Gene Watson Peer’s Quote from Dave Gibson: May 2022

Gene Watson’s Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as ‘the singer’s singer’ – and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson’s Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2022, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Dave Gibson, which he submitted to this site on Thursday 26 May 2022.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Dave Gibson who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online ‘celebration of a Lone Star Hero’.

Dave Gibson

Dave Gibson
This quote was submitted on Thursday 26 May 2022.

‘Gene Watson is one of the great artists I listened to before moving to Nashville, his voice and style were always an inspiration to me as an aspiring singer/songwriter.

Gene Watson: 'Love In The Hot Afternoon' (Capitol Records, 1975)

Love In The Hot Afternoon‘ is one of my favourite records of all time, and it’s awesome to see him still performing and singing great.

Keep on rockin’ buddy

Thank you, Dave Gibson, for your support of Gene Watson.



About Dave Gibson…

Dave Gibson

Dave Gibson was born David Lowell Gibson on Tuesday 1 October 1946 in El Dorado, Arkansas and was raised in Odessa, Texas before moving to Nashville in 1982.

Dave Gibson grew up loving music and, in particular, songwriters.  Buddy Holly (Monday 7 September 1936 – Tuesday 3 February 1959) and Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 – Tuesday 6 December 1988) were two Texans, who most influenced his vocal stylings, and later the dynamic and commanding performances of Elvis Presley (Tuesday 8 January 1935 – Tuesday 16 August 1977), gave Dave Gibson something more to strive for.

By 1982, Dave Gibson had patched up a rickety Ford van and headed east to Nashville armed with raw talent, determination and an infectious personality.

A keening baritone with a wry sense of humour, Dave Gibson was always drawn to the story-telling part of country music, and loved to deliver a surprise last line with his signature guffaw.  It wasn‚Äôt long before the jaded office doors of Nashville creaked open and Dave Gibson found himself in front of an array of power brokers, including producers Tony Brown, Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017), The Oak Ridge Boys, Duane Allen, and eventually, Doug Johnson.

Dave Gibson landed a publishing deal with The Oak Ridge Boys‘ company, Silverline Music, and began co-writing with a who‚Äôs who of hit makers.  The industry soon began to take notice of this fledgling writer, and Dave Gibson started getting cuts by Steve WarinerJoe Diffie (Sunday 28 December 1958 – Sunday 29 March 2020), Confederate Railroad, Tanya Tucker, Alabama, Pam Tillis, and Montgomery Gentry.

Dave Gibson earned six No.1s, and Alabama‚Äôs ‘Juke Box In My Mind’ stayed at No.1 for an impressive four weeks in 1990.  Dave Gibson soon became a much sought after writer and writing partner in Nashville.

Steve Wariner recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Midnight Fire’ (co-written with Lewis Anderson) and included the track on ‘Midnight Fire’ (RCA Victor Records, 1983); the track reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1983.

Steve Wariner recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Don’t You Give Up On Love’ and included the track on ‘Midnight Fire’ (RCA Victor Records, 1983); the track reached No.49 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1984, and No.46 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1984.

Steve Wariner: 'Heart Trouble: The Best of The MCA Years' (Hump Head Country / Wrasse Records, 2015)

Steve Wariner recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Heart Trouble’, which was co-written with Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997) and included the track on ‘One Good Night Deserves Another’ (MCA Records, 1985); this track, which reached No.8 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1985, was also included, on CD1, of Steve Wariner‘s ‘Heart Trouble: The Best of The MCA Years’ (Hump Head Country / Wrasse Records, 2015), a 2-CD set.

Marie Osmond: 'There's No Stopping Your Heart' (Capitol Records / Curb Records, 1985)

Marie Osmond recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Until I Fall In Love Again’ (co-written with Larry Boone) and included the track on ‘There’s No Stopping Your Heart’ (Capitol Records / Curb Records, 1985); the track reached No.54 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1985.

Mickey Gilley: 'I Feel Good About Lovin' You' (Epic Records, 1985)

Mickey Gilley (Monday 9 March 1936 – Saturday 7 May 2022) recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘You’ve Got Something On Your Mind’, which was co-written with Roger Murrah and Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017), and included the track on ‘I Feel Good About Lovin’ You’ (Epic Records, 1985); the track reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1985.

Larry Boone: 'Larry Boone' (Mercury Records, 1987)

Larry Boone recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Don’t Give Candy to A Stranger’, which was co-written with Larry Boone and Jimbeau Hinson (Wednesday 29 October 1952 – Friday 4 March 2022), and included the track on ‘Larry Boone’ (Mercury Records, 1987); the track reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1988.

Tanya Tucker: 'Love Me Like You Used To' (Capitol Records, 1987)

Tanya Tucker recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘If It Don’t Come Easy’ (co-written with Craig Karp) and included the track on ‘Love Me Like You Used To’ (Capitol Records, 1987); the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in July 1988.

Southern Pacific: 'Zuma' (Warner Bros. Records, 1988)

Southern Pacific recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Honey I Dare You’ (co-written with David Jenkins, Stu Cook, John McFee and Craig Karp) and included the track on ‘Zuma’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988); the track reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1988, and No.3 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1988.

Southern Pacific: 'Zuma' (Warner Bros. Records, 1988)

Southern Pacific recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘All Is Lost’ (co-written with Kurt Howell, Stu Cook and Craig Karp) and included the track on ‘Zuma’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988); the track reached No.19 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary Chart in 1989.

Conway Twitty: 'House On Old Lonesome Road' (MCA Records, 1989)

Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘House On Old Lonesome Road’ (co-written with Bernie Nelson) and included the track on ‘House On Old Lonesome Road’ (MCA Records, 1989); the track reached No.19 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1989.

James House: 'James House' (MCA Records, 1989)

James House recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘That’ll Be The Last Thing’ (co-written with James House and Craig Karp) and included the track on ‘James House’ (MCA Records, 1989); the track reached No.52 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1989.

Alabama: 'Pass It On Down' (RCA Nashville Records, 1990)

Alabama recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Jukebox In My Mind’ (co-written with Ronnie Rogers) and included the track on ‘Pass It On Down’ (RCA Nashville Records, 1990); the track was No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart for four weeks in 1990, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1990.

Barbara Mandrell: 'Morning Sun' (Capitol Records, 1990)

Barbara Mandrell recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Do You Know Where Your Man Is’, which was co-written with Carol Chase and Russell Smith (Friday 17 June 1949 – Friday 12 July 2019), and included the track on ‘Morning Sun’ (Capitol Records, 1990).

Despite his success and attention as a writer, Dave Gibson‚Äôs first dream was always to be a performer.  That dream was finally realised when Dave Gibson teamed up with rocker, Bill ‘Blue’ Miller, a famed guitar player for Bob Seger’s Silver Bullet Band, in 1990, when Doug Johnson, then-vice president of Epic Records, introduced them to each other, thinking that the two artists would work well together as songwriters.  The duo formed Gibson/Miller Band, and quickly racked up sell-out dates, received critical reviews, and scored multiple Billboard Top 10 hit singles, as well as a coveted Academy of Country Music (ACM) Award for ‘New Vocal Group or Duo’ in 1994.

Both Dave Gibson and Bill ‘Blue’ Miller served as vocalists and guitarists in Gibson/Miller Band, which also included Mike Daly (steel guitar), Bryan Grassmeyer (bass guitar) and Steve Grossman (drums).  Bryan Grassmeyer was replaced, in 1993, by Doug Kahan.

Tammy Wynette: 'Heart Over Mind' (Epic Records, 1990)

Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998) recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘What Goes With Blue’ (co-written with Paul Nelson) and included the track on ‘Heart Over Mind’ (Epic Records, 1990); the track reached No.56 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1991.

Joe Diffie: 'Joe, Joe, Joe Diffie!' (JLD, Incorporated, 2019)

Joe Diffie (Sunday 28 December 1958 – Sunday 29 March 2020) recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Ships That Don’t Come In’ (co-written with Paul Nelson) and included the track on ‘Regular Joe’ (Epic Records, 1992); the track reached No.5 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in July 1992, and No.1 on Radio & Records Chart in 1992.  This track was re-recorded by Joe Diffie (Sunday 28 December 1958 – Sunday 29 March 2020), who included it on ‘Joe, Joe, Joe Diffie!’ (JLD, Incorporated, 2019).

Pam Tillis: 'Homeward Looking Angel' (Arista Nashville Records, 1992)

Pam Tillis recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Do You Know Where Your Man Is’, which was co-written with Carol Chase and Russell Smith (Friday 17 June 1949 – Friday 12 July 2019), and included the track on ‘Homeward Looking Angel’ (Arista Nashville Records, 1992); the track reached No.16 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1993, and No.19 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1993.

Confederate Railroad: 'Confederate Railroad' (Atlantic Records, 1992)

Confederate Railroad recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Queen of Memphis’ (co-written with Kathy Louvin) and included the track on ‘Confederate Railroad’ (Atlantic Records, 1992); the track reached No.2 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in early 1993.

Cleve Francis recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘You Can’t Call It Love’ (co-written with Carol Chase) and included the track on ‘Walkin’ (Liberty Records, 1993).

Between 1992 and 1994, Gibson/Miller Band recorded two albums for Epic Records, in addition to charting seven singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart.

Gibson/Miller Band: 'Where There's Smoke...' (Epic Records, 1993)

On Tuesday 12 January 1993, Gibson/Miller Band saw the release of their debut album, ‘Where There’s Smoke…’ (Epic Records, 1993), which was produced by Doug Johnson (then-vice president of Epic Records) and Bill ‘Blue’ Miller, and included five tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Big Heart’ (written by Dave Gibson, Bill ‘Blue’ Miller and Freddy Weller) (No.37, 1992) / this track also reached No.58 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1992

‘High Rollin’ (written by Dave Gibson and Bill ‘Blue’ Miller) (No.20, 1993) / this track also reached No.18 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1993

‘Texas Tattoo’ (written by Dave Gibson and Bill ‘Blue’ Miller) (No.22, 1993) / this track also reached No.33 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1993

‘Small Price’ (written by Austin Cunningham and Thom McHugh) (No.46, 1993) / this track also reached No.55 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1993

‘Stone Cold Country’ (written by Dave Gibson and Bill ‘Blue’ Miller) (No.40, 1994) / this track also reached No.35 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1994

Gibson/Miller Band’s debut album, ‘Where There’s Smoke…’ (Epic Records, 1993), also included the following tracks:

Archer/Park: 'We Got A Lot In Common' (Atlantic Records, 1994)

‘Where There’s Smoke’, which was written by Bobby Paul Barker (Sunday 19 November 1944 – Friday 20 November 2015) and Mark Collie / this track was also recorded by Archer/Park (Randy Archer & Johnny Park), who included it on ‘We Got A Lot In Common’ (Atlantic Records, 1994); the track reached No.29 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1994

‘Your Daddy Hates Me’, which was written by Patricia Karen Bunch (Thursday 22 June 1939 – Monday 30 January 2023) and Doug Johnson
‘She’s Gettin’ A Rock’ (written by Garry Laron Phelps)
‘An Offer Her Heart Can’t Refuse’ (written by Dave Gibson and Bill ‘Blue’ Miller)
‘Thank Virginia’, which was written by Patricia Karen Bunch (Thursday 22 June 1939 – Monday 30 January 2023) and Doug Johnson
‘Southern Man’ (written by Dave Gibson and Richard Leigh)

Personnel involved in the recording of Gibson/Miller Band’s debut album, ‘Where There’s Smoke…’ (Epic Records, 1993), included the following:

Gibson/Miller Band
Mike Daly (steel guitar, lap steel guitar)
Dave Gibson (lead vocals, guitar)
Bryan Grassmeyer (bass guitar, background vocals)
Steve Grossman (drums, percussion)
Bill ‘Blue’ Miller (lead vocals, lead guitar)

Additional musicians
Bruce C. Bouton
(steel guitar)
Mark Morris (percussion)
Steve Nathan (Hammond B-3 organ)
Biff Watson and John Willis (rhythm guitar)

Gibson/Miller Band’s debut album, ‘Where There’s Smoke…’ (Epic Records, 1993), reached No.65 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1993.

Ronnie Milsap: 'True Believer' (Liberty Records, 1993)

Ronnie Milsap recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Desperate Man’ and included the track on ‘True Believer’ (Liberty Records, 1993).

Gibson/Miller Band: 'Red, White & Blue Collar' (Epic Records, 1994)

On Tuesday 19 July 1994, Gibson/Miller Band saw the release of ‘Red, White & Blue Collar’ (Epic Records, 1994), which was produced by Doug Johnson and Bill ‘Blue’ Miller, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

Ed Bruce: 'Ed Bruce' (United Artists Records, 1976)
Chris LeDoux: 'Songbook of The American West' (Chris LeDoux Independent Release, 1976)
Waylon Jennings & Willie Nelson: 'Waylon & Willie' (RCA Records, 1978)

‘Mammas, Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys’, which was written by Ed Bruce (Friday 29 December 1939 – Friday 8 January 2021) and Patsy Ann Bruce (Friday 8 March 1940 – Sunday 16 May 2021) (No.49, 1994) / this track was also featured on the soundtrack to the film ‘The Cowboy Way’, which starred Keifer Sutherland and Woody Harrelson / the original version of this track was recorded by Ed Bruce, who included it on his self-titled album, ‘Ed Bruce’ (United Artists Records, 1976); Ed Bruce‘s version of the track reached No.15 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1975 / this track was also recorded by Chris LeDoux (Saturday 2 October 1948 – Wednesday 9 March 2005), who included it on ‘Songbook of The American West’ (Chris LeDoux Independent Release, 1976) / this track was also recorded by Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 – Wednesday 13 February 2002) & Willie Nelson, who included it on ‘Waylon & Willie’ (RCA Records, 1978); Waylon Jennings & Willie Nelson’s version of the track, which was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for four weeks in March / April 1978, and No.42 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1978, won the 1979 Grammy Award for ‘Best Country Performance by A Duo or Group With Vocal’

‘Red, White & Blue Collar’ (written by Dave Gibson and Bill ‘Blue’ Miller) (No.59, 1994)

Gibson/Miller Band’s ‘Red, White & Blue Collar’ (Epic Records, 1994) also included the following tracks:

‘The Fugitive’, which was written by Patricia Karen Bunch (Thursday 22 June 1939 – Monday 30 January 2023) and Doug Johnson
‘All Because of You’ (written by Steven Dale Jones and Billy Henderson)
‘Haunted Honky Tonk’ (written by Dave Gibson and Bill ‘Blue’ Miller)
‘Right Off The Top of My Heart’ (written by Dave Gibson and Bill ‘Blue’ Miller)
‘Johnny, Get Your Gun’ (written by Dave Gibson and Bill ‘Blue’ Miller)

Mark Wills: 'Mark Wills' (Mercury Records, 1996)

‘Sudden Stop’, which was written by Patricia Karen Bunch (Thursday 22 June 1939 – Monday 30 January 2023) and Doug Johnson / this track was also recorded by Mark Wills, who included it on his self-titled debut album, ‘Mark Wills’ (Mercury Records, 1996)

‘Heavy Metal Rocker’ (written by Dave Gibson, Carol Chase and Kathy Louvin)
‘What Are You Waiting For’ (written by Bill ‘Blue’ Miller and Beth Miekos)

Personnel involved in the recording of Gibson/Miller Band’s ‘Red, White & Blue Collar’ (Epic Records, 1994) included the following:

Gibson/Miller Band
Mike Daly (steel guitar, slide guitar)
Dave Gibson (lead vocals, guitar)
Steve Grossman (drums, percussion)
Doug Kahan (bass guitar, background vocals)
Bill ‘Blue’ Miller (guitar, lead vocals)

Additional musicians
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Steve Nathan (keyboards)
Biff Watson (acoustic guitar)
John Willis (rhythm guitar)

Gibson/Miller Band’s ‘Red, White & Blue Collar’ (Epic Records, 1994) was less successful than their debut album, ‘Where There’s Smoke…’ (Epic Records, 1993) and, as a consequence, Gibson/Miller Band was dropped from the roster at Epic Records in 1994, shortly before disbanding.  Both Dave Gibson and Bill ‘Blue’ Miller continued to record solo, and as backing musicians for other artists.  Dave Gibson also began focusing again on his writing, and on developing new talent.

Confederate Railroad: 'Notorious' (Atlantic Records, 1994)

Confederate Railroad recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Daddy Never Was The Cadillac Kind’ (co-written with Bernie Nelson) and included the track on ‘Notorious’ (Atlantic Records, 1994); the track reached No.9 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1994, and No.7 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1994.

Confederate Railroad: 'Notorious' (Atlantic Records, 1994)

Confederate Railroad recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Redneck Romeo’ (co-written with Craig Wiseman) and included the track on ‘Notorious’ (Atlantic Records, 1994).

Sammy Kershaw: 'Labor of Love' (Mercury Records, 1997)

Sammy Kershaw recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Little Did I Know’ (co-written with Greg Crowe and Bill McCorvey) and included the track on ‘Labor of Love’ (Mercury Records, 1997).

In 1994, Dave Gibson‚Äôs life would take another turn when he received a demo from California singer-songwriter, Daisy Dern.  Dave Gibson was immediately smitten by Daisy Dern’s singing voice and songwriting ability.  The two became creative collaborators, with Dave Gibson producing her debut album.

In 1997, Dave Gibson and Daisy Dern were married and, two years later, they were blessed with their daughter, Savannah.

Neal McCoy: 'The Life of The Party' (Atlantic Records, 1999)

Neal McCoy recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘New Old Songs’ and included the track on ‘The Life of The Party’ (Atlantic Records, 1999).

Montgomery Gentry (Eddie Montgomery & Troy Gentry): 'Tattoos & Scars' (Columbia Nashville Records, 1999)

Montgomery Gentry – Eddie Montgomery and Troy Gentry (Wednesday 5 April 1967 – Friday 8 September 2017) – recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Lonely & Gone’ (co-written with Bill McCorvey and Greg Crowe) and included the track on ‘Tattoos & Scars’ (Columbia Nashville Records, 1999); the track reached No.5 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 1999, No.11 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1999, and No.46 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1999.

Savannah Music Group

Dave Gibson continues developing new talent for his own label and publishing company, Savannah Music Group, which he founded in October 2008 with Silicon Valley entrepreneur, Jeff Cohen.

Alabama: 'Southern Drawl' (BMG Chrysalis Records, 2015)

Alabama recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘American Farmer’ (co-written with Teddy Gentry, Randy Owen, Ronnie Rogers and Charles English) and included the track on ‘Southern Drawl’ (BMG Chrysalis Records, 2015).

Alabama: 'Southern Drawl' (BMG Chrysalis Records, 2015)

Alabama recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘It’s About Time’ (co-written with Teddy Gentry and Charles English) and included the track on ‘Southern Drawl’ (BMG Chrysalis Records, 2015).

Joe Diffie: 'Joe, Joe, Joe Diffie!' (JLD, Incorporated, 2019)

Joe Diffie (Sunday 28 December 1958 – Sunday 29 March 2020) re-recorded Dave Gibson’s ‘Ships That Don’t Come In’ (co-written with Paul Nelson) and included the track on ‘Joe, Joe, Joe Diffie!’ (JLD, Incorporated, 2019).  The original version of this track was recorded by Joe Diffie, who included it on ‘Regular Joe’ (Epic Records, 1992); the original version reached No.5 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in July 1992, and No.1 on Radio & Records Chart in 1992.

Josiah Siska: 'World Gone Wild' (written by Dave Gibson) (Black River Entertainment, 2020)

On Friday 11 September 2020, Josiah Siska saw the release of ‘World Gone Wild’ (written by Dave Gibson, Doug Johnson, Walker Montgomery and Nick Sturms), a CD single, which was produced by Doug Johnson for Black River Entertainment.

Dave Gibson

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