back Row', which was written by Jerry Chesnut and Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 - Thursday 8 June 2017)
'Walking The Floor Over You', which was written by Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 - Thursday 6 September 1984)
'All Night Long', which was written by Don Chapel (1931 - Sunday 6 December 2015)
'I'm a Lonesome Fugitive', which was written by Casey Anderson and Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 - Monday 31 October 2011)
'Break My Mind', which was written by John D. Loudermilk (Saturday 31 March 1934 - Wednesday 21 September 2016)
'Before The Next Teardrop Falls', which was written by Vivian Keith and Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 - Wednesday 25 May 2005)
'All The Good is Gone', which was written by Dottie Bruce and Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 - Thursday 8 June 2017)
'We Live in Two Different Worlds', which was written by Fred Rose (Floyd Jenkins) (24 August 1898 - Wednesday 1 December 1954) / this track featured guest vocals from Linda Gail Lewis

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Another Place, Another Time' (Smash Records, 1968) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968.

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'She Still Comes Around (To Love What's Left of Me)' (Smash Records, 1968)

In December 1968, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'She Still Comes Around (To Love What's Left of Me)' (Smash Records, 1968), which included the following tracks:

'She Still Comes Around (To Love What's Left of Me)', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1962 / No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1968)
'To Make Love Sweeter For You', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Jerry Kennedy (No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in March 1969 / No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'She Still Comes Around (To Love What's Left of Me)' (Smash Records, 1968) also included the following tracks:

'Let's Talk About Us', which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002)
'I Can't Get Over You', which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 - Wednesday 25 May 2005)
'Out of My Mind' (written by Kenny Lovelace)
'Today I Started Loving You Again', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 - Monday 24 April 2006)
'Louisiana Man' (written by Doug Kershaw)
'Release Me (& Let Me Love Again)' (written by Eddie Miller, Dub Williams and Robert Yount)
'Listen, They're Playing My Song', which was written by Glen Harold Garrison and Charlie Williams (Friday 20 December 1929 - Thursday 15 October 1992)
'There Stands The Glass' (written by Audrey Greisham, Russ Hull and Mary Jean Shurtz)
'Echoes' (written by Cecil Harrelson and Linda Gail Lewis)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'She Still Comes Around (To Love What's Left of Me)' (Smash Records, 1968) reached
No.12 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968.

Jerry Lee Lewis Discography: 1969

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Jerry Lee Lewis Sings The Country Music Hall of Fame Hits, Volume 1' (Smash Records, 1969)

In April 1969, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Jerry Lee Lewis Sings The Country Music Hall of Fame Hits, Volume 1' (Smash Records, 1969), which included the following tracks:

'I Wonder Where You Are Tonight', which was written by Johnny Bond (Tuesday 1 June 1915 - Monday 12 June 1978)
'I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'Jambalaya (On The Bayou)', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'Four Walls' (written by George Campbell and Marvin Moore)
'Heartaches By The Number', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'Mom & Dad's Waltz', which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975)
'Sweet Dreams', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'Born To Lose', which was written by Frankie Brown and Ted Daffan (Saturday 21 September 1912 - Sunday 6 October 1996)
'Oh, Lonesome Me', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003) 
'You've Still Got a Place in My Heart', which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 - Thursday 11 September 1969)
'I Love You Because', which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 - Thursday 11 September 1969) 
'Jackson', which was written by Billy Ed Wheeler and Jerome 'Jerry' Leiber (Tuesday 25 April 1933 - Monday 22 August 2011) / this track featured guest vocals from Linda Gail Lewis

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Jerry Lee Lewis Sings The Country Music Hall of Fame Hits, Volume 1' (Smash Records, 1969) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1969.

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Jerry Lee Lewis Sings The Country Music Hall of Fame Hits, Volume 2' (Smash Records, 1969)

It was also in April 1969 when Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Jerry Lee Lewis Sings The Country Music Hall of Fame Hits, Volume 2' (Smash Records, 1969), which included one track, which was released as a single:

'One Has My Name (The Other Has My Heart)', which was written by Eddie Dean (9 July 1907 - Thursday 4 March 1999), Lorene 'Dearest' Dean and Hal Blair (No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Jerry Lee Lewis Sings The Country Music Hall of Fame Hits, Volume 2' (Smash Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

'I Can't Stop Loving You', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'Fraulein', which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 - Thursday 26 July 2007)
'He'll Have To Go', which was written by Audrey Allison and Joe Allison (Friday 3 October 1924 - Friday 2 August 2002)
'More & More', which was written by Merle Kilgore (Thursday 9 August 1934 - Sunday 6 February 2005) and Webb Pierce (Monday 8 August 1921 - Sunday 24 February 1991)
'Why Don't You Love Me (Like You Used To Do)', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'It Makes No Difference Now', which was written by Jimmie Davis (11 September 1899 - Sunday 5 November 2000) and Floyd Tillman (Tuesday 8 December 1914 - Friday 22 August 2003)
'Pick Me Up On Your Way Down', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'I Get The Blues When It Rains' (written by Marcy Klauber and Harry Stoddard)
'Cold, Cold Heart', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'Burning Memories', which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 - Sunday 19 November 2017) and Wayne Paul Walker (Sunday 13 December 1925 - Tuesday 2 January 1979)
'Sweet Thang', which was written by Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988) / this track featured guest vocals from
Linda Gail Lewis

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Jerry Lee Lewis Sings The Country Music Hall of Fame Hits, Volume 2' (Smash Records, 1969) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1969.

Jerry Lee Lewis & Linda Gail Lewis: 'Together' (Smash Records, 1969)

In September 1969, Jerry Lee Lewis & Linda Gail Lewis saw the release of 'Together' (Smash Records, 1969), which included two tracks, which were released as singles:

'Don't Let Me Cross Over', which was written by Penny Jay (Friday 12 June 1925 - Wednesday 29 March 2006) (No.9 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969)
'Roll Over Beethoven' (written by Chuck Berry) (No.71 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1970, and No.12 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970)

Jerry Lee Lewis & Linda Gail Lewis' 'Together' (Smash Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

'Milwaukee (Here I Come)' (written by Lee Fikes)
'Jackson', which was written by Billy Ed Wheeler and Jerome 'Jerry' Leiber (Tuesday 25 April 1933 - Monday 22 August 2011)
'Don't Take It Out On Me' (written by Linda Gail Lewis and Kenny Lovelace)
'Crying Time', which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 - Saturday 25 March 2006)
'Sweet Thang', which was written by Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988)
'Secret Places' (written by Cecil Harrelson, Linda Gail Lewis and Kenny Lovelace)
'Gotta Travel On', which was written by Paul Clayton, Larry Ehrlich, Lee Hays, Fred Hellerman, Dave Lazar and Pete Seeger (Saturday 3 May 1919 - Monday 27 January 2014)

'We Live in Two Different Worlds', which was written by Fred Rose (Floyd Jenkins) (24 August 1898 - Wednesday 1 December 1954)
'Earth Up Above (Grand Ole Moon Up Above)'

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Original Golden Hits, Volume 1' (Sun Records, 1969)

In September 1969, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Original Golden Hits, Volume 1' (Sun Records, 1969), which included the following tracks:

'Crazy Arms', which was written by Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 - Sunday 20 March 2011) and Charles Seals (this track was released as a single in 1956, but it did not chart nationally in the United States, but it did well locally in Tennessee)
'End of The Road' (written by Jerry Lee Lewis)
'Great Balls of Fire', which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002) and Earl Solomon Burroughs (Jack Hammer) (Wednesday 16 September 1925 - Friday 8 April 2016) (No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart in December 1957 / No.2 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in December 1957 / No.1 on the Billboard R&B Chart in December 1957 / No.1 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in December 1957, and No.16 on the pop music singles chart in Belgium in December 1957)
'It'll Be Me', which was written by Cowboy Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013)
'Move On Down The Line', which was written by Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 - Tuesday 6 December 1988) and Sam Phillips (Friday 5 January 1923 - Wednesday 30 July 2003)
'You Win Again', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) (No.4 on the Billboard country music singles in 1957 / No.95 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1957)
'Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On', which was written by Dave 'Curlee' Williams and James Faye 'Roy' Hall (Sunday 7 May 1922 - Saturday 3 March 1984) (No.3 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1957, No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1957, No.1 on the Billboard R&B Chart in 1957, No.8 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1957, and No.13 on the pop music singles chart in Belgium in 1957)
'Little Quennie' (written by Chuck Berry) / this track was released as a single in 1959, but it did not appear on any chart
'Breathless', which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002) (No.7 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1958, No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1958, and No.3 on the Billboard R&B Chart in 1958); the track also reached No.8 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1958)
'Teenage Letter' / this track was released as a single in 1963, but it did not appear on any chart
'Lewis Boogie' (written by Jerry Lee Lewis) / this track was released as a single in 1963, but it did not appear on any chart

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Original Golden Hits, Volume 1' (Sun Records, 1969) reached No.119 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1969.

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Original Golden Hits, Volume 2' (Sun Records, 1969)


In September 1969, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Original Golden Hits, Volume 2' (Sun Records, 1969), which included the following tracks:

'Fools Like Me', which was written by 'Cowboy' Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013) and Murphy Maddux (No.11 on the Billboard R&B Chart in 1958)
'Break Up' (No.52 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1958)
'Money (That's All I Want)'
/ this track was released as a single in 1961, but it did not appear on any chart
'I'll Make It All Up To You' (No.19 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1958, and No.85 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1958)
'Mean Woman Blues'
'High School Confidential' (written by Jerry Lee Lewis and Ron Hargrave) (No.9 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1958, No.21 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1958, No.5 on the Billboard R&B Chart in 1958, and No.12 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1958)
'How's My Ex Treating You' / this track was released as a single in 1962, but it did not appear on any chart
'I'll Sail My Ship Alone', which was written by Moon Mulligan (Monday 29 March 1909 - Sunday 1 January 1967) / this track reached No.93 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1959
'I Could Never Be Ashamed of You'
'Save The Last Dance For Me' / this track was released as a single in 1961, but it did not appear on any chart

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Original Golden Hits, Volume 2' (Sun Records, 1969) reached No.122 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1969.

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Rockin' Rhythm & Blues' (Sun Records, 1969)

In November 1969, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Rockin' Rhythm & Blues' (Sun Records, 1969), which included two tracks, which were released as singles:

'Sweet Little Sixteen' (written by Chuck Berry) / this track reached No.95 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1962, and No.38 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1962
'Good Golly, Miss Molly', which was written by
John S. Marascalso and Robert Alexander 'Bumps' Blackwell (Thursday 23 May 1918 - Saturday 9 March 1985)
/ this track reached No.31 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1962
'
Big Legged Woman'
'Hang Up My Rock 'n' Roll Shoes''Save The Last Dance For Me' / this track was released as a single in 1961, but it did not appear on any chart
'Little Quennie' (written by Chuck Berry) / this track was released as a single in 1959, but it did not appear on any chart
'Johnny B. Goode' (written by Chuck Berry)
'Hello, Josephine'
'C.C. Rider'
'What'd I Say'
'Good Rockin' Tonight'

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'The Golden Cream of The Country' (Sun Records, 1969)

In November 1969, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'The Golden Cream of The Country' (Sun Records, 1969), which included two tracks, which were released as singles:

'Invitation To Your Party' (written by William E. Taylor) / this track reached No.6 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969
'One Minute Past Eternity' (written by William E. Taylor and Stanley Kesler) / this track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969, and No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'The Golden Cream of The Country' (Sun Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

'Jambalaya (On The Bayou)', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'Ramblin' Rose', which was written by Noel Sherman (1930 - Monday 4 June 1972) and Jim Sherman
'Cold, Cold Heart', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'As Long As I Live'
'Seasons of My Heart', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and Darrell Edwards
'I Can't Trust Me in Your Arms Anymore'
'Frankie & Johnny'
'Home'
'How's My Ex Treating You'

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'The Golden Cream of The Country' (Sun Records, 1969) reached No.11 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1969.

Jerry Lee Lewis Discography: 1970

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'She Even Woke Me Up To Say Goodbye' (Smash Records, 1970)

In January 1970, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'She Even Woke Me Up To Say Goodbye' (Smash Records, 1970), which included three tracks, which were released as singles:

'She Even Woke Me Up To Say Goodbye', which was written by Doug Gilmore and Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 - Sunday 29 September 2002) (No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969)
'Once More With Feeling', which was written by Kris Kristofferson and Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 - Saturday 8 May 1999 / Sunday 9 May 1999) (No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969, and No.17 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969)
'Waiting For A Train', which was written by Jimmie Rodgers (8 September 1897 - Friday 26 May 1933) (No.11 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1970, and No.18 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'She Even Woke Me Up To Say Goodbye' (Smash Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

'Workin' Man Blues', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'Brown Eyed Handsome Man' (written by Chuck Berry)
'My Only Claim To Fame', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'Since I Met You Baby', which was written by Ivory Joe Hunter (Saturday 10 October 1914 - Friday 8 November 1974)
'Wine Me Up', which was written by Eddie Crandall and Faron Young (Thursday 25 February 1932 - Tuesday 10 December 1996)
'When The Grass Grows Over Me', which was written by Don Chapel (1931 - Sunday 6 December 2015)
'You Went Out Of Your Way (To Walk On Me)
', which was written by Paul Craft (Friday 12 August 1938 - Saturday 18 October 2014)
'
Echoes' (written by Cecil Harrelson and Linda Gail Lewis)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'She Even Woke Me Up To Say Goodbye' (Smash Records, 1970) reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1969.

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'The Best of Jerry Lee Lewis' (Smash Records, 1970)


In April 1970, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'The Best of Jerry Lee Lewis' (
Smash Records, 1970), which included the following tracks:

'What's Made Milwaukee Famous (Made a Fool Out of Me)', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.2 on the Billboard country music singles in 1968, No.94 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1968, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1968)
'Another Place, Another Time' (written by Jerry Chesnut) (No.4 on the Billboard country music singles in 1968, and No.97 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1968)
'She Even Woke Me Up To Say Goodbye', which was written by Doug Gilmore and Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 - Sunday 29 September 2002) (No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969)
'Louisiana Man' (written by Doug Kershaw) / this track was an album track from 1968
'Slippin' Around' / this track was the 'B' side of 'She Still Comes Around (To Love What's Left of Me)', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1962, and No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1968)
'All The Good is Gone' / this track was the 'B' side of 'What's Made Milwaukee Famous (Made a Fool Out of Me)', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.2 on the Billboard country music singles in 1968, No.94 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1968, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1968)'To Make Love Sweeter For You', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Jerry Kennedy (No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in March 1969, and No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969)
'One Has My Name (The Other Has My Heart)', which was written by Eddie Dean (9 July 1907 - Thursday 4 March 1999), Lorene 'Dearest' Dean and Hal Blair (No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969)
'She Still Comes Around (To Love What's Left of Me)', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1962, and No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1968)
'Once More With Feeling' (No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969, and No.17 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969)
'Let's Talk About Us' / this track was the 'B' side of 'To Make Love Sweeter For You', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Jerry Kennedy (No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in March 1969, and No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'The Best of Jerry Lee Lewis' (Smash Records, 1970) reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1970.

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'A Taste of Country' (Sun Records, 1970)

In
April 1970, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'A Taste of Country' (Sun Records, 1970), which included the following tracks:

'I Can't Seem To Say Goodbye', which was written by Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 - Monday 16 March 2015) (No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1970, and No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970)
'I Love You So Much (It Hurts)', which was written by Floyd Tillman (Tuesday 8 December 1914 - Friday 22 August 2003)
'I'm Throwing Rice (At The Girl I Love)', which was written by Eddy Arnold (Wednesday 15 May 1918 - Thursday 8 May 2008) and Steve Nelson
'Goodnight Irene', which was written by Huddie William Ledbetter (Lead Belly) (20 January 1889 - Tuesday 6 December 1949) and John Avery Lomax (23 September 1867 - Monday 26 January 1948)
'Your Cheatin' Heart', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'For The Last Time Am I To Be The One', which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002) and B.W. Stevenson / this track featured background vocals from Charlie Rich (Wednesday 14 December 1932 - Tuesday 25 July 1995)
'Crazy Arms', which was written by Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 - Sunday 20 March 2011) and Chuck Seals
'Night Train To Memphis', which was written by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 - Wednesday 7 January 1998), Marvin Hughes and Harry Beasley Smith
'As Long As I Live', which was written by Dorsey Burnette (Wednesday 28 December 1932 - Sunday 19 August 1979) / this track was the B-side of 'Save The Last Dance For Me', which was released as a single in 1961
'You Win Again', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)    
'It Hurts Me So', which was written by Charlie Rich (Wednesday 14 December 1932 - Tuesday 25 July 1995) and William Everett 'Bill' Justis Junior (Thursday 14 October 1926 - Thursday 15 July 1982) / this track was
the B-side of 'I'll Sail My Ship Alone', which was written by Moon Mulligan (Monday 29 March 1909 - Sunday 1 January 1967), which reached No.93 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1959

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'A Taste of Country' (Sun Records, 1970) reached No.15 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1970.

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Ole Tyme Country Music' (Sun Records, 1970)


In July 1970, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Ole Tyme Country Music' (Sun Records, 1970), which included three tracks, which were released as singles:

'John Henry' / this track was released as a single in 1960, but it did not appear on any Billboard chart
'Carry Me Back To Old Virginia' / this track was released as a single in 1965, but it did not appear on any Billboard chart
'Waiting For a Train' (No.11 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1970, and No.18 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Ole Tyme Country Music' (Sun Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

'All Around The Watertank'
'Old Black Joe'
'My Blue Heaven'
'You're The Only Star (In My Blue Heaven)'
'Crawdad Song'
'Hand Me Down My Walking Cane'
'You Are My Sunshine'
'If The World Keeps On Turning'
'Deep Elem Blues'

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Jerry Lee Lewis: Live At The International Hotel Las Vegas' (Mercury Records, 1970)

In August 1970, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Jerry Lee Lewis: Live At The International Hotel Las Vegas' (Mercury Records, 1970), which included the following tracks:

'She Even Woke Me Up To Say Goodbye', which was written by Doug Gilmore and Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 - Sunday 29 September 2002) (No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969)
'Jambalaya (On The Bayou)', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'She Still Comes Around (To Love What's Left of Me)', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 -' Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1962, and No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1968)
'
Drinking Champagne' (written by Bill Mack)
'San Antonio Rose', which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 - Tuesday 13 May 1975)
'Once More With Feeling', which was written by Kris Kristofferson and Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 - Saturday 8 May 1999 / Sunday 9 May 1999)
'When You Wore a Tulip (& I Wore a Big Red Rose)' (written by Jack Mahoney and Percy Wenrich) / this track was a duet with Linda Gail Lewis
'Take These Chains From My Heart', which was written by Hy Heath (1890 - 1965) and Fred Rose (Floyd Jenkins) (24 August 1898 - Wednesday 1 December 1954) / this track featured a lead vocal from Linda Gail Lewis
'Ballad of Forty Dollars' (written by Tom T. Hall)
'Flip Flop & Fly' (written by Charles Calhoun and Lou Willie Turner)
'You Went Out of Your Way (To Walk On Me)', which was written by Paul Craft (Friday 12 August 1938 - Saturday 18 October 2014)
'My Only Claim To Fame', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'Brown Eyed Handsome Man' (written by Chuck Berry)

PersonnelI involved in the recording of Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Jerry Lee Lewis: Live At The International Hotel Las Vegas' (Mercury Records, 1970) included the following:

Jerry Lee Lewis (vocals, piano)
Linda Gail Lewis (lead vocal on 'Take These Chains From My Heart') (duet vocal on 'When You Wore a Tulip & I Wore a Big Red Rose')
Buck Hutcheson (guitar)
Ned Davis (steel guitar)
Kenny Lovelace (fiddle, guitar)
Eddie DeBruhl (bass)
Morris Tarrant (drums)
Jerry Lee Lewis Junior (tambourine)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Jerry Lee Lewis: Live At The International Hotel Las Vegas' (Mercury Records, 1970) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1970, and No.149 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1970.

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'In Loving Memories: The Jerry Lee Lewis Gospel Album' (Mercury Records, 1970)

In December 1970, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'In Loving Memories: The Jerry Lee Lewis Gospel Album' (Mercury Records, 1970), which included one track, which was released as a single:

'In Loving Memories' (No.48 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1970)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'In Loving Memories: The Jerry Lee Lewis Gospel Album' (Mercury Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

'
Lily of The Valley'
'Gather Round Children'
'My God's Not Dead'
'He Looked Beyond My Fault'
'Old Rugged Cross'
'I'll Fly Away'
'I'm Longing For Home'
'I Know That Jesus Will BeThere'
'Too Much To Gain To Lose'
'If We Never Meet Again' / 'I'll Meet You in The Morning'

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'In Loving Memories: The Jerry Lee Lewis Gospel Album' (Mercury Records, 1970) reached No.18 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1970.

Jerry Lee Lewis Discography: 1971

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'There Must Be More To Love Than This' (Mercury Records, 1971)

In January 1971, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'There Must Be More To Love Than This' (Mercury Records, 1971), which included one track, which was released as a single:

'There Must Be More To Love Than This' (written by Thomas LaVerne and Bill Taylor) (No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in September / October 1970, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'There Must Be More To Love Than This' (Mercury Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

'
Bottles & Barstools', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'Reuben James' (written by Barry Etris and Alex Harvey)
'I'd Be Talkin' All The Time' (written by Chuck Howard and Larry Kingston)
'One More Time', which was written by Larry Butler, Jan Crutchfield and Buddy Killen (Sunday 13 November 1932 - Wednesday 1 November 2006)
'Sweet Georgia Brown' (written by Ben Bernie, Kenneth Casey and Maceo Pinkard)
'Woman, Woman (Get Out of Our Way)' (written by Linda Gail Lewis and Cecil J. Harrelson)
'I Forgot More Than You'll Ever Know' (written by Cecil A. Null)
'Foolaid' (written by Cecil J. Harrelson and Carmen Holland)
'Home Away From Home' (written by Jerry Chesnut)
'Life Has Its Little Ups & Downs', which was written by Margaret Ann Rich (1934 - Thursday 22 July 2010)

Personnel involved in the recording of Jerry Lee Lewis' 'There Must Be More To Love Than This' (Mercury Records, 1971) included the following:

Jerry Lee Lewis (vocals, piano)
Buck Hutcheson, Chip Young, Harold Bradley and Ray Edenton (guitar)
Ned Davis (steel guitar)
Kenny Lovelace (fiddle)
Bob Moore and Eddie DeBruhl (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) and Kenny Buttrey (drums)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'There Must Be More To Love Than This' (Mercury Records, 1971) reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971, and No.190 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1971.

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Touching Home' (Mercury Records, 1971)

In June 1971, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Touching Home' (Mercury Records, 1971), which included two tracks, which were released as singles:

'Touching Home', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) (No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1971, and No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1971)
'When He Walks On You (Like You Have Walked On Me)', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) (No.11 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1971, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1971)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Touching Home' (Mercury Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

'Time Changes Everything', which was written by Tommy Duncan (Wednesday 11 January 1911 - Tuesday 25 July 1967)
'Hearts Were Made For Beating' (written by Lamar Morris and Warren Keith)
'Help Me Make It Through The Night' (written by Fred Foster and Kris Kristofferson)
'Mother, The Queen of My Heart', which was written by Jimmie Rodgers (8 September 1897 - Friday 26 May 1933) and Slim Bryant
'Foolish Kind of Man' (written by Linda Gail Lewis and Kenneth Lovelace)
'You Helped Me Up When The World Let Me Down' (written by Cile Davis, Carmen Holland and Clyde Pitts)
'When Baby Gets The Blues' (written by Charles R. Phipps)
'Please Don't Talk About Me When I'm Gone' (written by Sidney Clare, Sam H. Stept and Bee Palmer)
'Coming Back For More', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016)

Personnel involved in the recording of Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Touching Home' (Mercury Records, 1971) included the following:

Jerry Lee Lewis (vocals, piano)
Chip Young, Dale Sellers, Harold Bradley, Jerry Shook, Pete Wade and Ray Edenton (guitar)
Lloyd Green and Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 - Friday 29 July 1988) (steel guitar)
Kenny Lovelace (fiddle)
Bill Strom and Bob Moore (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) and Jerry Carrigan (drums)
The Nashville Sounds and The Jordanaires (vocal accompaniment)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Touching Home' (Mercury Records, 1971) reached No.11 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971, and No.152 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1971.

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Monsters' (Sun Records, 1971)

In July 1971, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Monsters' (Sun Records, 1971), which included the following tracks:

'
Don't Be Cruel'
'Your Cheatin' Heart', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'Save The Last Dance For Me'
'Pink Pedal Pushers'
'Good Golly, Miss Molly'
'Matchbox'
'Be Bop A Lula'
'Jailhouse Rock'
'Drinkin' Wine Spo Dee O Dee Drinkin' Wine'
'Honey Hush'
'Singing The Blues'

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Monsters' (Sun Records, 1971) reached No.44 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971.

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Would You Take Another Chance On Me' (Mercury Records, 1971)

In October 1971, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Would You Take Another Chance On Me' (Mercury Records, 1971), which included two tracks, which were released as singles:

'Would You Take Another Chance On Me' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) / 'Me & Bobby McGee' (written by Kris Kristofferson and Fred Foster) (No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in January 1972; 'Would You Take Another Chance On Me' also reached No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1972)

Jerry Lee Lewis' recording of 'Me & Bobby McGee' also reached No.40 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1972, and No.50 on the Canadian RPM pop music singles chart in 1972.


Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Would You Take Another Chance On Me' (Mercury Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

'
Another Hand Shaking Goodbye' (written by Dallas Frazier and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer)
'Swinging Doors', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'Thirteen At The Table', which was written by Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 - Wednesday 29 July 2015)
'Big Blon' Baby' (written by Kenny Jacobson and Rhoda Roberts)
'Lonesome Fiddle Man' (written by Dallas Frazier and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer)
'For The Good Times' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Things That Matter Most To Me' (written by Thomas LaVerne, Bill Taylor and Don Pittman)
'Hurtin' Part' (written by Thomas LaVerne and Bill Taylor)
'Goodbye of The Year', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)

Personnel involved in the recording of Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Would You Take Another Chance On Me' (Mercury Records, 1971) included the following:

Jerry Lee Lewis (vocals, piano)
Chip Young, Harold Bradley, Jerry Kennedy and Ray Edenton (guitar)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 - Friday 29 July 1988) (steel guitar)
Kenny Lovelace (fiddle)
Bob Moore (bass)
Bill Strom (organ)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
The Nashville Edition and The Nashville Sounds (vocal accompaniment)
Cam Mullins (arrangements on 'Would You Take Another Chance on Me', 'Me & Bobby McGee' and 'For The Good Times')

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Would You Take Another Chance On Me' (Mercury Records, 1971) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971, and No.115 on the Billboard Hot 200 Albums Chart in 1971.

Jerry Lee Lewis Discography: 1972

Jerry Lee Lewis: 'Original Golden Hits, Volume 3' (Sun Records, 1972)

In 1972, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Original Golden Hits, Volume 3' (Sun Records, 1972), which included the following tracks:

'One Minute Past Eternity' (written by William E. Taylor and Stanley Kesler) (No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969, and No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969)
'Let's Talk About Us' / this track was the 'B' side of 'To Make Love Sweeter For You', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Jerry Kennedy (No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in March 1969, and No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969)
'Your Lovin' Ways'
'I Can't Trust Me in Your Arms Anymore' / this track was the B-side of 'Good Golly, Miss Molly', which was written by John S. Marascalso and Robert Alexander 'Bumps' Blackwell (Thursday 23 May 1918 - Saturday 9 March 1985), which reached No.31 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1962
'Lovin' Up a Storm' / this track, which was released as a non-album single in 1959, reached No.28 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1959
'Love On Broadway' (No.31 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1971)
'Sweet Little Sixteen' (written by Chuck Berry) (No.95 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1962, and No.38 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1962)
'Invitation To Your Party' (written by Bill Taylor) (No.6 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969)
'I Love You Because', which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 - Thursday 11 September 1969) / this track was an album track from 1969
'As Long As I Live', which was written by Dorsey Burnette (Wednesday 28 December 1932 - Sunday 19 August 1979) / this track was the B-side of 'Save The Last Dance For Me', which was released as a non-charting single in 1961
'Good Golly, Miss Molly', which was written by John S. Marascalso and Robert Alexander 'Bumps' Blackwell (Thursday 23 May 1918 - Saturday 9 March 1985) / this track reached No.31 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1962



In December 1972, Jerry Lee Lewis saw the release of 'Who's Gonna Play This Old Piano' (Mercury Records, 1972), which included three tracks, which were released as singles:

'Think About It Darlin' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.19 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1972)
'Who's Gonna Play This Old Piano', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016) (No.14 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1972, and No.6 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1972)
'No More Hanging On' (written by Jerry Chesnut) (No.14 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1972, and No.6 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1972)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Who's Gonna Play This Old Piano' (Mercury Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

'She's Reaching For My Mind', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'Too Many Rivers', which was written by Harlan Howard ()
'We Both Know Which One of Us Was Wrong', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'Wall Around Heaven' (written by Cecil Harrelson, Carmen Holland and Jerry Lee Lewis)
'Bottom Dollar' (written by Doug Finley and Billy Joe Shaver)
'No Traffic Out of Abilene' (written by Woodrow Webb)
'Parting is Such Sweet Sorrow' (written by Linda Gail Lewis and Cecil Harrelson)
'Mercy of a Letter' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)

Personnel involved in the recording of Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Who's Gonna Play This Old Piano' (Mercury Records, 1972) included the following:

Jerry Lee Lewis (vocals, piano)
Chip Young, Dale Sellers, Harold Bradley, Jerry Kennedy, Pete Wade and Ray Edenton (guitar)
Pete Drake () (steel guitar)
Kenny Lovelace (fiddle)
Bob Moore (bass)
Bill Strom (organ)
Buddy Harman () (drums)
Bob Phillips (trumpet)
Wayne Butler (trombone)
Stephen Sefsik (clarinet)
Carol Montgomery, Dolores Edgin, Hurshel Wiginton, Joe Babcock, Millie Kirkham, Rickie Page and Trish Williams (vocal accompaniment)
Cam Mullins (arrangements)

Jerry Lee Lewis' 'Who's Gonna Play This Old Piano' (Mercury Records, 1972) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.









The Killer Rocks On (4/105) 1 | 0
Cover image of The Killer Rocks On Mercury SRM1-637 Mar / 1973
Don't Be Cruel|You Can Have Her|Games People Play|Lonely Weekends|You Don't Miss Your Water|Turn On Your Love Light (-/95)|Chantilly Lace (1/43)|C.C. Rider|Walk A Mile In My Shoes|Me And Bobby McGee|Shotgun Man|I'm Walkin'
Sessions (4/37) 1 | 0
Cover image of Sessions Mercury SRM2-803 Mar / 1973
Drinkin' Wine Spo Dee O Dee Drinkin' Wine (20/41)|Music To The Man|Baby What You Want Me To Do|Bad Moon Rising|Sea Cruise|Jukebox|Don't Put No Headstone On My Grave|Big Boss Man|Pledging My Love|Memphis Tennessee|Trouble In Mind|Johnny B, Goode|High School Confidential|Early Morning Rain|Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On|Sixty Minute Man|Movin' On Down The Line|What'd I Say|Good Golly Miss Molly / Long Tall Sally / Jenny Jenny / Tutti Frutti / Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On|(dbl)
Sometimes A Memory Ain't Enough (6/-) 1 | 0
Cover image of Sometimes A Memory Ain't Enough Mercury SRM1-677 Sep / 1973
Sometimes A Memory Ain't Enough (6/-)|Ride Me Down Easy|Mama's Hands|What My Woman Can't Do|My Cricket And Me|I'm Left You're Right She's Gone (23/-)|Honky Tonk Wine|Falling To The Bottom|Think I Need To Pray|Mornin' After Baby Let Me Down|Keep Me From Blowing Away
Southern Roots (6/-) 1 | 0
Cover image of Southern Roots Mercury SRM1-690 Dec / 1973
Meat Man|When A Man Loves A Woman|Hold On I'm Comin'|Just A Little Bit|Born To Be A Loser|Haunted House|Blueberry Hill|Revolution Man|Big Blue Diamond|That Old Bourbon Street Church

 

 





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