Gene Watson Peer’s Quote from Buzz Rabin: September 2019

Gene Watson’s Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as ‘the singer’s singer’ – and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson’s Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2019, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Buzz Rabin, which he submitted to this site, via postal mail, on Tuesday 17 September 2019.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Buzz Rabin who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online ‘celebration of a Lone Star Hero’.



Buzz Rabin

Buzz Rabin
This quote was submitted on Tuesday 17 September 2019.

‘Gene Watson has been one of my all-time favourite singers since day one.

The first time I heard him sing was in Houston, Texas; I think it was the early 1970s.

He sang ‘Today I Started Loving You Again’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 – Monday 24 April 2006).

I’d, of course, heard Haggard sing it many times, and thought, ‘that was it, the song had been sung’.

But, damn, Watson was right up there with Haggard – he nailed it.

Gene Watson: 'Between This Time & The Next Time' (MCA Records, 1981)

I met Gene, in 1981, I believe, shortly after his single release on my song, ‘Maybe I Should Have Been Listening’.

I met him at ‘The Stockyard’, a restaurant & club in Nashville, which was Buddy Killen’s place (Buddy Killen: Sunday 13 November 1932 – Wednesday 1 November 2006).

Gene was onstage when I walked in – I didn’t know he was gonna be there, just dumb luck.

He told me he had cut two more of my songs, ‘Even At It’s Worst, It’s Still The Best’ and ‘Maybe I Should Have Been Listening’ are both on the album, ‘Between This Time & The Next Time‘.

There’s a Wynn Stewart (Thursday 7 June 1934 – Wednesday 17 July 1985) / Jimmy Velvet song on that album also, that’s one of my favourites, ‘I’m Gonna Kill You’.

Gene Watson: 'Old Loves Never Die' (MCA Records, 1981)
Buzz Rabin: 'Cross Country Cowboy' (Elektra Records, 1974)

On a later album, ‘Old Loves Never Die‘ (MCA Records, 1981), Gene’s cut of ‘Roads & Other Reasons’.  This was never a single, but gets a lot of play – shows up on BMI statement almost every time.  This song was also on my album, ‘Cross Country Cowboy’ (Elektra Records, 1974).

Dallas Frazier‘s ‘Fourteen Carat Mind’ is also on Old Loves Never Die‘ (MCA Records, 1981) – Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2021).

Gene Watson: 'This Dream's On Me' (MCA Records, 1982)

Gene had also cut my song ‘Somethin’ ‘Bout Bein’ Gone’; this song is on the album, ‘This Dream’s On Me‘ (MCA Records, 1982).

I never had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Russ Reeder, who was so essential to Gene’s early career, and produced & co-produced his early stuff.

But, I called and spoke with him in the early ’80s when he was in Houston.  I was there with Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017), who was appearing at the world renowned Houston Rodeo.

Mr. Reeder had already scheduled a meeting in another city and had an evening flight.

I planned to meet him at a later date when I would be back in Houston.  But my schedule changed and we never met.  I regret that, I really liked him, from our conversations and what I’d heard from others.  And, he really liked my songs.

Gene Watson cuts on my songs are what every songwriter dreams of – a real singer interprets lyrics and sings with emotion.

Thank you, Gary Gene Watson, for hearing, believing in, and singing my songs.  Not only my career, but my life is better because of you.

Gene’s cuts on other songs are also among my favourites, Joe Allen‘s ‘Pick The Wildwood Flower’ among them; that’s where I learned that Gene Watson was Gary Gene.

I had heard the song, ‘Farewell Party’, which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 – Thursday 26 July 2007), at least 100 – 200 times, by others, around Texas and Louisiana, but never like Gene sang it.  Damn, he’s as good as it gets!

His early reputation around Houston, south-east, south and mid-Texas was legendary, and we all know why now.

Willie Nelson: 'Ride Me Back Home' (Sony Music / Legacy Recordings, 2019)

Lastly, Willie Nelson, another hero of mine, heard Gene’s cut on ‘Maybe I Should Have Been Listening’, and included it on his latest album, ‘Ride Me Back Home’ (Sony Music / Legacy Recordings, 2019).

Thanks again, Gene, and thanks, Willie!

Thank you, Sean, for this opportunity to say a few words about one of my country music heroes, Gene Watson’

Thank you, Buzz Rabin, for your support of Gene Watson.



About Buzz Rabin…

Buzz Rabin

Buzz Rabin was born Raybon Owen Busby, in Alexandria, Louisina on Friday 25 October 1940.


Ringo Starr: 'Beaucoups of Blues' (Apple Records, 1970)

Buzz Rabin is an acclaimed American songwriter, who is best known as one of the main contributors to Ringo Starr’s country music-oriented solo album, ‘Ringo Starr – Beaucoups of Blues’ (Apple Records, 1970).


Wynn Stewart: 'Wishful Thinking' (Bear Family Records, 2000)

On Tuesday 10 December 1968, Wynn Stewart (Thursday 7 June 1934 – Wednesday 17 July 1985) recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Since Baby’s Gone’ (co-written with Dave Pittman and Wynn Stewart) at Capitol Records recording studio, 1750 North Vine Street in Hollywood, California; the track remained un-issued until it was included on ‘Wishful Thinking’ (Bear Family Records, 2000), a 10-CD Box Set, which consisted of 274 tracks.

Everything Wynn Stewart (Thursday 7 June 1934 – Wednesday 17 July 1985) recorded for Intro Records, Capitol Records, Jackpot-Challenge Records, Copre Records, Playboy Records, RCA Records, and several other labels, including his own Win Records and Pretty World Records.


Wynn Stewart (Thursday 7 June 1934 - Wednesday 17 July 1985)

Wynn Stewart‘s recording of Buzz Rabin’s ‘Since Baby’s Gone’ (co-written with Dave Pittman and Wynn Stewart), which took place at Capitol Records recording studio, 1750 North Vine Street in Hollywood, California, was produced by Kenneth F. ‘Ken’ Nelson (19 January 1911 – Sunday 6 January 2008); the recording session number was 17598.


Jim Ed Brown: 'Remember Me' (RCA Victor Records, 1969)

Jim Ed Brown (Sunday 1 April 1934 – Thursday 11 June 2015) recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Man & Wife Time’ (co-written with Dave Pittman) and included the track on ‘Remember Me’ (RCA Victor Records, 1969); the track reached No.17 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969.


Ringo Starr: 'Beaucoups of Blues' (Apple Records, 1970)
Ringo Starr: 'Blast From The Past' (Apple Records, 1975)
Ringo Starr: 'Photograph: The Very Best of Ringo Starr' (Apple Records, 2007)

Ringo Starr recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Beaucoups of Blues’ and included the track on his country music-oriented solo album, ‘Ringo Starr – Beaucoups of Blues’ (Apple Records, 1970); the track, which reached No.87 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1970, and No.43 on the German pop music singles chart in 1970, was subsequently included on ‘Blast From The Past’ (Apple Records, 1975) and ‘Photograph: The Very Best of Ringo Starr’ (Apple Records, 2007).

On Friday 25 September 1970 (in the United Kingdom) and Monday 28 September 1970 (in the United States), Ringo Starr saw the release of his country music-oriented solo album, ‘Ringo Starr – Beaucoups of Blues’ (Apple Records, 1970), which was produced by Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988), and included the following tracks:

‘Beaucoups of Blues’ (written by Buzz Rabin) / this track was recorded on Thursday 25 June 1970 between 10:00pm and 1:00am
‘Love Don’t Last Long’ (written by Chuck Howard)
‘Fastest Growing Heartache In The West’, which was written by Larry Kingston (Sunday 10 August 1941 – Sunday 20 February 2005) and Fred Dycus
‘Without Her’ (written by Sorrells Pickard)
‘Woman of The Night’ (written by Sorrells Pickard)
‘I’d Be Talking All The Time’, which was written by Chuck Howard and Larry Kingston (Sunday 10 August 1941 – Sunday 20 February 2005)
‘$15 Draw’ (written by Sorrells Pickard)
‘Wine, Women & Loud Happy Songs’, which was written by Larry Kingston (Sunday 10 August 1941 – Sunday 20 February 2005)

‘I Wouldn’t Have You Any Other Way’ (writen by Chuck Howard) / this track featued backing vocals from Jeannie Kendall
‘Loser’s Lounge’ (written by Bobby Pierce)
‘Waiting’ (written by Chuck Howard)
‘Silent Homecoming’ (written by Sorrells Pickard)

On Monday 1 May 1995 (in the United Kingdom) and Tuesday 1 August 1995 (in the United States), Ringo Starr saw the re-issue, on CD, of his country music-oriented solo album, ‘Ringo Starr – Beaucoups of Blues’ (Apple Records, 1970), which included the following bonus tracks:

‘Coochy Coochy’ (written by Richard Starkey)

‘Nashville Jam’, which was written by Jim Buchanan, Charlie Daniels (Wednesday 28 October 1936 – Monday 6 July 2020), Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988), Dominic Joseph (D.J.) Fontana (Sunday 15 March 1931 – Wednesday 13 June 2018), Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008), Chuck Howard, Roy Huskey Jr. (Monday 17 December 1956 – Saturday 6 September 1997), Ben Keith (Saturday 6 March 1937 – Monday 26 July 2010), Jerry Kennedy, Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004), Grover Lavender, Charlie McCoy, Sorrells Pickard, Jerry Reed (Saturday 20 March 1937 – Monday 1 September 2008), George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 – Saturday 31 July 2010), Jerry Shook and Richard Starkey

Personnel involved in the recording of Ringo Starr’s country music-oriented solo album, ‘Ringo Starr – Beaucoups of Blues’ (Apple Records, 1970), included the following:

Ringo Starr (vocals, drums, acoustic guitar)
The Jordanaires (backing vocals)
Jeannie Kendall (backing vocals on ‘I Wouldn’t Have You Any Other Way’)
Chuck Howard, Charlie Daniels (Wednesday 28 October 1936 – Monday 6 July 2020), Jerry Kennedy, Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004), Sorrells Pickard, Jerry Reed (Saturday 20 March 1937 – Monday 1 September 2008) and Jerry Shook (guitar)
Ben Keith (Saturday 6 March 1937 – Monday 26 July 2010) and Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988) (pedal steel guitar)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) and Dominic Joseph (D.J.) Fontana (Sunday 15 March 1931 – Wednesday 13 June 2018) (drums)
Roy Huskey Jr. (Monday 17 December 1956 – Saturday 6 September 1997) (upright bass)
Jim Buchanan, George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 – Saturday 31 July 2010) and Grover Lavender (fiddle)
Charlie McCoy(harmonica)


David Rogers: 'She Don't Make Me Cry' (Columbia Records, 1971)

David Rogers (Friday 27 March 1936 – Tuesday 10 August 1993) recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Baby Don’t Cry’ and included the track on ‘She Don’t Make Me Cry’ (Columbia Records, 1971).


Sonny Throckmorton

In May 1973Sonny Throckmorton recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Angels In Red’ and included the track on ‘Wake Up, Judy’ (Capitol Records, 1973), an album which was produced by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004).


Buzz Rabin: 'Cross Country Cowboy' (Elektra Records, 1974)

In 1974, Buzz Rabin saw the release of ‘Cross Country Cowboy’ (Elektra Records, 1974), which was produced by Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988), and included the following tracks:

‘Cross Country Cowboy’ (part 1) (written by Buzz Rabin)
‘Travelin’ Music’ (written by Buzz Rabin)

Gene Watson: 'Old Loves Never Die' (MCA Records, 1981)

‘Roads & Other Reasons’ (written by Buzz Rabin) / this track was also recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on ‘Old Loves Never Die‘ (MCA Records, 1981)

‘Angels In Red’ (written by Buzz Rabin)
‘Little Darlin’s 1 Through 6’ (written by Buzz Rabin and Marvin Brantley)
‘Travelin’ Music’ (written by Buzz Rabin)
‘Death of A Derelict’ (written by Buzz Rabin)
‘The Drifter’ (written by Buzz Rabin)
‘Beaucoups of Blues’ (written by Buzz Rabin)
‘Travelin’ Music’ (written by Buzz Rabin)
‘Man & Wife Time’ (written by Buzz Rabin and Dave Pittman)
‘I Believe In Old Fashioned Jesus’ (written by Buzz Rabin)
‘This I Know’ (written by Buzz Rabin)
‘There’s A Jekyll Under Everybody’s Hyde’ (written by Buzz Rabin)
‘Travelin’ Music’
‘Cross Country Cowboy’
(part 2) (written by Buzz Rabin)

Personnel involved in the recording of Buzz Rabin’s ‘Cross Country Cowboy’ (Elektra Records, 1974) included the following:

Lea Jane Berinati, Sharon Vaughn and Wendy Suits (backing vocals)
Bill Humble and Hoyet Henry (bass)
Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 – Monday 24 August 1992) and Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988) (drums)
Lanny Avery (drums, tambourine)
Steve Baron (electric organ)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Jerry Shook (lead guitar)
Earl Ball (piano, electric organ)
J. Martin Johnson (rhythm guitar)
Jack Solomon (rhythm guitar, lead guitar)
Larry Sasser (steel guitar)
Buzz Rabin and Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010) (washboard)


David Allan Coe: 'The Mysterious Rhinestone Cowboy' (Columbia Records, 1974)

David Allan Coe recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Old Man, Tell Me’ (co-written with David Allan Coe) and included the track on ‘The Mysterious Rhinestone Cowboy’ (Columbia Records, 1974).


Jerry Lee Lewis: 'I-40 Country' (Mercury Records, 1974)

Jerry Lee Lewis (Sunday 29 September 1935 – Friday 28 October 2022) recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Alcohol of Fame’ and included the track on ‘I-40 Country’ (Mercury Records, 1974).


David Rogers: 'Hey There Girl' (Atlantic Records, 1974)

David Rogers (Friday 27 March 1936 – Tuesday 10 August 1993) recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘You Be You & I’ll Be Gone’ and included the track on ‘Hey There Girl’ (Atlantic Records, 1974).


Jody Miller: 'Here's Jody Miller' (Epic Records, 1977)

Jody Miller (Saturday 29 November 1941 – Thursday 6 October 2022) recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Maybe I Should Have Been Listening’ and included the track on ‘Here’s Jody Miller’ (Epic Records, 1977).


Rayburn Anthony: 'Maybe I Should Have Been Listening' (written by Buzz Rabin) / Polydor Records, 1978 / No.31 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978

In 1978, Rayburn Anthony saw the release, on Polydor Records, of ‘Maybe I Should Have Been Listening’ (written by Buzz Rabin), a non-album single, which reached No.31 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978.


Randy Cornor (Wednesday 28 July 1954 - Thursday 24 March 2022)

In November 1978, Randy Cornor (Wednesday 28 July 1954 – Thursday 24 March 2022) saw the release, on Texas-based Cherry Records, of a non-album single, ‘Hurt As Big As Texas’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Mike Kosser; the ‘B’ side was ‘Maybe You Should’ve Been Listening’ (written by Buzz Rabin), and both tracks were produced by A.V. Mittlestedt.


David Allan Coe: 'I've Got Something To Say' (Columbia Records, 1980)

David Allan Coe recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘If You’ll Hold The Ladder’ (co-written with Sara Rabin) and included the track on ‘I’ve Got Something To Say’ (Columbia Records, 1980).


David Wills

In 1980, David Wills saw the release of ‘The Light of My Life (Has Gone Out Again Tonight)’ (written by Buzz Rabin), a non-album single, which reached No.65 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1980.


Mel Tillis: 'Your Body is An Outlaw' (Elektra Records, 1980)

Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017) recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Your Body Is An Outlaw’ and included the track on ‘Your Body Is An Outlaw’ (Elektra Records, 1980); the track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1980.


Gene Watson: 'Between This Time & The Next Time' (MCA Records, 1981)

Gene Watson recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Maybe I Should Have Been Listening’ and included the track on ‘Between This Time & The Next Time‘ (MCA Records, 1981); the track reached No.23 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1981, and No.12 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1981.


Gene Watson: 'Old Loves Never Die' (MCA Records, 1981)

Gene Watson recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Even At It’s Worst, It’s Still The Best’ and included the track on ‘Old Loves Never Die‘ (MCA Records, 1981).

Gene Watson: 'Old Loves Never Die' (MCA Records, 1981)

Gene Watson recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Roads & Other Reasons’ and included the track on ‘Old Loves Never Die‘ (MCA Records, 1981).


David Allan Coe: 'Invictus (Means) Unconquered' (Columbia Records, 1981)

David Allan Coe recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘As Far As This Feeling Will Take Us’ (co-written with William ‘Flash’ Gordon) and included the track on ‘Invictus (Means) Unconquered’ (Columbia Records, 1981); this track was a duet with Karen Brooks.


Mel Tillis: 'It's a Long Way to Daytona' (Elektra Records, 1982)

Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017) recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘You’re The Only Song I Sing Today’ (co-written with Marvin Brantley) and included the track on ‘It’s A Long Way To Daytona’ (Elektra Records, 1982).

Mel Tillis: 'It's a Long Way to Daytona' (Elektra Records, 1982)

Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017) recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Why Ain’t Life The Way It’s Supposed To Be’ and included the track on ‘It’s A Long Way To Daytona’ (Elektra Records, 1982).


Gene Watson: 'This Dream's On Me' (MCA Records, 1982)

Gene Watson recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Somethin’ ‘Bout Being Gone’ and included the track on ‘This Dream’s On Me‘ (MCA Records, 1982).


Johnny Paycheck: 'Lovers & Losers' (Epic Records, 1982)

Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 – Wednesday 19 February 2003) recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘You’re The Only Song I Sing Today’ (co-written with Marvin Brantley) and included the track on ‘Lovers & Losers’ (Epic Records, 1982).


In 1983, Buzz Rabin’s ‘If You’ll Hold The Ladder’ (co-written with Sara Busby) was included on the soundtrack of the acclaimed movie, ‘Tender Mercies’.

'Tender Mercies' (directed by Bruce Beresford / screenplay by Albert Horton Foote Jr. / starring Robert Duvall, Tess Harper, Betty Buckley, Wilford Brimley, Ellen Barkin and Allan Hubbard / financed by EMI Films / distributed by Universal Pictures / released on Friday 4 March 1983)

‘Tender Mercies’ was a 1983 American drama film, which was directed by Bruce Beresford from a screenplay by Albert Horton Foote Jr. (14 March 1916 – Wednesday 4 March 2009), and focused on Mac Sledge, a recovering alcoholic country music singer, who seeks to turn his life around through his relationship with a young widow and her son in rural Texas.  Robert Duvall played the role of Mac, and the supporting cast included Tess Harper, Betty Buckley, Wilford Brimley, Ellen Barkin and Allan Hubbard.

Financed by EMI Films and distributed by Universal Pictures, ‘Tender Mercies’ was shot largely in Waxahachie, Texas.  Robert Duvall, who sang his own songs in the film, drove more than 600 miles (966 km) throughout Texas, tape recording local accents and playing in country music bands to prepare for the role.

‘Tender Mercies’ was released on Friday 4 March 1983, in a limited number of theatres.  Although unsuccessful at the box office, the movie was critically acclaimed and earned five Academy Award nominations, including one for Best Picture.  ‘Tender Mercies’ won Oscars for ‘Best Original Screenplay’ for Albert Horton Foote Jr. (14 March 1916 – Wednesday 4 March 2009) and ‘Best Actor’ for Robert Duvall.


Hank Williams Junior: 'Strong Stuff' (Elektra Records, 1983)

Hank Williams Jr. recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘In The Arms of Cocaine’ (co-written with William ‘Flash’ Gordon and Hank Williams Jr.) and included the track on ‘Strong Stuff’ (Elektra Records, 1983).


Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022) recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Touch Me With More Than Your Hands’ and included the track on ‘Lyin’ Cheatin’ Woman Chasin’ Honky Tonkin’ Whiskey Drinkin’ You’ (MCA Records, 1983).


David Allan Coe: 'Just Divorced' (Columbia Records, 1984)

David Allan Coe recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘I Wanna Know I’m Goin’ Home’ and included the track on ‘Just Divorced’ (Columbia Records, 1984).


George Strait: 'Something Special' (MCA Records, 1985)

George Strait recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘You Sure Got This Ol’ Redneck Feelin’ Blue’ (co-written with Dean Dillon) and included the track on ‘Something Special’ (MCA Records, 1985).


Alabama: 'Forty Hour Week' (RCA Records, 1985)

Alabama recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘(She Won’t Have A Thing To Do With) Nobody Like Me’ (co-written with Dean Dillon and William ‘Flash’ Gordon) and included the track on ‘Forty Hour Week’ (RCA Records, 1985).


David Allan Coe: 'Darlin', Darlin' (Columbia Records, 1985)

David Allan Coe recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘You’re The Only Song I Sing Today’ (co-written with Marvin Brantley) and included the track on ‘Darlin’, Darlin’ (Columbia Records, 1985).


David Allan Coe: 'Unchained' (Columbia Records, 1985)

David Allan Coe recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Angels In Red’ and included the track on ‘Unchained’ (Columbia Records, 1985).


Darrell McCall and Johnny Bush: 'Hot Texas Country' (Step One Records, 1986)

Darrell McCall and Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020) recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘If You’ll Hold The Ladder’ (co-written with Sara Rabin) and included the track on ‘Hot Texas Country’ (Step One Records, 1986).


Eddie Fitzsimons & The Bright Lights: 'Roads & Other Reasons' (written by Buzz Rabin) (Fire Records, possibly 1986)

In the mid-1980s, possibly 1986, Eddie Fitzsimons (passed away on Thursday 6 January 2011) & The Bright Lights recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Roads & Other Reasons’, and saw it released as a single, in Ireland, on Fire Records.


Dean Dillon: 'Slick Nickel' (Capitol Records, 1988)

Dean Dillon recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘You Sure Got This Ol’ Redneck Feelin’ Blue’ (co-written with Dean Dillon) and included the track on ‘Slick Nickel’ (Capitol Records, 1988).


Joe Stampley

In 1989, Joe Stampley saw the release of ‘You Sure Got This Ol’ Redneck Feelin’ Blue’ (written by Buzz Rabin and Dean Dillon), a non-album single, which reached No.89 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1989.


Clinton Gregory: 'If It Weren't For Country Music, I'd Go Crazy' (Step One Records, 1991)

Clinton Gregory recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Maybe I Should Have Been Listening’ and included the track on ‘If It Weren’t For Country Music, I’d Go Crazy’ (Step One Records, 1991).


Billy Hardwick Jr.: 'Too Country' (JRS Records, 1992)

Billy Hardwick Jr. recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘You Sure Got This Ol’ Redneck Feelin’ Blue’ (co-written with Dean Dillon) and included the track on ‘Too Country’ (JRS Records, 1992).


Jessi Colter: 'That's The Way A Cowboy Rock & Rolls' (Capitol Records, 1978)
Jessi Colter: 'Collection' (Liberty Records, 1995)

Jessi Colter recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘Maybe I Should Have Been Listening’ (as ‘Maybe You Should’ve Been Listening’) and included the track on ‘That’s The Way A Cowboy Rock & Rolls’ (Capitol Records, 1978); the track was subsequently included on Jessi Colter’s ‘Collection’ (Liberty Records, 1995).


Wynn Stewart: 'Wishful Thinking' (Bear Family Records, 2000)

In 2000, Bear Family Records in Germany released Wynn Stewart‘s ‘Wishful Thinking’ (Bear Family Records, 2000), a 10-CD Box Set, consisting of 274 tracks – everything Wynn Stewart recorded for Intro Records, Capitol Records, Jackpot-Challenge Records, Copre Records, Playboy Records, RCA Records, and several other labels, including his own Win Records and Pretty World Records.

The booklet, which accompanied Bear Family Records’ Wynn Stewart 10-CD Box Set, ‘Wishful Thinking’ (Bear Family Records, 2000), a 10-CD set consisting of 274 tracks, included the first-ever full-length biography of Wynn Stewart, along with a complete discography, and Wynn Stewart’s last album (from 1985) which was never released.

One of the included tracks, which was recorded on Tuesday 10 December 1968, at Capitol Records recording studio, 1750 North Vine Street in Hollywood, California, was Buzz Rabin’s ‘Since Baby’s Gone’ (co-written with Dave Pittman and Wynn Stewart); this track was not released in 1968 and remained un-issued until it was included on ‘Wishful Thinking’ (Bear Family Records, 2000) in 2000.


Wynn Stewart (Thursday 7 June 1934 - Wednesday 17 July 1985)

Wynn Stewart‘s recording of Buzz Rabin’s ‘Since Baby’s Gone’ (co-written with Dave Pittman and Wynn Stewart), which took place at Capitol Records recording studio, 1750 North Vine Street in Hollywood, California, was produced by Kenneth F. ‘Ken’ Nelson (19 January 1911 – Sunday 6 January 2008); the recording session number was 17598.


Billy Chernoff: 'Life Songs Revelations' (Spotted Pony Records, 2007)

Billy Chernoff recorded Buzz Rabin’s ‘I Believe In An Old Fashioned Jesus’ and included the track on ‘Life Songs Revelations’ (Spotted Pony Records, 2007).


Buzz Rabin

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