Gene Watson’s Peers: Quote from Brent Rowan: January 2021

Gene Watson’s Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as ‘the singer’s singer’ – and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson’s Peers, who were contacted during 2021, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Brent Rowan, which he submitted to this site on Thursday 14 January 2021.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Brent Rowan, who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online ‘celebration of a Lone Star Hero’.

Gene Watson with acclaimed producer and musician Brent Rowan in 2007 (photo credit: Patricia Presley) / Brent Rowan produced Gene Watson's 'In A Perfect World' (Shanachie Records, 2007)

Gene Watson with acclaimed producer and musician Brent Rowan in 2007
Brent Rowan produced Gene Watson’s ‘In A Perfect World‘ (Shanachie Records, 2007)
(photo credit: Patricia Presley)

Brent Rowan
This quote was submitted on Thursday 14 January 2021.

‘Simply put: Gene Watson is one of the most gifted and talented musical interpreters and storytellers ever.

His emotional depth and work ethic as a singer is unsurpassed.

It has been a pleasure to be a part of his musical journey.

His legacy is monumental, to say the least

Thank you, Brent Rowan, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Brent Rowan…

Brent Rowan

Brent Rowan was born on Monday 28 May 1956 in Waxahachie, Texas and is an American session musician and record producer, who works primarily in country music.

During his youth, Brent Rowan tinkered around with any musical instruments that were handy, including a harmonica and a piano.

In 1966, when he was ten years old, Brent Rowan received an acoustic guitar from his mother and father.

In 1967, when he was eleven years old, Brent Rowan progressed to an electric guitar.  The Rowan family settled in Colorado, where Brent Rowan drew inspiration from nature.

During his teenage years, Brent Rowan paid particular attention to his trumpet playing and gave serious thought to joining the United States Navy.

A desire to head to Tennessee won out and once Brent Rowan arrived, he played in a gospel group, The Kenny Parker Trio.

Brent Rowan made very little money, barely enough to keep eating, and was always traveling.  When he discovered the steady work offered to session musicians in a recording studio, Brent Rowan made the switch and settled down in Nashville.

Active since the 1970s, Brent Rowan began working with John Conlee through the recommendation of record producer Bud Logan.  Brent Rowan first played guitar on John Conlee‘s ‘Friday Night Blues’ (written by Sonny Throckmorton and Rafe Van Hoy) (No.2, 1980), and later became the only guitarist for John Conlee‘s recordings.

Brent Rowan has made his mark as a studio guitarist in Nashville, and has played for Alabama, George Strait, Alan Jackson, Chris LeDoux (Saturday 2 October 1948 – Wednesday 9 March 2005), Clay Walker, Confederate Railroad, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Shania Twain, Olivia Newton-John (Sunday 26 September 1948 – Monday 8 August 2022), Sting, Neil Diamond, Randy Travis, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013), Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993), and Brian Wilson, among others.

Deborah Allen: 'Let Me Be The First' (RCA Records, 1984)

In December 1984, Deborah Allen saw the release of ‘Let Me Be The First’ (RCA Records, 1984), which was the first album to be digitally recorded in, and released, from Nashville; the album, which was produced by Rafe Van Hoy, included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Heartache & A Half’ (written by Deborah Allen, Rafe Van Hoy and Eddie Struzick) (No.23, 1984)

Deborah Allen‘s ‘Let Me Be The First’ (RCA Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

‘I Can’t Stand It’ (written by Deborah Allen, Rafe Van Hoy and Bobby Braddock)
‘Your Love’ (written by Deborah Allen, Rafe Van Hoy and Steve Diamond)
‘Please Don’t Fall In Love’ (written by Deborah Allen, Rafe Van Hoy and Eddie Struzick)
‘Prove You Right’ (written by Deborah Allen and Rafe Van Hoy)
‘If I Didn’t Love You’ (written by Deborah Allen and Rafe Van Hoy)
‘Let Me Be The First’ (written by Deborah Allen, Rafe Van Hoy and Kix Brooks)
‘You Do It’ (written by Deborah Allen, Rafe Van Hoy and Eddie Struzick)
‘It’s A Good Thing’ (written by Deborah Allen and Rafe Van Hoy)
‘It Makes Me Cry’ (written by Deborah Allen)

Personnel involved in the recording of Deborah Allen‘s ‘Let Me Be The First’ (RCA Records, 1984) included the following:

Deborah Allen (lead vocals)
Eddie Bayers (drums, percussion)
Tom Robb (bass)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Steve Gibson (electric guitar, acoustic guitar)
Bobby Wood (organ)
John Jarvis (piano, keyboards)
Rafe Van Hoy (acoustic guitar, synthesizer)
Jim Horn (saxophone)
Steve Nathan (synthesizer)

Deborah Allen‘s ‘Let Me Be The First’ (RCA Records, 1984) reached No.52 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.

In December 1984, Ed Bruce (Friday 29 December 1939 – Friday 8 January 2021) saw the release of ‘Homecoming’ (RCA Victor Records, 1984), which was produced by Blake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘You Turn Me On (Like A Radio)’, which was written by Bob McDill and Jim Weatherly (Wednesday 17 March 1943 – Wednesday 3 February 2021)
(No.3, 1984)

‘If It Ain’t Love’ (written by Mark Nesler)
(No.20, 1985)

‘When Givin’ Up Was Easy’, which was written by Keith Palmer (Sunday 23 June 1957 – Thursday 13 June 1996)
(No.17, 1985)

Ed Bruce’s ‘Homecoming’ (RCA Victor Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

‘That’s How It Goes (Until It’s Gone)’ (written by Bucky Jones and Martin Johnson)
‘I Think I Could Love You (Better Than He Did)’ (written by Bob Morrison and Debbie Hupp)
‘Texas Girl, I’m Closing In On You’, which was written by Ed Bruce (Friday 29 December 1939 – Friday 8 January 2021)
‘Great Divide’ (written by Gary Harrison and J.D. Martin)
‘The Migrant’, which was written by Tony Joe White (Friday 23 July 1943 – Wednesday 24 October 2018)
‘Old Loves Never Die’, which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004) and Warren D. Robb
‘Forever Lovin’ Me’, which was written by Ed Bruce (Friday 29 December 1939 – Friday 8 January 2021) and Ron Peterson

Personnel involved in the recording of Ed Bruce‘s ‘Homecoming’ (RCA Victor Records, 1984) included the following:

Brent Rowan, Fred Newell, Randy Rich, Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 – Wednesday 18 May 2005) and Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) (guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar, Dobro)
Larry Paxton (bass)
Jerry Kroon (drums)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Gary Prim (keyboards)

The Oak Ridge Boys: 'Step On Out' (MCA Records, 1985)
John Conlee: 'Harmony' (Columbia Records, 1986)
Gene Watson: 'In Other Words' (Canada: Mercury / Polygram Records, 1992 / United States: Broadland International Records, 1992)

On Wednesday 6 March 1985, The Oak Ridge Boys saw the release of ‘Step On Out’ (MCA Records, 1985), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Little Things’ (written by Billy Barber) (No.1 for one week in June 1985)

‘Touch A Hand, Make A Friend’ (written by Homer Banks, Raymond Jackson and Carl Hampton)
(No.1 for one week in October / November 1985)

‘Come On In (You Did The Best You Could Do)’ (written by Rick Giles and George Green)
(No.3, 1985)

The Oak Ridge Boys‘ ‘Step On Out’ (MCA Records, 1985) also included the following tracks:

‘Ophelia’ (written by Robbie Robertson)
‘Love Is Everywhere’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006)
‘Only One I Love’, which was written by Michael Foster and Jimbeau Hinson (Wednesday 29 October 1952 – Friday 4 March 2022)
‘Roll Tennessee River’, which was written by Russell Smith (Friday 17 June 1949 – Friday 12 July 2019) and Dave Loggins

‘Class Reunion’ (written by
Don Henry and Craig Morris) / this track was also recorded by John Conlee, who included it on ‘Harmony’ (Columbia Records, 1986) / this track was also recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on ‘In Other Words‘ (Canada: Mercury / Polygram Records, 1992 / United States: Broadland International Records, 1992)

‘Staying Afloat’ (written by JD Martin and Don King)
‘Step On Out’ (written by Chris Hillman and Peter Knobler)

Personnel involved in the recording of The Oak Ridge Boys‘ ‘Step On Out’ (MCA Records, 1985) included the following:

The Oak Ridge Boys
Duane Allen and William Lee Golden (baritone vocals)
Joe Bonsall (tenor vocals)
Richard Sterban (bass vocals)

Additional musicians
Barry Beckett (Thursday 4 February 1943 – Wednesday 10 June 2009), Clayton Ivey, Steve Nathan and Ron Oates (keyboards)
Mickey Buckins (percussion)
Harrison Calloway, Ronnie Eades, Jim Horn, Charles Rose, Dennis Solee and Harvey Thompson (horns)
Duncan Cameron and Billy Sanford (lead guitar, acoustic guitar)
Jimmy Capps (Thursday 25 May 1939 – Monday 1 June 2020) (acoustic guitar)
Jerry Kirby Carrigan (Monday 13 September 1943 – Saturday 22 June 2019) and Roger Hawkins (drums)
Lloyd Green (steel guitar)
David Hood and Jack Williams (bass guitar)
Jimmy Johnson (electric guitar)
Kenneth Lovelace (fiddle)
Nashville String Machine (string section)
Wayne Perkins (lead guitar)
Brent Rowan and Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (lead guitar)

The Oak Ridge Boys‘ ‘Step On Out’ (MCA Records, 1985) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.

In August 1986Ed Bruce (Friday 29 December 1939 – Friday 8 January 2021) saw the release of ‘Night Things’ (RCA Victor Records, 1986), which was produced by Ed Bruce and T. Miller, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Nights’ (written by Byron Hill and Tony Hiller)
(No.4, 1986)

‘Fools For Each Other’, which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 – Tuesday 17 May 2016)
(No.49, 1986) / this track featured guest vocals from Lynn Anderson (Friday 26 September 1947 – Thursday 30 July 2015)

‘Quietly Crazy’, which was written by Steve Cropper and Mentor Williams (Tuesday 11 June 1946 – Wednesday 16 November 2016)
(No.36, 1986)

Ed Bruce‘s ‘Night Things’ (RCA Victor Records, 1986) also included the following tracks:

‘You Are A Rose’ (written by Joe Allen and Mike Elliott)
‘Fifteen To Forty Three’, which was written by Don Goodman, Mark Sherrill and Frank Dycus (Tuesday 5 December 1939 – Friday 23 November 2012)
‘Fishin’ In The Dark’ (written by Wendy Waldman and Jim Photoglo)
‘Somebody’s Somebody New’, which was written by Ed Bruce (Friday 29 December 1939 – Friday 8 January 2021)
‘Down The Hall’ (written by Troy Seals and Mike Reid)
‘Memphis Roots’, which was written by Ed Bruce (Friday 29 December 1939 – Friday 8 January 2021)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ed Bruce‘s ‘Night Things’ (RCA Victor Records, 1986) included the following:

Brent Rowan, Steve Cropper, Kenny Mims, Barry Chance, Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 – Wednesday 18 May 2005) and Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) (guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Joe Allen and Dick Dunn (bass)
Hayward Bishop and Jerry Kroon (drums)
Jonathan Yudkin (fiddle)
David Briggs, Bobby Wood, Mike Lawler and Gary Prim (piano, keyboards)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Ace Cannon (sax)
Dave Bowling, Danny Dickerson, R.E. Hardaway, Liana Manis, Diane Tidwell, Brian Whittington and Curtis Young (vocals)

In 1989, Brent Rowan was awarded ‘Guitarist of The Year’ by the Academy of Country Music (ACM).

In 1990, Mark Chesnutt signed to MCA Records and saw the release, on Friday 14 September 1990, of ‘Too Cold At Home’ (MCA Records, 1990), which included five tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Too Cold At Home’, which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 – Tuesday 30 May 2006) (No.3, 1990)

‘Brother Jukebox’, which was written by Paul Craft (Friday 12 August 1938 – Saturday 18 October 2014)
(No.1 for one week in February 1991) / this track was also recorded by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 – Tuesday 9 May 1989), who included it on ‘I Wonder Do You Think of Me’ (RCA Records, 1989) / this track was also recorded by Don Everly (Monday 1 February 1937 – Saturday 21 August 2021), whose version reached No.96 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1977

‘Blame It On Texas’ (written by Ronnie Rogers and Mark Wright)
(No.5, 1991)

‘Your Love Is A Miracle’ (written by Bill Kenner and Mark Wright)
(No.3, 1991)

‘Broken Promise Land’ (written by Bill Rice and Sharon Rice)
(No.10, 1991) / this track was also recorded by Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 – Wednesday 13 February 2002), who included it on ‘Turn The Page’ (RCA Records, 1985)

Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘Too Cold At Home’ (MCA Records, 1990) also included the following tracks:

‘Too Good A Memory’ (written by Lewis Anderson and Mark Wright)

‘Friends In Low Places’, which was written by Earl Bud Lee and Dewayne L. Blackwell (Thursday 17 September 1936 – Sunday 23 May 2021) / this track was also recorded by Garth Brooks, who included it on ‘No Fences’ (Capitol Records, 1990); Garth Brooks’ version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart for four weeks in October / November 1990

‘Lucky Man’ (written by Ronnie Rogers and Mark Wright)
‘Hey You There In The Mirror’, which was written by Jim Rushing and Herb McCullough (Thursday 18 May 1944 – Tuesday 5 May 2015)
‘Danger At My Door’ (written by Mark Wright)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘Too Cold At Home’ (MCA Records, 1990) included the following:

Richard Bennett (electric guitar)
David Briggs, Steve Nathan, Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Matt Rollings (piano)
Jerry Kirby Carrigan (Monday 13 September 1943 – Saturday 22 June 2019) and Lynn Meyer Peterzell (Monday 10 January 1955 – Thursday 8 September 1994) (percussion)
Mark Chesnutt (lead vocals)
Glen Duncan and Mark O’Connor (fiddle)
Pat Flynn and Biff Watson (acoustic guitar)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Owen Hale and Milton Sledge (drums)
Bill Kenner (reggae guitar)
Jana King, Lisa SilverBergen WhiteDennis Wilson, Mark Wright and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Phil Naish (synthesizer)
Brent Rowan (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Glenn Worf and Bob Wray (bass guitar)

Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘Too Cold At Home’ (MCA Records, 1990) reached No.12 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1990, No.132 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1990, and No.23 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1990.

Tanya Tucker: 'Tennessee Woman' (Capitol Records, 1990)

On Tuesday 27 March 1990, Tanya Tucker saw the release of ‘Tennessee Woman’ (Capitol Records, 1990), which was produced by Jerry Crutchfield (Friday 10 August 1934 – Tuesday 11 January 2022), and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Walking Shoes’ (written by Paul Kennerley) (No.3, 1990)

‘It Won’t Be Me’ (written by Tom Shapiro and Chris Waters)
(No.6, 1990)

‘Don’t Go Out’ (written by Radney Foster and Bill Lloyd)
(No.6, 1990) / this track was a duet with T. Graham Brown

‘Oh, What It Did To Me’, which was written by Jerry Crutchfield (Friday 10 August 1934 – Tuesday 11 January 2022)
(No.12, 1991)

Tanya Tucker‘s ‘Tennessee Woman’ (Capitol Records, 1990) also included the following tracks:

‘Take Another Run’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
‘Shotgun’ (written by Michael Garvin and Tom Shapiro)
‘As Long As There’s A Heartbeat’ (written by David Powelson)
‘There’s A Tennessee Woman / Ben’s Song’, which was written by Tanya Tucker and Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 – Tuesday 16 December 2003)
‘Goodbye Baby’, which was written by Paul Davis (Wednesday 21 April 1948 – Tuesday 22 April 2008)
‘Your Old Magic’ (written by Tony Martin and Troy Martin)

Personnel involved in the recording of Tanya Tucker‘s ‘Tennessee Woman’ (Capitol Records, 1990) included the following:

Eddie Bayers, Paul Leim and Harry Stinson (drums, percussion)
Roy Huskey Jr. (Monday 17 December 1956 – Saturday 6 September 1997) and Bob Wray (bass)
Mitch Humphries and Matt Rollings (keyboards)
Dennis Burnside (piano)
Mike Lawler (synthesizer)
Mark Casstevens, Steve Gibson, Don Potter, Brent Rowan and Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (guitars)
Paul Franklin and Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Beth Nielsen Chapman, Louis Dean Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 – Friday 26 October 2012), Wayland Patton, Dennis Wilson, Curtis Young and Liana Young (backing vocals)
Tanya Tucker (lead vocals)

Tanya Tucker‘s ‘Tennessee Woman’ (Capitol Records, 1990) reached No.18 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1990.

Randy Travis: 'Heroes & Friends' (Warner Bros. Records, 1990)

On Tuesday 11 September 1990, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Heroes & Friends’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1990), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billbooard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘A Few Ole Country Boys’, which was written by Troy Seals and Mentor Williams (Tuesday 11 June 1946 – Wednesday 16 November 2016) (No.8, 1990) / this track was a duet with George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013)

‘Heroes & Friends’ (written by Randy Travis and Don Schlitz)
(No.3, 1991)

‘We’re Strangers Again’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Leona Williams (No.49, 1991) / this track was a duet with Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998), and was also included on Tammy Wynette’s ‘Best Loved Hits’ (Epic Records, 1991) / the original version of this track was recorded by Merle Haggard and Leona Williams, who included it on ‘Heart To Heart’ (Mercury Records, 1983)

Randy Travis‘ ‘Heroes & Friends’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1990) also included the following tracks:

‘Do I Ever Cross Your Mind’ (written by Dolly Parton) / this track was a duet with Dolly Parton

‘The Birth of The Blues’ (written by Lew Brown, Buddy DeSylva and Ray Henderson)
/ this track was a duet with Willie Nelson

‘All Night Long’, which was written by Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) and Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 – Tuesday 13 May 1975)
/ this track was a duet with Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘The Human Race’, which was written by Tim Menzies, Jimmy Phillips and Eugene David Dobbins (Monday 19 March 1934 – Sunday 23 November 2008)
 / this track was a duet with Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 – Tuesday 28 April 2009)

‘Shopping For Dresses’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 – Friday 2 January 2015) / this track was a duet with Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022)

‘Waiting On The Light To Change’ (written by Gary Nicholson and Richard Leigh)
/ this track was a duet with B.B. King (Wednesday 16 September 1925 – Thursday 14 May 2015)

‘Walk Our Own Road’ (written by Bernie Nelson and Lisa Palas)
/ this track was a duet with Kris Kristofferson

‘Smokin’ The Hive’ (written by Byron Hill and J. Remington Wilde)
/ this track was a duet with Clint Eastwood

‘Come See About Me’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
/ this track was a duet with Conway Twitty

‘Happy Trails’, which was written by Dale Evans (Thursday 31 October 1912 – Wednesday 7 February 2001)
 / this track was a duet with Roy Rogers (Sunday 5 November 1911 – Monday 6 July 1998)

‘Heroes & Friends’ (written by Randy Travis and Don Schlitz)
(reprise)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis‘ ‘Heroes & Friends’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1990) included the following:

Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 – Saturday 30 June 2001) (gut string guitar, background vocals)
Kathie BaillieMichael Bonagura Jr., Lib Hatcher, Don Schlitz, Troy Seals, Allen Shamblin, Martha Sharp and Keith Stegall (choir)
Eddie Bayers, Paul Leim, Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 – Monday 24 August 1992) and Carlos Vega (drums)
Barry Beckett, Randy Goodrum and Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Dennis Burnside (piano, electric piano, Wurlitzer)
Larry Byrom, Mark Casstevens, Chris Leuzinger and Fred Tackett (acoustic guitar)
Gary Carter and Jay Dee Maness (steel guitar)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro)
Clint Eastwood (duet vocals on ‘Smokin’ The Hive’)
Steve Gibson (12-string guitar, electric guitar, mandolin)
Bob Glaub, David Hungate and Jack Williams (bass guitar)
Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 – Tuesday 28 April 2009) (duet vocals on ‘The Human Race’)
Doyle Grisham (steel guitar)
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) (duet vocals on ‘All Night Long’)
Sherilyn Huffman, Lisa Silver and Diane Vanette (choir, background vocals)
David Johnson and Mark O’Connor (fiddle)
Kirk ‘Jelly Roll’ Johnson and Mickey Raphael (harmonica)
George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) (duet vocals on ‘A Few Ole Country Boys’)
Nancy Jones (background vocals on ‘A Few Ole Country Boys’)
Shane Keister (organ, piano)
B.B. King (Wednesday 16 September 1925 – Thursday 14 May 2015) (duet vocals and electric guitar on ‘Waiting On The Light To Change’)
Kris Kristofferson (duet vocals on ‘Walk Our Own Road’)
Mike Lawler (banjo, synthesizer)
Kyle Lehning (Wurlitzer)
Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022) (duet vocals on ‘Shopping For Dresses’)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica, percussion)
Brent Mason, Dean Parks and Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Willie Nelson (duet vocals on ‘The Birth of The Blues’)
Dolly Parton (duet vocals on ‘Do I Ever Cross Your Mind’)
Roy Rogers (Sunday 5 November 1911 – Monday 6 July 1998) (duet vocals on ‘Happy Trails’)
Tom Rutledge (fiddle, acoustic guitar)
Denis Solee (clarinet)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)
Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) (duet vocals on ‘Come See About Me’)
Dennis Wilson (background vocals)
Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998) (duet vocals on ‘We’re Strangers Again’)

Randy Travis‘ ‘Heroes & Friends’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1990) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1990, No.31 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1990, and No.61 on the Canadian RPM Top Albums Chart in 1990.

Tanya Tucker: 'What Do I Do With Me' (Capitol Records, 1991)

On Tuesday 2 July 1991, Tanya Tuckersaw the release of ‘What Do I Do With Me’ (Capitol Records, 1991), which was produced by Jerry Crutchfield (Friday 10 August 1934 – Tuesday 11 January 2022), and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Down To My Last Teardrop’, which was written by Paul Davis (Wednesday 21 April 1948 – Tuesday 22 April 2008) (No.2, 1991)

‘(Without You) What Do I Do With Me’, which was written by Royce D. Porter (Saturday 1 April 1939 – Thursday 31 May 2018), L. David Lewis and David Chamberlain
(No.2, 1991)

‘Some Kind of Trouble’ (written by Mike Reid, Brent Maher and Don Potter)
(No.3, 1992)

‘If Your Heart Ain’t Busy Tonight’ (written by Tom Shapiro and Chris Waters)
(No.4, 1992)

Tanya Tucker‘s ‘What Do I Do With Me’ (Capitol Records, 1991) also included the following tracks:

‘Everything That You Want’ (written by Randy Sharp and Jack Wesley Routh)
‘Trail of Tears’ (written by Paul Kennerley)
‘Bidding America Goodbye (The Auction)’, which was written by Jamie O’Hara (Friday 18 August 1950 – Thursday 7 January 2021)
‘Time & Distance’ (written by Donny Lowery and Randy Sharp)
‘He Was Just Leaving’ (written by Lisa Angelle and Walt Aldridge)
‘Right About Now’ (written by Rick Bowles and Jeff Silbar)

Personnel involved in the recording of Tanya Tucker‘s ‘What Do I Do With Me’ (Capitol Records, 1991) included the following:

Eddie Bayers and Paul Leim (drums)
Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar)
Beth Nielsen Chapman, Paul Davis (Wednesday 21 April 1948 – Tuesday 22 April 2008), Greg Gordon, Liana Manis, Donna McElroy, Wayland Patton and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Steve Gibson (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
James Horn (saxophone)
Mitch Humphries (keyboards)
David Innis and Mike Lawler (synthesizer)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Tanya Tucker(lead vocals)

Tanya Tucker‘s ‘What Do I Do With Me’ (Capitol Records, 1991) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1991, and No.48 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1991.

Charlie Rich: 'Lonely Weekends' (Sun Records, 1969)

On Saturday 21 March 1992, Mark Chesnutt saw the release of ‘Longnecks & Short Stories’ (MCA Records, 1992), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Old Flames Have New Names’ (written by Bobby Braddock and Rafe Van Hoy) (No.5, 1992)

‘I’ll Think of Something’ (written by Bill Rice and Jerry Foster)
(No.1 for one week in August / September 1992) / the original version of this track was recorded by Hank Williams Jr., who included it on ‘Living Proof’ (MGM Records, 1974); Hank Williams Jr.’s version of this track reached No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1974

‘Bubba Shot The Jukebox’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006)
(No.4, 1992)
‘Ol’ Country’, which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 – Tuesday 30 May 2006) (No.4, 1993)

Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘Longnecks & Short Stories’ (MCA Records, 1992) also included the following tracks:

‘It’s Not Over (If I’m Not Over You)’, which was written by Mark Wright and Larry Kingston (Sunday 10 August 1941 – Sunday 20 February 2005) / this track featured guest vocals from Vince Gill and Alison Krauss / the original version of this track was recorded by Reba McEntire, who included it on ‘My Kind of Country’ (MCA Records, 1984)

Mark Chesnutt later included ‘It’s Not Over (If I’m Not Over You)’, which was written by Mark Wright and Larry Kingston (Sunday 10 August 1941 – Sunday 20 February 2005), on ‘Thank God For Believers’ (MCA Records, 1997); the track was released as a single in 1998 and reached No.34 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart

On Monday 10 November 2014, England’s Hux Records released Reba McEntire’s ‘My Kind of Country’ (MCA Records, 1984), along with Reba McEntire’s ‘Just A Little Love’ (MCA Records, 1984), as a special 2-for-1 CD set (HUX142)

‘Uptown, Downtown (Misery’s All The Same)’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) and Ron Peterson
‘Postpone The Pain’ (written by Gary Scruggs and Mark Wright)
‘Talking To Hank’, which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 – Tuesday 30 May 2006)
 / this track was a duet with George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013)
‘I’m Not Getting Any Better At Goodbyes’ (written by Steve Earle)

‘Who Will The Next Fool Be?’, which was written by Charlie Rich (Wednesday 14 December 1932 – Tuesday 25 July 1995) / the
original version of this track was recorded by Charlie Rich (Wednesday 14 December 1932 – Tuesday 25 July 1995), who included it on ‘Lonely Weekend’ (Sun Records, 1969); Charlie Rich’s version of the track reached No.67 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1970

Personnel involved in the recording of Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘Longnecks & Short Stories’ (MCA Records, 1992) included the following:

David Briggs and Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Mark Chesnutt (lead vocals)
Terry Crisp and Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Pat Flynn and Biff Watson (acoustic guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Owen Hale and Paul Leim (drums)
George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) (guest vocals on ‘Talking To Hank’)
Steve Nathan (keyboards)
Lynn Meyer Peterzell (Monday 10 January 1955 – Thursday 8 September 1994) (percussion)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar, acoustic guitar)
Wayne Toups (squeezebox)
Bob Wray (bass guitar)
Curtis Young, Jim Lauderdale, Bergen White, Alison Krauss, Wendy Suits Johnson, Jana King, Keith Morris, Wayne Toups, Dennis Wilson and Vince Gill (background vocals)
Nashville String Machine (strings conducted by Carl Gorodetzky and arranged by Bergen White)

Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘Longnecks & Short Stories’ (MCA Records, 1992) reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1992, No.68 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1992, and No.5 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1992.

Confederate Railroad: 'Confederate Railroad' (Atlantic Records, 1992)

On Tuesday 28 April 1992, Confederate Railroad saw the release of their self-titled debut album, ‘Confederate Railroad’ (Atlantic Records, 1992), which was produced by Barry Beckett (Thursday 4 February 1943 – Wednesday 10 June 2009), and included six tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘She Took It Like A Man’, which was written by Danny ‘Bear’ Mayo (Monday 2 October 1950 – Saturday 2 October 1999), Paul Nelson and Karen Staley (No.37, 1992)

‘Jesus & Mama’, which was written by Danny ‘Bear’ Mayo (Monday 2 October 1950 – Saturday 2 October 1999) and James Dean Hicks (No.4, 1992)

‘Queen of Memphis’ (written by Dave Gibson and Kathy Louvin) (No.2, 1992)

‘When You Leave That Way, You Can Never Go Back’, which was written by Steve Clark and Johnny MacRae (Friday 15 February 1929 – Wednesday 3 July 2013) (No.14, 1993) / the original version of this track was recorded by Bill Anderson, who included it on ‘Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow’ (Swanee Records, 1984); Bill Anderson‘s version of the track reached No.75 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1985

‘Trashy Women’, which was written by Chris Wall (passed away on Thursday 29 July 2021) (No.10, 1993)

‘She Never Cried’, which was written by Danny ‘Bear’ Mayo (Monday 2 October 1950 – Saturday 2 October 1999), Diana Rae and Freddy Weller (No.27, 1993)

Confederate Railroad’s self-titled debut album, ‘Confederate Railroad’ (Atlantic Records, 1992), also included the following tracks:

‘Long Gone’ (written by Pat Terry)
‘Time Off For Bad Behavior’ (written by Bobby Keel and Larry Latimaer)
‘Black Label, White Lies’ (written by Craig Wiseman)
‘You Don’t Know What It’s Like’ (written by Don Cook and Chris Waters)

Personnel involved in the recording of Confederate Railroad’s self-titled debut album, ‘Confederate Railroad’ (Atlantic Records, 1992), included the following:

Confederate Railroad
Mark Dufresne (drums)
Michael Lamb (electric guitar, background vocals)
Chris McDaniel (keyboards, background vocals)
Gates Nichols (steel guitar, background vocals)
Wayne Secrest (bass guitar)
Danny Shirley (acoustic guitar, lead vocals)

Additional personnel involved in the recording of Confederate Railroad’s self-titled debut album, ‘Confederate Railroad’ (Atlantic Records, 1992), included the following:

Eddie Bayers (drums)
Barry Beckett (Thursday 4 February 1943 – Wednesday 10 June 2009) (keyboards)
Michele Lamb, Suzi Ragsdale, Harry Stinson, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (background vocals)
‘Cowboy’ Eddie Long (steel guitar)
Don Potter and Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) (acoustic guitar)
Michael Rhodes (Wednesday 16 September 1953 – Saturday 4 March 2023) and Bob Wray (bass guitar)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar)

Confederate Railroad’s self-titled debut album, ‘Confederate Railroad’ (Atlantic Records, 1992), reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1992, No.53 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1992, No.3 on the Billboard Top Heatseekers Chart in 1992, and No.19 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1992.

Tanya Tucker: 'Can't Run From Yourself' (Capitol Records, 1992)

On Tuesday 6 October 1992, Tanya Tuckersaw the release of ‘Can’t Run From Yourself’ (Capitol Records, 1992), which was produced by Jerry Crutchfield (Friday 10 August 1934 – Tuesday 11 January 2022), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Two Sparrows In A Hurricane’ (written by Mark Alan Springer) (No.2, 1992)

‘It’s A Little Too Late’ (written by Pat Terry and Roger Murrah)
(No.2, 1992)

‘Tell Me About It’ (written by Bill LaBounty and Pat McLaughlin)
(No.4, 1993) / this track was a duet with Delbert McClinton

Tanya Tucker‘s ‘Can’t Run From Yourself’ (Capitol Records, 1992) also included the following tracks:

‘Can’t Run From Yourself’ (written by Marshall Chapman)
‘Don’t Let My Heart Be The Last To Know’ (written by Dennis Morgan and Billy Burnette)
‘I’ve Learned To Live’, which was written by Dean Dillon and Frank Dycus (Tuesday 5 December 1939 – Friday 23 November 2012)
‘What Do They Know’ (written by Richard Ross and Donny Kees)
‘Rainbow Rider’, which was written by Bobby Fischer, Charlie Black (Wednesday 23 November 1949 – Friday 23 April 2021) and Austin Roberts
‘Half The Moon’ (written by Hugh Prestwood)
‘Danger Ahead’ (written by Paul Kennerley)

Personnel involved in the recording of Tanya Tucker‘s ‘Can’t Run From Yourself’ (Capitol Records, 1992) included the following:

Larry Byrom and Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) (acoustic guitar)
Beth Nielsen Chapman, Carol Chase, Greg Gordon, Jonell Mosser, Louis Dean Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 – Friday 26 October 2012), Wayland Patton and Cindy Richardson-Walker (backing vocals)
Dan Dugmore and Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
David Hungate and Bob Wray (bass guitar)
John Barlow Jarvis (piano)
Craig Krampf and Paul Leim (drums)
Mike Lawler (keyboards, synthesizer)
Brent Mason and Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (electric guitar)
Delbert McClinton (duet vocals on ‘Tell Me About It’)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Bobby Ogdin (piano, synthesizer)
Tom Roady (percussion)
Matt Rollings (keyboards)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar, mandolin)
Tanya Tucker(lead vocals)

Tanya Tucker‘s ‘Can’t Run From Yourself’ (Capitol Records, 1992) reached No.12 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1992, No.51 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1992, and No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1992.

On Tuesday 22 June 1993, Mark Chesnutt saw the release of ‘Almost Goodbye’ (MCA Records, 1993), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘It Sure Is Monday’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006) (No.1 for one week in August 1993)

‘Almost Goodbye’ (written by Billy Livsey)
(No.1 for one week in November 1993)

‘I Just Wanted You To Know’ (written by Tim Menzies and Gary Harrison)
(No.1 for one week in March 1994)

‘Woman, Sensuous Woman’, which was written by Gary Sanford ‘Flip’ Paxton (Thursday 18 May 1939 – Sunday 17 July 2016)
(No.21, 1993) / the original version of this track was recorded by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 – Monday 17 November 2003), who included it on ‘Woman (Sensuous Woman)’ (Hickory Records, 1972); Don Gibson’s version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in September 1972

Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘Almost Goodbye’ (MCA Records, 1993) also included the following tracks:

‘April’s Fool’ (written by Mark Chesnutt, Glenn Gordon and David Lott)
‘Texas Is Bigger Than It Used To Be’ (written by Mark Wright, Joe Johnston and Ronnie Rogers)
‘My Heart’s Too Broke (To Pay Attention)’, which was written by Lonnie Wilson, Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016) and Phil Barnhart
‘Vickie Vance Gotta Dance’ (written by Mark Wright and Bill Kenner)
‘Til A Better Memory Comes Along’, which was written by Tim Menzies, Eugene David Dobbins (Monday 19 March 1934 – Sunday 23 November 2008) and Glenn Ray McGuirt (1938 – Thursday 11 June 2020)
‘The Will’ (written by Jackson Leap)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘Almost Goodbye’ (MCA Records, 1993) included the following:

Mark Chesnutt (lead vocals)
Tom Flora, Christopher Harris, Jana King, John Wesley RylesLisa SilverBergen White, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Pat Flynn, Glenn Gordon and Biff Watson (acoustic guitar)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar, slide guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Owen Hale and Paul Leim (drums)
David Hungate and Bob Wray (bass guitar)
Steve Nathan and Matt Rollings (keyboards)
Lynn Meyer Peterzell (Monday 10 January 1955 – Thursday 8 September 1994)(percussion, mixing)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Wayne Toups (squeezebox)
Nashville String Machine (strings conducted by Carl Gorodetzky and arranged by Bergen White)

Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘Almost Goodbye’ (MCA Records, 1993) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1993, No.43 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1993, and No.7 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1993.

Clay Walker: 'Clay Walker' (Giant Records, 1993)

On Tuesday 3 August 1993Clay Walker saw the release of his self-titled debut album, ‘Clay Walker’ (Giant Records, 1993), which was produced by James Stroud, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘What’s It To You’ (written by Robert Ellis Orrall and Curtis Wright) (No.1, 1993)

‘Live Until I Die’ (written by Clay Walker) (No.1, 1993)

‘Where Do I Fit In The Picture’ (written by Clay Walker) (No.11, 1994)

‘Dreaming With My Eyes Open’ (written by Tony Arata) (No.1, 1994)

Clay Walker‘s self-titled debut album, ‘Clay Walker’ (Giant Records, 1993), also included the following tracks:

‘The Silence Speaks For Itself’ (written by Chris Waters, Clay Walker and Tom Shapiro)
‘How To Make A Man Lonesome’, which was written by Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016) and Randy Boudreaux
‘Next Step In Love’ (written by Clay Walker)

‘White Palace’ (written by Zack Turner and Byron Hill) / this track reached No.67 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1993 based on unsolicited airplay

‘Money Can’t Buy (The Love We Had)’ (written by Clay Walker)
‘Things I Should Have Said’ (written by John Paul Daniel and Shawna Harrington-Burkhart)
‘I Don’t Know How Love Starts’ (written by Rich Alves, T.J. Knight and Curtis Wright)

Personnel involved in the recording of Clay Walker‘s self-titled debut album, ‘Clay Walker’ (Giant Records, 1993), included the following:

Eddie Bayers and Lonnie Wilson (drums)
Larry Byrom (acoustic guitar)
Jimmy Carter, Larry Paxton and Leland Sklar (bass guitar)
Stuart Duncan and Joe Spivey (fiddle)
Paul Franklin and Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Dann Huff and Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Jana King, Curtis Wright and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Steve Nathan, Bobby Ogdin and Matt Rollings (piano)
Clay Walker (lead vocals)

Clay Walker‘s self-titled debut album, ‘Clay Walker’ (Giant Records, 1993), reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1993, No.52 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1993, No.2 on the Billboard Top Heatseekers Chart in 1993, No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1993, and No.47 on the Canadian RPM Top Albums Chart in 1993.

Tanya Tucker: 'Soon' (Liberty Records, 1993)

On Monday 11 October 1993, Tanya Tucker saw the release of ‘Soon’ (Liberty Records, 1993), which was produced by Jerry Crutchfield (Friday 10 August 1934 – Tuesday 11 January 2022), and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Soon’ (written by Casey Kelly and Bob Regan) (No.2, 1993)

‘We Don’t Have To Do This’ (written by Gary Burr and Victoria Shaw)
(No.11, 1994)

‘Hangin’ In’ (written by Steve Bogard and Rick Giles)
(No.4, 1994)

‘You Just Watch Me’ (written by Rick Giles and Bob Regan)
(No.20, 1994)

Tanya Tucker‘s ‘Soon’ (Liberty Records, 1993) also included the following tracks:

‘Come On Honey’, which was written by Paul Davis (Wednesday 21 April 1948 – Tuesday 22 April 2008)
‘I Love You Anyway’ (written by Pat Terry)
‘Let The Good Times Roll’ (written by Tony Martin and Reese Wilson)
‘Sneaky Moon’ (written by Bill LaBounty)
‘Silence Is King’ (written by Gary Burr and Jim Photoglo)
‘A Blue Guitar’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006)

Personnel involved in the recording of Tanya Tucker‘s ‘Soon’ (Liberty Records, 1993) included the following:

Eddie Bayers and Paul Leim (drums)
David Hungate and Michael Rhodes (Wednesday 16 September 1953 – Saturday 4 March 2023) (bass guitar)
Mike Lawler (synthesizer, keyboards)
Matt Rollings (piano)
Paul Davis (Wednesday 21 April 1948 – Tuesday 22 April 2008) (organ, backing vocals)
Steve Gibson, Brent Mason, Brent Rowan and Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) (guitars)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Jerry Douglas and Brent Rowan (Dobro)
Jim Horn and Harvey Thompson (saxophone)
Charles Rose (trombone)
George Tidwell (trumpet)
Bruce Watkins (banjo)
Tanya Tucker(lead vocals)
Gary Burr, Dale Daniel, Jonell Mosser and Curtis Young (backing vocals)

Tanya Tucker‘s ‘Soon’ (Liberty Records, 1993) reached No.18 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1993.

Confederate Railroad: 'Notorious' (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1994)

On Tuesday 22 March 1994, Confederate Railroad saw the release of ‘Notorious’ (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1994), which was produced by Barry Beckett (Thursday 4 February 1943 – Wednesday 10 June 2009), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Daddy Never Was The Cadillac Kind’ (written by Dave Gibson and Bernie Nelson) (No.9, 1994) / this track also reached No.7 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1994

‘Elvis & Andy’ (written by Craig Wiseman) (No.20, 1994) / this track also reached No.8 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1994

‘Summer In Dixie’ (written by Gene Levine and John Robbin) (No.55, 1994)

Confederate Railroad’s ‘Notorious’ (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1994) also included the following tracks:

‘I Am Just A Rebel’ (written by Bob DiPiero, John Scott Sherrill and Dennis Robbins)
‘Notorious’ (written by Pat Terry)
‘Redneck Romeo’ (written by Dave Gibson and Craig Wiseman)
‘Hunger Pains’, which was written by Rory Bourke, Bucky Jones and Ronny Scaife (1947 – Wednesday 3 November 2010)
‘Roll The Dice’ (written by Larry Boone and Paul Nelson)
‘Move Over Madonna’ (written by Craig Wiseman and Troy Seals)
‘Three Verses’ (written by J. Fred Knobloch)

Personnel involved in the recording of Confederate Railroad’s ‘Notorious’ (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1994) included the following:

Confederate Railroad
Mark Dufresne (drums)
Michael Lamb (electric guitar, background vocals)
Chris McDaniel (keyboards, background vocals)
Gates Nichols (steel guitar, background vocals)
Wayne Secrest (bass guitar)
Danny Shirley (lead vocals)

Additional personnel involved in the recording of Confederate Railroad’s ‘Notorious’ (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1994) included the following:

Eddie Bayers (drums)
Barry Beckett (Thursday 4 February 1943 – Wednesday 10 June 2009) and Phil Naish (keyboards)
Bruce C. Bouton (steel guitar, synthesizer)
Gary Burr, Suzi Ragsdale, Harry Stinson, Hurshel Wayne Wiginton (Saturday 29 January 1938 – Monday 6 March 2017), Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Paul Franklin and ‘Cowboy’ Eddie Long (steel guitar)
Russ Pahl (Dobro)
Tom Roady (percussion)
Michael Rhodes (Wednesday 16 September 1953 – Saturday 4 March 2023) (bass guitar)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) (acoustic guitar)

Confederate Railroad’s ‘Notorious’ (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1994) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1994, No.52 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1994, and No.13 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1994.

On Tuesday 13 September 1994, Mark Chesnutt saw the release of ‘What A Way To Live’ (MCA Records, 1994), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘She Dreams’ (written by Tim Menzies and Gary Harrison) (No.6, 1994) / the original version of this track was recorded by Tim Menzies, who included it on ‘This Ol’ Heart’ (Giant Records, 1992); Tim Menzies‘ version of the the track reached No.74 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1993

‘Goin’ Through The Big D’ (written by Mark Wright, Ronnie Rogers and John Wright)
(No.2, 1994)

‘Gonna Get A Life’, which was written by Frank Dycus (Tuesday 5 December 1939 – Friday 23 November 2012) and Jim Lauderdale
(No.1 for one week in May 1995)

‘Down In Tennessee’ (written by Wayland D. Holyfield)
(No.23, 1995)

Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘What A Way To Live’ (MCA Records, 1994) also included the following tracks:

‘What A Way To Live’ (written by Willie Nelson and Hank Craig)
‘Live A Little’ (written by Roger Springer and Tony Martin)
‘It’s Almost Like You’re Here’, which was written by Charles William Quillen (Monday 21 March 1938 – Friday 19 August 2022), John Priestley and Jonathan Clift
‘Rainy Day Woman’, which was written by Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 – Wednesday 13 February 2002) / this track was a duet with Waylon Jennings

 

‘This Side of The Door’ (written by Tim Menzies and Shawn Camp) / this track was also recorded by Tim Menzies, who included it on ‘Tim Mensy’ (PJM Records, 2002) / this track was also recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on ‘In a Perfect World‘ (Shanachie Records, 2007), which was produced by Brent Rowan

‘Half of Everything (& All of My Heart)’ (written by David Lott, Glenn Gordon and Mark Chesnutt)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘What A Way To Live’ (MCA Records, 1994) included the following:

Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Tim Broussard (squeezebox)
Mark Chesnutt (lead vocals)
Glen Duncan (fiddle, mandolin)
Pat Flynn, B. James Lowry, Tim Menzies and Biff Watson (acoustic guitar)
Paul Franklin and Russ Pahl (steel guitar)
Owen Hale and Paul Leim (drums)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Roy Huskey Jr. (Monday 17 December 1956 – Saturday 6 September 1997) (upright bass)
Steve Nathan and Matt Rollings (keyboards)
Bob Wray (bass guitar)
Curtis Young, John Wesley Ryles, Bergen White, Jana King, Lisa Silver, Dennis Wilson, Cindy Walker, Tom Flora, Chris Harris, Matt Kaminski, Ann Wright and Kim Rogers (background vocals)
Nashville String Machine (strings conducted by Carl Gorodetzky and arranged by Bergen White)

Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘What A Way To Live’ (MCA Records, 1994) reached No.15 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1994, and No.98 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1994.

Clay Walker: 'If I Could Make A Living' (Giant Records, 1994)

On Tuesday 27 September 1994Clay Walker saw the release of ‘If I Could Make A Living’ (Giant Records, 1994); one of the included tracks was ‘Lose Your Memory’ (written by Clay Walker), which featured Brent Rowan on electric guitar.

Tanya Tucker: 'Fire To Fire' (Liberty Records, 1995)

On Tuesday 21 March 1995, Tanya Tucker saw the release of ‘Fire To Fire’ (Liberty Records, 1995), which was produced by Jerry Crutchfield (Friday 10 August 1934 – Tuesday 11 January 2022), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Between the Two of Them’ (written by Mickey Cates) (No.27, 1995)

‘Find Out What’s Happenin’, which was written by Jerry Crutchfield (Friday 10 August 1934 – Tuesday 11 January 2022)
(No.40, 1995)

Tanya Tucker‘s ‘Fire To Fire’ (Liberty Records, 1995) also included the following tracks:

‘Come In Out of The World’ (written by Don Schlitz and Billy Livsey)
‘I’ll Take The Memories’, which was written by Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 – Friday 1 July 2011) and Keith Stegall
‘I Bet She Knows’ (written by Paul Thorn and Billy Maddox)
‘Fire To Fire’ (written by Sharon Rice, Bill Rice and Mike Lawler) / this track was a duet with Willie Nelson
‘Nobody Dies From A Broken Heart’ (written by Randy Sharp and Sonny LeMaire)
‘I’ll Take Today’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997) and Will Robinson
‘The Love You Gave To Me’ (written by Gary Nicholson and Delbert McClinton)
‘Love Will’ (written by Byron Hill and Cyril Rawson)

Personnel involved in the recording of Tanya Tucker‘s ‘Fire To Fire’ (Liberty Records, 1995) included the following:

Dan Dugmore and Paul Leim (drums)
David Hungate, Michael Rhodes (Wednesday 16 September 1953 – Saturday 4 March 2023) and Willie Weeks (bass)
Mitch Humphries, John Barlow Jarvis, Steve Nathan and Matt Rollings (keyboards)
Mike Lawler (synthesizer)
Steve Gibson, Dann Huff, Chris Leuzinger, Brent Rowan, Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) and Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (guitars)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Tanya Tucker(lead vocals)
Christy Cornelius, Gregory Gordon, Sharon Rice, Judy Rodman, Sunny Russ, Randy Sharp and Curtis Young (backing vocals)
Nashville String Machine (strings arranged by Bergen White, led by Carl Gorodetzky)

Tanya Tucker‘s ‘Fire To Fire’ (Liberty Records, 1995) reached No.28 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1995.

Confederate Railroad: 'When and Where' (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1995)

On Tuesday 13 June 1995, Confederate Railroad saw the release of ‘When and Where’ (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1995), which was produced by Barry Beckett (Thursday 4 February 1943 – Wednesday 10 June 2009), and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘When and Where’ (written by Jess Brown, Brett Jones and Jeff Pennig) (No.24, 1995) / this track also reached No.17 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1995

‘Bill’s Laundromat, Bar & Grill’ (written by Mark Germino and Jimmy Alan Stewart) (No.54, 1995) / this track also reached No.58 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1995

‘When He Was My Age’ (written by Kenny Chesney, David Lowe and Billy Lawson) (No.66, 1995) / this track also reached No.90 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1995

See Ya’ (written by Thom McHugh and Chris Ward) (No.51, 1996)

Confederate Railroad’s ‘When and Where’ (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1995) also included the following tracks:

‘Right Track Wrong Train’ (written by Michael White and Frank J. Myers)

‘Toss A Little Bone’ (written by Steve Bogard and Rick Giles) / this track was also included on Confederate Railroad’s ‘Rockin’ Country Party Pack’ (Atlantic Records Nashville, 2000), and reached No.71 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 2000

‘All I Wanted’ (written by Pat Terry)
‘Sounds of Home’ (written by James Dean Hicks, Mark Alan Springer and Jerry Laseter)
‘Oh No’ (written by Al Anderson and Mike Lawler)
‘My Baby’s Lovin’ (written by Delbert McClinton and Michael Lunn)

Personnel involved in the recording of Confederate Railroad’s ‘When and Where’ (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1995) included the following:

Confederate Railroad
Jimmy Dormire (electric guitar)
Mark Dufresne (drums)
Chris McDaniels (keyboards)
Gates Nichols (steel guitar)
Wayne Secrest (bass guitar)
Danny Shirley (lead vocals, acoustic guitar)

Additional personnel involved in the recording of Confederate Railroad’s ‘When and Where’ (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1995) included the following:

Eddie Bayers (drums)
Barry Beckett (Thursday 4 February 1943 – Wednesday 10 June 2009) and Bobby Ogdin (keyboards)
Mike Lawler (acoustic guitar, synthesizer)
‘Cowboy’ Eddie Long (steel guitar)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (percussion)
Phil Naish (synthesizer)
Louis Dean Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 – Friday 26 October 2012), Harry Stinson, Hurshel Wayne Wiginton (Saturday 29 January 1938 – Monday 6 March 2017), Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Michael Rhodes (Wednesday 16 September 1953 – Saturday 4 March 2023) (bass guitar)
Brent Rowan and Mike Severs (electric guitar)
Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) (acoustic guitar)
Jim Horn, Charles Rose, Jim Hoke and Michael Haynes (horns)

Confederate Railroad’s ‘When and Where’ (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1995) reached No.21 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1995, and No.152 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1995.

Clay Walker: 'Hypnotize The Moon' (Giant Records, 1995)

On Tuesday 17 October 1995Clay Walker saw the release of ‘Hypnotize The Moon’ (Giant Records, 1995), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Who Needs You Baby’, which was written by Clay Walker, Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016) and Randy Boudreaux (No.2, 1995)

‘Hypnotize The Moon’ (written by Eric Kaz and Steve Dorff) (No.2, 1996)

‘Only On Days That End In Y’ (written by Richard Fagan) (No.5, 1996)

‘Bury The Shovel’ (written by Chris Arms and Chuck Jones) (No.18, 1996)

Clay Walker‘s ‘Hypnotize The Moon’ (Giant Records, 1995) also included the following tracks:

‘I Won’t Have The Heart’, which was written by Clay Walker, Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016) and Kent Blazy
‘Let Me Take The Heartache (Off Your Hands)’, which was written by Clay Walker, Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016) and Kent Blazy
‘Hand Me Down Heart’ (written by Zack Turner and Lonnie Wilson)
‘Where Were You’ (written by Tim Menzies)
‘Loving You Comes Naturally To Me’, which was written by Ray Methvin, Tim Johnson (Friday 29 January 1960 – Sunday 21 October 2012) and Roger Springer
‘A Cowboy’s Toughest Ride’, which was written by Clay Walker, Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016) and Randy Boudreaux
‘Love Me Like You Love Me’ (written by Steve Wariner and Bill LaBounty)

Personnel involved in the recording of Clay Walker‘s ‘Hypnotize The Moon’ (Giant Records, 1995) included the following:

Eddie Bayers and Maxwell Schauf (drums)
Larry Byrom and Kyle Frederick (acoustic guitar)
Mike Brignardello, Byron House and Glenn Worf (bass guitar)
Stuart Duncan, Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015), Jason Roberts and Joe Spivey (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (Dobro)
Sonny Garrish and Tim Sergeant (steel guitar)
John A. Hobbs (Saturday 11 February 1928 – Wednesday 12 June 2019), Van Rentz and Matt Rollings (piano)
Dann Huff, Brent Rowan and Landon Taylor (electric guitar)
Clay Walker (lead vocals)
Curtis Wright and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Nashville String Machine (strings contracted by Carl Gorodetzsky, conducted and arranged by Steve Dorff)

Clay Walker‘s ‘Hypnotize The Moon’ (Giant Records, 1995) reached No.10 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1995, and No.57 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1995.

Hank Williams, Hank Williams Jr. and Hank Williams III: 'Three Hanks: Men With Broken Hearts' (Curb Records, 1996)

On Tuesday 17 September 1996, Hank Williams Jr. and Hank Williams III saw the release of ‘Three Hanks: Men With Broken Hearts’ (Curb Records, 1996), a collaborative studio album, which combined the songs of Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953) with accompanying vocals from his son and grandson.

‘Three Hanks: Men With Broken Hearts’ (Curb Records, 1996), which marked the recording debut of Hank Williams III, included the following tracks:

‘I’ll Never Get Out of This World Alive’, which was written by Hank Williams and Fred Rose (Floyd Jenkins) (24 August 1898 – Wednesday 1 December 1954)
‘Move It On Over’ (written by Hank Williams)
‘Moanin’ The Blues’ (written by Hank Williams)
‘Never Again (Will I Knock On Your Door)’ (written by Hank Williams)
‘I’m A Long Gone Daddy’ (written by Hank Williams)
‘Honky Tonk Blues’ (written by Hank Williams)
‘I Won’t Be Home No More’ (written by Hank Williams)
‘Neath A Cold Gray Tomb of Stone’, which was written by Hank Williams and Mel Foree (Tuesday 25 July 1911 – Sunday 28 October 1990)
‘Where The Soul of Man Never Dies’, which was written by Wayne Raney (Wednesday 17 August 1921 – Saturday 23 January 1993)
‘Hand Me Down’ (written by Hank Williams Jr.)
‘Men With Broken Hearts’ (written by Hank Williams)
‘Lost Highway’, which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 – Thursday 11 September 1969)

Personnel involved in the recording of ‘Three Hanks: Men With Broken Hearts’ (Curb Records, 1996) included the following:

Eddie Bayers (drums, background vocals)
J.T. Corenflos (Wednesday 6 November 1963 – Saturday 24 October 2020), Dann Huff, Brent Mason, Brent Rowan and John Willis (electric guitar)
Larry Franklin (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
David Hungate (bass guitar, tic tac bass, background vocals)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Steve Nathan (keyboards)
Michael Spriggs (acoustic guitar)
Audrey Mae Sheppard Williams (Wednesday 28 February 1923 – Tuesday 4 November 1975) (background vocals)
Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953) and Hank Williams III (lead vocals)
Hank Williams Jr. (acoustic guitar, lead vocals, background vocals)
Glenn Worf (bass guitar)

‘Three Hanks: Men With Broken Hearts’ (Curb Records, 1996) reached No.29 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1996, and No.167 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1996.

Clay Walker: 'Rumor Has It' (Giant Records, 1997)

On Tuesday 8 April 1997Clay Walker saw the release of ‘Rumor Has It’ (Giant Records, 1997), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Rumor Has It’ (written by M. Jason Greene and Clay Walker) (No.1, 1997)

‘One, Two, I Love You’ (written by Ed Hill and Bucky Jones) (No.18, 1997)

‘Watch This’ (written by Ron Harbin, Aaron Barker and Anthony L. Smith) (No.4, 1997)

‘Then What?’ (written by Jon Vezner and Randy Sharp) (No.2, 1998)

Clay Walker‘s ‘Rumor Has It’ (Giant Records, 1997) also included the following tracks:

‘I’d Say That’s Right’ (written by Tim Nichols and Mark D. Sanders)
‘Heart Over Head Over Heels’ (written by Bob Regan and Jeff Pennig)
‘You’ll Never Hear The End of It’ (written by Dickie Kaiser and Jon Robbin)
‘Country Boy & City Girl’ (written by Clay Walker)
‘I Need A Margarita’ (written by Dana Hunt Black, Monty Holmes and Tony Mullins)
‘That’s Us’ (written by Tim Menzies and Clay Walker)

Personnel involved in the recording of Clay Walker‘s ‘Rumor Has It’ (Giant Records, 1997) included the following:

Eddie Bayers (drums)
Bruce C. Bouton, Dan Dugmore, Paul Franklin and Tim Sargeant (steel guitar)
Larry Byrom and Tim Menzies (acoustic guitar)
Stuart Duncan and Joe Spivey (fiddle)
Steve Nathan (piano)
Tom Roady (percussion, steel drums)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar, acoustic guitar)
Wayne Toups (squeeze box)
Clay Walker (lead vocals)
Glenn Worf (bass guitar)
Curtis Wright and Curtis Young (background vocals)

Clay Walker‘s ‘Rumor Has It’ (Giant Records, 1997) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1997, No.32 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1997, and No.7 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1997.

On Tuesday 23 September 1997, Mark Chesnutt saw the release of ‘Thank God For Believers’ (Decca Records, 1997), which was produced by Mark Wright, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Thank God For Believers’, which was written by Mark Alan Springer, Roger Springer and Tim Johnson (Friday 29 January 1960 – Sunday 21 October 2012) (No.2, 1997)

‘It’s Not Over (If I’m Not Over You)’, which was
written by Mark Wright and Larry Kingston (Sunday 10 August 1941 – Sunday 20 February 2005) (No.34, 1997) / this track featured guest vocals from Vince Gill and Alison Krauss

‘I Might Even Quit Lovin’ You’
(written by Mark Chesnutt, Roger Springer and Slugger Morrissette) (No.18, 1998)

‘Wherever You Are’
(written by Roger Springer, Reese Wilson and Tony Martin) (No.45, 1998)

Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘Thank God For Believers’ (Decca Records, 1997) also included the following tracks:

‘Goodbye Heartache’ (written by Mark Chesnutt, Steve Leslie and Roger Springer)
‘Numbers On The Jukebox’ (written by Mark Chesnutt, Roger Springer and Slugger Morrissette)
‘That Side of You’ (written by Mark Chesnutt, Steve Leslie and Roger Springer)
‘Useless’ (written by Mark Wright, Roger Springer and Robert Arthur)
‘Hello, Honky Tonk’, which was written by Ron Harbin, Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016) and L. David Lewis
‘Any Ole Reason’ (written by Mark Chesnutt, Roger Springer and Slugger Morrissette) 
/ this track featured guest vocals from Vince Gill and Alison Krauss

Personnel involved in the recording of Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘Thank God For Believers’ (Decca Records, 1997) included the following:

Mike Brignardello (bass guitar on ‘Useless’)
Mark Chesnutt (lead vocals)
Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 – Wednesday 29 July 2015) (steel guitar)
Jana King Evans, Lisa Silver and Bergen White (background vocals on ‘Numbers On The Jukebox’ and ‘Goodbye Heartache’)
Pat Flynn and B. James Lowry (acoustic guitar)
Larry Franklin (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar on ‘Useless’)
Owen Hale (drums)
Liana Manis, Louis Dean Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 – Friday 26 October 2012), John Wesley Ryles and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Steve Nathan (piano, B-3 organ)
Michael Rhodes (Wednesday 16 September 1953 – Saturday 4 March 2023) (bass guitar)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Hank Singer (fiddle on ‘Hello Honky Tonk’)
Biff Watson (acoustic guitar on ‘Useless’)
Bergen White (string arrangements, Carl Gorodetzky conducting the Nashville String Machine)

Personnel involved in the recording of ‘It’s Not Over’ included the following:

Mark Chesnutt (lead vocals)
Pat Flynn and Biff Watson (acoustic guitar)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Paul Leim (drums)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Bob Wray (bass guitar)

Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘Thank God For Believers’ (Decca Records, 1997) reached No.25 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1997, and No.165 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1997.

Randy Travis: 'You & You Alone' (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1998)

On Tuesday 21 April 1998, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘You & You Alone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1998), which was produced by Randy Travis, Byron Gallimore and James Stroud, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Out of My Bones’ (written by Gary Burr, Robin Lerner and Sharon Vaughn) (No.2, 1998)

‘The Hole’ (written by Skip Ewingand James Dean Hicks)
(No.9, 1998)

‘Spirit of A Boy, Wisdom of A Man’ (written by Glen Burtnik and Trey Bruce)
(No.2, 1999) / the original version of this track was recorded by Mark Collie, who included it on ‘Tennessee Plates’ (Giant Records, 1995)

‘Stranger In My Mirror’, which was written by Skip Ewing and Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016)
(No.16, 1999)

Randy Travis‘ ‘You & You Alone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1998) also included the following tracks:

‘Only Worse’, which was written by John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 – Thursday 1 February 2001) and Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997) / this track was best known for playing in the background of a diner in the 2000 comedy film, ‘Road Trip’

‘One Word Song’, which was written by John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 – Thursday 1 February 2001) and Max T. Barnes


‘I Did My Part’ (written by Don Schlitz and Billy Livsey)
/ this track featured background vocals from Patrick (Wayne) Swayze (Monday 18 August 1952 – Monday 14 September 2009)

‘A Horse Called Music’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015)
/ the original version of this track was recorded by Willie Nelson, who included it on ‘A Horse Called Music’ (Columbia Records, 1989)

‘I’m Still Here, You’re Still Gone’ (written by Ralph Murphy and Kevin Brandt)


‘Easy To Love You’ (written by Deanna Bryant and Danny Orton)


‘You & You Alone’ (written by Melba Montgomery, Leslie Satcher and Tim Ryan Rouillier)

‘Satisfied Mind’ (written by Tony Arata)
/ the original version of this track was recorded by Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020), who included it on ‘The Hits’ (MCG / Curb Records, 1996)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis‘ ‘You & You Alone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1998) included the following:

Eddie Bayers, Paul Leim and Lonnie Wilson (drums)
Larry Beiard and Larry Byrom (acoustic guitar)
Mike Brignardello, Michael Rhodes (Wednesday 16 September 1953 – Saturday 4 March 2023) and Glenn Worf (bass guitar)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Paul Franklin and Sonny Garrish (steel guitar, Dobro)
Vince Gill, Alison Krauss, Melba MontgomeryJohn Wesley Ryles, Leslie Satcher, Curtis Wright and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle, mandolin)
Jeff King (electric guitar)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Brent Mason (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Steve Nathan (keyboards, piano, Hammond B-3 organ)
Matt Rollings (piano, Hammond B-3 organ)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Patrick (Wayne) Swayze (Monday 18 August 1952 – Monday 14 September 2009) (background vocals on ‘I Did My Part’)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)
Dan Tyminski (background vocals, vibraphone)

Randy Travis‘ ‘You & You Alone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1998) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1998, and No.49 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1998.

Confederate Railroad: 'Keep On Rockin' (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1998)

On Tuesday 20 October 1998, Confederate Railroad saw the release of ‘Keep On Rockin’ (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1998), which was produced by Barry Beckett (Thursday 4 February 1943 – Wednesday 10 June 2009) and Pete Greene, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘The Big One’ (written by Jon Ims and Pam Matthews) (No.66, 1998)

‘Cowboy Cadillac’ (written by Danny Wells and Wiseman) (No.70, 1999)

Confederate Railroad’s ‘Keep On Rockin’ (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1998) also included the following tracks:

Keep On Rockin’ (written by Al Anderson and Craig Wiseman)
‘I Hate Rap’, which was written by Dewayne L. Blackwell (Thursday 17 September 1936 – Sunday 23 May 2021)
‘Sunday Morning & Saturday Night’ (written by Danny Shirley and Craig Wiseman)
I Don’t Want To Hang Out With Me’ (written by Chris Knight and Craig Wiseman)
A Bible & A Bus Ticket Home’ (written by James Dean Hicks and Craig Wiseman)
‘Good Ol’ Boy (Gettin’ Tough)’ (written by Richard Bennett and Steve Earle)
‘Momma Ain’t Home Tonight’ (written by Ed Hunnicutt, Buck Moore, Roger Alan Wade and Danny Shirley)
‘Simple Man’, which was written by Ronnie Van Zant (Thursday 15 January 1948 – Thursday 20 October 1977) and Gary Rossington

Personnel involved in the recording of Confederate Railroad’s ‘Keep On Rockin’ (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1998) included the following:

Eddie Bayers (percussion, drums)
Barry Beckett (Thursday 4 February 1943 – Wednesday 10 June 2009) and Bobby Ogdin (keyboards)
Mike Brignardello and Michael Rhodes (Wednesday 16 September 1953 – Saturday 4 March 2023) (bass)
Charlie Daniels (Wednesday 28 October 1936 – Monday 6 July 2020) (fiddle)
Steve Earle (guest vocals, rhythm guitar)
Paul Franklin and ‘Cowboy’ Eddie Long (steel guitar)
Blue Miller and Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) (acoustic guitar)
Louis Dean Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 – Friday 26 October 2012), Harry Stinson, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (guest vocals)
Brent Rowan (guitar, electric guitar)
Danny Shirley (guest vocals, lead vocals)

Confederate Railroad’s ‘Keep On Rockin’ (Atlantic Records Nashville, 1998) reached No.57 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1998.

On Tuesday 9 February 1999, Mark Chesnutt saw the release of ‘I Don’t Want To Miss A Thing’ (Decca Records, 1999), which included a cover of Aerosmith’s hit single, ‘I Don’t Want To Miss A Thing’ (written by Diane Warren), which returned him to No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart, for two weeks, in early 1999, and brought him to No.17 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1999.

Despite the success of this single, Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘I Don’t Want To Miss A Thing’ (Decca Records, 1999) album’s only other release was ‘This Heartache Never Sleeps’ (written by Daryl Burgess and Tim Johnson) (No.17, 1999), which was issued before Decca Records once again closed its country music division.

Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘I Don’t Want To Miss A Thing’ (Decca Records, 1999) also included the following tracks:

‘My Way Back Home’ (written by Mark Nesler and Tony Martin)
‘I’ll Get You Back’ (written by Ron Harbin, Aimee Mayo and Dusty Drake)
‘That’s The Way You Make An Ex’ (written by Roger Springer, Reese Wilson and Tony Martin)
‘Tonight I’ll Let My Memory Take Me Home’ (written by Roger Springer, Robert Arthur and Dean Dillon)
‘Jolie’, which was written by Skip Ewing, Paul Overstreet and Paul Davis (Wednesday 21 April 1948 – Tuesday 22 April 2008)
‘What Was You Thinking?’ (written by Doug Johnson and Roger Springer)
‘I’m Gone’ (written by Rick Orozco and Marv Green)
‘Let’s Talk About Our Love’ (written by Mark Chesnutt, Roger Springer and Robert Arthur)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mark Chesnutt‘s ‘I Don’t Want To Miss A Thing’ (Decca Records, 1999) included the following:

Mike Brignardello, Michael Rhodes (Wednesday 16 September 1953 – Saturday 4 March 2023) and Glenn Worf(bass guitar)
Mark CasstevensPat Flynn, B. James Lowryand Biff Watson(acoustic guitar)
Mark Chesnutt (lead vocals)
Tim Davis, Natalie Grant, Liana Manis, Chris Rodriguez, John Wesley Ryles, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 – Wednesday 29 July 2015), Paul Franklin and Sonny Garrish(steel guitar)
Larry Franklin (fiddle)
Carl Gorodetzky (conductor)
Owen Hale and Lonnie Wilson (drums)
John Barlow Jarvis (organ, piano)
Kirk ‘Jelly Roll’ Johnson (harmonica)
Terence Johnston (12-string guitar, background vocals)
Brent Mason and Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
The Nashville String Machine (strings)
Steve Nathan (organ, piano, synthesizer)
Tom Roady (percussion)
Wayne Toups (accordion)

Mark Chesnutt‘s‘I Don’t Want To Miss A Thing’ (Decca Records, 1999) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1999, No.6 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1999, and No.65 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1999.

Clay Walker: 'Live, Laugh, Love' (Giant Records, 1999)

On Tuesday 24 August 1999Clay Walker saw the release of ‘Live, Laugh, Love’ (Giant Records, 1999), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘She’s Always Right’ (written by Richie McDonald, Ed Hill and Phil Barnhart) (No.16, 1999)

Live, Laugh, Love’ (written by Gary Nicholson and Allen Shamblin) (No.11, 1999)

‘The Chain of Love’ (written by Jonnie Barnett and Rory Lee Feek) (No.3, 2000)

‘Once In A Lifetime’ (written by M. Jason Greene and Clay Walker) (No.50, 2000)

Clay Walker‘s ‘Live, Laugh, Love’ (Giant Records, 1999) also included the following tracks:

‘Lose Some Sleep Tonight’ (written by M. Jason Greene and Clay Walker)

‘Holding Her & Loving You’ (written by Walt Aldridge and Tom Brasfield) / this track charted for Clay Walker in 2000, as a result of unsolicited airplay prior to the release of ‘Live, Laugh, Love’ (Giant Records, 1999) / the original version of this track was recorded by Earl Thomas Conley (Friday 17 October 1941 – Wednesday 10 April 2019), who included it on ‘Don’t Make It Easy For Me’ (RCA Victor Records, 1983); Earl Thomas Conley‘s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in November / December 1983, and he was nominated for multiple Grammy Awards for the song in 1983

‘Cold Hearted’ (written by M. Jason Greene and Clay Walker)
‘If A Man Ain’t Thinking (‘Bout His Woman)’ (written by Buddy Brock, Debi Cochran and Jerry Kilgore)
‘It Ain’t Called Heartland (For Nothin’)’ (written by Justin Lantz and Bryan Wayne)
‘Woman Thing’ (written by Larry Boone, Tracy Lawrence and Paul Nelson)
‘This Time Love’, which was written by Patricia Karen Bunch (Thursday 22 June 1939 – Monday 30 January 2023) and Randy Boudreaux

Personnel involved in the recording of Clay Walker‘s ‘Live, Laugh, Love’ (Giant Records, 1999) included the following:

Eddie Bayers (drums, percussion)
Joe Chemay, David Hungate and Leland Sklar (bass guitar)
Dan Dugmore, Paul Franklin and Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Shannon Forrest and Tom Roady (percussion)
Larry Franklin (fiddle)
Steve Gibson (mandolin, acoustic guitar)
Wes Hightower, Mike Jones, Liana Manis, Blue Miller, John Wesley Ryles and Curtis Young (background vocals)
John A. Hobbs (Saturday 11 February 1928 – Wednesday 12 June 2019) (piano, Hammond B-3 organ, keyboards)
Terence Johnston (background vocals, guitar)
B. James Lowry and John Willis (acoustic guitar)
Joey Miskulin (accordion)
Matt Rollings (piano)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar, gut string guitar, acoustic guitar)
Clay Walker (lead vocals)
Biff Watson (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Lonnie Wilson (drums)

Clay Walker‘s ‘Live, Laugh, Love’ (Giant Records, 1999) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1999, No.55 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1999, and No.23 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1999.

Randy Travis: 'A Man Ain't Made of Stone' (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1999)

On Tuesday 21 September 1999, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘A Man Ain’t Made of Stone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1999), which was produced by Byron Gallimore, James Stroud and Randy Travis, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘A Man Ain’t Made of Stone’ (written by Gary Burr, Robin Lerner and Franne Golde) (No.16, 1999)

‘Where Can I Surrender’ (written by Rock Killough)
(No.48, 2000)

‘A Little Left of Center’ (written by Billy Henderson and Steven Dale Jones)
(No.54, 2000)

‘I’ll Be Right Here Loving You’ (written by Jeffrey Steele and T.W. Hale)
(No.68, 2000) / this track was also recorded by Rhett Akins, who included it on ‘What Livin’s All About’ (MCA Nashville Records, 1998)

Randy Travis‘ ‘A Man Ain’t Made of Stone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1999) also included the following tracks:

‘A Little Bitty Crack In Her Heart’ (written by Shawn Camp and Jim Rushing) / this track was also recorded by Sammy Kershaw, who included it on ‘Politics, Religion & Her’ (Mercury Records, 1996)

‘The Family Bible & The Farmer’s Almanac’ (written by Bob Regan and Lee Thomas Miller)


‘A Heartache In The Works’ (written by Chet Biggers and Melba Montgomery)


‘No Reason To Change’, which was written by Troy Seals and Mentor Williams (Tuesday 11 June 1946 – Wednesday 16 November 2016)


‘Once You’ve Heard The Truth’ (written by Leslie Satcher and Chuck Jones)


‘In A Heart Like Mine’ (written by Skip Ewing and Donny Kees)


‘Day One’, which was written by Jimmy Yeary and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004)


‘Thirteen Mile Goodbye’ (written by Gary Burr and Gerry House)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis‘ ‘A Man Ain’t Made of Stone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1999) included the following:

Michael Black, Carol Chase, Tabitha Fair, John Wesley Ryles, Lisa Silver, Russell Terrell, Cindy Richardson-Walker and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Mike Brignardello (bass guitar)
Paul Franklin and Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle, mandolin)
Paul Leim (drums)
Jerry McPherson, Brent Mason and Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Matt Rollings and Gary Smith (keyboards, piano)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)
Biff Watson (acoustic guitar)

Randy Travis‘ ‘A Man Ain’t Made of Stone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1999) reached No.15 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1999, No.130 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1999, and No.11 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1999.

In 1999, Joe Nichols met Brent Rowan, a Nashville session guitarist who helped him land a recording contract with Universal South Records, a then newly-formed record label.

Wade Hayes

Following the release of ‘Highways & Heartaches’ (Monument Records, 2000), Wade Hayes (guitar, vocals) partnered with musician, Mark McClurg (fiddle, vocals), who had previously played fiddle in Alan Jackson’s road band, The Strayhorns, to form the duo, McHayes.

Signed to Universal South Records in 2003, McHayes charted one single, ‘It Doesn’t Mean I Don’t Love You’, which reached No.41 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart.

McHayes also recorded an album, ‘Lessons In Lonely’, under the production of Brent Rowan, which was slated for release in mid-2003. The album was never released, and the duo exited Universal South Records recording roster.

After the disbanding of McHayes in July 2004, Mark McClurg rejoined Alan Jackson’s band, and Wade Hayes joined former Alabama lead singer, Randy Owen’s backing band.

Blake Shelton: 'Blake Shelton' (Warner Bros. Records, 2001)

On Tuesday 31 July 2001, Blake Shelton saw the release of his self-titled debut album, ‘Blake Shelton’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2001), which was produced by Bobby Braddock, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Austin’ (written by Kirsti Manna and David Kent) (No.1 for five weeks in August / September 2001)

‘All Over Me’, which was written by Earl Thomas Conley (Friday 17 October 1941 – Wednesday 10 April 2019), Blake Shelton and Mike Pyle
 (No.18, 2001)

‘Ol’ Red’ (written by James ‘Bo’ Bohan, Don Goodman and Mark Sherrill)
(No.14, 2002)

Due to the closure of Giant Records in 2001, Blake Shelton was transferred to the Nashville division of Giant’s parent label, Warner Bros. Records, which promoted and distributed the second and third singles.

Blake Shelton’s self-titled debut album, ‘Blake Shelton’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2001), also included the following tracks:

‘Every Time I Look At You’ (written by Doug Johnson and Blake Shelton) / this track featured background vocals from Curtis Young
‘She Doesn’t Know She’s Got It’ (written by John Rich, Chris Waters and Tom Shapiro)
‘I Thought There Was Time’ (written by Bobby Braddock)
‘Same Old Song’ (written by Bobby Braddock)
‘That’s What I Call Home’ (written by Richard Mainegra, Blake Shelton and Michael Kosser)
‘Problems At Home’ (written by Don Ellis, Billy Montana and Blake Shelton) / this track featured background vocals from Deborah Allen and Curtis Young
‘If I Was Your Man’ (written by Lauren Braddock and Don Henry) / this track featured background vocals from Curtis Young

Personnel involved in the recording of Blake Shelton’s self-titled debut album, ‘Blake Shelton’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2001), included the following:

Bobby Braddock (synth strings)
Alison Brown (5-string banjo)
Chad Cromwell (drums)
Dan Dugmore (pedal steel guitar, lap steel guitar, Dobro)
Shannon Forrest (drums, percussion)
Steve Gibson (sitar)
Rob Hajacos and Andrea Zonn (fiddle)
Tim Lauer (accordion, keyboard, organ, piano, synthesizer)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica, Jew’s harp)
Alison Prestwood (bass guitar)
Mike Rojas (piano)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar, sitar)
Scott Sanders (lap steel guitar)
John Willis (acoustic guitar)

Blake Shelton’s self-titled debut album, ‘Blake Shelton’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2001), reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2001.

Various Artists: 'A Special Steamboat Christmas Gathering' (Steamboat Records, 2001)

In 2001, Steamboat Records released ‘A Special Steamboat Christmas Gathering’ (Steamboat Records, 2001), a various artists compilation, which was produced by Brent Rowan, and included the following tracks:

‘Christmas For Cowboys’ / this track featured Smokehouse
‘The Wonder’ / this track featured Tanya Tucker
‘Oh, Holy Night’ / this track featured Brittany Lamb
‘Blue Christmas’ / this track featured Alpine Posse
‘Star of Wonder’ / this track featured Mark D. Sanders
‘Hope’ / this track featured Mary Martin Stockdale
‘We Three Kings’ / this track featured Sleeping Giant
‘Colorado Christmas’ / this track featured Worried Men
‘Mary, Did You Know’ / this track featured Billy Dean
‘Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas’ / this track featured Shenanigans
‘Away In A Manger’ / this track featured Brent Rowan

On Tuesday 23 July 2002, Joe Nichols saw the release of ‘Man With A Memory’ (Universal South Records, 2002), which was produced by Brent Rowan, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘The Impossible’ (written by Kelley Lovelace and Lee Thomas Miller) (No.3, 2002) / this track was declared by Billboard as the tenth most-played country song on Amercian country music radio in 2003

‘Brokenheartsville’, which was written by Donny Kees, Blake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022), Randy Boudreaux and Clint Daniels
(No.1 for one week in March / April 2003)

‘She Only Smokes When She Drinks’ (written by Connie Harrington, Tim Nichols and Tony Martin)
(No.17, 2003)

‘Cool To Be A Fool’ (written by Joe Nichols, Steve Dean and Wil Nance)
(No.18, 2003)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘Man With A Memory’ (Universal South Records, 2002) also included the following tracks:

‘Joe’s Place’, which was written by Mike Dekle (Sunday 25 June 1944 – Thursday 24 February 2022) and Byron Hill)
‘Everything’s A Thing’ (written by Joe Nichols, Steve Dean and Wil Nance)
‘That Would Be Her’, which was written by Reed Nielsen (1950 – Saturday 15 November 2014) and Jeffrey Steele
‘Can’t Hold A Halo To You’ (written by Joe Nichols and Don Sampson)
‘You Can’t Break The Fall’ (written by Mark McClurg and Jerry Salley)
‘You Ain’t Heard Nothin’ Yet’ (written by Tim Menzies and Tony Haselden)
‘Life Don’t Have To Mean Nothin’ At All’, which was written by Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021)
‘Man With A Memory’, which was written by Charlie Black (Wednesday 23 November 1949 – Friday 23 April 2021) and Rory Bourke

Personnel involved in the recording of Joe Nichols‘ ‘Man With A Memory’ (Universal South Records, 2002) included the following:

Vinnie Colaiuta and Shannon Forrest (drums)
Eric Darken (percussion)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro)
Dan Dugmore, John Hughey (Wednesday 27 December 1933 – Sunday 18 November 2007) and Tommy White (steel guitar)
Vince Gill, Wes HightowerLiana Manis and Harry Stinson(background vocals)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
David Hungate (bass guitar)
Shane Keister (Wurlitzer)
Tim Lauer (accordion, Fender Rhodes, harmonium, keyboards, mellotron, organ, Wurlitzer)
Gordon Mote (piano)
Joe Nichols (lead vocals, background vocals)
Brent Rowan (acoustic guitar, baritone guitar, electric guitar, gut string guitar, hi-string guitar, tiple, background vocals)
Bryan Sutton (banjo, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, mandolin, national duolian)
Chris Thile (mandolin)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘Man With A Memory’ (Universal South Records, 2002) reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2002 and was ceritifed ‘Platinum’ by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for shipments of one million copies.

Joe Nichols‘ ‘Man With A Memory’ (Universal South Records, 2002) was the first production credit for session guitarist Brent Rowan, with whom Joe Nichols worked with on all subsequent albums.

‘Man With A Memory’ (Universal South Records, 2002) earned Joe Nichols a ‘Top New Male Vocalist’ Award from the Academy of Country Music (ACM), along with three Grammy Award nominations.

Between 1995 and 2002, McHayes frontman Wade Hayes was a solo artist, recording four studio albums, and charting more than a dozen singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart, including the No.1 single, ‘Old Enough To Know Better’, which was written by Wade Hayes and Chick Rains (Wednesday 5 November 1941 – Friday 21 January 2022), (No.1 for one week in February 1995).

After the poor performance of his fourth studio album, ‘Highways & Heartaches’ (Monument Records, 2000), Wade Hayes partnered with musician, Mark McClurg, who had previously played fiddle in Alan Jackson’s road band, The Strayhorns, to form the duo McHayes.

Signed to Universal South Records in 2003, McHayes charted one single, ‘It Doesn’t Mean I Don’t Love You’, which reached No.41 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2003.

McHayes also recorded an album, ‘Lessons In Lonely’, which was slated for release in mid-2003 under the production of Brent Rowan.  The album was never released, and the duo exited the recording roster at Universal South Records.

Blake Shelton: 'The Dreamer' (Warner Bros. Records, 2004)

On Tuesday 4 February 2004, Blake Shelton saw the release of ‘The Dreamer’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2004), which was produced by Bobby Braddock, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘The Baby’, which was written by Harley Allen (Monday 23 January 1956 – Wednesday 30 March 2011) and Michael White (No.1 for three weeks in early 2003)

‘Heavy Liftin’ (written by Boyd Houston Robert, George Teren and Rivers Rutherford) (No.32, 2003)

‘Playboys of The Southwestern World’, which was written by Randy VanWarmer (Wednesday 30 March 1955 – Monday 12 January 2004) and Neal Coty (No.24, 2003)

Blake Shelton’s ‘The Dreamer’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2004) also included the following tracks:

‘Asphalt Cowboy’ (written by Jeff Stevens and Kenny West)

‘In My Heaven’ (written by Rivers Rutherford and Bobby Pinson) / this track was also recorded by Mark Wills, who included it on ‘Loving Every Minute’ (Mercury Records, 2001)

‘The Dreamer’ (written by Blake Shelton)
‘My Neck of The Woods’ (written by Blake Shelton, Don Ellis and Billy Montana)
‘Underneath The Same Moon’ (written by Sharon Vaughn Bellamy and John Rich)

‘Georgia In A Jug’ (written by Bobby Braddock) / the original version of this track was recorded by Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 – Wednesday 19 February 2003), who included it on ‘Take This Job & Shove It’ (Epic Records, 1977); Johnny Paycheck’s version of this track reached No.17 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1977, and No.6 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1977

‘Someday’ (written by Kathy Locke and Bobby Braddock)

Personnel involved in the recording of Blake Shelton’s ‘The Dreamer’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2004) included the following:

Bobby Braddock (keyboards)
Larry Cordle, Neal Coty, Melodie Crittenden, Wes Hightower, Blue Miller, Danny Myrick, John Rich, John Wesley Ryles, Leslie Satcher, Sharon Vaughn Bellamy and Dennis Wilson (background vocals)
Dan Dugmore and Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Shannon Forrest and Greg Morrow (drums)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Tim Lauer and Michael Rojas (keyboards)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, trumpet, vibraphone)
Russ Pahl (banjo)
Alison Prestwood and Michael Rhodes (Wednesday 16 September 1953 – Saturday 4 March 2023) (bass guitar)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar, baritone guitar, Wurlitzer electric piano)
Blake Shelton (lead vocals, acoustic guitar)
John Willis (acoustic guitar)

Blake Shelton’s ‘The Dreamer’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2004) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2004, and No.8 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2004.

Julie Roberts: 'Julie Roberts' (Mercury Records, 2004)

In 2004, Julie Roberts signed to Mercury Nashville Records and saw the release, on Tuesday 25 May 2004, of her self-titled debut album, ‘Julie Roberts’ (Mercury Records, 2004), which was produced by Brent Rowan, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Break Down Here’ (written by Jess Brown and Patrick Jason Matthews) (No.18, 2004)

Trace Adkins: 'Comin' on Strong' (Capitol Nashville Records, 2003)

Trace Adkins recorded ‘Break Down Here’ (written by Jess Brown and Patrick Jason Matthews) as ‘I’d Sure Hate To Break Down Here’ and included it on ‘Comin’ On Strong’ (Capitol Nashville Records, 2003); it was not released as a single.

‘The Chance’ (written by Deanna Bryant and Liz Hengber) (No.47, 2004)

‘Wake Up Older’ (written by Lisa Carver) (No.46, 2005)

Julie Roberts’ self-titled debut album, ‘Julie Roberts’ (Mercury Records, 2004), also included the following tracks:

‘You Ain’t Down Home’, which was written by Jamie O’Hara (Friday 18 August 1950 – Thursday 7 January 2021) / Jamie O’Hara had been one half of the 1980s duo The O’Kanes, the other member being Kieran Kane

Jann Browne: 'Tell Me Why' (Curb Records, 1990)

Jann Browne recorded ‘You Ain’t Down Home’, which was written by Jamie O’Hara (Friday 18 August 1950 – Thursday 7 January 2021) and included the track on ‘Tell Me Why’ (Curb Records, 1990).

The O'Kanes (Kieran Kane & Jamie O'Hara)

Jamie O’Hara (Friday 18 August 1950 – Thursday 7 January 2021) had been one half of the 1980s duo The O’Kanes, the other member being Kieran Kane.

‘Pot of Gold’ (written by Frank Rogers and Chris Stapleton)
‘Unlove Me’ (written by Patrick Jason Matthews and Paul Overstreet)
‘Just ‘Cause We Can’ (written by Frank Rogers and Chris Stapleton)
‘If You Had Called Yesterday’ (written by Cory Batten, Kent Blazy and Wendell Mobley)
‘No Way Out’ (written by Marcus Hummon and Darrell Scott)

Suzy Bogguss: 'Give Me Some Wheels' (Liberty Records, 1996)

Suzy Bogguss recorded ‘No Way Out’ (written by Marcus Hummon and Darrell Scott) and included the track on ‘Give Me Some Wheels’ (Liberty Records, 1996); Suzy Bogguss’ version of ‘No Way Out’ reached No.53 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1996.

‘I Can’t Get Over You’ (written by Julie Miller)
‘Rain On A Tin Roof’ (written by Chris Stapleton and Trent Willmon)

Personnel involved in the recording of Julie Roberts‘ self-titled debut album, ‘Julie Roberts’ (Mercury Records, 2004), included the following:

Eric Darken (percussion on ‘Just ‘Cause We Can’ and ‘No Way Out’)
Shannon Forrest (drums on all tracks)
Vince Gill (background vocals on ‘Unlove Me’ and ‘The Chance’)
Wes Hightower (background vocals on all tracks, except ‘Break Down Here’ and ‘The Chance’)
David Hungate (bass guitar on all tracks)
Tim Lauer (pump organ on ‘Break Down Here’, accordion on ‘Pot of Gold’; keyboards on ‘If You Had Called Yesterday’ and ‘I Can’t Get Over You’)
Delbert McClinton (background vocals on ‘No Way Out’)
Pat McLaughlin (background vocals on ‘Break Down Here’)
Gordon Mote (keyboards on all tracks)
Al Perkins (steel guitar on ‘Unlove Me’ and ‘I Can’t Get Over You’)
Julie Roberts (lead vocals on all tracks)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar on all tracks; background vocals and hand claps on ‘No Way Out’)
Bryan Sutton (acoustic guitar on all tracks; mandocello on ‘Break Down Here’ and ‘Pot of Gold’)

Julie Roberts‘ self-titled debut album, ‘Julie Roberts’ (Mercury Records, 2004), which was certified ‘Gold’ by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2004.

Joe Nichols: 'Revelation' (Universal South Records, 2004)

On Tuesday 29 June 2004, Joe Nichols saw the release of ‘Revelation’ (Universal South Records, 2004), which was produced by Brent Rowan, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Tracks & Singles Chart:

‘If Nobody Believed in You’, which was written by Harley Allen (Monday 23 January 1956 – Wednesday 30 March 2011) (No.10, 2004)

‘What’s A Guy Gotta Do’ (written by Don Sampson, Joe Nichols and Kelley Lovelace)
(No.4, 2004)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘Revelation’ (Universal South Records, 2004) also included the following tracks:

‘The Shade’ (written by Shane Decker and Troy Jones)
‘Singer In A Band’ (written by Tim Menzies and Gary Harrison)
‘Don’t Ruin It For The Rest of Us’ (written by Annie Tate, Sam Tate, Jimmy Ritchey and Georgia Middleman)
‘I Wish That Wasn’t All’ (written by Chris DuBois and Ashley Gorley)
‘If I Ever Get Her Back’ (written by Billy Yates and Billy Lawson)

‘Farewell Party’, which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 – Thursday 26 July 2007)
/ this track was also recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on ‘Reflections‘ (Capitol Records, 1978) / Gene Watson‘s version of this track reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1979, and No.9 on the Canadian RPM Singles Chart in 1979

‘Things Like That (These Days)’, which was written by Mike Dekle (Sunday 25 June 1944 – Thursday 24 February 2022) and Byron Hill)

‘Revelation’ (written by Bobby Braddock)
‘No Time To Cry’ (written by Iris DeMent)

Personnel involved in the recording of Joe Nichols‘ ‘Revelation’ (Universal South Records, 2004) included the following:

Terry Crisp, Dan Dugmore, John Hughey (Wednesday 27 December 1933 – Sunday 18 November 2007) and Tommy White (steel guitar)
Eric Darken (percussion, vibraphone)
Stuart Duncan and Larry Franklin (fiddle)
Shannon Forrest (drums)
Wes Hightower and Liana Manis (background vocals)
David Hungate (bass guitar)
Rob Ickes (Dobro)
Tim Lauer (Fender Rhodes, organ, pump organ)
Gordon Mote (piano, synthesizer, synthesizer pads, Wurlitzer)
Brent Rowan (6-string bass, Dobro, 12-string guitar, keyboards, percussion, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, baritone guitar)
Brian Spradlin (electric guitar)
Bryan Sutton (acoustic guitar, hi-string guitar, mandolin)
Joe Nichols (lead vocals)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘Revelation’ (Universal South Records, 2004) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2004, and No.23 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2004.

On Tuesday 28 September 2004, Joe Nichols saw the release of ‘A Traditional Christmas’ (Universal South Records, 2004), which was produced by Brent Rowan, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘The Christmas Song’, which was written by Mel Tormé (Sunday 13 September 1925 – Saturday 5 June 1999) and Robert Wells (Sunday 15 October 1922 – Monday 28 September 1998) (No.60, 2005)

‘Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas’ (written by Ralph Blane and Hugh Martin)
(No.57, 2004)

‘I’ll Be Home For Christmas’, which was written by Kim Gannon, Walter Kent and Buck Ram (Thursday 21 November 1907 – Tuesday 1 January 1991)
(No.56, 2005)

‘Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!’, which was written by Sammy Cahn (Wednesday 18 June 1913 – Friday 15 January 1993) and Jule Styne (Sunday 31 December 1905 – Tuesday 20 September 1994)
(No.37, 2005)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘A Traditional Christmas’ (Universal South Records, 2004) also included the following tracks:

‘Away In A Manger’ (traditional)
‘Silent Night’ (traditional)
‘White Christmas’, which was written by Irving Berlin (11 May 1888 – Friday 22 September 1989)
‘Silver Bells’, which was written by Raymond Bernard Evans (4 February 1915 – Thursday 15 February 2007) and Jay Livingston (28 March 1915 – Wednesday 17 October 2001)
‘Winter Wonderland’ (written by Felix Bernard and Richard B. Smith)
‘O, Holy Night’ (traditional)

Personnel involved in the recording of Joe Nichols‘ ‘A Traditional Christmas’ (Universal South Records, 2004) included the following:

Lisa Cochran and Wes Hightower (background vocals)
Shannon Forrest (drums)
Jim Hoke (accordion, autoharp, clarinet, harmonica, recorder, soprano saxophone, tin whistle)
David Hungate (upright bass)
Gordon Mote (organ, piano, synthesizer)
Joe Nichols (lead vocals)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar, keyboards)
Bryan Sutton (acoustic guitar, hi-string guitar, soloist)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘A Traditional Christmas’ (Universal South Records, 2004) reached No.47 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2004, and No.19 on the Billboard Top Holiday Albums Chart in 2004.

Blake Shelton: 'Blake Shelton's Barn & Grill' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2004)

On Tuesday 26 October 2004, Blake Shelton saw the release of ‘Blake Shelton’s Barn & Grill’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2004), which was produced by Bobby Braddock, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘When Somebody Knows You That Well’, which was written by Jimmy Melton and Harley Allen (Monday 23 January 1956 – Wednesday 30 March 2011) (No.37, 2004) / String arrangements on this track by Bobby Braddock and Tim Lauer, conducted by Tim Lauer, and Michael Goode, copyist

‘Some Beach’ (written by Rory Lee Feek and Paul Overstreet) (No.1 for four weeks in late 2004 / early 2005)

‘Goodbye Time’ (written by James Dean Hicks and Roger Murrah) (No.10, 2005)

‘Nobody But Me’ (written by Shawn Camp and Phillip White) (No.4, 2005)

Blake Shelton’s ‘Blake Shelton’s Barn & Grill’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2004) also included the following tracks:

‘Good Old Boy, Bad Old Boyfriend’ (written by Bobby Braddock)
‘Love Gets In The Way’ (written by Scott Joyce and Blake Shelton)
‘Cotton Pickin’ Time’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Even Stevens)
‘What’s On My Mind’ (written by Leslie Satcher and Jim Lauderdale)
‘On A Good Day’ (written by Blake Shelton, Tom Shapiro and Tony Martin)
‘The Bartender’, which was written by Harley Allen (Monday 23 January 1956 – Wednesday 30 March 2011)
‘I Drink’ (written by Mary Gauthier and Crit Harmon)

Personnel involved in the recording of Blake Shelton’s ‘Blake Shelton’s Barn & Grill’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2004) included the following:

David Angell, David Davidson and Connie Ellisor (violin)
Bobby Braddock (Minimoog, Wurlitzer electric piano right hand, synthesizer)
Byrd Burton (acoustic guitar)
Frank DeBretti Jr. (slide guitar)
Shannon Forrest (drums)
Paul Franklin (pedal steel guitar, lap steel guitar)
Sonny Garrish (pedal steel guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Scott Joyce (keyboards)
Tim Lauer (Hammond B-3 organ, Wurlitzer electric piano left hand, keyboards)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica, Jew’s harp and whistling)
Gordon Mote and Mike Rojas (piano)
Alison Prestwood (bass guitar)
Carole Rabinowitz (cello)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar, bass guitar)
Ed Seay (additional crash cymbals)
Blake Shelton (acoustic guitar)
Shawn Simpson (shaker)
Bryan Sutton (acoustic guitar, 5-string banjo)
Kris Wilkinson (viola)
John Willis (acoustic guitar)
Glenn Worf (bass guitar)
Jonathan Yudkin (fiddle, backing fiddle, violin, viola, cello)

Backing vocalists involved in the recording of Blake Shelton’s ‘Blake Shelton’s Barn & Grill’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2004) included Melodie Crittenden, Wes Hightower, Carl Jackson, Blue Miller, Danny Myrick, Paul Overstreet, Rachel Proctor, John Wesley Ryles, Leslie Satcher, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young.

Blake Shelton’s ‘Blake Shelton’s Barn & Grill’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2004) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2005.

 

On Tuesday 25 October 2005, Joe Nichols saw the release of ‘III’ (Universal South Records, 2005), which was produced by Buddy Cannon, Byton Gallimore and Brent Rowan, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Tracks & Singles Chart:

‘Tequila Makes Her Clothes Fall Off’ (written by John Wiggins and Gary Hannan) (No.1 for one week in December 2005)

‘Size Matters (Someday)’, which was written by Mike Dekle (Sunday 25 June 1944 – Thursday 24 February 2022) and Byron Hill
(No.9, 2006)

‘I’ll Wait For You’, which was written by Bill Anderson and Harley Allen (Monday 23 January 1956 – Wednesday 30 March 2011)
(No.7, 2006)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘III’ (Universal South Records, 2005) also included the following tracks:

‘Freedom Feels Like Lonely’ (written by Mark Nesler, Billy Currington and Tony Martin)
‘Talk Me Out of Tampa’ (written by Don Sampson and Casey Beathard)
‘That’s What Love’ll Get You’ (written by Mark D. Sanders and Carson Chamberlain)

‘Should I Come Home (Or Should I Go Crazy?)’ (written by Joe Allen)
/ the original version of this track was recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on ‘Should I Come Home‘ (Capitol Records, 1979); Gene Watson‘s version of this track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1979, and No.6 on the Canadian RPM Singles Chart in 1979

‘My Old Friend The Blues’ (written by Steve Earle)
‘As Country As She Gets’ (written by Jim Collins, Wendell Mobley and Tony Martin)
‘Honky Tonk Girl’ (written by Steve Dean, Wil Nance and Joe Nichols)
‘Just A Little More’ (written by Joe Nichols and Donny Lowery)

Personnel involved in the recording of Joe Nichols‘ ‘III’ (Universal South Records, 2005) included the following:

Wyatt Beard, Morgane Hayes, Wes Hightower, Liana Manis and Russell Terrell (backing vocals)
Tom Bukovac, Kenny Greenberg and Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Terry Crisp, Dan Dugmore, Paul Franklin, Al Perkins and Robby Turner (pedal steel guitar)
Chad Cromwell (drums)
Stuart Duncan, Larry Franklin, Rob Hajacos and Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
Shannon Forrest (drums, percussion)
Steve Gibson (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
John A. Hobbs (Saturday 11 February 1928 – Wednesday 12 June 2019) (piano, Wurlitzer)
David Hungate, Gary Lunn and Larry Paxton (bass guitar)
Kirk ‘Jelly Roll’ Johnson (harmonica)
Tim Lauer (pump organ)
B. James Lowry (acoustic guitar, resonator guitar)
Randy McCormick (keyboards, Hammond organ, piano)
Gordon Mote (Fender Rhodes, Hammond organ, piano, Wurlitzer)
Steve Nathan (Hammond organ, piano)
Brent Rowan (bass guitar, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, keyboards)
Bryan Sutton (acoustic guitar, mandolin)
Joe Nichols (lead vocals, background vocals)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘III’ (Universal South Records, 2005), which reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2005, and No.7 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2005, received ‘Gold’ certification from the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).

Blake Shelton: 'Pure BS' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2007)

On Tuesday 1 May 2007, Blake Shelton saw the release of ‘Pure BS’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2007), which was produced by Bobby Braddock, Brent Rowan and Paul Worley, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Don’t Make Me’ (written by Marla Cannon-Goodman, Deanna Bryant and Dave Berg) (No.12, 2007) / this track was produced by Brent Rowan

‘The More I Drink’ (written by David Lee Murphy, Chris DuBois and Dave Turnbull) (No.19, 2007) / this track was produced by Brent Rowan

‘Home’ (written by Michael Bublé, Alan Chang and Amy Foster-Gillies) (No.1 for one week in July 2008) / this track was produced by Brent Rowan / this track was re-recorded by Blake Shelton, with additional lyrics and a guest vocal from Michael Buble, and included it on ‘Cheers, It’s Christmas’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2012), which was produced by Scott Hendricks and Brent Rowan

Blake Shelton’s ‘Pure BS’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2007) also included the following tracks:

‘This Can’t Be Good’ (written by Timothy DeArmitt and Blake Shelton) / this track was produced by Paul Worley

‘I Don’t Care’ (written by Dean Dillon and Casey Beathard) / this track was produced by Bobby Braddock/ this track was also included on Blake Shelton’s ‘Startin’ Fires’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2008)

‘She Don’t Love Me’ (written by Casey Beathard and Jay Knowles) / this track was produced by Brent Rowan

‘Back There Again’ (written by Tom Douglas) / this track was produced by Paul Worley

‘It Ain’t Easy Bein’ Me’ (written by Chris Knight and Craig Wiseman) / this track was produced by Brent Rowan

‘What I Wouldn’t Give’ (written by Charlie Brown, Tommy Karlas and Charley Stefl) / this track was produced by Paul Worley

‘I Have Been Lonely’ (written by Blake Shelton, Rachel Proctor and Michael Kosser) / this track was produced by Bobby Braddock

‘She Can’t Get That’ (written by Billy Lawson and Wally Wilson) / this track was produced by Bobby Braddock

‘The Last Country Song’ (written by Bobby Braddock, Blake Shelton and Michael Kosser) / this track, which featured guest vocals from John Anderson and George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013), was produced by Bobby Braddock

Blake Shelton’s ‘Pure BS’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2007) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2007.

On Tuesday 21 August 2007, Joe Nichols saw the release of ‘Real Things’ (Universal South Records, 2007), which was produced by Brent Rowan and Mark Wright, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Tracks & Singles Chart:

‘Another Side of You’ (written by Carson Chamberlain and Jamey Johnson) (No.17, 2007)

‘It Ain’t No Crime’ (written by Tony Martin, Tom Shapiro and Mark Nesler)
(No.16, 2007)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘Real Things’ (Universal South Records, 2007) also included the following tracks:

‘Real Things’ (written by John Brown and Billy Dean)
‘Who Are You When I’m Not Looking’ (written by John Wiggins and Earl Bud Lee)
‘Comin’ Back In A Cadillac’ (written by Ben Daniels, Clint Daniels, Rob McNelley and Lynn Hutton)
‘My Whiskey Years’ (written by Tom Hambridge and Jeffrey Steele)
‘All Good Things’ (written by Dean Dillon and Scotty Emerick)
‘Let’s Get Drunk & Fight’ (written by Chris Lindsey, Aimee Mayo, Troy Verges and Aaron Lines)
‘Ain’t Nobody Gonna Take That From Me’ (written by Rivers Rutherford, Sam Tate and Annie Tate)
‘She’s All Lady’ (written by Jamey Johnson and Dallas Davidson)
‘The Difference Is Night & Day’ (written by Walt Aldridge, Joe Nichols and John Paul White)
‘All I Need Is A Heart’ (written by Scott Emerick and John Scott Sherrill)
‘If I Could Only Fly’, which was written by Blaze Foley (Sunday 18 December 1949 – Wednesday 1 February 1989) / this track was a duet with Lee Ann Womack

Personnel involved in the recording of Joe Nichols‘ ‘Real Things’ (Universal South Records, 2007) included the following:

Perry Coleman (background vocals on ‘Comin’ Back In A Cadillac’ and ‘It Ain’t No Crime’)
J.T. Corenflos (Wednesday 6 November 1963 – Saturday 24 October 2020) (electric guitar)
Eric Darken (percussion)
Shannon Forrest (drums)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar, Dobro)
Morgane Hayes (background vocals on ‘It Ain’t No Crime’ and additional background vocals on ‘My Whiskey Years’, ‘Let’s Get Drunk & Fight’, ‘The Difference Is Night & Day’ and ‘If I Could Only Fly’)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle, mandolin)
Wes Hightower (background vocals)
Jim Hoke (horns on ‘Comin’ Back In A Cadillac’)
John Hughey (Wednesday 27 December 1933 – Sunday 18 November 2007) (steel guitar on ‘If I Could Only Fly’)
David Hungate (bass guitar, upright bass)
Mac McAnally (acoustic guitar, reso-electric guitar)
Gordon Mote (piano, Wurlitzer, Fender Rhodes, B3 organ)
Joe Nichols (lead vocals, background vocals on ‘The Difference Is Night & Day’ and ‘All I Need Is A Heart’)
Brent Rowan (acoustic guitar, electric guitar, Tic tac bass, Wurlitzer, horn arrangement, slide guitar, mellotron, sitar, 6-string bass, 12-string acoustic guitar, piano, harmonium)
Bryan Sutton (acoustic guitar, mandolin, mandocello)
Craig Young (bass guitar on ‘Ain’t Nobody Gonna Take That from Me’ and ‘If I Could Only Fly’)
Universal Records South Family Singers (vocals on ‘Let’s Get Drunk & Fight’)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘Real Things’ (Universal South Records, 2007) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2007, and reached No.23 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2007.

Joe Nichols' 'Real Things' (Hump Head Country / Wrasse Records, 2007)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘Real Things’ (Universal South Records, 2007) was released, in England, by Hump Head Country / Wrasse Records.

Joe Nichols: 'Revelation' (Universal South Records, 2004)

Overall, Joe Nichols‘ four studio albums for Universal South Records, ‘Man With A Memory’ (Universal South Records, 2002), ‘Revelation’ (Universal South Records, 2004), ‘III’ (Universal South Records, 2005) and ‘Real Things’ (Universal South Records, 2007) accounted for ten singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart, including two No.1 singles and five Top Ten hit singles.

Gene Watson: 'In A Perfect World' (Shanachie Records, 2007)

On Tuesday 25 September 2007, Gene Watson saw the release of ‘In A Perfect World‘ (Shanachie Records, 2007), which was produced by Brent Rowan, and included one track, which was released as a single on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘I Buried Our Love’ (written by Tim Menzies and Tony Haselden) / this track, which was released as a single on Monday 20 August 2007, did not chart

Personnel involved in the recording of ‘I Buried Our Love’ included the following:

John Gardner (drums, percussion)
David Smith (bass guitar)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Bobby All (passed away on Thursday 19 March 2009) (acoustic guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (mandolin)
Gregg Galbraith (electric guitar)
Brent Rowan (Dobro, Wurlitzer, acoustic guitar)
Wes Hightower (background vocals)

Gene Watson‘s ‘In A Perfect World‘ (Shanachie Records, 2007) also included the following tracks:

‘Don’t You Ever Get Tired (of Hurting Me)’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010)

Personnel involved in the recording of ‘Don’t You Ever Get Tired (of Hurting Me)’ included the following:

Shannon Forrest (drums)
David Smith (bass guitar)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Bobby All (passed away on Thursday 19 March 2009) (acoustic guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
Gregg Galbraith (electric guitar)
Morgane Hayes and Wes Hightower (background vocals)

‘Let Me Be The First To Go’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)

Personnel involved in the recording of ‘Let Me Be The First To Go’ included the following:

Shannon Forrest (drums)
David Smith (bass guitar)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Bobby All (passed away on Thursday 19 March 2009) (acoustic guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
Gregg Galbraith (electric guitar)
Vince Gill and Wes Hightower (background vocals)

‘What Was I Thinking’ (written by Skip Ewing and James Dean Hicks)

Personnel involved in the recording of ‘What Was I Thinking’ included the following:

John Gardner (drums)
David Smith (bass guitar)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Bobby All (passed away on Thursday 19 March 2009) (acoustic guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
Gregg Galbraith (electric guitar)
Morgane Hayes and Wes Hightower (background vocals)

‘Today I Started Loving You Again’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 – Monday 24 April 2006)

Personnel involved in the recording of ‘Today I Started Loving You Again’ included the following:

Shannon Forrest (drums)
David Smith (bass guitar)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Bobby All (passed away on Thursday 19 March 2009) (acoustic guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
Gregg Galbraith (electric guitar)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar solo)
Lee Ann Womack (background vocals) 

‘In A Perfect World’, which was written by Harley Allen (Monday 23 January 1956 – Wednesday 30 March 2011) and Tim Menzies

Personnel involved in the recording of ‘In A Perfect World’ included the following:

Shannon Forrest (drums)
David Smith (bass guitar)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Bobby All (passed away on Thursday 19 March 2009) (acoustic guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
Gregg Galbraith (electric guitar)
Brent Rowan (Fender Rhodes)
Joe Nichols, Morgane Hayes and Wes Hightower (background vocals)

‘She’s Already Gone’ (written by Tim Menzies)

Personnel involved in the recording of ‘She’s Already Gone’ included the following:

Shannon Forrest (drums)
David Smith (bass guitar)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Bobby All (passed away on Thursday 19 March 2009) (acoustic guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
Gregg Galbraith (electric guitar)
Brent Rowan (Fender Rhodes)
Wes Hightower (background vocals)

‘Together Again’, which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006)

Personnel involved in the recording of ‘Together Again’ included the following:

John Gardner (drums)
David Smith (bass guitar)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Bobby All (passed away on Thursday 19 March 2009) (acoustic guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
Gregg Galbraith (electric guitar)
Brent Rowan (gut string guitar)
Rhonda Vincent (background vocals)

‘This Side of The Door’ (written by Tim Menzies and Shawn Camp)

Personnel involved in the recording of ‘This side of The Door’ included the following:

John Gardner (drums)
David Smith (bass guitar)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Bobby All (passed away on Thursday 19 March 2009) (acoustic guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
Gregg Galbraith and Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Brent Rowan (gut string guitar)
Mark Chesnutt and Wes Hightower (background vocals)

‘A Good Place To Turn Around’ (written by J. Matthews, Rebecca Lynn Howard and Jon Mabe)

Personnel involved in the recording of ‘A Good Place To Turn Around’ included the following:

Shannon Forrest (drums)
David Smith (bass guitar)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Bobby All (passed away on Thursday 19 March 2009) (acoustic guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle, mandolin)
Gregg Galbraith (electric guitar)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar solo, B-3 Organ)
Connie Smith and Wes Hightower (background vocals)

‘Like I Wasn’t Even There’ (written by Wes Hightower, Tim Menzies and Monty Criswell)

Personnel involved in the recording of ‘Like I Wasn’t Even There’ included the following:

John Gardner (drums)
David Smith (bass guitar)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Bobby All (passed away on Thursday 19 March 2009) (acoustic guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
Gregg Galbraith (electric guitar)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar, electric keyboards)
Morgane Hayes and Wes Hightower (background vocals)

Gene Watson‘s ‘In A Perfect World‘ (Shanachie Records, 2007), which was produced by Brent Rowan, included the following sleeve notes:

‘A special thanks to Randall Grass and the great staff at Shanachie Records for allowing me to make this record.

Thanks to some of the greatest musicians I’ve ever had the pleasure of working with: ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022), Shannon Forrest, John Gardner, Sonny Garrish, Bobby All (passed away on Thursday 19 March 2009), Gregg Galbraith, Aubrey Haynie and David Smith who added their unique talent to this record.  It was a true pleasure and honor to work with you.

To Brent Rowan, thank you for every minute you spent working on this record.  Your personal dedication to this project will never be forgotten.

To Craig White, thank you for your fine engineering skills.

To John Lytle, Sarah Brosmer, Hannah Sanford at Lytle Management Group – thank you for believing in me and tirelessly working on my behalf.

To Carrie Moore, my agent, thanks for keeping me on the road.

To Sean Brady, thank you for the great job you do managing the website.



To
Mark Chesnutt, Vince Gill, Lee Ann Womack, Connie Smith, Joe Nichols and Rhonda Vincent, I am so flattered for your great contribution on this record. Each of you makes this world a better place with the beauty of your music.  I couldn’t have asked for a better gift than you gave me.

To my Farewell Party Band, without you there would be no Gene Watson style.

Thanks to all my fans who have been so loyal throughout my career.

To Texas – you are my heart, my soul and my inspiration.

Most of all, thanks to God for my health and happiness and allowing me to continue to share the talent He has given me.

Gene Watson’

Gene Watson’s ‘In A Perfect World‘ (Shanachie Records, 2007) was produced by Brent Rowan; the album was recorded and mixed by Craig White at Curb Studios, Nashville, assisted by Greg Strizek.  Additional recording by Craig White and Brent Rowan took place at Curb Studios in Nashville, and Studio 44 in Nashville.

The mastering of Gene Watson’s ‘In A Perfect World‘ (Shanachie Records, 2007), which took place at Independent Mastering, 114 17th Avenue South in Nashville TN 37203 on Monday 9 July 2007, was undertaken by Eric Conn, Don Cobb and producer Brent Rowan.

Blake Shelton: 'Startin' Fires' (Warner Bros. Records, 2008)

On Tuesday 18 November 2008, Blake Shelton saw the release of ‘Startin’ Fires’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2008), which was produced by Scott Hendricks, Brent Rowan and Bobby Braddock, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘She Wouldn’t Be Gone’ (written by Jennifer Adan and Cory Batten) (No.1 for one week in February 2009) / this track, which was produced by Scott Hendricks, reached No.43 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 2009, and No.7 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 2009
 
‘I’ll Just Hold On’ (written by Ben Hayslip, Troy Olsen and Bryan Simpson) (No.8, 2009) / this track, which was produced by Scott Hendricks, reached No.40 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 2009

Blake Shelton’s ‘Startin’ Fires’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2008) also included the following tracks:

Green’ (written by George Teren and Craig Wiseman) / this track was produced by Scott Hendricks

‘Good At Startin’ Fires’ (written by Sherrié Austin, Will Rambeaux and John Stephan)
 / this track was produced by Scott Hendricks

‘100 Miles’ (written by Chris Stapleton and Craig Wiseman)
 / this track was produced by Scott Hendricks

‘Never Lovin’ You’ (written by Kendell Marvel and Chris Stapleton)
 / this track was produced by Scott Hendricks

‘Country Strong’ (written by Rhett Akins, Dallas Davidson and Ben Hayslip)
 / this track was produced by Scott Hendricks

‘Home Sweet Home’ (written by Rhett Akins, Dallas Davidson and Ben Hayslip)
 / this track was produced by Scott Hendricks

‘This Is Gonna Take All Night’ (written by Chris DuBois and Ashley Gorley)
/ this track was produced by Brent Rowan

‘Here I Am’ (written by Blake Shelton and Dean Dillon)
 / this track was produced by Scott Hendricks

‘I Don’t Care’ (written by Casey Beathard and Dean Dillon)
/ this track, which was produced by Bobby Braddock, was originally included on Blake Shelton’s ‘Pure BS’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2007)

‘Bare Skin Rug’ (written by Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert)
/ this track, which was a duet with Miranda Lambert, was produced by Scott Hendricks

Personnel involved in the recording of Blake Shelton’s ‘Startin’ Fires’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2008) included the following:

David Angell and David Davidson (violin)
Monisa Angell and Kristin Wilkinson (viola)
Bobby Braddock (string arrangements, strings)
Tom Bukovac (electric guitar, sitar)
Lisa Cochran, Perry Coleman, Melodie Crittenden, Chip Davis, Wes Hightower and Russell Terrell (background vocals)
Eric Darken (percussion, shaker)
Shannon Forrest, Chris McHugh and Greg Morrow (drums, percussion)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle, mandolin)
Mike Johnson (pedal steel guitar)
Miranda Lambert (duet vocals on ‘Bare Skin Rug’)
Tim Lauer (Hammond B-3 organ, string arrangements, strings)
B. James Lowry, Bryan Sutton and Ilya Toshinsky (acoustic guitar)
Anthony LaMarchina (cello)
Brent Mason and Brent Rowan (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Gordon Mote (Hammond B-3 organ, piano)
Blake Shelton (acoustic guitar, lead vocals)
Jimmie Lee Sloas, Glenn Worf and Craig Young (bass guitar)
Jonathan Yudkin (mandolin)

Blake Shelton’s ‘Startin’ Fires’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2008) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2008, and No.34 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2008.

On Tuesday 27 October 2009, Joe Nichols saw the release of ‘Old Things New’ (Universal South Records, 2009), which was produced by Brent Rowan and Mark Wright, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Tracks & Singles Chart:

‘Believers’ (written by Ashley Gorley, Wade Kirby and Bill Luther) (No.26, 2009)

‘Gimmie That Girl’ (written by Rhett Akins, Dallas Davidson and Ben Hayslip)
(No.1 for one week in May 2010)

‘The Shape I’m In’ (written by Rhett Akins, Dallas Davidson and Ben Hayslip)
(No.11, March 2011)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘Old Things New’ (Universal South Records, 2009) also included the following tracks:

‘It’s Me I’m Worried About’ (written by Tony Martin, Mark Nesler and Tom Shapiro)
‘Old Things New’ (written by Bill Anderson, Paul Overstreet and Buddy Cannon)
‘Man Woman’ (written by Shawn Camp and Marv Green)
‘Cheaper Than A Shrink’ (written by Bill Anderson, Buddy Cannon and Jamey Johnson)
‘This Bed’s Too Big’ (written by Gary Burr and Victoria Shaw)
‘We All Go Home’ (written by Jimmy Melton, Neal Coty and Michael Mobley)
‘An Old Friend of Mine’ (written by Rick Tiger and Brock Stalvey)

Personnel involved in the recording of Joe Nichols‘ ‘Old Things New’ (Universal South Records, 2009) included the following:

Lisa Cochran, Vince Gill, Wes Hightower, Russell Terrell and Perry Coleman (background vocals)
J.T. Corenflos (Wednesday 6 November 1963 – Saturday 24 October 2020) (electric guitar, baritone guitar)
Eric Darken (percussion)
Greg Droman, Kenny Greenberg, Brent Mason and James Mitchell (electric guitar)
Dan Dugmore, Paul Franklin and Mike Johnson (steel guitar)
Shannon Forrest (drums, percussion)
Larry Franklin and Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
David Hungate, Michael Rhodes (Wednesday 16 September 1953 – Saturday 4 March 2023) and Craig Young (bass guitar)
Charlie Judge (keyboards)
Shane Keister (Fender Rhodes, piano)
Tim Lauer (harmonica, piano, B-3 organ, Wurlitzer)
B. James Lowry, Mac McAnally and Ilya Toshinsky (acoustic guitar)
Gordon Mote (piano)
Steve Nathan (piano, B-3 organ, Wurlitzer)
Joe Nichols (lead vocals)
Brent Rowan (6-string bass, electric guitar, harmonium, solo)
Lonnie Wilson (drums)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘Old Things New’ (Universal South Records, 2009) reached No.15 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2009, and No.71 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2009.

Joe Nichols: 'Old Things New' (Hump Head Country / Wrasse Records, 2009)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘Old Things New’ (Universal South Records, 2009) was released, in England, by Hump Head Country / Wrasse Records.

Charley Pride: 'Christmas in My Hometown' (RCA Records, 1970)

In November 1970, Charley Pride (Friday 18 March 1934 – Saturday 12 December 2020) saw the release of his first collection of Christmas songs, ‘Christmas In My Hometown’ (RCA Records, 1970); the title track reached No.11 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1970.

Charley Pride‘s first collection of Christmas songs, ‘Christmas In My Hometown’ (RCA Records, 1970), also included the following tracks:

‘Christmas In My Home Town’ (written by Lassaye Van Buren Holmes)
‘Deck The Halls (With Boughs of Holly)’ (traditional)
‘They Stood In Silent Prayer’, which was written by Alex Zanetis (Monday 15 May 1922 – Tuesday 13 September 2005)
‘Santa & The Kids’, which was written by Sue Lane and Charley Pride (Friday 18 March 1934 – Saturday 12 December 2020)
‘Silent Night’, which was written by Franz Xaver Gruber (25 November 1787 – 7 June 1863) and Joseph Mohr (11 December 1792 – 4 December 1848)
‘Little Drummer Boy’ (written by Katherine Davis, Henry Onorati and Harry Simeone)
‘Happy Christmas Day’, which was written by Sue Lane and Charley Pride (Friday 18 March 1934 – Saturday 12 December 2020)
‘The First Christmas Morn’ (written by Sue Lane)
‘Christmas & Love’ (written by Lassaye Van Buren Holmes)
‘O, Holy Night’ (written by Adolphe Adam and John Sullivan Dwight)
‘Out of The East’ (written by Harry Noble)
‘Christmas Without Mary’, which was written by Blake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022), William Shore and David Wills
‘Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!’, which was written by Sammy Cahn (Wednesday 18 June 1913 – Friday 15 January 1993) and Jule Styne (Sunday 31 December 1905 – Tuesday 20 September 1994)

Charley Pride: 'Christmas In My Home Town' (Music City Records, 2013 / RCA Victor Records, 1970)

In 2013, Charley Pride‘s ‘Christmas In My Home Town’ (RCA Victor Records, 1970) was re-issued, on CD, by Music City Records, complete with three bonus tracks, ‘Out of The East’ (written by Harry Noble), ‘Christmas Without Mary’, which was written by Blake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022), William Shore and David Wills, and ‘Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!’, which was written by Sammy Cahn (Wednesday 18 June 1913 – Friday 15 January 1993) and Jule Styne (Sunday 31 December 1905 – Tuesday 20 September 1994).

Personnel involved in the recording of Charley Pride‘s ‘Christmas In My Home Town’ (RCA Victor Records, 1970) included the following (credits as listed on the 2013 liner notes of ‘Christmas In My Home Town’ for Music City Records):

Willie Ackerman (Monday 1 May 1939 – Thursday 13 December 2012), Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) and Jimmy Isabelle (drums)
Beegie Adair and Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Doris Allen, Milton Hackney, Bobby Becker, George Binkley, Jo Parker and Carol Walker (violin)
Joseph Babcock, Dolores Edgin, Hoyt Hawkins (Thursday 31 March 1927 – 1982), The Jordanaires, Millie Kirkham, Neal Matthews (Saturday 26 October 1929 – Friday 21 April 2000), Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007), The Nashville Edition, June Page, Lisa Silver, Raymond Walker and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019), Mark Casstevens, Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022), Jack Eubanks, Fred Newell, Brent Rowan, Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 – Wednesday 18 May 2005), Pete Wade and Chip Young (guitar)
David Briggs (piano, keyboards)
Jimmie Colvard (1943 – 1977), Larry Paxton, David Hungate, Junior Huskey and Joe Zinkan (bass)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988), Sonny Garrish and Lloyd Green (steel guitar)
Solie Fott (viola)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015), Rob Hajacos and Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Billy Grammer (rhythm guitar)
Mitch Humphries and Gary Prim (keyboards)
William Irwin (organ)
Farrell Morris (bells, percussion, vibraphone)
Robert Mowrey (viola)
Billy Sanford (bass, electric guitar)
Dale Sellers (electric guitar)
David Vaderkool and Gary Williams (cello)
Bergen White (bells)

Technical personnel involved in the recording of Charley Pride‘s ‘Christmas In My Home Town’ (RCA Victor Records, 1970) included the following (credits as listed on the 2013 liner notes of ‘Christmas In My Home Town’ for Music City Records):

‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013), Blake Mevis and Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017) (producer)
Doug Crider (assistant engineer)
Greg Gosselin (art direction, design, liner notes, project supervisor)
Bill Harris, Al Pachucki and Tom Pick (engineer)
Jack D. Johnson and Bergen White (arranger)
Les Ladd and Roy Shockley (recording technician)
Jimmy Moore (cover photo)
M.G. Wilder (mastering)

Joe Nichols: 'Never Gets Old' (Red Bow Records / Broken Bow Records, 2017)

On Friday 28 July 2017, Joe Nichols saw the release of ‘Never Gets Old’ (Red Bow Records / Broken Bow Records, 2017), which was produced by Tony Brown, Mickey Jack Cones and Brent Rowan, and included two tracks, which were released as singles:

‘Never Gets Old’ (written by Connie Harrington and Steve Moakler) / this track, which was produced by Brent Rowan, reached No.49 on the Billboard Airplay Chart in 2017

‘Billy Graham’s Bible’ (written by Neal Coty, Chris DuBois and Jimmy Melton)
/ this track, which was released as a single in 2018 and did not chart, was produced by Tony Brown, and was previously included on Joe Nichols’ ‘Crickets’ (Red Bow Records / Broken Bow Records, 2013)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘Never Gets Old’ (Red Bow / Broken Bow Records, 2017) also included the following tracks:

‘Diamonds Make Babies’ (written by Jim Beavers, Lee Thomas Miller and Chris Stapleton) / this track was produced by Brent Rowan

‘Girl In The Song’ (written by Neal Coty and Lynn Hutton)
/ this track was produced by Mickey Jack Cones

‘We All Carry Something’ (written by Westin Davis and Justin Weaver)
 / this track was produced by Mickey Jack Cones

‘I’d Sing About You’ (written by Chris Janson, Preston Brust and Chris Lucas)
 / this track was produced by Mickey Jack Cones

‘Breathless’ (written by Zach Crowell, Matt Jenkins and Jon Nite)
 / this track was produced by Mickey Jack Cones

‘Tall Boys’ (written by Monty Criswell, Shane Minor and Tom Shapiro)
 / this track was produced by Mickey Jack Cones

‘Hostage’ (written by Aaron Eshuis, Ryan Lafferty and Brett Tyler)
 / this track was produced by Mickey Jack Cones

‘So You’re Saying’ (written by Ross Copperman, Josh Kear and Chris Tompkins)
 / this track was produced by Mickey Jack Cones

‘This Side of The River’ (written by Jeremy Crady, Clint Daniels and Justin Lantz)
 / this track was produced by Mickey Jack Cones

‘Baby Got Back’ (written by Anthony Ray) 
/ this track, which featured special guest, comedian Darren Knight, was produced by Mickey Jack Cones

Personnel involved in the recording of Joe Nichols‘ ‘Never Gets Old’ (Red Bow Records / Broken Bow Records, 2017) included the following:

Eddie Bayers, Shannon Forrest and Lonnie Wilson (drums)
Pat Buchanan, J.T. Corenflos (Wednesday 6 November 1963 – Saturday 24 October 2020), Jeff King and Troy Lancaster (electric guitar)
Hailey Cirovski, Jackson Daniel Cones, Shannon Cones, Wes Hightower, Dave Salley and Russell Terrell (background vocals)
Mickey Jack Cones (acoustic guitar, electric guitar, keyboards, programming, background vocals)
David Dorn, Tony Harrell, Charlie Judge, Gordon Mote and Steve Nathan (keyboards)
Dan Dugmore, Mike Johnson and Russ Pahl (steel guitar)
Jeneé Fleenor and Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
Kenny Greenberg, B. James Lowry and Ilya Toshinsky (acoustic guitar)
Mark Hill (bass guitar)
Darren Knight (featured vocals on ‘Baby Got Back’)
Tim Lauer (accordion)
Joe Nichols (lead vocals)
Brent Rowan (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Brady Tilow (programming, background vocals)
Glenn Worf and Craig Young (bass guitar)

Joe Nichols‘ ‘Never Gets Old’ (Red Bow / Broken Bow Records, 2017) reached No.120 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2017, No.15 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2017, and No.6 on the Billboard Independent Albums Chart in 2017.

Brent Rowan: 'Classic Country' (Elias Music, 2020)

In September 2020, Brent Rowan saw the release of ‘Classic Country’ (Elias Music, 2020), which included the following tracks:

‘Still Wishin You Were Mine’
‘Another Love Like Mine’
‘Me & This Guitar’
‘You & Me’
‘By You’
‘Maybe I Will’
‘Everybody Thinks It’s Me’
‘Faithful & True’
‘In My Arms’
‘If You Ain’t A Cowboy’

Brent Rowan’s skill has earned him five nominations for ‘Instrumentalist of The Year’ from the Country Music Association (CMA).

Brent Rowan has also recorded a collection of his own compositions for acoustic guitar, ‘Bare Essentials’, and played on the soundtracks of more than a dozen films.

Gene Watson with acclaimed producer and musician Brent Rowan in 2007 (photo credit: Patricia Presley) / Brent Rowan produced Gene Watson's 'In A Perfect World' (Shanachie Records, 2007)

Gene Watson with acclaimed producer and musician Brent Rowan in 2007
(photo credit: Patricia Presley)
Brent Rowan produced Gene Watson’s ‘In A Perfect World‘ (Shanachie Records, 2007)

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