Gene Watson Peer’s Quote from Charley Pride: October 2012

Gene Watson’s Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as ‘the singer’s singer’ – and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson’s Peers, who were contacted during 2012, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Charley Pride, which he submitted to this site on Sunday 7 October 2012.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Charley Pride who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online ‘celebration of a Lone Star Hero’.

David Allan

Sean Brady would also like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to David Allan, without whom this Gene Watson ‘Peer’s Quote’ from Charley Pride would not have been possible.

Charley Pride



Charley Pride
This quote was submitted on Sunday 7 October 2012.

‘Gene Watson is one of my favourite singers.

Gene Watson: 'Reflections' (Capitol Records, 1978)

When we are at The Opry together, I am always at the side stage to enjoy his singing, especially ‘Farewell Party‘, which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 – Thursday 26 July 2007)

I am his friend – yours, Charley Pride

Thank you, Charley Pride, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Charley Pride…

Charley Pride

Charley Pride was a country music singer, musician / guitarist, recording artist, performer and business owner.

Charley Pride’s greatest musical success came in the early-to-mid 1970s when he became the best-selling performer for RCA Records since Elvis Presley (Tuesday 8 January 1935 – Tuesday 16 August 1977).

In total, Charley Pride achieved thirty-nine No.1 hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart.

Charley Pride was one of the few African-American country musicians to have had considerable success in the country music industry and only the second African American to have been inducted as a member of The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville.

Charley Pride was born Charley Frank Pride on Friday 18 March 1938 in Sledge, Mississippi and was one of eleven children of poor sharecroppers.

Charley Pride’s father intended to name him Charl Frank Pride, but owing to a clerical error on his birth certificate, his legal name is Charley Frank Pride.

In his early teens, Charley Pride began playing guitar.

Charley Pride was raised on a steady diet of traditional country music by listening to radio stations WMPS and WREC in Memphis, as well as The Grand Ole Opry on WSM 650AM in Nashville.

Though he also loved music, one of Charley Pride’s lifelong dreams was to become a professional baseball player.

In 1952, Charley Pride pitched for The Memphis Red Sox of The Negro American League.  Charley Pride pitched well and, in 1953, he signed a contract with Boise Yankees, the Class C farm team of the New York Yankees.

During that season, an injury caused Charley Pride to lose the ‘mustard’ on his fastball, and he was sent to the Yankees’ Class D team in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin.

Later that season, while in The Negro Leagues with The Louisville Clippers, Charley Pride and another player, Jesse Mitchell, were traded to Birmingham Black Barons for a team bus.

Charley Pride pitched for several other minor league teams, his hopes of making it to the big leagues still alive.  Charley Pride appeared to be advancing to a career in baseball, but the Army derailed this.  After serving two years in the military, Charley Pride tried to return to baseball.

Though hindered by an injury to his throwing arm, Charley Pride briefly played for Missoula Timberjacks of The Pioneer League, a farm club of Cincinnati Reds, in 1960, and had tryouts with California Angels in 1961 and New York Mets in 1962, but was not picked up by either team.

Charley Pride worked construction in Helena, Montana during this time.  When it became apparent that he was not destined for greatness on the baseball diamond, Charley Pride pursued a music career.

While he was active in baseball, Charley Pride had been encouraged to join the music business by country music stars, including Red Sovine (Wednesday 17 July 1918 – Friday 4 April 1980) and Red Foley (Friday 17 June 1910 – Thursday 19 September 1968), and was working towards this career.

In 1963, Charley Pride sang for Red Foley (Friday 17 June 1910 – Thursday 19 September 1968) backstage at a concert in Montana.  When Charley Pride started singing, Red Red Foley (Friday 17 June 1910 – Thursday 19 September 1968) was suitably impressed and arranged for a recording session in Nashville.

In Nashville, Charley Pride met manager and agent Jack D. Johnson, who signed him to a management deal on Wednesday 4 March 1964.

'Cowboy' Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013)

On Monday 16 August 1965, ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) produced Charley Pride’s first recording session and then tried to secure a recording contract for Charley.

‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) then brought the tape to the attention of record producer Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 – Saturday 30 June 2001).

Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 – Saturday 30 June 2001) was the longtime producer at RCA Victor Records who had made stars out of a number of country music singers, including Jim Reeves (Monday 20 August 1923 – Friday 31 July 1964) and Skeeter Davis (Wednesday 30 December 1931 – Sunday 19 September 2004).

On Tuesday 28 September 1965, Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 – Saturday 30 June 2001) signed Charley Pride to RCA Records.

On Tuesday 28 December 1965, Charley Pride saw the release of his first single for RCA Records, ‘The Snakes Crawl At Night’, which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017) and Fred Burch, was shipped to radio stations, without the usual accompanying photo and biographical information.

RCA Records hoped to draw attention to Charley Pride’s vocal quality before he gained attention for his colour.  ‘The Snakes Crawl At Night’, which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017) and Fred Burch, did not chart.

Four noted record producers, Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 – Saturday 30 June 2001), ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013), Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 – Sunday 22 July 2001) and Felton Jarvis (Friday 16 November 1934 – Saturday 3 January 1981), were credited on the first five of Charley Pride’s early single releases.

However, ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) was the only producer who entered the studio with Charley Pride, who was credited as ‘Country Charley Pride’ on these first five singles.

In June 1966, Charley Pride’s second single for RCA Records, ‘Before I Met You’, was released, but it did not chart.

Charley Pride: 'Country Charley Pride' (RCA Records, 1966)

In September 1966, Charley Pride saw the release of his debut album for RCA Records, ‘Country Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1966), which included his two early singles, ‘The Snakes Crawl At Night’, which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017) and Fred Burch, and ‘Before I Met You’.

Charley Pride’s ‘Country Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1966) also included the following tracks:

‘Busted’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)
‘Distant Drums’, which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 – Thursday 23 March 2006)
‘Detroit City’, which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017) and Danny Dill (Friday 19 September 1924 – Thursday 23 October 2008)
‘Yonder Comes A Sucker’, which was written by Jim Reeves (Monday 20 August 1923 – Friday 31 July 1964)
‘Green, Green Grass of Home’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)
‘That’s The Chance I’ll Have To Take’ (written by Jackson King)
‘Folsom Prison Blues’, which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 – Friday 12 September 2003)
‘Miller’s Cave’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘Atlantic Coastal Line’, which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017) and Fred Burch
‘Got Leavin’ On Her Mind’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)

Charley Pride’s ‘Country Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1966) reached No.16 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1966.

Charley Pride: 'Pride of Country Music' (RCA Records, 1967)

In June 1967, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Pride of Country Music’ (RCA Records, 1967), which included his third single for RCA Records; ‘Just Between You & Me’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013), was the track which finally brought Charley Pride success on the Billboard country music singles chart when it reached No.9 in 1966 and earned him a Grammy Award.

Charley Pride’s ‘Pride of Country Music’ (RCA Records, 1967) also included the following tracks:

‘In The Middle of Nowhere’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Last Thing On My Mind’ (written by Tom Paxton)
‘Apartment No.9’, which was written by Bobby Austin and Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 – Wednesday 19 February 2003)
‘Spell of The Freight Train’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘I Know One’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) (No.6, 1967)
‘I’m Not The Boy I Used To Be’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)
‘A Good Woman’s Love’, which was written by Cyrus ‘Cy’ Coben (Friday 4 April 1919 – Friday 26 May 2006)
‘Silence’, which was written by Leon Walton (known professionally as Leon Ashley) (Monday 18 May 1936 – Sunday 20 October 2013) and Margie Singleton
‘Take Me Home’, which was written by Allen Reynolds and ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘Touch My Heart’, which was written by Aubrey Mayhew (Sunday 2 October 1927 – Sunday 22 March 2009) and Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 – Wednesday 19 February 2003)
‘Best Banjo Picker’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)

Charley Pride’s ‘Pride of Country Music’ (RCA Records, 1967) reached No.33 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1967.

Charley Pride: 'The Country Way' (RCA Records, 1967)

In December 1967, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘The Country Way’ (RCA Records, 1967), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Does My Ring Hurt Your Finger’, which was written by Doris Clement, Jerry Crutchfield (Friday 10 August 1934 – Tuesday 11 January 2022) and Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 – Monday 16 March 2015) (No.4, 1967)

‘The Day The World Stood Still’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
(No.4, 1967)

Charley Pride’s ‘The Country Way’ (RCA Records, 1967) also included the following tracks:

‘Too Hard To Say I’m Sorry’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘The Little Folks’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)

‘Crystal Chandeliers’, which was written by Ted Harris (Monday 2 August 1937 – Sunday 22 November 2015)
/ this track was not issued as a single in the United States, but it did become a very popular track in England and Ireland

‘Act Naturally’, which was written by Voni Morrison and Johnny Russell (Tuesday 23 January 1940 – Tuesday 3 July 2001)

‘Mama, Don’t Cry For Me’ (written by Wilson and Foster)
‘Gone, On The Other Hand’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘You Can Tell The World’, which was written by Country Johnny Mathis (Sunday 28 September 1930 – Tuesday 27 September 2011)
‘I’ll Wander Back To You’, which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017), Fred Burch and Danny Dill (Friday 19 September 1924 – Thursday 23 October 2008)
‘Life Turned Her That Way’, which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017)
‘I Threw Away The Rose’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

Charley Pride’s ‘The Country Way’ (RCA Records, 1967) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1967.

It was also in 1967 when Charley Pride became the first black performer to appear at The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville since harmonica player DeFord Bailey (14 December 1899 – Friday 2 July 1982).

DeFord Bailey (14 December 1899 – Friday 2 July 1982) was a regular cast member of The Opry from 1925 through until 1941, and made his final appearance in 1974.  Charley Pride also appeared in 1967 on American Broadcasting Company’s ‘The Lawrence Welk Show’.

Charley Pride: 'Make Mine Country' (RCA Records, 1968)

In April 1968, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Make Mine Country’ (RCA Records, 1968), which was produced by Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 – Saturday 30 June 2001), ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013), Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 – Sunday 22 July 2001) and Felton Jarvis (Friday 16 November 1934 – Saturday 3 January 1981).

Charley Pride’s ‘Make Mine Country’ (RCA Records, 1968) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968, no tracks were released from the album as singles.

Charley Pride’s ‘Make Mine Country’ (RCA Records, 1968) included the following tracks:

‘Now I Can Live Again’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘A Word Or Two To Mary’ (written by Vince Bulla and Peter Cotton)
‘If You Should Come Back Today’, which was written by Country Johnny Mathis (Sunday 28 September 1930 – Tuesday 27 September 2011) and Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)
‘Guess Things Happen That Way’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘Before The Next Teardrop Falls’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005) and Vivian Keith
‘Banks of The Ohio’, which was arranged by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘Wings of A Dove’, which was written by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 – Sunday 22 July 2001)
‘A Girl I Used To Know’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘Lie To Me’, which was written by Harold Dorman (Thursday 23 December 1926 – Saturday 8 October 1988) and Wylie Gann
‘Why Didn’t I Think of That’ (written by Allen, Green and Glaser)
‘Above & Beyond (The Call of Love)’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)
‘Baby Is Gone’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement
 (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)

Personnel involved in the recording of Charley Pride’s ‘Make Mine Country’ (RCA Records, 1968) included the following:

Charley Pride (vocals)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019), Wayne Moss and William Irvin (guitar)
Lloyd Green and Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 – Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Roy M. ‘Jr.’ Huskey (bass)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Jerry Kirby Carrigan (Monday 13 September 1943 – Saturday 22 June 2019) (drums)

Charley Pride: 'Songs of Pride...Charley That Is' (RCA Records, 1968)

In September 1968, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Songs of Pride…Charley That Is’ (RCA Records, 1968), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘The Easy Part’s Over’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023) (No.2, 1968)

Charley Pride’s ‘Songs of Pride…Charley That Is’ (RCA Records, 1968) also included the following tracks:

‘Someday You Will’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘She Made Me Go’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘The Right To Do Wrong’, which was written by Fred Foster (Sunday 26 July 1931 – Wednesday 20 February 2019)
‘The Day You Stop Loving Me’ (written by Ray Buzzeo)
‘I Could Have Saved You The Time’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘One of These Days’, which was written by Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 – Saturday 22 November 2003)
‘All The Time’, which was written by Wayne P. Walker and Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017)
‘My Heart Is A House’ (written by Ray Winkler and Johnny Hathcock)
‘Let Me Help You Work It Out’, which was written by Fred Foster (Sunday 26 July 1931 – Wednesday 20 February 2019)
‘Both of Us Love You’, which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 – Wednesday 1 July 2015)
‘The Top of The World’ (written by Johnny Irwin)

Charley Pride’s ‘Songs of Pride…Charley That Is’ (RCA Records, 1968), which reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968, was released in the United Kingdom in 1971.

Charley Pride: 'The Sensational Charley Pride' (RCA Records, 1969)

In May 1969, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘The Sensational Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1969), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Let The Chips Fall’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
(No.4, 1969)

Charley Pride’s ‘The Sensational Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

‘Louisiana Man’ (written by Doug Kershaw)
‘She’s Still Got A Hold On You’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘Come On Home (& Sing The Blues To Daddy)’ (written by Ray Corbin)
‘Never More Than’, which was written by Alex Zanetis (Monday 15 May 1922 – Tuesday 13 September 2005)
‘Let Me Live Again’, which was written by Alex Zanetis (Monday 15 May 1922 – Tuesday 13 September 2005)
‘Take Care of The Little Things’, which was written by Alex Zanetis (Monday 15 May 1922 – Tuesday 13 September 2005)
‘Even After Everything She’s Done’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘It’s Just A Matter of Making Up My Mind’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘It’s The Little Things’ (written by Arlie Duff)
‘Billy Bayou’, which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 – Sunday 25 October 1992)
‘We Had All The Good Things Going’ (written by Jerry Monday)

Charley Pride: 'Charley Pride...in Person at Panther Hall' (RCA Records, 1969)

In January 1969, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Charley Pride…In Person At Panther Hall’ (RCA Records, 1969), an album which was recorded ‘live’ and included ‘Kaw-Liga’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953); the track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969.

In June 1969, Charley Pride moved from Helena, Montana to Dallas, Texas; Texas’ central location made it easier for him to tour.

On Saturday 6 September 1969, Charley Pride appeared on American national television on ‘The Johnny Cash Show’ to perform a medley of Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953) songs with Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 – Friday 12 September 2003).

Charley Pride: 'The Best of Charley Pride' (RCA Records, 1969)

In October 1969, Charley Pride saw the release of his first ‘Best of’ collection, ‘The Best of Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1969), which included the following tracks:

‘Just Between You & Me’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
 (No.9, 1966)

‘Does My Ring Hurt Your Finger’, which was written by Doris Clement, Jerry Crutchfield (Friday 10 August 1934 – Tuesday 11 January 2022) and Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 – Monday 16 March 2015)
 (No.4, 1967)

‘Kaw-Liga’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
(No.3, 1969)

‘The Snakes Crawl At Night’, which was written by
 Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017) and Fred Burch / this track was released as a single in 1966, but it did not chart

‘All I Have To Offer You (Is Me)’, which was written by Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999) and Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)
 (No.1 for one week in August 1969)

‘The Easy Part’s Over’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
(No.2, 1968)

‘The Day The World Stood Still’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
(No.4, 1967)

‘I Know One’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) 
(No.6, 1967)

‘Gone, On The Other Hand’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement
 (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)

‘Before I Met You’ (written by Seitz, Rader and Lewis) / this track was released as a single in 1966, but it did not chart

‘Too Hard To Say I’m Sorry’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement
 (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) / this track was an album track in 1967

‘Let The Chips Fall’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) 
(No.4, 1969)

Charley Pride’s ‘The Best of Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1969) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart on Saturday 20 December 1969 and remained there for thirteen weeks; the album sold over one million copies and was awarded a ‘Gold’ disc.

Charley Pride: 'Just Plain Charley' (RCA Records, 1970)

In January 1970, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Just Plain Charley’ (RCA Records, 1970), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘I’m So Afraid of Losing You Again’, which was written by Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999) and Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)
 (No.1 for three weeks in December 1969 / January 1970)

Charley Pride’s ‘Just Plain Charley’ (RCA Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

‘Me & Bobby McGee’, which was written by Fred Foster (Sunday 26 July 1931 – Wednesday 20 February 2019) and Kris Kristofferson
‘A Good Chance of Tear Fall Tonight’, which was written by Carolyn Stringer and L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)
‘One Time’, which was written by Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023) and Jerry Foster
‘A Brand New Bed of Roses’, which was written by Alex Zanetis (Monday 15 May 1922 – Tuesday 13 September 2005)
‘That’s Why I Love You So Much’, which was written by Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023) and Jerry Foster
‘If You’d Have Only Taken The Time’ (written by Kent Westberry and Mervin Shiner)
‘Gone, Gone, Gone’, which was written by Buckley Maxwell and Jerry Crutchfield (Friday 10 August 1934 – Tuesday 11 January 2022)
‘Happy Street’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘I’m A Lonesome Fugitive’, which was written by Casey Anderson (Saturday 23 January 1926 – Monday 26 November 2018) and Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘It’s All Right’ (written by Betty Jean Robinson)

Charley Pride: 'Charley Pride's 10th Album' (RCA Records, 1970)

In June 1970, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Charley Pride’s 10th Album’ (RCA Records, 1970), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Is Anybody Goin’ To San Antone’, which was written by Glenn W. Martin (Thursday 30 June 1932 – Sunday 12 May 2019) and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004)
 (No.1 for two weeks in April / May 1970)

‘Charley Pride’s 10th Album’ (RCA Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

‘Able Bodied Man’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘Through The Years’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘Thought of Losing You’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘I Think I’ll Take A Walk’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘Things Are Looking Up’ (written by Hugh X. Lewis)
‘Special’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘Poor Boy Like Me’, which was written by Alex Zanetis (Monday 15 May 1922 – Tuesday 13 September 2005)
‘(There’s) Nobody Home To Go Home To’, which was written by Milton ‘Mitt’ Addington (1924 – 1979), Dickey Lee and Allen Reynolds

‘This Is My Year For Mexico’, which was written by Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 – Saturday 22 November 2003)

Gene Watson: 'Love in the Hot Afternoon' (Capitol Records, 1975)

Gene Watson recorded ‘This Is My Year For Mexico’, which was written by Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 – Saturday 22 November 2003), and included the track on ‘Love in the Hot Afternoon‘ (Capitol Records, 1975).

Gene Watson: 'Love in the Hot Afternoon & Paper Rosie' (Hux Records, 2002)

On Tuesday 3 December 2002, England’s Hux Records released Gene Watson’s ‘Love in the Hot Afternoon‘ (Capitol Records, 1975), along with Gene Watson’s ‘Paper Rosie‘ (Capitol Records, 1977), as a special ‘2-for-1‘ CD set.

Crystal Gayle: 'Crystal Gayle' (United Artists Records, 1975)

Crystal Gayle
recorded ‘This Is My Year For Mexico’, which was written by Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 – Saturday 22 November 2003), and included the track on ‘Crystal Gayle’ (United Artists Records, 1975).

Charley Pride: 'Christmas in My Hometown' (RCA Records, 1970)

In November 1970, Charley Pride saw the release of his first collection of Christmas songs, ‘Christmas In My Hometown’ (RCA Records, 1970); the title track reached No.11 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1970.

Charley Pride’s first collection of Christmas songs, ‘Christmas In My Hometown’ (RCA Records, 1970), also included the following tracks:

‘Christmas In My Home Town’ (written by Lassaye Van Buren Holmes)
‘Deck The Halls (With Boughs of Holly)’ (traditional)
‘They Stood In Silent Prayer’, which was written by Alex Zanetis (Monday 15 May 1922 – Tuesday 13 September 2005)
‘Santa & The Kids’ (written by Sue Lane and Charley Pride)
‘Silent Night’, which was written by Franz Xaver Gruber (25 November 1787 – 7 June 1863) and Joseph Mohr (11 December 1792 – 4 December 1848)
‘Little Drummer Boy’ (written by Katherine Davis, Henry Onorati and Harry Simeone)
‘Happy Christmas Day’ (written by Sue Lane and Charley Pride)
‘The First Christmas Morn’ (written by Sue Lane)
‘Christmas & Love’ (written by Lassaye Van Buren Holmes)
‘O, Holy Night’ (written by Adolphe Adam and John Sullivan Dwight)
‘Out of The East’ (written by Harry Noble)
‘Christmas Without Mary’, which was written by Blake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022), William Shore and David Wills
‘Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow’, which was written by Sammy Cahn (Wednesday 18 June 1913 – Friday 15 January 1993) and Jule Styne (Sunday 31 December 1905 – Tuesday 20 September 1994)

Charley Pride: 'Christmas In My Home Town' (Music City Records, 2013 / RCA Victor Records, 1970)

In 2013, Charley Pride‘s ‘Christmas In My Home Town’ (RCA Victor Records, 1970) was re-issued, on CD, by Music City Records, complete with three bonus tracks, ‘Out of The East’ (written by Harry Noble), ‘Christmas Without Mary’, which was written by Blake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022), William Shore and David Wills, and ‘Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!’, which was written by Sammy Cahn (Wednesday 18 June 1913 – Friday 15 January 1993) and Jule Styne (Sunday 31 December 1905 – Tuesday 20 September 1994).

Personnel involved in the recording of Charley Pride‘s ‘Christmas In My Home Town’ (RCA Victor Records, 1970) included the following (credits as listed on the 2013 liner notes of ‘Christmas In My Home Town’ for Music City Records):

Willie Ackerman (Monday 1 May 1939 – Thursday 13 December 2012), Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) and Jimmy Isabelle (drums)
Beegie Adair and Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Doris Allen, Milton Hackney, Bobby Becker, George Binkley, Jo Parker and Carol Walker (violin)
Joseph Babcock, Dolores Edgin, Hoyt Hawkins (Thursday 31 March 1927 – 1982), The Jordanaires, Millie Kirkham, Neal Matthews (Saturday 26 October 1929 – Friday 21 April 2000), Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007), The Nashville Edition, June Page, Lisa Silver, Raymond Walker and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019), Mark Casstevens, Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022), Jack Eubanks, Fred Newell, Brent Rowan, Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 – Wednesday 18 May 2005), Pete Wade and Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) (guitar)
David Briggs (piano, keyboards)
Jimmie Colvard (1943 – 1977), Larry Paxton, David Hungate, Junior Huskey and Joe Zinkan (bass)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988), Sonny Garrish and Lloyd Green (steel guitar)
Solie Fott (viola)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015), Rob Hajacos and Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Billy Grammer (rhythm guitar)
Mitch Humphries and Gary Prim (keyboards)
William Irwin (organ)
Farrell Morris (bells, percussion, vibraphone)
Robert Mowrey (viola)
Billy Sanford (bass, electric guitar)
Dale Sellers (electric guitar)
David Vaderkool and Gary Williams (cello)
Bergen White (bells)

Technical Personnel involved in the recording of Charley Pride‘s ‘Christmas In My Home Town’ (RCA Victor Records, 1970) included the following (credits as listed on the 2013 liner notes of ‘Christmas In My Home Town’ for Music City Records):

‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013), Blake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022) and Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017) (producer)
Doug Crider (assistant engineer)
Greg Gosselin (art direction, design, liner notes, project supervisor)
Bill Harris, Al Pachucki and Tom Pick (engineer)
Jack D. Johnson and Bergen White (arranger)
Les Ladd and Roy Shockley (recording technician)
Jimmy Moore (cover photo)
M.G. Wilder (mastering)

Charley Pride: 'From Me to You' (RCA Records, 1970)

In December 1970, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘From Me To You’ (RCA Records, 1970), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Wonder Could I Live There Anymore’, which was written by Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
(No.1 for two weeks in July / August 1970)

‘I Can’t Believe That You’ve Stopped Loving Me’, which was written by Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999) and Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)
 (No.1 for two weeks in November 1970)

Charley Pride’s ‘From Me To You’ (RCA Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

‘That’s The Only Way Life’s Good To Me’ (written by David Wilkins)
‘(There’s Still) Someone I Can’t Forget’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
‘Sweet Promises’ (written by Duane Valentry)
‘Was It All Worth Losing You’, which was written by Audie Leon Murphy (Saturday 20 June 1925 – Friday 28 May 1971)
‘Fifteen Years Ago’ (written by Raymond A. Smith)
‘Pirogue Joe’ (written by Roy Botkin)
‘Time, You’re Not A Friend of Mine’ (written by Sue Lane)
‘Today Is That Tomorrow’ (written by Gene Strasser and George Winter)

Charley Pride: 'The Best of Charley Pride' (RCA Records, 1969)
Charley Pride: 'Just Plain Charley' (RCA Records, 1970)
Charley Pride: 'Charley Pride's 10th Album' (RCA Records, 1970)

During the course of 1970, Charley Pride made the top of the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart a home of his own; he spent a total of thirty weeks at No.1 with three releases, ‘The Best of Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1969), ‘Just Plain Charley’ (RCA Records, 1970) and ‘Charley Pride’s 10th Album’ (RCA Records, 1970).

Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 - Monday 14 August 2006)

It was also during the course of 1970 when Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006) joined Charley Pride’s show.

Charley Pride saw promise in Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006) as a vocalist and allowed him to use his band, The Pridesmen, while on tour.

Charley Pride: 'Did You Think to Pray' (RCA Records, 1971)

In March 1971, Charley Pride saw the release of his first collection of religious material; ‘Did You Think To Pray’ (RCA Records, 1971) included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music hit singles chart:

‘Let Me Live’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
(No.21, 1971)

‘Did You Think To Pray’ (written by Mary Kidder and William Perkins)
(No.70, 1971)

Charley Pride’s first collection of religious material, ‘Did You Think To Pray’ (RCA Records, 1971), also included the following tracks:

‘I’ll Fly Away’, which was written by Albert Edward Brumley (Sunday 29 October 1905 – Tuesday 15 November 1977)
‘Time Out For Jesus’ (written by Ann J. Morton)
‘Angel Band’ (written by William B. Bradbury)
‘Jesus, Don’t Give Up On Me’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) and Alex Zanetis
‘Whispering Hope’ (written by Septimus Winner)
‘This Highway Leads To Glory’ (written by Lassaye Holmes)
‘The Church In The Wildwood’ (written by William Pitts)
‘Lord, Build Me A Cabin In Glory’ (written by Curtis Stewart)
‘Wings of A Dove’, which was written by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 – Sunday 22 July 2001)

Charley Pride’s first collection of religious material, ‘Did You Think To Pray’ (RCA Records, 1971), reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971.

Charley Pride: 'I'm Just Me' (RCA Records, 1971)

In June 1971, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘I’m Just Me’ (RCA Records, 1971), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘I’d Rather Love You’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
(No.1 for three weeks in March 1971)

‘I’m Just Me’, which was written by Glenn W. Martin (Thursday 30 June 1932 – Sunday 12 May 2019)
 (No.1 for four weeks in July / August 1971)

Charley Pride’s ‘I’m Just Me’ (RCA Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

‘On The Southbound’ (written by Allen Reynolds and Dickey Lee)
‘(In My World) You Don’t Belong’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
‘You Never Gave Up On Me’ (written by Allen Reynolds)
‘Instant Loneliness’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
‘A Place For The Lonesome’ (written by James Bullington)
‘Hello Darlin’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘You’re Still The Only One I’ll Ever Love’ (written by Bill Anderson)
‘That’s My Way’ (written by Dave Turner)

Charley Pride’s ‘I’m Just Me’ (RCA Records, 1971) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971.

Charley Pride: 'Charley Pride Sings Heart Songs' (RCA Records, 1971)
Heather Myles: 'Highways & Honky Tonks' (Rounder Records, 1998)

 

In October 1971, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Charley Pride Sings Heart Songs’ (RCA Records, 1971), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Kiss An Angel Good Morning’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
 (No.1 for five weeks in December 1971 / January 1972) / this track also reached No.21 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1971, was a Top 10 hit single on the Billboard Adult Contemporary Chart in 1971, and reached No.19 on the Cash Box Top 100 Chart in 1971 / this track was also recorded by Heather Myles, who included it on ‘Highways & Honky Tonks’ (Rounder Records, 1998)

‘Kiss An Angel Good Morning’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005), became Charley Pride’s biggest hit single, and signature song, and sold a million copies.

‘Kiss An Angel Good Morning’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005), helped Charley Pride win the Country Music Association’s prestigious ‘Entertainer of The Year’ Award in 1971, as well as ‘Top Male Vocalist’ (also in 1971).

Charley Pride’s ‘Charley Pride Sings Heart Songs’ (RCA Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

‘You’ll Still Be The One’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
‘Anywhere (Just Inside Your Arms)’ (written by Wanda Ballman)
‘I’m Beginning To Believe My Own Lies’ (written by Al Urban)
‘What Money Can’t Buy’ (written by Knight, Ford and White)
‘No One Could Ever Take Me From You’, which was written by Hal Bynum (Saturday 29 September 1934 – Thursday 2 June 2022)
‘Jeanie Norman’ (written by Dale Morris)
‘Once Again’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
‘Miracles, Music & My Wife’ (written by Hezzi Kyle and Jim Shanger)
‘Pretty Houses For Sale’, which was written by Harold Dorman (Thursday 23 December 1926 – Saturday 8 October 1988) and Wylie Gann

Charley Pride’s ‘Charley Pride Sings Heart Songs’ (RCA Records, 1971) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971.

In 1972, Charley Pride won the Country Music Association’s ‘Top Male Vocalist’ Award.

Charley Pride: 'The Best of Charley Pride, Volume 2' (RCA Records, 1972)

In February 1972, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘The Best of Charley Pride, Volume 2’ (RCA Records, 1972), which included the following tracks:

‘A Place For The Lonesome’ (written by James Bullington)
 / this track was an album track in 1972

‘I’d Rather Love You’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
 (No.1 for three weeks in March 1971)

‘Is Anybody Goin’ To San Antone’, which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004) and Glenn W. Martin (Thursday 30 June 1932 – Sunday 12 May 2019)
 (No.1 for two weeks in April / May 1970)

‘Kiss An Angel Good Morning’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
 (No.1 for five weeks in December 1971 / January 1972) / this track also reached No.21 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1971, was a Top 10 hit single on the Billboard Adult Contemporary Chart in 1971, and reached No.19 on the Cash Box Top 100 Chart in 1971

‘(In My World) You Don’t Belong’, which was written by
 Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006) / this track was an album track in 1971

‘(There’s Still) Someone I Can’t Forget’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
 / this track was an album track in 1970

‘I’m Just Me’, which was written by Glenn W. Martin (Thursday 30 June 1932 – Sunday 12 May 2019)
 (No.1 for four weeks in July / August 1971)

‘Let Me Live’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
(No.21, 1971)

‘I’m So Afraid of Losing You Again’, which was written by Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999) and Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)
 (No.1 for three weeks in December 1969 / January 1970

‘You’ll Still Be The One’, which was written by
 Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006) / this track was an album track in 1971

Charley Pride’s ‘The Best of Charley Pride, Volume 2’ (RCA Records, 1972) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.

On Tuesday 14 March 1972, Charley Pride won his first two Grammy Awards; ‘Did You Think To Pray’ picked up the award for ‘Best Sacred Performance’ and ‘Let Me Live’ picked up the award for ‘Best Gospel Performance’.

In April 1972, Charley Pride’s recording of ‘All The Children’, with lyrics by Alan and Marilyn Bergman and music by Henry Mancini, was included on the soundtrack of ‘Sometimes A Great Notion’, a movie which starred Paul Newman (Monday 26 January 1925 – Friday 26 September 2008), who also directed the feature.

‘All The Children’ reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in April 1972.

Charley Pride: 'A Sunshiny Day' (RCA Records, 1972)

In July 1972, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘A Sunshiny Day’ (RCA Records, 1972), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘It’s Gonna Take A Little Bit Longer’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
(No.1 for three weeks in July / August 1972)

Charley Pride’s ‘A Sunshiny Day’ (RCA Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

‘Sunshiny Day’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘When The Trains Come In’ (written by Al Urban)
‘You’re Wanting Me To Stop Loving You’ (written by Al Urban)
‘Back To The Country Roads’ (written by Richard Jarvis)
‘Put Back My Ring On Your Hand’ (written by Glenn Ash)
‘Seven Years With A Wonderful Woman’ (written by Rev. Roland W. Davis)
‘She’s Helping Me Get Over You’, which was written by Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999) and Hal Bynum (Saturday 29 September 1934 – Thursday 2 June 2022)
‘One More Year’, which was written by Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999) and Hal Bynum (Saturday 29 September 1934 – Thursday 2 June 2022)
‘Nothin’ Left But Leaving’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)

Charley Pride’s ‘A Sunshiny Day’ (RCA Records, 1972) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Slbums Chart in 1972.

Charley Pride: 'The Incomparable Charley Pride' (RCA Records, 1972)

In August 1972, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘The Incomparable Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1972), a compilation album, which included the following tracks:

‘I’d Rather Love You’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
 (No.1 for three weeks in March 1971)

‘Time (You’re Not A Friend of Mine)’ (written by Sue Lane)
/ this track was an album track in 1970

‘Jeanie Norman’ (written by Dale Morris) 
/ this track was an album track in 1971

‘Anywhere (Just Inside Your Arms)’ (written by Wanda Ballman)
/ this track was an album track in 1971

‘When The Trains Come In’ (written by Al Urban)
/ this track was an album track in 1972

‘Piroque Joe’ (written by Roy Botkin)
/ this track was an album track in 1970

‘Was It All Worth Losing You’, which was written by Audie Leon Murphy (Saturday 20 June 1925 – Friday 28 May 1971)
/ this track was an album track in 1970

‘Instant Loneliness’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
 / this track was an album track in 1971

‘This Highway Leads To Glory’ (written by Lassaye Holmes)
/ this track was an album track in 1971

‘Time Out For Jesus’ (written by 
Ann J. Morton) / this track was an album track in 1971

Charley Pride’s ‘The Incomparable Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1972) reached No.16 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972, and No.189 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1972.

Charley Pride: 'Songs of Love by Charley Pride' (RCA Records, 1972)

In December 1972, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Songs of Love By Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1972), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘She’s Too Good To Be True’, which was written by
Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006) (No.1 for three weeks in November / December 1972)

Charley Pride’s ‘Songs of Love By Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

‘Too Weak To Let You Go’ (written by Donn Tankersley and Bob Robison)
‘She’s That Kind’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘You Were All The Good In Me’ (written by Shirley Ann Worth)
‘Give A Lonely Heart A Home’ (written by Ciles Davis and Jan Pitts)
‘Good Hearted Woman’, which was written by Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 – Wednesday 13 February 2002) and Willie Nelson
‘I Love You More In Memory’, which was written by L. E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)
‘My Love Is Deep, My Love Is Wide’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘(Darlin’ Think of Me) Every Now & Then’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
‘I’m Building Bridges’ (written by Renau and Monahan)

Charley Pride’s ‘Songs of Love by Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1972) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.

It was also in late 1972 when Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006) left the Charley Pride Show in order to concentrate on his own recording career.

In December 1972, Billboard named Charley Pride ‘Top Country Singles Artist’ for the entire year.

Charley Pride: 'Sweet Country' (RCA Records, 1973)

In April 1973, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Sweet Country’ (RCA Records, 1973), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘A Shoulder To Cry On’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
(No.1 for one week in April 1973)

‘Don’t Fight The Feelings of Love’ (written by John Schweers)
 (No.1 for one week in June / July 1973)

Charley Pride’s ‘Sweet Country’ (RCA Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

‘Along The Mississippi’ (written by Bob Robinson and Perry Tankersley)
‘The Happiest Song On The Jukebox’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘The Shelter of Your Eyes’, which was written by Don Williams (Saturday 27 May 1939 – Friday 8 September 2017)
‘I’m Learning To Love Her’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
‘Just To Be Loved By You’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘Tennessee Girl’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘Love Unending’ (written by Jerry Grindele, Paul Gibbons and Tony Hatch)
‘Pass Me By’, which was written by Hillman Hall (1938 – 1989)

Charley Pride’s ‘Sweet Country’ (RCA Records, 1973) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.

Charley Pride: 'Amazing Love' (RCA Records, 1973)

In October 1973, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Amazing Love’ (RCA Records, 1973), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Amazing Love’ (written by John Schweers)
(No.1 for one week in December 1973)

Charley Pride’s ‘Amazing Love’ (RCA Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

‘Comin’ Down With Love’ (written by James W. Bullington)
‘If She Just Helps Me Get Over You’, which was written by Allen Reynolds and Don Williams (Saturday 27 May 1939 – Friday 8 September 2017)
‘I’m Only Losin’ Everything I Threw Away’ (written by John Schweers)
‘Footprints In The Sands of Time’ (written by Jerry McBee)
‘Blue Ridge Mountains Turnin’ Green’ (written by Jim Lunsford)
‘I’ve Just Found Another Reason For Loving You’ (written by Joe Keene and Charles Isbell)
‘Old Photographs’ (written by Al Urban)
‘I’m Glad It Was You’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘Mr. Joe Henry’s Happy Hand Clappin’ Open Air Rhythm Band’, which was written by Glenn Douglas Tubb (Saturday 29 June 1935 – Saturday 22 May 2021) and Larry Lee Favorite (Saturday 6 January 1940 – Saturday 26 May 2001)

Charley Pride’s ‘Amazing Love’ (RCA Records, 1973) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.

Charley Pride: 'A Sunshiny Day' (RCA Records, 1972)

In February 1974, Charley Pride’s ‘A Sunshiny Day’ (RCA Records, 1972) was the first record named ‘Favourite Country Album’ in the American Music Awards; the album had been released by RCA Records in July 1972.

Charley Pride: 'Country Feeling' (RCA Records, 1974)

In May 1974, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Country Feeling’ (RCA Records, 1974), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘We Could’, which was written by Felice Bryant (Friday 7 August 1925 – Tuesday 22 April 2003) (No.3, 1974)

Charley Pride’s ‘Country Feeling’ (RCA Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

‘Which Way Do We Go’, which was written by Allen Reynolds and Don Williams (Saturday 27 May 1939 – Friday 8 September 2017)
‘It Amazes Me’ (written by Allen Reynolds and Wayland D. Holyfield)
‘All His Children’ (written by Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman) / this track was arranged and conducted by Henry Mancini for the motion picture, ‘Sometimes A Great Nation’
‘Streets of Gold’ (written by Jim Lunsford)
‘I Don’t See How I Can Love You Anymore’, which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004) and Maria Houston
‘Singin’ A Song About Love’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘The Man I Used To Be’, which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004)
‘Let My Love In’ (written by John Riggs)
‘Love Put A Song In My Heart’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)

Charley Pride’s ‘Country Feeling’ (RCA Records, 1974) reached No.15 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

Charley Pride: 'Pride of America' (RCA Records, 1974)

In November 1974, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Pride of America’ (RCA Records, 1974), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Mississippi Cotton Pickin’ Delta Town’, which was written by Harold Dorman (Thursday 23 December 1926 – Saturday 8 October 1988) and Wiley Gann (No.3, 1974)

‘Then Who Am I’, which was written by Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999) and Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)
 (No.1 for one week in February 1975)

Charley Pride’s ‘Pride of America’ (RCA Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

‘I Still Can’t Leave Your Memory Alone’, which was written by Geoffrey Morgan and Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)
‘The Hard Times Will Be The Best Times’ (written by Red Stegall)
‘Completely Helpless’ (written by John Schweers)
‘She Loves Me The Way That I Love You’, which was written by Bobby Paul Barker (Sunday 19 November 1944 – Friday 20 November 2015)
‘Mary Go Round’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
‘That Was Forever Ago’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
‘Thorns of Life’ (written by Paul Huffman, Joane Keller and Bucky Jones)
‘North Wind’ (written by Rod Morris)

The vocal accompaniment on Charley Pride’s ‘Pride of America’ (RCA Records, 1974) was by The Jordanaires, and The Nashville Edition.

Charley Pride’s ‘Pride of America’ (RCA Records, 1974) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

Charley Pride: 'Charley' (RCA Records, 1975)

In May 1975, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Charley’ (RCA Records, 1975), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘It Ain’t All Bad’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
(No.6, 1975)

‘Hope You’re Feelin’ Me (Like I’m Feelin’ You)’ (written by Bobby David and Jim Rushing)
(No.1 for one week in October 1975)

Charley Pride’s ‘Charley’ (RCA Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

‘Searching For The Morning Sun’ (written by Paul Gibbons, Jerry Grindele and Tony Hatch)
‘The Hardest Part of Livin’s Loving Me’ (written by Don Feagin)
‘Now & Then’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘Fools’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
‘She’s As Close As I Can Get To Loving You’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)
‘One Mile More’ (written by Anne Monkhouse)
‘You’re The Woman Behind Everything’, which was written by Gary Stewart (Sunday 28 May 1944 – Tuesday 16 December 2003)
‘Lovin’ Understandin’ Man’ (written by Jim Rushing)

Personnel involved in the recording of Charley Pride’s ‘Charley’ (RCA Records, 1975) included the following:

David Briggs (piano, keyboards)
Jimmy Capps (Thursday 25 May 1939 – Monday 1 June 2020), Dale Sellers, Jerry Shook and Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) (guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) and Tommy Williams (fiddle)
Lloyd Green and Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
The Jordanaires, and The Nashville Edition (background vocals)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Charley Pride (lead vocals)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 – Wednesday 18 May 2005) (banjo, guitar)

Charley Pride’s ‘Charley’ (RCA Records, 1975) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

Charley Pride: 'The Happiness of Having You' (RCA Records, 1975)

In November 1975, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘The Happiness of Having You’ (RCA Records, 1975), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘The Happiness of Having You’, which was written by Ted Harris (Monday 2 August 1937 – Sunday 22 November 2015)
(No.3, 1975)

‘My Eyes Can Only See As Far As You’ (written by Naomi Martin and Jimmy Payne)
(No.1 for one week in May 1976)

Charley Pride’s ‘The Happiness of Having You’ (RCA Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

‘I Can’t Keep My Hands Off of You’, which was written by Bobby Borchers and Mack Vickery (Wednesday 8 June 1938 – Tuesday 21 December 2004)
‘Everything I Am’, which was written by Kenny O’Dell (born Kenneth Gist Jr.) (Wednesday 21 June 1944 – Monday 27 March 2018)
‘I’ve Got A Woman To Lean On’ (written by Jim Owen)
‘Right Back Missing You Again’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
‘Help Me Make It Through The Night’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)
‘Oklahoma Morning’, which was written by Jerry Donald Chesnut (Thursday 7 May 1931 – Saturday 15 December 2018)
‘Everything She Touches Turns To Love’ (written by Shirley Ann Worth)
‘Signs of Love’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)

Personnel involved in the recording of Charley Pride’s ‘The Happiness of Having You’ (RCA Records, 1975) included the following:

Hayward Bishop (drums)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019), Dale Sellers, Pete Wade, Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) and Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (guitar)
David Briggs (piano)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988) and Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) and Tommy Williams (fiddle)
The Jordanaires, and The Nashville Edition (background vocals)
The Sheldon ‘Shelly’ Kurland (Saturday 9 June 1928 – Wednesday 6 January 2010) Strings (string instruments)
Mike Leach (bass)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Charley Pride (lead vocals)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 – Wednesday 18 May 2005) (banjo)

Charley Pride’s ‘The Happiness of Having You’ (RCA Records, 1975) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

Charley Pride: 'Sunday Morning with Charley Pride' (RCA Records, 1976)

In April 1976, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Sunday Morning With Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1976), which was produced by Jerry Bradley, and included the following tracks:

‘I Don’t Deserve A Mansion’ (written by John Schweers and Winnie Simms)
‘Be Grateful’ (written by Don Hosea)
‘He’s The Man’ (written by George Place)
‘In Jesus’ Name I Pray’ (written by Paul Gibbons, Jerry Grindele and Tony Hatch)
‘Without Mama Here’ (written by Sue Lane)
‘Little Delta Church’ (written by George Knight)
‘Next Year Finally Came’ (written by Jerry Grindele and Jim Lunsford)
‘Jesus Is Our Saviour, Child’ (written by Don Feagin)
‘He Took My Place’ (written by Ruth Hukill)
‘Brush Arbor Meeting’ (written by Kenny Munds)

Personnel involved in the recording of Charley Pride’s ‘Sunday Morning With Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1976) included the following:

David Briggs (organ, piano)
Jimmy Capps (Thursday 25 May 1939 – Monday 1 June 2020), Dale Sellers, Jerry Shook and Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) (guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) and Tommy Williams (fiddle)
Lloyd Green and Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
The Jordanaires, and The Nashville Edition (background vocals)
Charley Pride (lead vocals)
Joe Zinkan (bass)

Charley Pride’s ‘Sunday Morning With Charley Pride’ (RCA Records, 1976) reached No.14 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.

Dave & Sugar: 'Dave & Sugar' (RCA Records, 1976)

In August 1976, Dave & Sugar saw the release of their self-titled debut album, ‘Dave & Sugar’ (RCA Records, 1976), which was produced by Jerry Bradley, Charley Pride and Dave Rowland (Monday 26 January 1942 – Thursday 1 November 2018), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Queen of The Silver Dollar’, which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 – Monday 10 May 1999)
(No.25, 1975)

‘The Door Is Always Open’ (written by Bob McDill and Dickey Lee)
(No.1 for one week in July 1976)

‘I’m Gonna Love You’, which was written by Thomas Baker Knight Jr. (Tuesday 4 July 1933 – Wednesday 12 October 2005)
(No.3, 1976)

Dave & Sugar’s self-titled debut album, ‘Dave & Sugar’ (RCA Records, 1976), also included the following tracks:

‘Can’t Help But Wonder’
‘Whole Lotta Things To Sing About’
‘I’ve Been So Wrong For So Long’
‘Fools’
‘Late Nite Country Lovin’ Music’
‘I’m Leavin’ The Leavin’ To You’
‘Queen of My Heart’

Dave & Sugar’s self-titled debut album, ‘Dave & Sugar’ (RCA Records, 1976), reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.

Charley Pride: 'The Best of Charley Pride, Volume 3' (RCA Records, 1976)

In October 1976, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘The Best of Charley Pride, Volume 3’ (RCA Records, 1976), which included the following tracks:

‘I Don’t Deserve A Mansion’ (written by John Schweers and Winnie Simms)
/ this track was an album track in 1976

‘My Eyes Can Only See As Far As You’ (written by Naomi Martin and Jimmy Payne)
 (No.1 for one week in May 1976)

‘The Happiness of Having You’, which was written by Ted Harris (Monday 2 August 1937 – Sunday 22 November 2015) (No.3, 1975)

‘Hope You’re Feelin’ Me (Like I’m Feelin’ You)’ (written by Bobby David and Jim Rushing)
 (No.1 for one week in October 1975)

‘It Ain’t All Bad’, which was written by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 – Monday 14 August 2006)
 (No.6, 1975)

‘Then Who Am I’, which was written by Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999) and Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)
 (No.1 for one week in February 1975)

‘Mississippi Cotton Pickin’ Delta Town’, which was written by Harold Dorman (Thursday 23 December 1926 – Saturday 8 October 1988) and Wiley Gann
 (No.3, 1974)

‘Searching For The Morning Sun’ (written by Paul Gibbons, Jerry Grindele and Tony Hatch) / this track was an album track in 1975

‘Amazing Love’ (written by John Schweers)
 (No.1 for one week in December 1973)

‘Don’t Fight The Feelings of Love’ (written by John Schweers)
 (No.1 for one week in June / July 1973)

‘Oklahoma Morning’, which was written by Jerry Donald Chesnut (Thursday 7 May 1931 – Saturday 15 December 2018) / this track was an album track in 1975

Charley Pride’s ‘The Best of Charley Pride, Volume 3’ (RCA Records, 1976) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.

Charley Pride: 'She's Just An Old Love Turned Memory' (RCA Records, 1977)

In March 1977, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘She’s Just An Old Love Turned Memory’ (RCA Records, 1977), which was produced by Jerry Bradley (Tuesday 30 January 1940 – Monday 17 July 2023) and Charley Pride, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘A Whole Lotta Things To Sing About’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
(No.2 in October 1976)

‘She’s Just An Old Love Turned Memory’ (written by John Schweers)
(No.1 for one week in March 1977)

‘I’ll Be Leaving Alone’ (written by Dickey Lee and Wayland D. Holyfield)
(No.1 for one week in July 1977)

Charley Pride’s ‘She’s Just An Old Love Turned Memory’ (RCA Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

‘Rhinestone Cowboy’ (written by Larry Weiss)
‘The Hunger’ (written by Lee Fry)
‘I Feel The Country Callin’ Me’ (written by Joe Richie)
‘We Need Lovin’ (written by Bobby David and June Dussia)
‘Country Music’ (written by Don Feagin)
‘The Rose Is For Today’ (written by John Schweers)
‘Get Up Off Your Good Intention’ (written by Bobby David and June Dussia)

Personnel involved in the recording of Charley Pride’s ‘She’s Just An Old Love Turned Memory’ (RCA Records, 1977) included the following:

The Jordanaires, and The Nashville Edition (background vocals)
Charley Pride (lead vocals)

Charley Pride’s ‘She’s Just An Old Love Turned Memory’ (RCA Records, 1977) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.

Charley Pride: 'Someone Loves You Honey' (RCA Records, 1978)

In February 1978, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Someone Loves You Honey’ (RCA Records, 1978), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘More To Me’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
 (No.1 for one week in November 1977)

‘Someone Loves You Honey’ (written by Don Devaney)
(No.1 for two weeks in April 1978)

Charley Pride’s ‘Someone Loves You Honey’ (RCA Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

‘Georgia Keeps Pulling On My Ring’ (written by Tim Marshall and David Wilkins)
‘I Love You’ (written by John Schweers)
‘Play Guitar Play’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘Another I Love You Kind of Day’ (written by Dennis Morgan and John Schweers)
‘Days of Our Lives’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)
‘Daydreams About Night Things’ (written by John Schweers)
‘Heaven Watches Over Fools Like Me’ (written by Paul Gibbons, Jerry Grindele and Tony Hatch)
‘The Days of Sand & Shovels’ (written by Doyle Marsh and Bud Reneau)
‘I’m Never Leavin’ You’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)

Personnel involved in the recording of Charley Pride’s ‘Someone Loves You Honey’ (RCA Records, 1978) included the following:

Hayward Bishop (drums)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
David Briggs (piano)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) and Tommy Williams (fiddle)
Lloyd Green (steel guitar)
The Jordanaires, and The Nashville Edition (background vocals)
Mike Leach (bass)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
The Nashville String Machine (strings)
Charley Pride (lead vocals)
Dale Sellers, Pete Wade, Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) and Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (guitar)
David Briggs and Bergen White (arrangements)

Charley Pride’s ‘Someone Loves You Honey’ (RCA Records, 1978) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.

Dave & Sugar: 'Tear Time' (RCA Records, 1978)

In August 1978, Dave & Sugar saw the release of ‘Tear Time’ (RCA Records, 1978), which was produced by Jerry Bradley (Tuesday 30 January 1940 – Monday 17 July 2023), Charley Pride and Dave Rowland (Monday 26 January 1942 – Thursday 1 November 2018), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Gotta Quit Lookin’ At You, Baby’ (No.4, 1978)

‘Tear Time’, which was written by Jan Crutchfield (Saturday 26 February 1938 – Thursday 1 November 2012)
(No.1 for one week in October 1978)

‘It’s A Heartache’ (written by Ronnie Scott and Steve Wolfe)
(No.32, 1981)

Dave & Sugar’s ‘Tear Time’ (RCA Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

‘We Are The One’
‘Tie Me To Your Heart Again’
‘How Can I Stop My Lovin’ You’
‘Somebody Wake Me’
‘Nothing Makes Me Feel As Good’
‘Baby, Take Your Coat Off’
‘Easy To Love’

Dave & Sugar’s ‘Tear Time’ (RCA Records, 1978) reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.

Charley Pride saw the release of 'Burgers & Fries / When I Stop Leaving (I'll Be Gone)' (RCA Records, 1978)

In October 1978, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Burgers & Fries / When I Stop Leaving (I’ll Be Gone)’ (RCA Records, 1978), which was produced by Jerry Bradley (Tuesday 30 January 1940 – Monday 17 July 2023) and Charley Pride, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘When I Stop Leaving (I’ll Be Gone)’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)
(No.3, 1978)

‘Burgers & Fries’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
(No.2 in December 1978)

‘Where Do I Put Her Memory’, which was written by Jim Weatherly (Wednesday 17 March 1943 – Wednesday 3 February 2021)
 (No.1 for one week in April / May 1979)

Charley Pride’s ‘Burgers & Fries’ (RCA Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

‘Best In The World’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘Whose Arms Are You In Tonight’, which was written by Eugene David Dobbins (Monday 19 March 1934 – Sunday 23 November 2008), Rory Bourke and Johnny Wilson
‘Nothing’s Prettier Than Rose Is’ (written by Gary McCray)
‘Mem’ries’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010) and Susan Hargrove
‘I Can See The Lovin’ In Your Eyes’ (written by Mickey Johnson, June LaSalvia and Charley Pride)
‘One On One’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘You Snap Your Fingers (& I’m Back In Your Hands)’ (written by John Schweers)

Personnel involved in the recording of Charley Pride’s ‘Burgers & Fries / When I Stop Leaving (I’ll Be Gone)’ (RCA Records, 1978) included the following:

Hayward Bishop (drums)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
David Briggs (piano)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) and Tommy Williams (fiddle)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Mike Leach (bass)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, vibes)
Charley Pride (lead vocals)
Dale Sellers, Pete Wade and Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) (guitar)
Bergen White (arrangements)

Charley Pride’s ‘Burgers & Fries’ (RCA Records, 1978) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.

Charley Pride: 'You're My Jamaica' (RCA Records, 1979)

In August 1979, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘You’re My Jamaica’ (RCA Records, 1979), which was produced by Jerry Bradley (Tuesday 30 January 1940 – Monday 17 July 2023) and Charley Pride, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘You’re My Jamaica’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)
(No.1 for one week in September 1979) / this track holds the distinction as the first Billboard No.1 country music hit single ever recorded in England

‘Missin’ You’ (written by Kye Fleming and Dennis Morgan)
(No.2, 1979)

Charley Pride’s ‘You’re My Jamaica’ (RCA Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

‘What’re We Doing Doing This Again’ (written by Bob McDill)
‘No Relief In Sight’, which was written by Rory Bourke, Eugene David Dobbins (Monday 19 March 1934 – Sunday 23 November 2008) and Johnny Wilson
‘Playin’ Around’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘Heartbreak Mountain’ (written by Gary McCray)
‘To Have & To Hold’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘Let Me Have A Chance To Love You (One More Time)’ (written by Gary McCray)
‘I Want You’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)
‘When The Good Times Outweighed The Bad’ (written by Doug Campbell and Gary McCray)

Personnel involved in the recording of Charley Pride’s ‘You’re My Jamaica’ (RCA Records, 1979) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
David Briggs (piano)
Jimmy Capps (Thursday 25 May 1939 – Monday 1 June 2020), Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022), Pete Wade and Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) (guitar)
Ralph Gallant (drums)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Mike Leach (bass)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, vibes)
Charley Pride (lead vocals)
Bergen White and Mike Moran (arrangements)

Charley Pride’s ‘You’re My Jamaica’ (RCA Records, 1979) reached No.11 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1979.

Charley Pride: 'There's a Little Bit of Hank in Me' (RCA Records, 1980)

In January 1980, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘There’s A Little Bit of Hank In Me’ (RCA Records, 1980), an entire album of Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953) songs, which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Honky Tonk Blues’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953) (No.1 for one week in April 1980)

‘You Win Again’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
 (No.1 for one week in July 1980)

Charley Pride’s ‘There’s A Little Bit of Hank In Me’ (RCA Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

‘There’s A Little Bit of Hank In Me’ (written by John Schweers)
‘My Son Calls Another Man Daddy’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953) and Jewell House
‘Moanin’ The Blues’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
‘Mansion On The Hill’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953) and Fred Rose (Floyd Jenkins) (24 August 1898 – Wednesday 1 December 1954)
‘Mind Your Own Business’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
‘I Can’t Help It (If I’m Still In Love With You)’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
‘I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
‘Low Down Blues’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
‘I Could Never Be Ashamed of You’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
‘Why Don’t You Love Me’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)

Charley Pride’s ‘There’s A Little Bit of Hank In Me’ (RCA Records, 1980) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.

Charley Pride: 'Roll On Mississippi' (RCA Records, 1981)

In March 1981, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Roll On Mississippi’ (RCA Records, 1981), which was produced by Jerry Bradley (Tuesday 30 January 1940 – Monday 17 July 2023) and Charley Pride, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘You Almost Slipped My Mind’ (written by Tilden Back, Delbert Barker, Don Goodman and Troy Seals) (No.4, 1980)

‘Roll On Mississippi’ (written by Kye Fleming and Dennis Morgan)
(No.7, 1981) / this track is considered the official song of Mississippi, Charley Pride’s home state

Charley Pride’s ‘Roll On Mississippi’ (RCA Records, 1981) also included the following tracks:

‘I Used To Be That Way’ (written by John Schweers)
‘Taking The Easy Way Out’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997) and David Wills
‘She’s As Good As Gone’, which was written by Charles William Quillen (Monday 21 March 1938 – Friday 19 August 2022) and David Wills
‘He Can Be An Angel’ (written by Donny Lowery)
‘Fall Back On Me’ (written by Danny Dunn and Richard Root)
‘Make It Special Again’ (written by Gary Harrison and David Wills)
‘You Beat ‘Em All’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘Ghost-Written Love Letters’ (written by Jerry Hutchins)

Personnel involved in the recording of Charley Pride’s ‘Roll On Mississippi’ (RCA Records, 1981) included the following:

The Jordanaires, and The Nashville Edition (background vocals)
The Sheldon ‘Shelly’ Kurland (Saturday 9 June 1928 – Wednesday 6 January 2010) Strings (strings)
Charley Pride (lead vocals)
Bergen White (arrangements)

Charley Pride’s ‘Roll On Mississippi’ (RCA Records, 1981) reached No.17 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1981.

Charley Pride: 'Greatest Hits, Volume 1' (RCA Records, 1981)

In September 1981, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Greatest Hits, Volume 1’ (RCA Records, 1981), which included the following tracks:

‘Never Been So Loved (In All My Life)’, which was written by Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017) and Wayland D. Holyfield (No.1 for two weeks in October / November 1981)

‘Missin’ You’ (written by Kye Fleming and Dennis Morgan) (No.2, 1979)

‘When I Stop Leaving (I’ll Be Gone)’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997) (No.3, 1978)

‘You’re My Jamaica’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)
 (No.1 for one week in September 1979)

‘Honky Tonk Blues’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
 (No.1 for one week in April 1980)

‘Burgers & Fries’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005) (No.2 in December 1978)

‘Roll On Mississippi’ (written by Kye Fleming and Dennis Morgan) (No.7, 1981) / this track is considered the official song of Mississippi, Charley Pride’s home state

‘A Whole Lotta Things To Sing About’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
 (No.2 in October 1976)

‘She’s Just An Old Love Turned Memory’ (written by John Schweers)
 (No.1 for one week in March 1977)

‘Someone Loves You Honey’ (written by Don Devaney)
 (No.1 for two weeks in April 1978)

‘Where Do I Put Her Memory’, which was written by Jim Weatherly (Wednesday 17 March 1943 – Wednesday 3 February 2021)
 (No.1 for one week in April / May 1979)

Charley Pride’s ‘Greatest Hits, Volume 1’ (RCA Records, 1981) reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1981.

Charley Pride: 'Charley Sings Everybody's Choice' (RCA Records, 1982)

In March 1982, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Charley Sings Everybody’s Choice’ (RCA Records, 1982), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Mountain of Love’, which was written by Harold Dorman (Thursday 23 December 1926 – Saturday 8 October 1988) (No.1 for one week in March 1982) / this track was produced by Jerry Bradley (Tuesday 30 January 1940 – Monday 17 July 2023) and Charley Pride

‘I Don’t Think She’s In Love Any More’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)
(No.2 in July 1982) / this track was produced by Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017)

‘You’re So Good When You’re Bad’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
(No.1 for one week in November 1982) / this track was produced by Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017)

Charley Pride’s ‘Charley Sings Everybody’s Choice’ (RCA Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

‘I See The Devil In Your Deep Blue Eyes’, which was written by Dorsey Burnette (Wednesday 28 December 1932 – Sunday 19 August 1979), Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 – Thursday 18 December 2014) and Larry Keith / this track was produced by Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017)

‘When She Dances’
(written by Brian Blugerman) / this track was produced by Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017)

‘Oh, What A Beautiful Love Song’, which was written by Allen Henson and Keith Palmer (Sunday 23 June 1957 – Thursday 13 June 1996) / this track was produced by Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017)

‘I Haven’t Loved This Way In Years’ (written by Bill Shore and David Wills) / this track was produced by Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017)

‘Cup of Love’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005) / this track was produced by Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017)

‘Love Is A Shadow’ (written by John Schweers) / this track was produced by Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017)

‘I Hope You Never Cry Again’ (written by Tom Collins) / this track was produced by Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017)

Personnel involved in the recording of Charley Pride’s ‘Charley Sings Everybody’s Choice’ (RCA Records, 1982) included the following:

The Cherry Sisters, and The Nashville Edition (background vocals)
Charley Pride (lead vocals)

Charley Pride’s ‘Charley Sings Everybody’s Choice’ (RCA Records, 1982) reached No.10 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.

Charley Pride: 'Country Classics' (RCA Records, 1983)

In March 1983, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Country Classics’ (RCA Records, 1983), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Why, Baby, Why’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) and Darrell Edwards (No.1 for one week in February / March 1983)

‘More & More’, which was written by Merle Kilgore (Thursday 9 August 1934 – Sunday 6 February 2005) and Webb Pierce (Monday 8 August 1921 – Sunday 24 February 1991)
(No.7, 1983)

Charley Pride’s ‘Country Classics’ (RCA Records, 1983) also included the following tracks:

‘In The Jailhouse Now’, which was written by Jimmie Rodgers (8 September 1897 – Friday 26 May 1933)
‘Burning Bridges’ (written by Walter Scott)
‘Tennessee Saturday Night’, which was written by Everette Ishmael ‘Billy’ Hughes (14 September 1908 – Saturday 6 May 1995)
‘Radio Heroes’ (written by John Schweers)
‘Wondering’, which was written by Joseph Edward Werner (20 September 1909 – Saturday 10 June 1978)
‘That’s How Much I Love You’, which was written by Eddy Arnold (Wednesday 15 May 1918 – Thursday 8 May 2008), Graydon Hall and John Wallace ‘Wally’ Fowler (15 February 1917 – Friday 3 June 1994)
‘Filipino Baby’, which was written by William Jennings Cox (4 August 1897 – Tuesday 10 December 1968) and Clark Van Ness
‘Up To My Heart In Memories’ (written by John Schweers)

Charley Pride’s ‘Country Classics’ (RCA Records, 1983) reached No.36 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.

Charley Pride: 'Night Games' (RCA Records, 1983)

In August 1983, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Night Games’ (RCA Records, 1983), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Night Games’, which was written by Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017) and Blake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022) (No.1 for one week in September 1983)

‘Ev’ry Heart Should Have One’ (written by Bill Shore and Byron Gallimore)
(No.2, 1984)

Charley Pride’s ‘Night Games’ (RCA Records, 1983) also included the following tracks:

‘Love On A Blue Rainy Day’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997) and Richard E. Carpenter
‘The Late Show’ (written by Mickey Reed and Mike Jones)
‘Draw The Line’ (written by Jerry Fuller)
‘Down In Louisiana’ (written by Keith Stegall and Jim McBride)

‘I Could Let Her Get Close To Me (But She Could Never Get Close to You)’, which was written by Bill Shore, Blake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022) and David Wills
‘Thanks For Waking Me This Morning’ (written by Shelley Pinz)
‘Just Can’t Leave That Woman Alone’ (written by Wayland D. Holyfield and Jim McBride)

‘Lovin’ It Up (Livin’ It Down)’ (written by Bill Shore, Byron Gallimore and David Wills)

Charley Pride’s ‘Night Games’ (RCA Records, 1983) reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.

Charley Pride: 'The Power of Love' (RCA Records, 1984)

In August 1984, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Power of Love’ (RCA Records, 1984), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music hit singles chart:

‘Power of Love’ (written by Gary Nicholson and Don Cook) (No.9, 1984)

‘Missin’ Mississippi’, which was written by Blake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022), Bill Shore and Byron Gallimore
 (No.32, 1984)

Charley Pride’s ‘The Power of Love’ (RCA Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

‘Everybody’s Lookin’ For Love’, which was written by Don Pfrimmer (Thursday 9 September 1937 – Monday 7 December 2015), Bill Shore and Byron Gallimore
‘Ellie’, which was written by Blake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022), Bill Shore and Byron Gallimore
‘Falling In Love Again’, which was written by Susanna Clark (Saturday 11 March 1939 – Wednesday 27 June 2012)
‘Stagger Lee’, which was written by Harold Logan and Lloyd Price (Thursday 9 March 1933 – Monday 3 May 2021)
‘Gotta See Some More of You’ (written by Bill Shore and Byron Gallimore)
‘I Only Miss You On Weak Days’, which was written by John Schweers and Mack David (Friday 5 July 1912 – Thursday 30 December 1993)
‘Girl Trouble’ (written by Bobby David and Ray Kennedy)
‘Some Days It Rains All Night Long’ (written by Ed Penney)

Charley Pride’s ‘Power of Love’ (RCA Records, 1984) reached No.49 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.

Charley Pride: 'Greatest Hits, Volume 2' (RCA Records, 1985)

In May 1985, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Greatest Hits, Volume 2’ (RCA Records, 1985), which included the following tracks:

‘Down On The Farm’, which was written by John Greenebaum, Troy Seals and Edward F. Setser (1945 – Monday 27 January 2020)
(No.25, 1985)

‘Night Games’, which was written by Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017) and Blake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022)
(No.1 for one week in September 1983)

‘I Don’t Think She’s In Love Any More’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)
 (No.2 in July 1982)

‘Mountain of Love’, which was written by Harold Dorman (Thursday 23 December 1926 – Saturday 8 October 1988)
 (No.1 for one week in March 1982)

‘Now & Then’ (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) / this track was an album track from 1975

‘Let A Little Love Come In’ (written by Bob McDill)
(No.34, 1985)

‘Ev’ry Heart Should Have One’ (written by Bill Shore and Byron Gallimore)
 (No.2, 1984)

‘You’re So Good When You’re Bad’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005) 
(No.1 for one week in November 1982)

‘Power of Love’ (written by Gary Nicholson and Don Cook)
 (No.9, 1984)

‘Why, Baby, Why’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) and Darrell Edwards
 (No.1 for one week in February / March 1983)

Charley Pride’s ‘Greatest Hits, Volume 2’ (RCA Records, 1985) reached No.60 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.

Charley Pride: 'Best There Is' (RCA Records, 1986)

In January 1986, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Best There Is’ (RCA Records, 1986), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Best There Is’ (written by Wayland D. Holyfield and Randy Goodrum)
(No.75, 1985)

‘Love On A Blue Rainy Day’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997) and R. Carpenter
(No.74, 1986)

Charley Pride’s ‘Best There Is’ (RCA Records, 1986) also included the following tracks:

‘Wherever You Are’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)
‘I Used It All On You’ (written by T. Crum)
‘I Discovered You’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)
‘The Tumbleweed & The Rose’, which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004)
‘Ain’t No Way Around It’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)
‘Just Can’t Leave That Woman Alone’ (written by Wayland D. Holyfield and Jim McBride)

Charley Pride: 'Back to The Country' (RCA Records, 1986)

In July 1986, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Back To The Country’ (RCA Records, 1986), which included the following tracks:

‘I Coulda Had Love’ (written by Byron Gallimore and Carol Jenkins)
‘How Many Angels’, which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004)
‘If You Were Mine’ (written by Randy Albright, John Greenbaum, Gene Nelson and Paul Nelson)
‘Are You Sincere’ (written by Wayne Walker)
‘I Keep Forgettin’ (I Forgot About You)’, which was written by Byron GallimoreDon Pfrimmer (Thursday 9 September 1937 – Monday 7 December 2015) and Bill Shore
‘Back To The Country’, which was written by Byron GallimoreBlake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022) and Bill Shore
‘A Heart Like Mine (& A Memory Like Yours)’, which was written by Byron GallimoreBlake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022) and Bill Shore
‘Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain’, which was written by Fred Rose (Floyd Jenkins) (24 August 1898 – Wednesday 1 December 1954)

Charley Pride’s ‘Back To The Country’ (RCA Records, 1986) reached No.60 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1986.

Charley Pride remained with RCA Records until 1986, when the record label began to promote newer country artists and did not renew contracts with many of the older artists who had been with the label for years.

Charley Pride then signed a recording contract with 16th Avenue Records.

Charley Pride: 'After All This Time' (16th Avenue Records, 1987)

In April 1987, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘After All This Time’ (16th Avenue Records, 1987), his debut album for 16th Avenue Records, which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Have I Got Some Blues For You’ (written by David Chamberlain)
(No.14, 1987)

‘If You Still Want A Fool Around’which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)
(No.31, 1987)

Charley Pride’s ‘After All This Time’ (16th Avenue Records, 1987), also included the following tracks:

‘Looking At A Sure Thing’which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)
‘Even Knowin’, which was written by Dickey Lee, Johnny Russell (Tuesday 23 January 1940 – Tuesday 3 July 2001) and Tommy Rocco
‘After All This Time’, which was written by Tommy Collins (Sunday 28 September 1930 – Tuesday 14 March 2000)
‘Next To You, I Like Me’ (written by Billy Haynes, Bobby Fischer and Rick Giles)
‘On The Other Hand’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
‘One of These Days’, which was written by Ray Charles (Tuesday 23 September 1930 – Thursday 10 June 2004), Lamont Hawkins, Jason Hunter and Corey Woods
‘Look In Your Mirror’ (written by Bill Shore and Byron Gallimore)
‘You Took Me There’, which was written by Blake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022), Bill Shore and Byron Gallimore

Charley Pride’s ‘After All This Time’ (16th Avenue Records, 1987) reached No.18 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1987.

Charley Pride: 'I'm Gonna Love Her on The Radio' (16th Avenue Records, 1988)

In February 1988, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘I’m Gonna Love Her On The Radio’ (16th Avenue Records, 1988), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Shouldn’t It Be Easier Than This’, which was written by John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 – Thursday 1 February 2001) and Rick Giles
(No.5, 1987)

‘I’m Gonna Love Her On The Radio’ (written by Mac McAnally and Tom Brasfield)
(No.13, 1988)

‘Where Was I’ (written by Steve Clark and Rick Peoples)
(No.49, 1988)

Charley Pride’s ‘I’m Gonna Love Her On The Radio’ (16th Avenue Records, 1988) also included the following tracks:

‘She’s Soft To Touch’
‘Your Used To Be’
‘Come On In & Let Me Love You’
‘Whole Lot of Lovin’
‘Leaving Never Gets Me Anywhere’
‘There Ain’t No Me (If There Ain’t No You)’
‘Little Piece of Heaven’

Charley Pride’s ‘I’m Gonna Love Her On The Radio’ (16th Avenue Records, 1988) reached No.36 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988.

Charley Pride: 'Moody Woman' (16th Avenue Records, 1989)

In February 1989, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Moody Woman’ (16th Avenue Records, 1989), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘White Houses’ (written by Johnny Cunningham)
(No.49, 1989)

‘The More I Do’ (written by Gidget Baird and Byron Gallimore)
(No.77, 1989)

‘Amy’s Eyes’ (written by Terry Brown and Jaima Prater Hunt)
(No.28, 1989)

Charley Pride’s ‘Moody Woman’ (16th Avenue Records, 1989) also included the following tracks:

‘Can’t Stop The Mississippi’ (written by Richard Leigh and Wayland D. Holyfield)
‘You Put It There’ (written by Donny Kees, Jimmy Jay and Richard Ross)
‘Sail Away’, which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 – Sunday 29 September 2002)
‘Moody Woman’ (written by Donny Kees, Jimmy Jay and Richard Ross)
‘Heaven Help Us All’ (written by Ronald Miller) / this track featured guest vocals from Dion Pride
‘After Me, After You’ (written by Gidget Baird, Byron Gallimore and Bill Shore)
‘I Made Love To You In My Mind’ (written by Danny Hutchins and Stephen Pride)

Charley Pride’s ‘Moody Woman’ (16th Avenue Records, 1989) reached No.51 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1989.

Charley Pride: 'After All This Time' (16th Avenue Records, 1987)
Charley Pride: 'I'm Gonna Love Her on The Radio' (16th Avenue Records, 1988)
Charley Pride: 'Moody Woman' (16th Avenue Records, 1989)

Charley Pride’s three albums released under the 16th Avenue Records label, ‘After All This Time’ (16th Avenue Records, 1987), ‘I’m Gonna Love Her On The Radio’ (16th Avenue Records, 1988) and ‘Moody Woman’ (16th Avenue Records, 1989), were released in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland, under a licensing arrangement, by Ritz Records.

The Grand Ole Opry, Nashville: Charley Pride

On Saturday 1 May 1993, Charley Pride accepted an invitation to join The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville and, in the process, became the first black Opry regular in the show’s more than seventy year history.

Charley Pride: 'My Six Latest & Six Greatest' (Honest Entertainment Records, 1993)

In July 1993, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘My Six Latest & Six Greatest’ (Honest Entertainment Records, 1993), which included the following tracks, six of which were new songs:

‘Just For The Love of It’ (written by Jeff Chase and Wood Newton)
/ this track was a newly recorded track, and featured guest vocals from Joe Diffie (Sunday 28 December 1958 – Sunday 29 March 2020) / this track was released as a single in 1993, but it did not chart

‘Walk On By’ (written by Kendall Hayes and Gary Walker)
/ this track was a newly recorded track

‘I’ve Been There’, which was written by Vern Dant, Dobie Gray (Friday 26 July 1940 – Tuesday 6 December 2011) and Don Pfrimmer (Thursday 9 September 1937 – Monday 7 December 2015)
/ this track was a newly recorded track, and featured guest vocals from Joe Diffie (Sunday 28 December 1958 – Sunday 29 March 2020)

‘Burnin’ Down The Town’, which was written by Joe Diffie (Sunday 28 December 1958 – Sunday 29 March 2020), Wayne Perry and Lonnie Wilson
/ this track was a newly recorded track, and featured guest vocals from Travis Tritt

‘For Today’ (written by David Slater and Jack White)
/ this track was a newly recorded track, and featured guest vocals from Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) / this track was released as a single in 1994, but it did not chart

‘I Came Straight To You’ (written by John Jarvis and Kevin Welch)
 / this track was a newly recorded track, and featured guest vocals from Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020)

‘Is Anybody Goin’ To San Antone’, which was written by Glenn W. Martin (Thursday 30 June 1932 – Sunday 12 May 2019) and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004)
 / this track was a re-recording / the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in April / May 1970

‘Crystal Chandeliers’, which was written by Ted Harris (Monday 2 August 1937 – Sunday 22 November 2015)
 / this track was a re-recording / the original version of this track was not issued as a single in the United States, but became a very popular track in England and Ireland

‘Hope You’re Feelin’ Me (Like I’m Feelin’ You)’ (written by Bobby David and Jim Rushing)
 / this track was a re-recording, and featured guest vocals from Marty Stuart / the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in October 1975

‘Roll On Mississippi’ (written by Kye Fleming and Dennis Morgan)
 / this track was a re-recording / the original version of this track reached No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1981

‘Kiss An Angel Good Morning’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
 / this track was a re-recording / the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for five weeks in December 1971 / January 1972, No.21 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1971, a Top 10 hit single on the Billboard Adult Contemporary Chart in 1971, and No.19 on Cash Box Top 100 Chart in 1971

‘You’re So Good When You’re Bad’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005) 
/ this track was a re-recording / the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in November 1982

In June 1993, Charley Pride was honoured by The Academy of Country Music (ACM) with its prestigious 'Pioneer Award'

In June 1993, Charley Pride was honoured by the Academy of Country Music (ACM) with its prestigious ‘Pioneer Award’.

'Pride: The Charley Pride Story' / Charley Pride Autobiography co-written with Jim Henderson / Published by William Morrow in 1994

In 1994, Charley Pride saw the release of his autobiography, ‘Pride: The Charley Pride Story’, which was co-written with Jim Henderson and was published by William Morrow.  In this book, Charley Pride revealed that he had struggled for years with manic depression.

In January 1996, Charley Pride was honoured with a ‘Trumpet Award’ by Turner Broadcasting, marking outstanding African-American Achievement.

Charley Pride: 'Classics with Pride' (Honest Entertainment Records, 1996)

On Tuesday 7 May 1996, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Classics With Pride’ (Honest Entertainment Records, 1996), which included the following tracks:

‘You’ve Got To Stand For Something’ (written by Aaron Tippin and Buddy Brock) / the original version of this track was recorded by Aaron Tippin, and reached No.6 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1991

‘Sea of Heartbreak’, which was written by Paul Hampton and Hal David (Wednesday 25 May 1921 – Saturday 1 September 2012)
/ the original version of this track was recorded by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 – Monday 17 November 2003), and reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1961

‘Please Help Me I’m Falling’, which was written by Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 – Monday 16 March 2015) and Hal Blair
/ the original version of this track was recorded by Hank Locklin (Friday 15 February 1918 – Sunday 8 March 2009), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for fourteen weeks (May – August) in 1960, and No.8 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1960

‘The Hunger’ (written by Lee Fry)
/ the original version of this track was recorded by Charley Pride, who included the track on ‘She’s Just An Old Love Turned Memory’ (RCA Records, 1977)

‘But I Do’ (written by Paul Gayton and Robert Guidry)


‘Ramblin’ Rose’, which was written by Noel Sherman (1930 – Monday 4 June 1972) and Jim Sherman
/ the original version of this track was recorded by Nat King Cole (Monday 17 March 1919 – Monday 15 February 1965), and reached No.2 on both the Billboard and Cash Box Charts in 1962 and sold over a million copies as a single / the track also spent five weeks at No.1 on the Billboard Easy Listening Chart in 1962, No.1 on the Australian Chart in 1962, and No.7 on the Billboard R&B Chart in 1962

‘Walls’ (written by Brent Mason, Marvin Morrow and Keith Stegall)


‘Hello Love’ (written by Betty Jean Robinson and Aileen Muich)
/ the original version of this track was recorded by Hank Snow (Saturday 9 May 1914 – Monday 20 December 1999), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in April / May 1974

‘Lovesick Blues’, which was written by Cliff Friend (1 October 1893 – Thursday 27 June 1974) and Irving Mills (16 January 1894 – Sunday 21 April 1985)
/ the original version of this track was recorded by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1949

‘Lone Star Lonely’ (written by Wood Newton)


‘I Love You Because’, which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 – Thursday 11 September 1969)
/ the original version of this track was recorded by Leon Payne, and reached No.4 on the Billboard Country & Western Best Seller List in 1949, and spent two weeks at No.1 on the Country & Western Disk Jockey List in 1949 / this track was also recorded by Al Martino (Friday 7 October 1927 – Tuesday 13 October 2009), whose version reached No.3 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1963, and No.1 on the Middle-Road (or Easy Listening) Chart for two weeks in May 1963 / this track was also recorded by Jim Reeves (Monday 20 August 1923 – Friday 31 July 1964), whose version reached No.5 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1976 / the track was the title track of a posthumous Jim Reeves album, which peaked at No.24 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976 / the 45rpm vinyl single reached No.54 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1976

‘It’s Just A Matter of Time’, which was written by Clyde Otis (Thursday 11 September 1924 – Tuesday 8 January 2008), Brook Benton (Saturday 19 September 1931 – Saturday 9 April 1988) and Belford Hendricks (Tuesday 11 May 1909 – Saturday 24 September 1977)
/ the original version of this track was recorded by Brook Benton (Saturday 19 September 1931 – Saturday 9 April 1988), whose version reached No.3 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1959, sold over one million copies and was awarded a ‘Gold’ disc by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA)

In July 1999, Charley Pride received his own star on Hollywood Walk of Fame.

In July 1999, Charley Pride received his own star on Hollywood Walk of Fame.

In 2000, Charley Pride was inducted into The Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum in Nashville.

In 2000, Charley Pride was inducted into The Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum in Nashville.

Charley Pride: 'A Tribute to Jim Reeves' (Music City Records, 2001)

On Tuesday 15 May 2001, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘A Tribute To Jim Reeves’ (Music City Records, 2001); the album was a collection of material, which had previously been recorded by Jim Reeves (Monday 20 August 1923 – Friday 31 July 1964), including the following tracks:

‘Is It Really Over?’ (written by Jim Reeves)
‘I Love You Because’, which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 – Thursday 11 September 1969)
‘Guilty’, which was written by Alex Zanetis (Monday 15 May 1922 – Tuesday 13 September 2005)
‘He’ll Have To Go’, which was written by Audrey Allison and Joe Allison (Friday 3 October 1924 – Friday 2 August 2002)
‘Blue Boy’, which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 – Thursday 25 June 1987)
‘Four Walls’ (written by George Campbell and Marvin Moore)
‘There’s A Heartache’ (written by Ray Baker)
‘Blue Side of Lonesome’, which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 – Thursday 11 September 1969)
‘I’m Gonna Change Everything’, which was written by Alex Zanetis (Monday 15 May 1922 – Tuesday 13 September 2005)
‘I Won’t Come In’ (written by Gene Davis)
‘I Guess I’m Crazy’ (written by Werly Fairburn)
‘Missin’ You’ (written by Kye Fleming and Dennis Morgan)
‘Welcome To My World’, which was written by Johnny Hathcock and Ray Winkler (Wednesday 13 October 1920 – Saturday 9 May 1998)
‘Am I Losing You’ (written by Jim Reeves)
‘Adios Amigo’ (written by Ralph Freed and Jerry Livingston)

On Tuesday 25 March 2003, Charley Pride received Texas Cultural Trust’s ‘Texas Medal of Arts’.

On Thursday 27 March 2003, Charley Pride was ranked No.18 on CMT’s ’40 Greatest Men in Country Music’.

Charley Pride: 'Comfort of Her Wings' (Music City Records, 2003)

On Tuesday 20 May 2003, Charley Pride saw the release of ‘Comfort of Her Wings’ (Music City Records, 2003), which included the following tracks:

‘Hook In My Heart’ (written by Kevin Wicker)
‘Field of Dreams’ (written by Jim Casey and Dickey Lee)
‘Empty Shoes’, which was written by Patricia Karen Bunch (Thursday 22 June 1939 – Monday 30 January 2023) and Doug Johnson
‘I Need Somebody Bad’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘Trapped In An Old Country Song’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) and Don Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 – Monday 16 March 2015)
‘(I Believe In) Good Old Country Music’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022), Rodney Gibson and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)
‘Chain of Love’ (written by Rory Lee Feek)
‘Two Pump Texaco’ (written by Michael Dulaney and Neil Thrasher)
‘Plenty Good Lovin’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘Old Heart (Rest In Pieces)’ (written by Roger West, Perry Jones and Bobby Crocker)
‘If This Old House Could Talk’ (traditional)
‘Comfort of Her Wings’ (written by J.B. Rudd, Vip Vipperman and Darryl Worley)
‘Stars & Stripes’, which was written by Kenny Beard (Thursday 26 February 1959 – Sunday 1 October 2017) and Aaron Tippin

On Thursday 10 January 2008, Charley Pride received Mississippi Arts Commission’s ‘Lifetime Achievement’ Award during the organisation’s Governor’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts.

Charley Pride & Gene Watson participating in 'Country Family Reunion' television recording in Nashville on Tuesday 22 January 2008

On Tuesday 22 January 2008, Charley Pride and Gene Watson were two of the extraordinary country music artists who participated in Country Family Reunion’s television recording in Nashville.

In 2010, Charley Pride became a special investor and minority owner of Texas Rangers Major League Baseball Club.

On Wednesday 6 October 2010, Bill Anderson‘s 50th Anniversary Celebration took place in Nashville with a special ‘Country Family Reunion’ television recording.

Charley Pride & Gene Watson participating in Bill Anderson's 50th Anniversary Celebration in Nashville during a television recording of 'Country Family Reunion' on Wednesday 6 October 2010

On Wednesday 6 October 2010, Charley Pride and Gene Watson were two of the very special country music artists who participated in Bill Anderson‘s 50th Anniversary Celebration in Nashville during a television recording of ‘Country Family Reunion’.

On Friday 29 April 2011, it was announced that a biopic was in the works based on Charley Pride’s life and career.  The film was expected to be produced by, and star, actor and professional wrestler, Dwayne Johnson.

Charley Pride

Charley Pride
(photo credit: Joseph Llanes)

On Wednesday 11 November 2020, The Country Music Association honoured Charley Pride by awarding him the Willie Nelson Lifetime Achievement Award; Charley Pride accepted the honour during The 54th Annual CMA Awards, which was broadcast ‘live’ from Nashville’s Music City Center on ABC.

‘Charley Pride is the epitome of a trailblazer’, said Sarah Trahern, CMA Chief Executive Officer.  ‘Few other artists have grown country music’s rich heritage and led to the advancement of country music around the world like Charley.  His distinctive voice has created a timeless legacy that continues to echo through the country community today.  We could not be more excited to honour Charley with one of CMA’s highest accolades.

The Willie Nelson Lifetime Achievement Award is for an iconic artist who has attained the highest degree of recognition in country music.  The Award was established to recognise an artist who has achieved both national and international prominence and stature through concert performances, humanitarian efforts, philanthropy, record sales, and public representation at the highest level.  The artist receiving this Award has positively impacted and contributed to the growth of the genre throughout a course of years that have proven to have an unprecedented historical impact on fans and industry alike.

Previous recipients of the Willie Nelson Lifetime Achievement Award include Willie Nelson in 2012, Kenny Rogers (Sunday 21 August 1938 – Friday 20 March 2020) in 2013, Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 – Friday 12 September 2003) in 2015, Dolly Parton in 2016, and Kris Kristofferson in 2019.

Through a mix of courage, determination, and extraordinary talent, Charley Pride made country music history by becoming the genre’s first black superstar.  The country legend has seen remarkable longevity in his career, which spans more than five decades.  His distinctive baritone voice allowed him to take almost every song he touched into the Top 10, if not the No.1 position, typically spending multiple weeks there.  Between his chart debut in 1966, and 1989, Charley Pride had 29 No.1 country hits and over 50 Top 10 tracks.

In 1971, Charley Pride was named ‘CMA Entertainer of The Year’, as well as ‘Male Vocalist of The Year’ in both 1971 and 1972.  Charley Pride was also the first black man to co-host the CMA Awards, taking the reins in 1975 alongside Glen Campbell (Wednesday 22 April 1936 – Tuesday 8 August 2017).  He became a Grand Ole Opry member in 1993 and, in 2000, was inducted into The Country Music Hall of Fame.  He holds three Grammy Awards and was honoured with a Lifetime Achievement Award by The Recording Academy in 2017

Charley Pride (Friday 18 March 1938 - Saturday 12 December 2020)

On Saturday 12 December 2020, Charley Pride’s official team released the following statement:

‘It is with great sadness that we confirm that Charley Pride passed away this morning, Saturday, December 12, 2020, in Dallas, Texas of complications from Covid-19 at age 86.

He was admitted to the hospital in late November with Covid-19 type symptoms and, despite the incredible efforts, skill and care of his medical team over the past several weeks, he was unable to overcome the virus.

Charley felt blessed to have such wonderful fans all over the world.  And, he would want his fans to take this virus very seriously.

Charley Pride was the son of Tessie Stewart Pride and Mack Pride Sr.  He was the husband of Ebby Rozene Cohran Pride.  His children are Carlton Kraig Pride, Charles Dion Pride and Angela Rozene Pride.

His grandchildren are Carlton Kraig Pride Jr., Malachi Pride, Syler Pride, Ebby Pride and Arrentino Vassar.

His two great-grandchildren are Skyler Pride and Carlton Kraig Pride III.

He is preceded in death by brothers Jonas McIntyre, Mack Pride Jr., Louis Pride, Edward Pride and Joe L. Pride, and by sister Bessie Chambers.

He leaves behind siblings Harmon Pride (and spouse Barbara), Stephen Pride (and spouse Pamela), Catherine Sanders, and Maxine Pride, as well as numerous nieces and nephews.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks for donations to The Pride Scholarship at Jesuit College Preparatory School, St. Philips School & Community Center, The Food Bank, or the charity of your choice’

Charley Pride

• Visit Charley Pride’s official site at charleypride.com