Gene Watson Peer’s Quote from Jim Rooney: April 2014

Gene Watson’s Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as ‘the singer’s singer’ – and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson’s Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2014, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Jim Rooney, which he submitted to this site on Wednesday 23 April 2014.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Jim Rooney who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online ‘celebration of a Lone Star Hero’.

Jim Rooney

Jim Rooney
This quote was submitted on Wednesday 23 April 2014.

Gene Watson: 'Love In The Hot Afternoon' (Capitol Records, 1975)

‘From the first time I heard ‘Love In The Hot Afternoon‘, which was produced by my dear friend Bob Webster (Friday 30 December 1927 – Sunday 22 July 22 2001), I loved Gene Watson’s voice.

A real, honest-to-goodness, country singer, who has made a career giving great songs a way to get into people’s lives and hearts.

Long may he continue!’

Thank you, Jim Rooney, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Jim Rooney…

Jim Rooney

Jim Rooney was born on Friday 28 January 1938 in Boston, Massachusetts and grew up in Dedham, Massachusetts.

In 1954, Jim Rooney sang on WCOP’s ‘Hayloft Jamboree’ for three months or so.

In 1956, Jim Rooney graduated from Roxbury Latin School in West Roxbury, Massachusetts.

In 1959, Jim Rooney met Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015) at Amherst College, from where he graduated in 1960 (Classics major, Magna Cum Laude).

In June 1960, Jim Rooney played his first professional gig with Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015) at The Ballad Room in Boston, Massachusetts.

During the Summer of 1960, Jim Rooney traveled with Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015) to music festivals in Asheville, North Carolina and Galax, Virginia.

In 1960 / 1961, Jim Rooney earned a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship to Harvard Graduate School of Arts & Sciences (Classics).

In January 1961, Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015) and Jim Rooney opened for Joan Baez at Dartmouth Winter Carnival.

Between 1961 and 1963, Jim Rooney earned a Teaching Fellowship at Harvard University.

In 1962, Jim Rooney obtained an M.A. in Classics from Harvard Graduate School of Arts & Sciences.

Bill Keith & Jim Rooney: 'Living On The Mountain' (Prestige Records, 1963)

In the Spring, Summer and Fall of 1962, Jim Rooney formed a band with Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015), Joseph ‘Val’ Valiante (Joe Val) (Saturday 26 June 1926 – Tuesday 11 June 1985), Herb Applin and Fritz Richmond, and saw the recording of ‘Living On The Mountain’ (Prestige Records, 1963), which was produced by Paul A. Rothchild, and included the following tracks:

‘Livin’ On The Mountain’
‘Devil’s Dream’ / ‘Sailor’s Hornpipe’
‘Homestead On The Farm’
‘One Morning In May’
‘Ocean of Diamonds’
‘Pretty Polly’
‘New Muleskinner Blues’
‘Salty Dog’
‘Teardrops In My Eyes’
‘Jody’s Hornpipe’
‘Kentucky Moonshiner’
‘Log Cabin In The Lane’
‘I Hear A Sweet Voice Calling’
Reuben’s Old Train’

Personnel involved in the recording of Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015) & Jim Rooney’s ‘Living On The Mountain’ (Prestige Records, 1963) included the following:

Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015) (banjo, autoharp, guitar)
Joseph ‘Val’ Valiante (Joe Val) (Saturday 26 June 1926 – Tuesday 11 June 1985) (mandolin)
Herb Hooven (fiddle)
Herb Applin (guitar)
Fritz Richmond (washtub bass)

In 1963 / 1964, Jim Rooney was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to study at The American School of Classical Studies in Athens, Greece; it was at this time when Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 РFriday 23 October 2015) joined Bill Monroe’s Bluegrass Boys.

In 1964 / 1965, Jim Rooney’s studies at Harvard came to an end and he began performing with Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015) and Peter Rowan.

In September 1965, Jim Rooney started managing Club 47 in Cambridge, Massachusetts which he continued to do until December 1967.

In the Fall of 1965, Jim Rooney joined the Board of Directors of the Newport Folk Foundation.

In April 1968, Jim Rooney produced New Orleans Jazz Festival and joined George Wein’s Festival Productions as a tour manager for Jazz shows; Jim Rooney also took Ralph Rinzler’s place as talent co-ordinator for Newport Folk Festival.

The Blue Velvet Band: 'Sweet Moments With The Blue Velvet Band' (Warner Bros. Records / Seven Arts Records, 1969)

In 1969, Jim Rooney saw the release of ‘Sweet Moments With The Blue Velvet Band’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1969), which also featured Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015), Eric Weissberg (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Sunday 22 March 2020) and Richard Greene, and included the following tracks:

‘Ramblin’ Man’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
‘You’ll Find Her Name Written There’, which was written by Harold Hensley (Monday 3 July 1922 – Thursday 15 September 1988)
‘The Knight Upon The Road’ (arranged and adapted by Jim Rooney)
‘Weary Blues From Waitin’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
‘Little Sadie’, which was arranged and adapted by Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015)
‘Hitch-Hiker’, which was written by Eric Weissberg (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Sunday 22 March 2020) and Dick Reicheg
‘Sweet Moments’, which was arranged and adapted by Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015) and Benjamin Franklin ‘Tex’ Logan Jr. (Monday 6 June 1927 – Friday 24 April 2015)

Bonnie Owens: 'All of Me Belongs To You' (Capitol Records, 1967)
Gene Watson: 'Heartaches, Love & Stuff' (MCA Records, 1984)

‘I Must Be Somebody Else’, which was written by¬†Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) / the original version of this track was recorded by Merle Haggard, who included it on ‘Swinging Doors & The Bottle Let Me Down’ (Capitol Records, 1966) / this track was also recorded by¬†Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 – Monday 24 April 2006) & The Strangers, who included it¬†on ‘All of Me Belongs To You’ (Capitol Records, 1967) / this track was also recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on ‘Heartaches, Love & Stuff‘ (MCA Records, 1984)

‘Fond Affection’ (written by Jim Rooney)

Hank Williams: 'Moanin' The Blues' (MGM Records, 1952)
Hank Williams: 'Moanin' The Blues' (MGM Records, 1956)

‘My Sweet Love Ain’t Around’, which was written by¬†Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953) / the original version of this track was recorded by¬†Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953), who¬†included it on ‘Moanin’ The Blues’ (MGM Records, 1952); the track, which was released as a single in 1947, and did not chart,¬†was subsequently included on Hank Williams’ ‘Moanin’ The Blues’ (MGM Records, 1956)

Suzy Bogguss recorded ‘My Sweet Love Ain’t Around’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953), and included the track on ‘Somewhere Between’ (Liberty Records, 1989).

Karen Tobin: 'Carolina Smokey Moon' (Atlantic Records, 1991)

Karen Tobin recorded ‘My Sweet Love Ain’t Around’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953) and included the track on ‘Carolina Smokey Moon’ (Atlantic Records, 1991), which was produced by Keith Stegall.



Rhonda Vincent
recorded ‘My Sweet Love Ain’t Around’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953), and included the track on ‘The Storm Still Rages’ (Rounder Records, 2001).

Gene Watson & Rhonda Vincent: 'Your Money & My Good Looks' (Upper Management Music, 2011)

Gene Watson &¬†Rhonda Vincent recorded ‘My Sweet Love Ain’t Around’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953), and included the track on ‘Your Money & My Good Looks‘ (Upper Management Music, 2011).

Robin & Linda Williams: 'Back 40' (Red House Records, 2013)

Robin & Linda Williams recorded ‘My Sweet Love Ain’t Around’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953) and included the track on ‘Back 40’ (Red House Records, 2013).

‘Nobody Knows About My Cares & Nobody Cares About My Nose Rag’, which was written by Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015) and Richard Greene

‘Sittin’ On Top of The World’, which was arranged and adapted by Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015), Eric Weissberg (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Sunday 22 March 2020), Jim Rooney and Richard Greene

Personnel involved in the recording of The Blue Velvet Band’s ‘Sweet Moments With The Blue Velvet Band’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1969), which was produced by Erik Jacobsen, included the following:

Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015) (banjo, steel guitar)
Andy Kulberg (bass)
Buddy Saltzman and Gary Chester (drums)
Richard Greene (fiddle)
Eric Weissberg (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Sunday 22 March 2020) and Jim Rooney (guitar)
John Hammond (harmonica)
Pat Rebillot (piano)

In 1970, Jim Rooney wrote ‘Bossmen: Bill Monroe & Muddy Waters’ for Dial Press.

In May 1970, Jim Rooney moved to Woodstock, New York in order to manage Bearsville Sound Studios for Albert Grossman, which he did in 1971 and 1972.

In July 1972, Jim Rooney helped Ralph Rinzler produce the first concerts for Festival of American Folklife on The Mall in Washington, DC.

Various Artists: 'Mud Acres: Music Among Friends' (Rounder Records, 1972)

It was also in early 1972 when Jim Rooney recorded the various artists album, ‘Mud Acres: Music Among Friends’ (Rounder Records, 1972), which comprised of Happy Traum, Artie Traum, Maria Muldaur, John Herald, Eric Katz, Jim Rooney, Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015), Tony Brown and Lee Berg.

Jim Rooney also formed a band with David & Jon Gershen, which was called ‘Borderline’, and recorded an album for Avalanche Records, produced ‘Living On The Trail’ with Eric Von Schmidt for Poppy Records, and ceased managing Bearsviille Studios in October 1972.

In 1973, Jim Rooney played gigs with Borderline and also made a second album; Jim Rooney also traveled to Europe to play gigs with Bill Keith.

In November 1973, Jim Rooney moved to Nashville.

In 1974, while still in Nashville, Jim Rooney met James Talley, Townes Van Zandt (Tuesday 7 March 1944 – Wednesday 1 January 1997), Rodney Crowell, Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 – Tuesday 17 May 2016) & Susannah Clark (Saturday 11 March 1939 – Wednesday 27 June 2012), and Richard Dobson.

In July 1974, Jim Rooney helped Ralph Rinzler produce ten days of concerts for The Festival of American Folklife, which took place on The Mall in Washington, DC.

In the Fall of 1974, Jim Rooney left Nashville and returned to Europe for a series of gigs with Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015).

In 1975, Jim Rooney relocated to the family home in Green Harbor, Massachusetts and formed the ‘Partners in Crime’ Band with Everett and Tennis Lilly.

It was also in 1975 when Jim Rooney recorded ‘One Day At A Time’ (Rounder Records, 1975), which featuted special guests Everett & Tennis Lilly, Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015) and Joseph ‘Val’ Valiante (Joe Val) (Saturday 26 June 1926 – Tuesday 11 June 1985).  It was also at this time when Jim Rooney played gigs around New England.

In 1976, Jim Rooney recorded song demos and returned to Nashville, where he met ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013).

In June 1976, Jim Rooney decided to move back to Nashville and, in October 1976, he became part of ‘Cowboy‚Äôs Ragtime Band’.

'Cowboy' Jack Clement: 'All I Want To Do In Life' (Elektra Records, 1977)

In 1977, Jim Rooney played and sang on ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement‚Äôs ‘All I Want To Do In Life’ (Elektra Records, 1977), which included the following tracks:

‘Gone Girl’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘The Roving Gambler’, which was arranged by Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘We Must Believe In Magic’ (written by Bob McDill and Allen Reynolds)
‘Good Hearted Woman’, which was written by Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 – Wednesday 13 February 2002) and Willie Nelson
‘When I Dream’, which was written by Sandy Mason Theoret (Monday 18 December 1939 – Wednesday 1 April 2015)
‘All I Want To Do In Life’, which was written by Allen Reynolds and Sandy Mason Theoret (Monday 18 December 1939 – Wednesday 1 April 2015)
‘It’ll Be Her’, which was written by Billy Ray Reynolds (1940 – Friday 29 November 2019)
‘There She Goes’, which was written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)
‘Queen Bee’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘You Ask Me To’, which was written by Willie Nelson and Billy Joe Shaver (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Wednesday 28 October 2020)

Personnel involved in the recording of Jack Clement’s ‘All I Want To Do In Life’ (Elektra Records, 1977) included the following:

Jim Malloy (executive producer)
‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) and Jim Malloy (producers)
Curt Allen and Gene Eichelberger (engineers)
Curtis Allen (vocals, engineer)
Spady Brannan (bass)
David Briggs, Charles Cochran (Saturday 29 February 1936 – Thursday 7 June 2007), Bobby Wood and Dwight Scott (keyboards)
‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) (guitar, vocals, producer)
Pebble Daniel, Garth Fundis, Richie Jarvis, Kathryn Johnson, Allen Reynolds and Marcia Routh (vocals)
Lloyd Green (Dobro, steel guitar)
Irving Kane (trombone)
T’ner Krawczyn and Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021) (percussion, drums)
Sheldon ‘Shelly’ Kurland (Saturday 9 June 1928 – Wednesday 6 January 2010) (strings)
Chris Leuzinger and Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar)
Rachel Peer-Prine (bass, vocals)
Jim Rooney (guitar, vocals)
Rick Schulman (guitar, vocals)
Lisa Silver (violin, vocals)
Dennis Solee (flute, saxophone)

It was also in 1977 when Jim Rooney returned to Woodstock, New York to record ‘More Music From Mud Acres’ (Rounder Records, 1977), and also toured Japan with Happy & Artie Traum, Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015), John Herald and Arlen Roth.

George Hamilton IV: 'Feels Like A Million' (Anchor Records, 1977)

George Hamilton IV (Monday 19 July 1937 – Wednesday 17 September 2014) recorded Jim Rooney’s ‘Only The Best’ and included the track on ‘Feels Like A Million’ (Anchor Records, 1977); the track reached No.81 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978.

Woodstock Mountains Revue: 'Pretty Lucky' 'Pretty Lucky' (Rounder Records, 1978) (cover photo credit: Howie Greenberg)

In 1978, Jim Rooney recorded ‘Pretty Lucky’ (Rounder Records, 1978), with the newly-formed Woodstock Mountains Revue, for Rounder Records, along with new additions Pat Alger and Roly Salley; the album included the following tracks:

‘Pretty Boy Floyd’, which was written by Woodrow ‚ÄėWoody‚Äô Wilson Guthrie (Sunday 14 July 1912 – Tuesday 3 October 1967)
‘Love Cast Your Shadow’ (written by David Nichtern)
‘Je T’aime Beaucoup’ (written by Jack Bonus)
‘Georgia’ (written by Tom Mitchell)
‘Gone Girl’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘Ride, Ride, Ride’ (traditional)
‘Ocracoke Time’ (written by Bill Dale and Pat Alger)
‘Pretty Lucky’ (written by Roly Salley)
‘Interest On The Loan (written by Jim Rooney)
‘Starry Eyed Songs’ (written by John Herald)

Personnel involved in the recording of Woodstock Mountains Revue’s ‘Pretty Lucky’ (Rounder Records, 1978) included the following:

Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015) (banjo)
Roly Salley (bass, vocals, lead vocals)
Norman Smart (drums)
Pat Alger and Artie Traum (electric slide guitar)
Caroline Dutton (fiddle)
Happy Traum, Artie Traum, John Herald and Jim Rooney (lead vocals, guitar)
Gordon Titcomb (pedal steel guitar, piano, mandolin)
Doug James (drums – hand drums)
Marc Kunkel and John Sebastian (harmonica)
Janice Solia, Janie Schramm, John Herald, Andy Robinson, Eric Andersen and Patti Elam (vocals)
The Hello People, Andy Robinson, Caroline Dutton, John Sebastian, Lee Berg, Norman Smart, Pat Alger and Rory Block (chorus, vocals)
Ron Sutton (Dobro)
Arlen Roth, Artie Traum and Pat Alger (electric guitar)
Jim Rooney, Happy Traum and Artie Traum (guitar)
Pat Alger (lead vocals, guitar)
Murray Weinstock (piano)
Bernie Leadon (electric guitar, vocals)
Janice Solia, Janie Schramm and Rory Block (vocals)
Eric Andersen (vocals, guitar)
Bernie Leadon (high string guitar)
Arlen Roth (lead vocals)
Jim Rooney (lead vocals, bass)
George James (trumpet)
John Herald (lead vocals)
Happy Traum (melodica)

Eric Von Schmidt & Jim Rooney: 'Baby Let Me Follow You Down: The Illustrated Story of The Cambridge Folk Years' (Doubleday / Anchor Books, 1978)

It was also in 1978 when Jim Rooney wrote, with Eric Von Schmidt, ‘Baby Let Me Follow You Down: The Illustrated Story of The Cambridge Folk Years’ for Doubleday / Anchor Books; the book was the winner of ASCAP‚Äôs ‘Deems Taylor Award’.

In 1979, Jim Rooney played on recording sessions and song demos at ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement‚Äôs Cowboy Arms Hotel & Recording Spa in Nashville, and also toured Europe with Woodstock Mountains Revue.

In 1980, Jim Rooney helped Don Everly to form a band called ‘The Dead Cowboys’ and toured France, England and Ireland.

Pat Alger

It was also at this time when Jim Rooney was convinced by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) to learn how to run the control board in the studio and Jim, in turn, convinced Pat Alger to move to Nashville and helped him demo his songs.

Between 1981 and 1987, Jim Rooney was involved with the engineering of various album projects at ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement’s Cowboy Arms Hotel & Recording Spa in Nashville.

Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 - Friday 13 August 2021)

Jim Rooney became one of Nashville’s most valued recording engineers and producers; his finely tuned ear was an obvious asset.  Jim Rooney’s keen eye for talent unearthed diamonds in Nashville‚Äôs rhinestone-studded rough, none more so than Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021).

‘Who‚Äôs better than Jim Rooney?’ asked Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021). ‘He‚Äôs magical. I wouldn‚Äôt have a career without Jim Rooney’.

Nanci Griffith: 'Once In A Very Blue Moon' (Philo Records, 1984)

In 1984, Nanci Caroline Griffith‘s third album, ‘Once In A Very Blue Moon’ (Philo Records, 1984), was recorded at ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement’s Cowboy Arms Hotel & Recording Spa in Nashville, and was produced by Jim Rooney and Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021); the album was a little more country and a little less folk than her previous album releases.

Nanci Caroline Griffith‘s first two albums were backed sparsely with instrumentation, but starting with ‘Once In A Very Blue Moon’ (Philo Records, 1984), the whole complement of country-styled instrumentalists could be heard.  Noted country music musicians performing on the album included banjo player B√©la Fleck and champion fiddle player Mark O’Connor.

Nanci Caroline Griffith‘s third album, ‘Once In A Very Blue Moon’ (Philo Records, 1984), included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

Dolly Parton: 'Real Love' (RCA Victor Records, 1985)

‘Once In A Very Blue Moon’ (written by Pat Alger and Eugene Levine) (No.85, 1986) / this track was also recorded by Dolly Parton, who included it on ‘Real Love’ (Records, 1985)

Nanci Caroline Griffith‘s third album, ‘Once In A Very Blue Moon’ (Philo Records, 1984), also included the following tracks:

‘Ghost In The Music’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021) and Eric Taylor (Sunday 25 September 1949 – Monday 9 March 2020)
‘Love Is A Hard Waltz’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021)
‘Roseville Fair’ (written by Bill Staines)
‘Mary & Omie’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021)
‘Friend Out In The Madness’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021)
‘I’m Not Drivin’ These Wheels (Bring The Prose To The Wheel)’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021)
‘Time Alone’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021)
‘Ballad of Robin Winter-Smith’ (written by Richard Dobson)
‘Daddy Said’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021)
‘If I Were The Woman You Wanted’ (written by Lyle Lovett)
‘Year Down In New Orleans’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021)
‘Spin On A Red Brick Floor’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021)

John Prine: 'Aimless Love' (Oh Boy Records, 1984)

In 1984, John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) saw the release of ‘Aimless Love’ (Oh Boy Records, 1984), his eighth studio album, and the first release on his independent record label, Oh Boy Records; the album was produced by Steve Goodman, Jim Rooney and John Prine.

John Prine’s ‘Aimless Love’ (Oh Boy Records, 1984) included the following tracks:

‘Be My Friend Tonight’, which was written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020), Roger Cook and Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 – Monday 10 May 1999)
‘Aimless Love’, which was written by¬†John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)
‘Me, Myself & I’, which was written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020), Spooner Oldham and Dan Penn
‘The Oldest Baby in The World’, which was written by¬†John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) and¬†Donald (‘Donnie’) Ray Fritts (Sunday 8 November 1942 – Tuesday 27 August 2019)
‘Slow Boat To China’, which was written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020), Bobby Whitlock and Linda Whitlock
‘The Bottomless Lake’, which was written by¬†John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)
‘Maureen, Maureen’, which was written by¬†John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)
‘Somewhere Someone’s Falling In Love’, which was written by¬†John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) and¬†Donald (‘Donnie’) Ray Fritts (Sunday 8 November 1942 – Tuesday 27 August 2019)
‘People Puttin’ People Down’, which was written by¬†John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)
‘Unwed Fathers’, which was written by¬†John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) and Bobby Braddock
‘Only Love’, which was written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020), Roger Cook and¬†Sandy Mason Theoret (Monday 18 December 1939 – Wednesday 1 April 2015)

Personnel involved in the recording of John Prine’s ‘Aimless Love’ (Oh Boy Records, 1984) included the following:

John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) (vocals, guitar)
Charles Cochran (Saturday 29 February 1936 – Thursday 7 June 2007) (organ, upright bass)
Roger Cook (ukulele, background vocals)
Philip Donnelly (Friday 31 December 1948 – Thursday 28 November 2019) (guitar, background vocals)
Stuart Duncan (mandolin)
Chuck Fiore and Dee Murray (bass)
Steve Fishell (pedal steel guitar, background vocals)
Donald (‘Donnie’) Ray Fritts (Sunday 8 November 1942 – Tuesday 27 August 2019) and Glen D. Hardin (piano)
Jack Grochmal (guitar, tambourine)
James Harrah (electric guitar)
Leo LeBlanc (guitar, pedal steel guitar, bass)
Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021), Tony Newman and Kevin Wells (drums)
Bobby Whitlock (piano, organ, background vocals)
Bobby Woods and Spooner Oldham (piano)
Rachel Peer-Prine (bass, harmony and background vocals, guitar)
Dave Prine (fiddle)
Jim Rooney (guitar)
John Sebastian (harmonica, autoharp)
Sandy Mason Theoret (Monday 18 December 1939 – Wednesday 1 April 2015), Jennifer Warnes, Greg Prestopino and Matthew Wilder (background vocals)

Nanci Griffith: 'Last of The True Believers' (Philo Records, 1986)

Between Monday 7 October 1985 and Wednesday 9 October 1985, Nanci Caroline Griffith‘s fourth album, ‘Last of The True Believers’ (Philo Records, 1986), was recorded at Jack Clement’s Cowboy Arms Hotel & Recording Spa in Nashville; the album, which was produced by Jim Rooney and Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021), was Nanci Caroline Griffith’s last release with the folk music-oriented Philo Records.

The acclaim accorded Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021) from her previous albums, ‘Once In A Very Blue Moon’ (Philo Records, 1984) and ‘Last of The True Believers’ (Philo Records, 1986), would gain her a contract with a major recording company following the release of this album.

On ‘Last of The True Believers’ (Philo Records, 1986), Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021) continued her turn toward a more country music-oriented work than that included on her first two albums, which were primarily folk music-sounding.

Nanci Caroline Griffith‘s fourth album, ‘Last of The True Believers’ (Philo Records, 1986), included the following tracks:

‘Last of The True Believers’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021)

Kathy Mattea: 'Walk The Way The Wind Blows' (Mercury Records, 1986)

‘Love At The Five & Dime’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021) / this track was also recorded by Kathy Mattea, who included it on ‘Walk The Way The Wind Blows’ (Mercury Records, 1986); Kathy Mattea‘s version of the track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1986

Tom Russell: 'Heart On A Sleeve' (Edsel Records, 1984)

‘St. Olav’s Gate’ (written by Tom Russell) / this track was also recorded by Tom Russell, who included it on ‘Heart On A Sleeve’ (Edsel Records, 1984)

‘More Than A Whisper’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021) and Bobby Nelson
‘Banks of The Pontchartrain’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021)
‘Lookin’ For The Time (Workin’ Girl)’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021)

Kathy Mattea: 'Untasted Honey' (Mercury Records, 1987)

‘Goin’ Gone’ (written by Pat Alger, Bill Dale and Fred Koller) / this track was also recorded by Kathy Mattea, who included it on ‘Untasted Honey’ (Mercury Records, 1987); Kathy Mattea‘s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in January / February 1988

‘One of These Days’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021)
‘Love’s Found A Shoulder’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021)
‘Fly By Night’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021)
‘The Wing & The Wheel’, which was written by Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021)

John Prine: 'German Afternoons' (Oh Boy Records, 1986)

In June 1986, John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) saw the release of ‘German Afternoons’ (Oh Boy Records, 1986), which was produced by Jim Rooney, and included the following tracks:

‘Lulu Walls’, which was written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)
‘Speed of The Sound of Loneliness’, which was written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)
‘Out of Love’, which was written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) and Bill Caswell
‘Sailin’ Around’, which was written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) and John Burns
‘If She Were You’, which was written by Steve Goodman (Sunday 25 July 1948 – Thursday 20 September 1984) and John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)
‘Linda Goes To Mars’, which was written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)
‘Let’s Talk Dirty In Hawaiian’, which was written by Fred Koller and John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)
‘I Just Want To Dance With You’, which was written by Roger Cook and John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)
‘Love Love Love’, which was written by Keith Sykes and John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)
‘Bad Boy’, which was written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)
‘They’ll Never Take Her Love From Me’, which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 – Thursday 11 September 1969)
‘Paradise’ (written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)

Edgar Meyer: 'Unfolding' (MCA Records, 1986)

In 1986, Jim Rooney was involved in the recording sessions for Edgar Meyer‚Äôs first album, ‘Unfolding’ (MCA Records, 1986), which included the following tracks:

‘Unfolding’
‘Cottonwood’
‘Cycles’
‘My Pet Frog’
‘Duet’
‘After Dark’

Personnel involved in the recording of Edgar Meyer‚Äôs first album, ‘Unfolding’ (MCA Records, 1986), included the following:

Jim Rooney (engineer at Cowboy Arms Hotel)
Bill VornDick (Thursday 9 March 1950 – Tuesday 5 July 2022) (engineer at Nashville Sound Connection)
Giles Reaves (engineer at The Castle)
Bela Fleck (banjo, guitar)
Edgar Meyer (bass, piano)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro)
Sam Bush (mandolin)
Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021) (percussion)
Mark O’Connor (violin)

In 1986, Jim Rooney formed New Blue Velvet Band with Bill Keith (Wednesday 20 December 1939 – Friday 23 October 2015), Eric Weissberg (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Sunday 22 March 2020) and Kenny Kosek, and played many music festivals in Canada and Europe.

It was also in 1986 when Jim Rooney formed Forerunner Music, a publishing company, with Allen Reynolds, Mark Miller and Terrell Tye; Pat Alger, David Mallett, and Barry & Holly Tashian were the first Forerunner writers.

Kathy Mattea: 'Untasted Honey' (Mercury Records, 1987)

In 1987, Forerunner Music achieved its first No.1 Billboard record; Kathy Mattea‘s recording of ‘Goin‚Äô Gone’ (written by Pat Alger, Bill Dale and Fred Koller), which was included on Kathy Mattea‘s ‘Untasted Honey’ (Mercury Records, 1987), was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in January / February 1988.

Alison Krauss: 'Too Late To Cry' (Rounder Records, 1987)

In 1987, Jim Rooney was involved in the recording sessions for Alison Krauss‚Äô debut album, ‘Too Late To Cry’ (Rounder Records, 1987), which was recorded at Jack Clement’s Cowboy Arms Hotel & Recording Spa in Nashville, and included the following tracks:

‘Too Late To Cry’ (written by John Pennell)
‘Foolish Heart’ (written by John Pennell)
‘Song For Life’ (written by Rodney Crowell)
‘Dusty Miller’ (traditional)
‘If I Give My Heart’ (written by John Pennell)
‘In Your Eyes’ (written by John Pennell)
‘Don’t Follow Me’ (written by John Pennell)
‘Gentle River’ (written by Todd Rakestraw)
‘On The Borderline’ (written by John Pennell)
‘Forgotten Pictures’ (written by Tony Trischka)
‘Sleep On’ (written by Nelson Mandrell)

Personnel involved in the recording of Alison Krauss‚Äô debut album, ‘Too Late To Cry’ (Rounder Records, 1987), included the following:

Alison Krauss (fiddle, vocals)
Russ Barenberg (acoustic guitar)
Sam Bush (mandolin)
John Cowan and Dave Denman (vocals)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro)
Roy Huskey Jr. (Monday 17 December 1956 – Saturday 6 September 1997) (upright bass)
Lonnie Meeker (acoustic guitar, vocals)
John Schmaltz and Tony Trischka (banjo)

Between 1988 and 2000, Forerunner Music enjoyed many hit songs by a number of writers, including Pat Alger, Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 РMonday 23 November 2020), Tony Arata, Tim O’Brien, Pete Wasner, Charles John Quarto and Shawn Camp.

Artists who have recorded songs of the Forerunner Music publishing company include Garth Brooks, Kathy Mattea, Patty Loveless, Vince Gill, Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 РMonday 23 November 2020) and Trisha Yearwood.

Various Artists: 'Bringing It All Back Home' (BBC Records, 1991)

In 1989, Jim Rooney helped to organise Nashville recording sessions for a BBC television documentary on Irish music and its travels around the world.

‘Bringing It All Back Home’ (BBC Records, 1991), which featured The Everly Brothers – Don Everly (Monday 1 February 1937 – Saturday 21 August 2021) and Phil Everly (Thursday 19 January 1939 – Friday 3 January 2014) – Liam O‚ÄôFlynn, Emmylou Harris, Richard Thompson, Mary Black, Dolores Keane, Ricky Skaggs, Mark O’Connor and Paddy Glackin, was a Hummingbird Production for BBC Northern Ireland in association with Ireland’s RTE (Raidio Teilifis Eireann); the album was released by BBC Records in May 1991.

‘Bringing It All Back Home’ (BBC Records, 1991) included the following tracks:

CD1
‘April The 3rd’ / this track was performed by Donal Lunny & Friends

‘My Love Is In America’ (written by Mick Hanly)
/ this track was performed by Dolores Keane with Mick Hanly

‘A St√≥r Mo Chro√≠’
/ this track was performed by Rita Keane and Sara Keane

‘When First Into This Country’
/ this track was performed by The Lee Valley String Band

‘Carolina Star’ (written by Hugh Moffatt)
/ this track was performed by The Lee Valley String Band

‘Kilkelly’
/ this track was performed by Mick Moloney, Jimmy Keane and Robbie O’Connell

‘Thousands Are Sailing’
/ this track was performed by Philip Chevron

‘The Bucks of Oranmore’
/ this track was performed by The Hughes’ Band

‘Rose Connolly’
/ this track was performed by The Everly Brothers – Don Everly (Monday 1 February 1937 – Saturday 21 August 2021) and Phil Everly (Thursday 19 January 1939 – Friday 3 January 2014)

‘Lakes of Ponchartrain’
/ this track was performed by Hothouse Flowers

‘Humours of Galway’
/ this track was performed by De Dannan

‘Sonny’
/ this track was performed by Emmylou Harris, Dolores Keane and Mary Black

‘Grey Funnel Line’
/ this track was performed by Emmylou Harris, Dolores Keane and Mary Black

‘Nothing But The Same Old Story’
/ this track was performed by Paul Brady

‘Kevin Griffins’
/ this track was performed by Sharon Shannon, Mary Custy and Eoin O’Neill

‘No Frontiers’
/ this track was performed by Mary Black

‘You Couldn’t Have Come At A Better Time’
/ this track was performed by Luka Bloom

‘Bringing It All Back Home’ (BBC Records, 1991) included the following tracks:

CD2
‘Go Mbeannaoithar Duit’ / this track was performed by Peadar O’Riada & C√≥r C√ļil Aodh

‘Carolan’s Farewell To Music’
/ this track was performed by M√°ire N√≠ Chathasaigh

‘An T-Ais√©ir√≠’
/ this track was performed by Noir√≠n N√≠ Riain & The Monks Of Glenstall Abbey

‘Oile√°nn / Island’
/ this track was performed by M√≠chael O’S√ļilleabh√°in & The Irish Chamber Orchestra with John McCarthy

‘Idir Eatarthu / Between Worlds’
/ this track was performed by M√≠chael O’S√ļilleabh√°in & The Irish Chamber Orchestra

‘Mischievous Ghost’
/ this track was performed by Elvis Costello with Mary Coughlan

‘Equinox’
/ this track was performed by Davy Spillane

‘Blue’
/ this track was performed by An Emotional Fish With M√°ire N√≠ Bhraon√°in

‘St. Ann’s Reel’
/ this track was performed by Ricky Skaggs, Paddy Glackin and Mark O’Connor

‘The Dimming of The Day’
/ this track was performed by Richard Thompson and Mary Black

‘Cooler At The Edge’
/ this track was performed by Sonny Condell

‘Glen Road To Carrick’
/ this track was performed by Paddy Glackin, Seamas Glackin and Kevin Glackin

‘Don’t Let Our Love Die’
/ this track was performed by The Everly Brothers – Don Everly (Monday 1 February 1937 – Saturday 21 August 2021) and Phil Everly (Thursday 19 January 1939 – Friday 3 January 2014)

‘Easter Snow’
/ this track was performed by Catherine Ennis and Liam O’Flynn

‘All Messed Up’
/ this track was performed by Pierce Turner

‘Tunes’
/ this track was performed by Roger Sherlock, Bobby Casey, John Bowe, Tom Nagle, Eilish Byrne and Siobhan O’Donnell

‘Western Highway’
/ this track was performed by Maura O’Connell

‘A Song For The Life’ (written by Rodney Crowell)
/ this track was performed by The Waterboys

‘The Parting Glass’
/ this track was performed by The Voice Squad

‘A St√≥ir Mo Chro√≠’
/ this track was performed by Liam O’Flynn

Iris DeMent: 'Infamous Angel' (Rounder Records, 1991)

In 1991, Jim Rooney produced Iris DeMent’s debut album, ‘Infamous Angel’ (Rounder Records, 1991), which was recorded at The Cowboy Arms Hotel in Nashville in July 1991, and The Recording Spa in Nashville in August 1991, and was released in January 1992.

Iris DeMent’s debut album, ‘Infamous Angel’ (Rounder Records, 1991), included the following tracks:

‘Let The Mystery Be’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘These Hills’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Hotter Than Mojave In My Heart’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘When Love Was Young’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Our Town’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Fifty Miles of Elbow Room’ (written by F.W. McGee) / this track featured guest vocals from Jim Rooney
‘Infamous Angel’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Sweet Forgiveness’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘After You’re Gone’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Mama’s Opry’ (written by Iris DeMent) / this track featured guest vocals from Emmylou Harris
‘Higher Ground’ (written by Iris DeMent) / this track featured guest vocals from Flora Mae DeMent

Personnel involved in the recording of Iris DeMent’s debut album, ‘Infamous Angel’ (Rounder Records, 1991), included the following:

Mark Howard (guitar)
Jerry Douglas and Al Perkins (Dobro)
Roy Huskey Jr. (Monday 17 December 1956 – Saturday 6 September 1997) and Jeff Huskins (bass)
Pete Wasner (piano)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle, mandolin)
Emmylou Harris, Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020), Jim Rooney, Flora Mae DeMent and The Infamous Angel Choir (vocals)

In 1992, Iris DeMent stated that she owed her career to Jim Rooney:

‘He was one of the first people in Nashville who was willing to give me the time of day.  The key thing with Jim is that he knows when the performance has happened.  He has an excellent instinct for when you‚Äôve sung the song as well as you‚Äôre going to.  He’s a deeply intelligent man, but he really cares about the music.  His heart has been wrapped around it for a long, long time’.

Hal Ketchum: 'Past The Point of Rescue' (Curb Records, 1991)

On Tuesday 7 May 1991Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) saw the release of ‘Past The Point of Rescue’ (Curb Records, 1991), which was produced by Jim Rooney and Allen Reynolds, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Small Town Saturday Night’ (written by Pat Alger and Hank DeVito) (No.2, 1991)

‘I Know Where Love Lives’, which was written by Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) (No.13, 1991)

‘Past The Point of Rescue’ (written by Mick Hanly) (No.2, 1992)

‘Five O’Clock World’ (written by Allen Reynolds) (No.16, 1992)

Hal Ketchum‘s ‘Past The Point of Rescue’ (Curb Records, 1991) also included the following tracks:

‘Old Soldiers’, which was written by Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) and Dave Mallett
‘Somebody’s Love’, which was written by Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) and Pat Alger
‘I Miss My Mary’, which was written by Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020)
‘Don’t Strike A Match (To The Book of Love)’, which was written by Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) and Pat Alger
‘Long Day Comin’, which was written by Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) and Gary Burr
‘She Found The Place’, which was written by Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hal Ketchum‘s ‘Past The Point Of Rescue’ (Curb Records, 1991) included the following:

Richard Bennett (acoustic guitar)
Bruce C. Bouton (steel guitar)
Gary Burr, Dave Francis, Kathy Mattea and Allen Reynolds (background vocals)
Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) (lead vocals, background vocals, acoustic guitar)
Chris Leuzinger (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Milton Sledge (drums)
Will Smith (autoharp)
Pete Wasner (keyboards)
Bob Wray (bass guitar)

Pat Alger: 'True Love & Other Short Stories' (Sugar Hill Records, 1991)

In 1991, Pat Alger saw the release of his first album, ‘True Love & Other Short Stories’ (Sugar Hill Records, 1991), which was produced by Jim Rooney, and included the following tracks:

‘True Love’ (written by¬†Pat Alger)
‘Lone Star State of Mind’ (written by¬†Pat Alger,¬†Fred Koller¬†and Gene Levine)
‘Goin’ Gone’ (written by¬†Pat Alger, Bill Dale¬†and Fred Koller)
‘Like A Hurricane’ (written by¬†Pat Alger and Mark D. Sanders)
‘This Town’ (written by¬†Pat Alger¬†and Fred Koller)
‘Love Can Be A Dangerous Thing’ (written by¬†Pat Alger¬†and Fred Koller)
‘I Do’ (written by¬†Pat Alger and Susan Longacre)
‘She Came From Fort Worth’ (written by¬†Pat Alger¬†and Fred Koller)
‘Forever Lovin’ You’ (written by¬†Pat Alger and Garth Brooks)
‘Small Town Saturday Night’ (written by¬†Pat Alger and Hank DeVito)
‘Once In A Very Blue Moon’ (written by¬†Pat Alger and Gene Levine)
‘Blue Highway’ (written by¬†Pat Alger)

Hal Ketchum: 'Sure Love' (Curb Records, 1992)

On Tuesday 22 September 1992Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) saw the release of ‘Sure Love’ (Curb Records, 1992), which was produced by Jim Rooney and Allen Reynolds, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Sure Love’, which was written by Gary Burr and Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) (No.3, 1992)

‘Hearts Are Gonna Roll’, which was wriitten by Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) and Ronny Scaife (1947 – Wednesday 3 November 2010) (No.2, 1993)

‘Mama Knows The Highway’ (written by Pete Wasner and Charles John Quarto) (No.8, 1993)

‘Someplace Far Away (Careful What You’re Dreaming)’, which was written by Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) (No.24, 1993)

Hal Ketchum‘s ‘Sure Love’ (Curb Records, 1992) also included the following tracks:

‘You Lovin’ Me’, which was written by Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020)
‘Softer Than A Whisper’ (written by by Pat Alger and Austin Cunningham)
‘Ghost Town’ (written by Pete Wasner and Charles John Quarto)
‘Daddy’s Oldsmobile’, which was written by Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) and David Mallett
‘Til The Coast Is Clear’, which was written by Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) by Fred Koller
‘Trail of Tears’ (written by Randy Handley)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hal Ketchum‘s ‘Sure Love’ (Curb Records, 1992) included the following:

Richard Bennett (acoustic guitar)
Gary Burr, Keith Carper, Scott Neubert, Debbie Nims and Trisha Yearwood (background vocals)
Bruce C. Bouton (pedal steel guitar)
Stuart Duncan (mandolin)
Kirk ‘Jelly Roll’ Johnson (harmonica)
Chris Leuzinger (electric guitar, slide guitar, acoustic guitar)
Bill Miller (Woodland Indian courtship flute)
Joey Miskulin (accordion)
Milton Sledge (drums)
Pete Wasner (keyboards)
Bob Wray (bass guitar)

Following the end of her MCA Records contract, in 1991, Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021) signed with Elektra Records, a record label with a solid history in folk music.  Elektra Records allowed Nanci Griffith to choose her own producer; she chose Jim Rooney.  He always guided me in the right direction’, Nanci Griffith explained at the time.

Nanci Griffith: 'Other Voices, Other Rooms' (Elektra Records, 1993)

On Tuesday 2 March 1993Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021) saw the release of ‘Other Voices, Other Rooms’ (Elektra Records, 1993), which was produced by Jim Rooney, and included songs written by songwriters who had influenced Nanci Caroline Griffith‘s own career.

Guest artists, who performed on their own compositions, included Frank Christian (Sunday 19 October 1952 – Monday 24 December 2012) playing guitar on ‘Three Flights Up’, Bob Dylan playing harmonica on ‘Boots of Spanish Leather’, and John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) lending harmony vocals on ‘Speed of The Sound of Loneliness’.

Nanci Caroline Griffith‘s ‘Other Voices, Other Rooms’ (Elektra Records, 1993) included the following tracks:

‘Across The Great Divide’, which was written by Kate Wolf (Tuesday 27 January 1942 – Wednesday 10 December 1986) / this track featured Emmylou Harris

‘Woman of The Phoenix’ (written by Vince Bell) / this track featured James Hooker

‘Tecumseh Valley’, which was written by Townes Van Zandt (Tuesday 7 March 1944 – Wednesday 1 January 1997) / this track featured Arlo Guthrie

‘Three Flights Up’, which was written by Frank Christian (Sunday 19 October 1952 – Monday 24 December 2012)

‘Boots of Spanish Leather’ (written by Bob Dylan)


‘Speed of The Sound of Loneliness’, which was written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)
 / this track featured John Prine

‘From Clare To Here’ (written by Ralph McTell
 / this track featured Pete Cummins

‘Can’t Help But Wonder Where I’m Bound’ (written by Tom Paxton)
 / this track featured Carolyn Hester

‘Do-Re-Mi’, which was written by Woody Guthrie (Sunday 14 July 1912 – Tuesday 3 October 1967)
 / this track featured Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 – Tuesday 17 May 2016)

‘This Old Town’ (written by Janis Ian and Jon Vezner)


‘Comin’ Down In The Rain’ (written by Buddy Mondlock)
 / this track featured Lee Satterfield

‘Ten Degrees & Getting Colder’ (written by Gordon Lightfoot)
 / this track featured Iris DeMent

‘Morning Song For Sally’, which was written by Jerry Jeff Walker (Monday 16 March 1942 – Friday 24 October 2020)


‘Night Rider’s Lament’ (written by Michael Burton)
 / this track featured Don Edwards (1935 or 1936 – Sunday 23 October 2022)

‘Are You Tired of Me, Darling?’ (written by G.P. Cook and Ralph Roland)
 / this track featured Iris DeMent and Emmylou Harris

‘Turn Around’ (written by Malvina Reynolds, Harry Belafonte and Allen Greene)


‘Wimoweh’ (written by Solomon Linda)
 / this track featured Odetta, Indigo Girls, Kennedy Rose, John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020), James Hooker, Holly & Barry Tashian, John Gorka, Dave Mallett, Marlin Griffith (Nanci Caroline Griffith‘s father) and Jim Rooney

Personnel involved in the recording of Nanci Caroline Griffith‘s tenth album, ‘Other Voices, Other Rooms’ (Elektra Records, 1993), included the following:

Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021) (vocals, guitar, harmony vocals)
Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 – Saturday 30 June 2001) (guitar)
Fran Breen (drums, percussion)
John Catchings (cello)
Frank Christian (Sunday 19 October 1952 – Monday 24 December 2012) (guitar)
Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 – Tuesday 17 May 2016) (guitar, vocals)
Pete Cummins, Arlo Guthrie, Emmylou Harris and Carolyn Hester (harmony vocals, guitar)
Iris DeMent (vocals, harmony vocals, guitar)
Philip Donnelly (Friday 31 December 1948 – Thursday 28 November 2019), Pat Flynn, Pete Kennedy and Leo Kottke (guitar)
Stuart Duncan (mandolin, violin)
Bob Dylan (harmonica)
Béla Fleck (banjo)
John Hartford (Thursday 30 December 1937 – Monday 4 June 2001) (banjo, vocals)
James Hooker (harmony vocal, organ, piano, keyboards)
Roy Huskey Jr. (Monday 17 December 1956 – Saturday 6 September 1997) and Edgar Meyer (bass)
Lee Satterfield (guitar, harmony vocals)
Mary Ann Kennedy (percussion, vocals)
Alison Krauss (violin)
Pat McInerney (percussion)
David Mallett, Odetta, John Gorka, Marlin Griffith, Amy Ray, Jim Rooney, Pamela Rose, Emily Saliers, Holly Tashian and Barry Tashian (vocals)
Don Edwards (1935 or 1936 – Sunday 23 October 2022) (yodeling)
John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) (vocals, harmony vocals)
Andrea Zonn (viola)

Nanci Caroline Griffith‘s ‘Other Voices, Other Rooms’ (Elektra Records, 1993) became her most commercially successful album.  At the time, Jim Rooney stated ‘That was a very special album’.  The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences obviously thought so, too; Nanci Caroline Griffith won the 1993 Grammy Award for ‘Best Contemporary Folk Album’, while producer Jim Rooney won a Grammy Award for his production work on the project.

Nanci Caroline Griffith‘s ‘Other Voices, Other Rooms’ (Elektra Records, 1993) reached No.54 on the Billboard Pop Albums Chart in 1993, although it had no charting singles.

John Prine: 'A John Prine Christmas' (Oh Boy Records, 1993)

In late 1993, John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) saw the release of ‘A John Prine Christmas’ (Oh Boy Records, 1993); two tracks included on the album, ‘Silver Bells’, which was written by Jay Livingston (28 March 1915 – Wednesday 17 October 2001) and Raymond Bernard Evans (4 February 1915 – Thursday 15 February 2007), and ‘I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus’, which was written by Thomas Patrick Connor (16 November 1904 – Sunday 28 November 1993), were produced by Jim Rooney.

Iris DeMent: 'My Life' (Warner Bros. Records, 1994)

In April 1994, Iris DeMent saw the release of her second album, ‘My Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1994), which was produced by Jim Rooney, and was recorded at The Cowboy Arms Hotel in Nashville (September 1993) and The Recording Spa in Nashville (October 1993).

Iris DeMent’s second album, ‘My Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1994), included the following tracks:

‘Sweet Is The Melody’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘You’ve Done Nothing Wrong’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Calling For You’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Childhood Memories’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘No Time To Cry’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Troublesome Waters’, which was written by Maybelle Carter (Monday 10 May 1909 – Monday 23 October 1978) and Dixie Dean
‘Mom & Dad’s Waltz’, which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 – Saturday 19 July 1975)
‘Easy’s Gettin’ Harder Every Day’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Shores of Jordan’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘My Life’ (written by Iris DeMent)

Personnel involved in the recording of Iris DeMent’s second album, ‘My Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1994), included the following:

Richard Bennett, Mark Howard and ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) (guitar)
Al Perkins (Dobro)
Roy Huskey Jr. (Monday 17 December 1956 – Saturday 6 September 1997) (bass)
Pat McInerney and Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021) (drums, percussion)
Charles Cochran (Saturday 29 February 1936 – Thursday 7 June 2007) and Pete Wasner (piano, keyboards)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle, flute, mandolin)
Phil Parlapiano (accordion)
John Catchings (cello)
Joy Lynn White, Linda Williams and Robin Williams (vocals)

Hal Ketchum: 'Every Little Word' (Curb Records, 1994)

On Tuesday 31 May 1994Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) saw the release of ‘Every Little Word’ (Curb Records, 1994), which was produced by Jim Rooney and Allen Reynolds, and included five tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘(Tonight We Just Might) Fall In Love Again’, which was written by Al Anderson and Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) (No.20, 1994)

‘That’s What I Get For Losin’ You’, which was written by Al Anderson and Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) (No.22, 1994)

‘Stay Forever’, which was written by Benmont Tench and Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) (No.8, 1995)

‘Every Little Word’, which was written by Marcus Hummon and Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) (No.49, 1995)

‘Veil of Tears’, which was written by Michael Noble, Jeff Pennig and Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) (No.56, 1995)

Hal Ketchum‘s ‘Every Little Word’ (Curb Records, 1994) also included the following tracks:

‘Swing Low’, which was written by Pete Wasner and¬†Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020)
‘Another Day Gone’, which was written by Gary Nicholson and Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020)¬†/ this track featured harmony vocals from Patty Loveless
‘Walk Away’, which was written by Gary Nicholson and¬†Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020)
‘No Easy Road’, which was written by Harley Allen (Monday 23 January 1956 – Wednesday 30 March 2011) and Herb McCullough (Thursday 18 May 1944 – Tuesday 5 May 2015)
‘Drive On’, which was written by Gary Burr and¬†Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020)

Personnel involved in the recording of Hal Ketchum‘s ‘Every Little Word’ (Curb Records, 1994) included the following:

Sam Bacco (percussion)
Richard Bennett (acoustic guitar)
Gary Burr (harmony vocals on ‘Drive On’)
Sam Bush (mandolin)
Keith Carper and Scott Neubert (harmony vocals)
Dan Dugmore (pedal steel guitar, dobro)
Chris Leuzinger (acoustic and electric guitar)
Patty Loveless (harmony vocals on ‘Another Day Gone’)
Russ Pahl (Dobro on ‘Another Day Gone’, acoustic guitar on ‘Drive On’)
Milton Sledge (drums)
Pete Wasner (piano, Wurlitzer)
Bobby Wood (B3 organ, synthesizer)
Bob Wray (bass guitar)
The Nashville String Machine arranged by Charles Cochran (Saturday 29 February 1936 – Thursday 7 June 2007) (strings)

Hal Ketchum‘s ‘Every Little Word’ (Curb Records, 1994) reached No.31 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1994.

Pat Alger: 'Notes & Grace Notes' (Liberty Records / Capitol Records, 1994)

On Tuesday 6 September 1994Pat Alger saw the release of ‘Notes & Grace Notes’ (Liberty/Capitol Records, 1994), which was produced by Jim Rooney, and included the following tracks:

‘Tear In Mama’s Eye’ (written by Pat Alger and Bobby Fischer)
‘Open Invitation To The Blues’ (written by Pat Alger and Gary Nicholson)
‘Somebody’s Love’, which was written by Pat Alger and Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020)
‘Like We Never Had A Broken Heart’ (written by Pat Alger and Garth Brooks)
‘That Summer’ (written by Pat Alger, Sandy Mahl-Brooks and Garth Brooks)
‘One Less Rose In Texas’ (written by Pat Alger and Jon Vezner)
‘Missing In Action’ (written by Pat Alger and Alice Randall)
‘The Laughing Years’ (written by Pat Alger and Ralph Murphy)
‘I’m Taking My Time’ (written by Pat Alger and Rick Beresford)
‘We’ve Heard It All Before’ (written by Pat Alger)

Personnel involved in the recording of Pat Alger‘s ‘Notes & Grace Notes’ (Liberty Records, 1994), the recording of which took place at Jack’s Tracks Recording Studio in Nashville, included the following:

Pat Alger (vocals, guitar, acoustic guitar)
Chris Leuzinger (electric and acoustic guitar)
Maura O’Connell (gut-string guitar)
Kirk ‘Jelly Roll’ Johnson (harmonica)
Carl Marsh (piano, keyboards, Fairlight strings)
Pat McInerney (drums, percussion)
Brenda Lee, Maura O’Connell and Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020) (vocals)
Tommy Spurlock (steel guitar)
Pete Wasner (piano, Wurlitzer piano)
Dave Francis (bass, background vocals)
Bob Wray and Mike Chapman (bass)
Milton Sledge (drums)
Claire Louise, Suzi Ragsdale and Verlon Thompson (background vocals)

Pat Alger: 'Seeds' (Sugar Hill Records, 1994)

In 1994Pat Alger saw the release of ‘Seeds’ (Sugar Hill Records, 1994), which was produced by Jim Rooney, and included the following tracks:

‘For Everyone With A Broken Heart’ (written by¬†Pat Alger¬†and Bobby Wood)
‘For Lack of A Better Word’ (written by¬†Pat Alger¬†and Gary Scruggs)
‘Like I Used To Do’ (written by¬†Pat Alger¬†and Tim O’Brien)
‘Seeds’ (written by¬†Pat Alger¬†and Ralph Murphy)
‘The Thunder Rolls’ (written by¬†Pat Alger¬†and Garth Brooks)
‘Your Voice’ (written by¬†Pat Alger¬†and Bobby Fischer)
‘Never Needs A Reason To Rain’ (written by Pat Alger, Jim Elliott and Mark D. Sanders)
‘Be Ready To Sail’ (written by¬†Pat Alger¬†and Austin Cunningham)
‘Until My Love Moves You’ (written by¬†Pat Alger¬†and Gary Scruggs)
‘A Few Good Things Remain’ (written by¬†Pat Alger¬†and Jon Vezner)
‘You’ll Come Back To Me’, which was written by¬†Pat Alger¬†and¬†Sandy Mason Theoret (Monday 18 December 1939 – Wednesday 1 April 2015)
‘Heart And Soul’ (written by¬†Pat Alger)
‘Unanswered Prayers’ (written by Pat Alger, Larry Bastian and Garth Brooks)

Iris DeMent: 'The Way I Should' (Warner Bros. Records, 1996)

In October 1996, Iris DeMent saw the release of her third album, ‘The Way I Should’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1996), which was produced by Jim Rooney, and was recorded at Scruggs Sound Studio in Nashville (May 1996).

Iris DeMent’s third album, ‘The Way I Should’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1996), included the following tracks:

‘When My Mornin’ Comes Around’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘There’s A Wall In Washington’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Wasteland of The Free’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘I’ll Take My Sorrow Straight’ (written by Iris DeMent and Elmer McCall)
‘This Kind of Happy’, which was written by Iris DeMent and Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Way I Should’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Letter To Mom’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Keep Me God’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Quality Time’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Walkin’ Home’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Trouble’ (written by Iris DeMent and Elmer McCall) / this track featured guest vocals from Delbert McClinton

Personnel involved in the recording of Iris DeMent’s third album, ‘The Way I Should’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1996), included the following:

Brent Mason, Randy Lynn Scruggs (Monday 3 August 1953 – Tuesday 17 April 2018), Lonnie Mack, Mark Knopfler and Steuart Smith (guitar)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Dave Pomeroy and John Jennings (bass)
Harry Stinson (drums)
Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 – Wednesday 28 March 2012) (banjo)
Chuck Leavell (piano, organ, accordion)
Tom Roady (tambourine)
Tammy Rogers (fiddle, mandolin, violin, cello, viola)
Delbert McClinton (harmonica, vocals)
Russ Taff, Billy Burnette, Bekka Bramlett and Melodie Crittenden (vocals)

Nanci Griffith: 'Other Voices, Too (A Trip Back To Bountiful' (Elektra Records, 1998)

In July 1998Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021) saw the release of ‘Other Voices, Too (A Trip Back To Bountiful’ (Elektra Records, 1998), which was produced by Jim Rooney and Nanci Caroline Griffith, with the exception of ‘Streets Of Baltimore’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) and Tompall Glaser (Sunday 3 September 1933 – Tuesday 13 August 2013)’, which was produced by Jim Rooney, Nanci Caroline Griffith and Don Gehman.

Nanci Caroline Griffith‘s ‘Other Voices, Too (A Trip Back To Bountiful’ (Elektra Records, 1998) included the following tracks:

‘Wall of Death’ (written by Richard Thompson)
‘Who Knows Where The Time Goes’, which was written by Sandy Denny (Monday 6 January 1947 – Friday 21 April 1978)
‘You Were On My Mind’ (written by Sylvia Fricker)
‘Walk Right Back’ (written by Sonny Curtis)
‘Canadian Whiskey’ (written by Tom Russell)
‘Desperados Waiting For A Train’, which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 – Tuesday 17 May 2016)
‘Wings of A Dove’, which was written by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 – Sunday 22 July 22 2001)
‘Dress of Laces’ (written by John Grimaudo and Saylor White)
‘Summer Wages’, which was written by Ian Tyson (Monday 25 September 1933 – Thursday 29 December 2022)
‘He Was A Friend of Mine’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) and Bobby Bare
‘Hard Times Come Again No More’, which was written by Stephen Foster (4 July 1826 – 13 January 1864)
‘Wasn’t That A Mighty Storm’ (traditional)
‘Deportee (Plane Wreck At Los Gatos)’, which was written by Woody Guthrie (Sunday 14 July 1912 – Tuesday 3 October 1967) and Martin Hoffman
‘Yarrington Town’ (written by Mickie Merkens)
‘I Still Miss Someone’, which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 – Friday 12 September 2003) and Ray Cash Jr.
‘Try The Love’ (written by Pat McLaughlin)
‘Streets of Baltimore’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) and Tompall Glaser (Sunday 3 September 1933 – Tuesday 13 August 2013)
‘Darcy Farrow’ (written by Steve Gillette and Tom Campbell)
‘If I Had A Hammer (The Hammer Song)’, which was written by Lee Hayes and Pete Seeger (Saturday 3 May 1919 – Monday 27 January 2014)

Sean Keane: 'No Stranger' (Grapevine Records, 1998)

In 1998, Jim Rooney produced Sean Keane’s ‘No Stranger’ (Grapevine Records, 1998), which earned a ‘Gold’ record for sales, and included the following tracks:

‘Crooked Mile’ (written by Mick Hanly)
‘Fields of Gold’ (written by Sting)
‘Killing Blues’ (written by Roly Sally)
‘Life Is A Bittersweet Waltz’ (written by Craig Safan and Mark Mueller)
‘May Morning Dew’ (traditional arrangement by Sean Keane)
‘Lullaby’, which was written by Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 – Wednesday 25 March 2009) and Rafe Van Hoy, with additional lyrics by Charlie McGettigan
‘No Stranger To The Rain’ (written by Sonny Curtis and Ron Hellard)
‘Galway’ (lyrics by Oliver St. John Gogarty – from the poem – with music by Tony Small)
‘Like I Used To Do’ (written by Tim O’Brien and Pat Alger)
‘Lay Down Your Weary Tune’ (written by Bob Dylan)
‘We Dreamed Our Dreams’ (written by Dick Farrelly)

Personnel involved in the recording of Sean Keans’s ‘No Stranger’ (Grapevine Records, 1998) included the following:

Sean Keane (vocals, whistles)
Jim Rooney (guitar, backing vocals)
Arty McGlynn (1944 – Wednesday 18 December 2019) (guitars)
James Blennerhassett (upright bass)
Nollaig Casey (fiddle)
Rod McVey (keyboards)
Johnny Og Connolly (accordion)
Tommy Hayes (percussion)
Tommy Keane (uilleann pipes)
Kirk ‘Jelly Roll’ Johnson (harmonica)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Pat McInerney (drums)
Tim O’Brien (mandolin)
John Catchings (cello)
Christian Teal and Connie Heard (violin)
Kristin Wilkinson (viola)
Dolores Keane, Matt Keane, Jimmy McCarthy and Mick Hanly (backing vocals)

The Lee Valley String Band: 'Corner Boys' (Corner House Records, 1998)

It was also in 1998 when Jim Rooney produced The Lee Valley String Band’s ‘Corner Boys’ (Corner House Records, 1998) and started ‘Rooney‚Äôs Irregulars’ gigs at Station Inn in Nashville.

The Lee Valley String Band’s ‘Corner Boys’ (Corner House Records, 1998) included the following tracks:

‘Oh, My Little Darling’ (traditional)
‘Great Baltimore Fire’ (traditional)
‘Empty Pocket Blues’ (written by Palmer)
‘My Hearts Tonight In Texas’, which was written by Alvin Pleasant (A.P.) Delaney Carter (15 December 1891 – Monday 7 November 1960)
‘On My Mind’, which was written by Lester Flatt (Friday 19 June 1914 – Friday 11 May 1979)
‘Whiskey Before Breakfast & The One That Comes After It’ (traditional)
‘Ramblin’ & Gamblin’, which was written by Alton Delmore (Friday 25 December 1908 – Monday 8 June 1964) and Rabon Delmore (Sunday 3 December 1916 – Sunday 4 December 1952)
‘Handsome Molly’ (traditional)
‘Queen of Hearts’ (written by Tim O’Brien)
‘Chalk Up Another One’ (written by H. Winston and W. Neat)
‘Wilbur Forbes’ (traditional)
‘Kimby’ (traditional)
‘Out In The Snow’, which was written by Russell Smith (Friday 17 June 1949 – Friday 12 July 2019)
‘Wait A Little Longer, Sweet Jesus’ (traditional)
‘I Thought I Heard You Calling My Name’ (written by Lee Emerson)
‘Are You From Dixie’ (traditional)
‘Yellow Rose of Texas Set’ (traditional)

Personnel involved in the recording of The Lee Valley String Band’s ‘Corner Boys’ (Corner House Records, 1998) included the following:

Chris Twomey (autoharp, vocals)
Mick Daly (banjo, vocals)
Pete Brennan (bass, vocals)
Kevin Gill (Dobro)
Hal O’Neill (fiddle, guitar)
Mick ‘Tana’ O’Brien (guitar, vocals)
Jim Rooney and Mick Daly (liner notes)
Brendan Butler and Mick Murphy (mandolin, vocals)

John Prine: 'In Spite of Ourselves' (Oh Boy Records, 1999)

In September 1999, John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) saw the release of ‘In Spite of Ourselves’ (Oh Boy Records, 1999), which was recorded at Jack’s Tracks Studio in Nashville and was produced by Jim Rooney; the album included the following tracks:

‘(We’re Not The) Jet Set’ (written by Bobby Braddock) / this track featured Iris DeMent

‘So Sad (To Watch Good Love Go Bad)’, which was written by Don Everly (Monday 1 February 1937 – Saturday 21 August 2021) / this track featured Connie Smith

‘Wedding Bells / Let’s Turn Back The Years’, which was written by Claude Boone and Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953) / this track featured Lucinda Williams

‘When Two Worlds Collide’, which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 – Sunday 25 October 1992) and Bill Anderson / this track featured Trisha Yearwood

‘Milwaukee Here I Come’ (written by Lee Fykes) / this track featured Melba Montgomery

‘I Know One’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) / this track featured Emmylou Harris

‘It’s A Cheating Situation’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Sonny Throckmorton / this track featured Dolores Keane

‘Back Street Affair’ (written by Billy Wallace and Jimmy Rule) / this track featured Patty Loveless

‘Loose Talk’, which was written by Freddie Hart (Tuesday 21 December 1926 – Saturday 27 October 2018) and Ann Lucas / this track featured Connie Smith

‘Let’s Invite Them Over’ (written by Oney Wheeler) / this track featured Iris DeMent

‘Til A Tear Becomes A Rose’ (written by Bill Rice and Mary Sharon Rice) / this track featured Fiona Prine

‘In A Town This Size’ (written by Kieran Kane) / this track featured Dolores Keane

‘We Could’, which was written by Felice Bryant (Wednesday 7 August 1925 – Tuesday 22 April 2003) / this track featured Iris DeMent

‘We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds’ (written by Melba Montgomery) / this track featured Melba Montgomery

‘In Spite of Ourselves’, which was written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) / this track featured Iris DeMent

‘Dear John (I’ve Sent Your Saddle Home)’, which was written by Tex Ritter (Thursday 12 January 1905 – Wednesday 2 January 1974) and Aubry Gass

John Prine’s ‘In Spite of Ourselves’ (Oh Boy Records, 1999) reached No.21 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1999.

In 2000, Forerunner Music was sold, and Jim Rooney began to spend four to five months a year in Ireland.

Iris DeMent: 'Lifeline' (Flariella Records, 2004)

In November 2004, Iris DeMent saw the release of ‘Lifeline’ (Flariella Records, 2004), which was produced by Jim Rooney and Iris DeMent, and included the following tracks:

‘I’ve Got That Old Time Religion In My Heart’ (written by Hurdis Milsap)
‘Blessed Assurance’ (written by Fanny Crosby and Phoebe Knapp)
‘Fill My Way With Love’ (written by Iris DeMent and George Sebern)
‘Hide Thou Me’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Old Gospel Ship’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Sweet Hour of Prayer’ (written by William Bradbury and William Walford)
‘That Glad Reunion Day’ (written by Adger Pace)
‘Leaning On The Everlasting Arms’ (written by Elisha Hoffman and Anthony Showalter)
‘He Reached Down’ (written by Iris DeMent)
‘Jesus Keep Me Near The Cross’ (written by Fanny Crosby and William Doane)
‘I Never Shall Forget The Day’ (written by Zack Deberry)
‘I Don’t Want To Get Adjusted’ (written by Iris Dement and Sanford Massangale)
‘God Walks The Dark Hills’ (written by Audrey Czarnikow)

Robin & Linda Williams: 'These Old Dark Hills' (Red House Records, 2012)

In 2012, Jim Rooney produced Robin & Linda Williams’ ‘These Old Dark Hills’ (Red House Records, 2012), which included the following tracks:

‘Lonesome’ (written by Linda Williams and Robin Williams)
‘These Old Dark Hills’ (written by Linda Williams and Robin Williams)
‘Arizona’ (written by Linda Williams and Robin Williams)
‘Beyond The Realm of Words’ (written by Ron Davies)
‘Crossing The Bar’ (written by Rani Arbo and Alfred Lord Tennyson)
‘Tessie Mae’ (written by Linda Williams and Robin Williams)
‘Storms Never Last’ (written by Bo Jan Erik Andersson and Jessi Colter)
‘They All Faded Away’ (written by Jerome Clark and Robin Williams)
‘Looking For Love’ (written by Linda Williams and Robin Williams)
‘My Lucky Day’ (written by Bruce Springsteen)
‘Forever’ (written by Linda Williams and Robin Williams)
‘World Wide Peace’ (written by Will M. Ramsey and Almeda Riddle)

In 2012, Jim Rooney’s ‘Bossmen: Bill Monroe & Muddy Waters’, was re-issued by JRP Books.

Robin & Linda Williams: 'Back 40' (Red House Records, 2013)

In 2013, Jim Rooney produced Robin & Linda Williams’ ‘Back 40’ (Red House Records, 2013), which included the following tracks:

‘On & On’ (written by Linda Williams and Robin Williams)
‘Pine County’ (written by Jerome Clark and Robin Williams)
‘My Sweet Love Ain‚Äôt Around’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
‘This Is The Real Thing’ (written by Jerome Clark, Linda Williams and Robin Williams)
‘Urge For Going’ (written by Joni Mitchell)
‘Dixie Highway Sign’ (written by Linda Williams and Robin Williams)
‘Green Summertime’ (written by Jerome Clark, Linda Williams and Robin Williams)
‘The Old Familiar House On Christmas Day’ (written by Linda Williams and Robin Williams)
‘Daughter of Macleod’ (written by Robin Williams)
‘Adam Rude’ (written by Robin Williams)
‘The Other Side of Town’ (written by Jerome Clark, Linda Williams and Robin Williams)
‘Boots of Spanish Leather’ (written by Bob Dylan)
‘Seventeen Years Old’ (written by Jerome Clark, Linda Williams and Robin Williams)
‘Henry Brown & Jane Saroo’ (written by Jerome Clark, Linda Williams and Robin Williams)

At the time of the acquisition of this Gene Watson ‘Peer’s Quote’, in April 2014, Jim Rooney was promoting his memoir, ‘In It For The Long Run: A Musicial Odyssey’ (published by University of Illinois Press).

Jim Rooney

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