Gene Watson Peer’s Quote from Johnny Rodriguez: February 2023

Gene Watson’s Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as ‘the singer’s singer’ – and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson’s Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2023, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Johnny Rodriguez, which he submitted to this site on Tuesday 7 February 2023.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Johnny Rodriguez who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online ‘celebration of a Lone Star Hero’.

Mary Jane Losey

Sean Brady would also like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Mary Jane Losey, without whom this Gene Watson ‘Peer’s Quote’ from Johnny Rodriguez would not have been possible.



Johnny Rodriguez


Johnny Rodriguez
This quote was submitted on Tuesday 7 February 2023.

‘Gene’s heart is bigger than his voice.

And, that’s big!

Johnny Rodriguez and Gene Watson on the set of 'Larry's Country Diner' in Nashville

I admire the man, and his talent’

Thank you, Johnny Rodriguez, for your support of Gene Watson.



About Johnny Rodriguez…

Johnny Rodriguez

Johnny Rodriguez
(photo courtesy of Ron Losey)

Johnny Rodriguez was born Juan Raul Davis ‘Johnny’ Rodriguez in Sabinal, Texas, a small town situated ninety miles from Mexico, on Monday 10 December 1951 and is a Latin American country music singer, infusing his music with Latin sounds, and even singing verses of songs in Spanish; he was the second youngest in a family of ten children, who lived in a four-room house.

In the 1970s and 1980s, Johnny Rodriguez was one of country music’s most successful male artists, recording a string of hit songs, including ‘You Always Come Back To Hurting Me’, which was written by Johnny Rodriguez and Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021) (No.1 for one week in June 1973), ‘Desperado’, which was written by Don Henley and Glenn Frey (Saturday 6 November 1948 – Tuesday 19 January 2016) (No.5, 1977), ‘Down On The Rio Grande’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez, Bill Boling and Doug Teasley) (No.6, 1979), and ‘Fools For Each Other’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez and Bill Boling) (No.17, 1979).

Johnny Rodriguez has recorded six Billboard No.1 country music hit singles during the course of his career.

Growing up in Sabinal, Texas, Johnny Rodriguez was a good student in school and an altar boy for his church.  Johnny Rodriguez was also the captain of his junior high school football team.

When Johnny Rodriguez was sixteen years old, his father died of cancer, and his older brother, Andres, died in an automobile accident the following year.  The two incidents had an effect on Johnny Rodriguez and he became a troubled teen.

In 1969, when he was eighteen years old, Johnny Rodriguez ended up in jail.  He sang frequently in his cell and was overheard by Texas Ranger Joaquin Jackson, who was very impressed and told promoter ‘Happy’ Shahan about him.  The common story told is that Johnny Rodriguez was arrested after he and some friends were caught stealing and barbecuing a goat, although ‘Happy’ Jackson would later state that Johnny Rodriguez was in jail simply for an unpaid fine.


Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 - Friday 20 August 2021)

‘Happy’ Shahan then hired Johnny Rodriguez to perform at his local tourist attraction called Alamo Village.  During one of his sets in 1971, Johnny Rodriguez came to the attention of country music artist, Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021, who encouraged the young singer to go to Nashville.

Bobby Bare

Another acclaimed country music artist, Bobby Bare, also encouraged Johnny Rodriguez to go to Nashville.

The twenty-one year old singer arrived in Nashville with only a guitar in his hand and $14.00 in his pocket.  Fortunately, Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021) soon found work for Johnny Rodriguez fronting his band, as well as writing songs.

Less than one year later, Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021) personally took Johnny Rodriguez to the head of Mercury Records’ Nashville division to land him an audition with the record label.  After performing the songs ‘I Can’t Stop Loving You’ and ‘If I Left It Up To You’, Johnny Rodriguez was offered a contract with Mercury.  Johnny Rodriguez signed and began recording in their Nashville studio.

After signing with Mercury Records, Johnny Rodriguez was soon on the way to becoming famous.  Johnny Rodriguez’s first single to be released for Mercury Records was ‘Pass Me By (If You’re Only Passing Through)’ in 1972, which was written by Hillman Hall (1938 – 1989).  This recording was a big success, reaching No.9 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1972, and making him a country music star overnight.

Johnny Rodriguez became the first well-known Latin American country music singer.  Freddy Fender (Friday 4 June 1937 – Saturday 14 October 2006) achieved fame a few years later, in 1975.

In 1972, Johnny Rodriguez was voted ‘Most Promising Vocalist’ by the Academy of Country Music (ACM).


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Introducing Johnny Rodriguez' (Mercury Records, 1973)

In February 1973, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of his debut album, ‘Introducing Johnny Rodriguez’ (Mercury Records, 1973), which was produced by Jerry Kennedy and Roy Dea, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Pass Me By (If You’re Only Passing Through)’, which was written by Hillman Hall (1938 – 1989) (No.9, 1973) / this track also reached No.7 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1973

‘You Always Come Back To Hurting Me’, which was written by Johnny Rodriguez and Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021)
(No.1 for one week in June 1973) / this track also reached No.86 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1973

Johnny Rodriguez’s debut album, ‘Introducing Johnny Rodriguez’ (Mercury Records, 1973), also included the following tracks:

‘I Wonder Where You Are Tonight’, which was written by Johnny Bond (Tuesday 1 June 1915 – Monday 12 June 1978)
‘One More Chance To Be With You’, which was written by Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021) and Johnny Rodriguez
‘Jealous Darlin’, which was written by Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021) and Hillman Hall (1938 – 1989)

‘Easy Come, Easy Go’, which was written by Billy Joe Shaver (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Wednesday 28 October 2020)
‘Answer To Your Letter’, which was written by Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021) and Johnny Rodriguez
‘Jealous Heart’, which was written by Jenny Lou Carson (Wednesday 13 January 1915 – Saturday 16 December 1978)
‘We Had A Good Time Trying’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘You Go Around’, which was written by Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021) and Johnny Rodriguez
‘Leavin’ Somethin’ Left To Do’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)

Personnel involved in the recording of Johnny Rodriguez’s debut album, ‘Introducing Johnny Rodriguez’ (Mercury Records, 1973), included the following:

Jerry Kennedy (guitar, Dobro, sitar)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019), Pete Wade, Jerry Shook, Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) and Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) (guitar)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988) (steel guitar)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Hargus ‚ÄėPig‚Äô Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) and Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Cam Mullins (arrangements)

Johnny Rodriguez’s debut album, ‘Introducing Johnny Rodriguez’ (Mercury Records, 1973), reached No.1 on the Billboard¬†Top Country Albums Chart in 1973, and No.156 on the Billboard Top pop music albums chart in 1973.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'All I Ever Meant To Do Was Sing' (Mercury Records, 1973)

In August 1973, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘All I Ever Meant To Do Was Sing’ (Mercury Records, 1973), which was produced by Jerry Kennedy, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Ridin’ My Thumb To Mexico’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez) (No.1 for two weeks in October 1973) / this track also reached No.70 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1973

‘That’s The Way Loves Goes’, which was written by Sanger D. ‘Whitey’ Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 – Saturday 12 January 2019) and Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 – Saturday 19 July 1975)
 (No.1 for one week in February 1974)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘All I Ever Meant To Do Was Sing’ (Mercury Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

‘Release Me (& Let Me Love Again)’, which was written by Edward Monroe ‘Eddie’ Miller (Wednesday 10 December 1919 – Monday 11 April 1977), W.S. Stevenson (1900 – 1978) and Robert Yount (Sunday 20 October 1929 – Thursday 30 June 2005)
‘I’ll Just Have To Learn To Stay Away From You’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Love & Honor’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Jimmy Was A Drinkin’ Kind of Man’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘All I Ever Meant To Do Was Sing’, which was written by Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021) and Johnny Rodriguez
‘Music City Band’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Love Ain’t Such An Easy Thing To Find’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)

‘Good Lord Knows I Tried’, which was written by Billy Joe Shaver (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Wednesday 28 October 2020)
‘I Really Don’t Want To Know’, which was written by Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 – Monday 16 March 2015) and Howard Barnes

Personnel involved in the recording of Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘All I Ever Meant To Do Was Sing’ (Mercury Records, 1973) included the following:

Jerry Kennedy (lead guitar)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019), Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022), Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) and Jerry Shook (guitar)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988) (steel guitar)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Hargus ‚ÄėPig‚Äô Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) and Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Cam Mullins (arrangements)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘All I Ever Meant To Do Was Sing’ (Mercury Records, 1973) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums chart in 1973, and No.174 on the Billboard Top pop music albums chart in 1973.

Johnny Rodriguez: 'Introducing Johnny Rodriguez & All I Ever Meant To Do Was Sing' (Hux Records, 2010)

On¬†Monday 25 October 2010, England’s¬†Hux Records¬†released Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Introducing Johnny Rodriguez & All I Ever Meant To Do Was Sing’ (Hux Records, 2010) as a special CD set (HUX 118).

‘In the 1970s, Johnny Rodriguez brought a sudden and unexpected exotic Hispanic dash and sexiness to country music. ¬†Rodriguez would introduce whole verses sung completely in Spanish to his records, to a completely unprepared yet delighted country music audience.

Rodriguez was discovered by¬†Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021) in 1971.¬†Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021) was looking for a replacement guitarist for his road band The Storytellers, and gave Rodriguez the job, as well as his own solo spot. ¬†Eventually, Rodriguez’ success began to eclipse that of¬†Tom T. Hall‘s.

In 1972, Johnny Rodriguez debuted on the country chart with the superlative ‘Pass Me By (if You’re Only Passing Through)’ (No.9, 1973), making him the first Hispanic artist to make Billboard’s Top 40 country listings. ¬†The single climbed into the Top Ten and turned out to be the first of fourteen consecutive Rodriguez singles to do so.

His next two singles, ‘You Always Come Back (To Hurting Me)’, which was written by Johnny Rodriguez and¬†Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021) (No.1 for one week in June 1973), and ‘Ridin’ My Thumb To Mexico’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez) (No.1 for one week in October 1973), both hit No.1.

‘You Always Come Back (To Hurting Me)’, which was written by Johnny Rodriguez and¬†Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021) was also Johnny Rodriguez’s first foray onto the Billboard pop charts, reaching No.86 in 1973.

Rodriguez’ debut album, ‘Introducing Johnny Rodriguez’, was released in 1973. ¬†This was quickly followed in the same year by ‘All I Ever Meant To Do Was Sing’.

Both titles have now been digitally re-mastered and are re-issued on CD now for the first time.

The accompanying 12-page booklet includes extensive liner notes, photographs and full lyrics to every featured track’.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'My Third Album' (Mercury Records, 1974)

In March 1974, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘My Third Album’ (Mercury Records, 1974), which was produced by Jerry Kennedy, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Something’, which was written by George Harrison, MBE (Thursday 25 February 1943 – Thursday 29 November 2001)
¬†(No.6, 1974) / this track also reached No.85 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1974 / the original version of this track was recorded by The Beatles, who included it on ‘Abbey Road’ (Apple Records, 1969); The Beatles’ version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1969, and reached No.4 on the United Kingdom Singles Chart in 1969

‘Dance With Me One More Time’¬†(written by Johnny Rodriguez)
(No.2, 1974)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘My Third Album’ (Mercury Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

‘I’ve Never Loved Anyone More’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010) and Michael Nesmith (Wednesday 30 December 1942 – Friday 10 December 2021)
‘Ramblin’ Man’ (written by Richard Betts)
‘Faded Love’, which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 – Tuesday 13 May 1975) and John Wills
‘As Long As You Keep Clinging To My Mind’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Bossier City Backyard’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘I’ve Never Had A Thing That Ain’t Been Used’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Jane’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Born To Lose’ (written by Frankie Brown)
‘Last Letter’, which was written by Rex Griffin (Monday 12 August 1912 – Sunday 11 October 1959)

Personnel involved in the recording of Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘My Third Album’ (Mercury Records, 1974) included the following:

Jerry Kennedy (guitar, Dobro, sitar)
Pete Wade, Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019), Jerry Shook and Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) (guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar, mandolin)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988) (steel guitar)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) and Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Hargus ‚ÄėPig‚Äô Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano, keyboards)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Cam Mullins (arrangements)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘My Third Album’ (Mercury Records, 1974) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Songs About Ladies & Love' (Mercury Records, 1974)

In September 1974, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Songs About Ladies & Love’ (Mercury Records, 1974), which was produced by Jerry Kennedy, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘We’re Over’ (written by Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann)
(No.3, 1974)

‘I Just Can’t Get Her Out of My Mind’ (written by Larry Gatlin)
(No.1 for one week in April 1975)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Songs About Ladies & Love’ (Mercury Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

‘Oh, How I Miss You’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘I Was Born A Travelin’ Man’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘It Feels Like Love’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Have I Told You Lately That I Love You’, which was written by Scott Greene Wiseman (Sunday 8 November 1908 – Saturday 31 January 1981)
‘Turn Around, Look At Me’, which was written by Jerry Capehart and Glen Campbell (Wednesday 22 April 1936 – Tuesday 8 August 2017)
‘Someone Loves You Honey’ (written by Don Devaney)
‘I’m Not That Good At Goodbye’, which was written by Bob McDill and Don Williams (Saturday 27 May 1939 – Friday 8 September 2017)
‘I Can’t Stop Loving You’, which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 – Monday 17 November 2003)
‘Do You Really Want To Know’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)

Personnel involved in the recording of Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Songs About Ladies & Love’ (Mercury Records, 1974) included the following:

Jerry Kennedy, Pete Wade, Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019), Johnny Christopher, Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) and Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) (guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar, mandolin)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988) (steel guitar)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) and Mike Leach (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) and Jerry Kirby Carrigan (Monday 13 September 1943 – Saturday 22 June 2019) (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) and Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Hargus ‚ÄėPig‚Äô Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano, keyboards)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, vibes)
Cam Mullins (arrangements)
The Jordanaires (vocals)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Songs About Ladies & Love’ (Mercury Records, 1974) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

Johnny Rodriguez: 'My Third Album & Songs About Ladies & Love' (Hux Records, 2016)

On¬†Friday 5 February 2016, England’s¬†Hux Records¬†released Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘My Third Album & Songs About Ladies & Love’ (Hux Records, 2016) as a special CD set (HUX148).

‘This is the third Rodriguez re-issue on the Hux label, following on from the recent success of¬†HUX118¬†and¬†HUX144.

The two albums on this CD were both produced by the legendary Jerry Kennedy and feature backing from The Jordanaires and the finest Nashville session musicians, including¬†Harold Bradley¬†(Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019), Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988), Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008), Hargus ‚ÄėPig‚Äô Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022),¬†Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) and¬†Charlie McCoy.

Both albums were both originally released in 1974 on Mercury Records. ¬†This was right in the middle of Rodriguez’ most successful recording period and both of these LPs reached the Top 10 on Billboard’s country music chart.

The booklet which accompanies this CD features extensive liner notes and full recording details’.

Johnny Rodriguez: 'Just Get Up & Close The Door' (Mercury Records, 1975)

In May 1975, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Just Get Up & Close The Door’ (Mercury Records, 1975), which was produced by Jerry Kennedy, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard ccountry music singles chart:

‘Just Get Up & Close The Door’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010)
(No.1 for one week in August 1975)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Just Get Up & Close The Door’ (Mercury Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

‘Take Me Back’ (written by Teddy Randazzo)
‘Texas Up Here In Tennessee’, which was written by Billy Joe Shaver (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Wednesday 28 October 2020)
‘New York City Snow’, which was written by Billy Joe Shaver (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Wednesday 28 October 2020)
‘Am I That Easy To Forget’, which was written by Carl Belew (Tuesday 21 April 1931 – Wednesday 31 October 1990) and W.S. Stevenson (1900 – 1978)
‘Invitation To The Blues’, which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 – Sunday 25 October 1992)
‘Steppin’ Out On You’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Sound In Your Mind’ (written by Willie Nelson)
‘Too Many Rivers’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)
‘Fraulein’, which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 – Thursday 26 July 2007)
‘C.C. Rider’ (written by Chuck Willis and Ma Rainey)

Personnel involved in the recording of Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Just Get Up & Close The Door’ (Mercury Records, 1975) included the following:

Jerry Kennedy (guitar, sitar)
Pete Wade, Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019), Johnny Christopher, Tommy Allsup (Tuesday 24 November 1931 – Wednesday 11 January 2017), Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022), Jerry Shook and Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) (guitar)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988) (steel guitar)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) and Mike Leach (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) and Jerry Kirby Carrigan (Monday 13 September 1943 – Saturday 22 June 2019) (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) and Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Hargus ‚ÄėPig‚Äô Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano, keyboards)
Charlie McCoy (vibes)
Joe Babcock, Herman Harper, Ginger Holladay, Prissy Hubbard, Millie Kirkham, Hurshel Wayne Wiginton (Saturday 29 January 1938 – Monday 6 March 2017), Trish Williams, and The Jordanaires (vocals)
Cam Mullins (arrangements)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Just Get Up & Close The Door’ (Mercury Records, 1975) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Love Put a Song in My Heart' (Mercury Records, 1975)

In November 1975, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Love Put A Song In My Heart’ (Mercury Records, 1975), which was produced by Jerry Kennedy, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Love Put A Song In My Heart’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005) (No.1 for one week in December 1975)

‘I Couldn’t Be Me Without You’, which was written by Billy Joe Shaver (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Wednesday 28 October 2020)
 (No.3, 1975)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Love Put A Song In My Heart’ (Mercury Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

‘It Took Us All Night Long To Say Goodbye’, which was written by¬†Bob McDill and Wayland D. Holyfield (Sunday 15 March 1942 – Tuesday 7 May 2024)
‘I Can’t Get Used To Sleeping Without You’ (written by¬†Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Take Back It’s Over’ (written by Larry Gatlin)
‘You Don’t Know Me’, which was written by¬†Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 – Thursday 23 March 2006) and Eddy Arnold (Wednesday 15 May 1918 – Thursday 8 May 2008)
‘Sometimes I Wish I Were You’ (written by¬†Johnny Rodriguez)
‘My Way’ (written by¬†Paul Anka, Jacques Revaux and Claude Francois)
‘Drinkin’ Man’s Blues’ (written by¬†R.C. Finnigan)
‘Candy In The Window’, which was written by Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021)
‘Will You Love Me Tomorrow’ (written by¬†Carole King and Gerry Goffin)

Personnel involved in the recording of Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Love Put A Song In My Heart’ (Mercury Records, 1975) included the following:

Jerry Kennedy, Pete Wade, Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019), Tommy Allsup (Tuesday 24 November 1931 – Wednesday 11 January 2017), Jerry Shook and Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) (guitar)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988) (steel guitar)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) and Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 – Monday 29 December 2014) (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) and Jerry Kirby Carrigan (Monday 13 September 1943 – Saturday 22 June 2019) (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Hargus ‚ÄėPig‚Äô Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano, keyboards)
Charlie McCoy (vibes)
Joe Babcock, Herman Harper, Ginger Holladay, Priscilla Ann Reed Hubbard (1941 – Wednesday 24 September 2014), Millie Kirkham, Hurshel Wayne Wiginton (Saturday 29 January 1938 – Monday 6 March 2017), Trish Williams, and The Jordanaires (vocals)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Love Put A Song In My Heart’ (Mercury Records, 1975) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'The Greatest Hits of Johnny Rodriguez' (Mercury Records, 1976)

In March 1976, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘The Greatest Hits of Johnny Rodriguez’ (Mercury Records, 1976), which was produced by Jerry Kennedy, and included the following tracks:

‘I Couldn’t Be Me Without You’, which was written by Billy Joe Shaver (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Wednesday 28 October 2020)
 (No.3, 1975)

‘Pass Me By (If You’re Only Passing Through)’, which was written by Hillman Hall (1938 – 1989)
 (No.9, 1973)

‘Something’, which was written by George Harrison, MBE (Thursday 25 February 1943 – Thursday 29 November 2001)
 (No.6, 1974) / this track also reached No.85 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1974

‘Faded Love’, which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 – Tuesday 13 May 1975) and John Wills
/ this track was an album track from 1974

‘Ridin’ My Thumb To Mexico’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
 (No.1 for two weeks in October 1973) / this track also reached No.70 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1973

‘Born To Lose’ (written by Frankie Brown)
 / this track was an album track from 1974

‘I Just Can’t Get Her Out of My Mind’ (written by Larry Gatlin)
 (No.1 for one week in April 1975)

‘Love Put A Song In My Heart’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
 (No.1 for one week in December 1975)

‘Dance With Me One More Time’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
 (No.2, 1974)

‘You Always Come Back To Hurting Me’, which was written by Johnny Rodriguez and Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021)
(No.1 for one week in June 1973) / this track also reached No.86 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1973

‘We’re Over’ (written by Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann)
 (No.3, 1974)

‘Jealous Heart’, which was written by Jenny Lou Carson (Wednesday 13 January 1915 – Saturday 16 December 1978)
/ this track was an album track from 1973

‘Just Get Up & Close The Door’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010)
 (No.1 for one week in August 1975)

‘That’s The Way Loves Goes’, which was written by Sanger D. ‘Whitey’ Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 – Saturday 12 January 2019) and Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 – Saturday 19 July 1975)
 (No.1 for one week in February 1974)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘The Greatest Hits of Johnny Rodriguez’ (Mercury Records, 1976) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Reflecting' (Mercury Records, 1976)

In October 1976, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Reflecting’ (Mercury Records, 1976), which was produced by Jerry Kennedy, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘I Wonder If I Ever Said Goodbye’, which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 – Sunday 29 September 2002) (No.2, 1976)

‘Hillbilly Heart’ (written by Dan Penn and Johnny Christopher)
(No.5, 1976)

‘Desperado’, which was written by Don Henley and Glenn Frey (Saturday 6 November 1948 – Tuesday 19 January 2016)
(No.5, 1977)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Reflecting’ (Mercury Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

‘Louisiana’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘I’ve Had All The Hurt I Can Take’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘It Was’ (written by Gayle Barnhill and Joanne Thain)
‘Commonly Known As The Blues’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Red Wine & Blue’ (written by Don Goodman, Bud Reneau and Mark Sherrill)
‘Lyin’ Eyes’, which was written by Don Henley and Glenn Frey (Saturday 6 November 1948 – Tuesday 19 January 2016)
‘Poison Red Berries’, which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 – Sunday 29 September 2002)
‘There’ll Always Be Honky Tonks In Texas’ (written by Bobby Bond and Conrad Pierce)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Reflecting’ (Mercury Records, 1976) reached No.11 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Practise Makes Perfect' (Mercury Records, 1977)

In May 1977, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Practise Makes Perfect’ (Mercury Records, 1977), which was produced by Jerry Kennedy, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘If Practise Makes Perfect’ (written by Larry Gatlin) (No.5, 1977)

‘Eres Tu’ (‘Touch The Wind’) (written by Mike Hawker and Carlos Calderon)
(No.25, 1977)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Practise Makes Perfect’ (Mercury Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

‘I’d Build A Bridge’ (written by Mike Settle)
‘Hard Times’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)

‘It Was So Easy For You To Say Goodbye’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘You Put A Hold On Me’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Little Bit More’ (written by Bobby Gosh)
‘I’m Gonna Make It After All’ (written by Bob McDill)
‘Torn Between Two Lovers’ (written by Peter Yarrow and Phillip Jarrell)
‘Steal A Little Time’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘She Calls It Love’ (written by John Schweers and Dean Dillon)
‘Mem’ries’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010) and Susan Hargrove

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Practise Makes Perfect’ (Mercury Records, 1977) reached No.18 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Just For You' (Mercury Records, 1977)

In November 1977, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Just For You’ (Mercury Records, 1977), which was produced by Jerry Kennedy, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Savin’ This Love Song For You’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez) (No.14, 1977)

‘We Believe In Happy Endings’ (written by Bob McDill)
(No.7, 1978)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Just For You’ (Mercury Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

‘Rodeo Rider’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Tell All Your Troubles To Me’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)

‘I Wanta Wear My Hat’ (written by Conrad Pierce and Cliff Reynolds)
‘Que Te Quiero’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)

‘Run Like A Thief’ (written by John David Souther)
‘Remember Me’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Hello Love Goodbye’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘They Always Remind Me of You’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Immigrant’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Just For You’ (Mercury Records, 1977) reached No.35 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Love Me With All Your Heart' (Mercury Records, 1978)

In June 1978, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Love Me With All Your Heart’ (Mercury Records, 1978), which was produced by Jerry Kennedy, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Love Me With All Your Heart’ 
(written by Sunny Skylar, Mario Rigual and Carlos Rigual) (No.7, 1978)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Love Me With All Your Heart’ (Mercury Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

‘Spanish Eyes’ (written by Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder and Bert Kaempfert)
‘Ramblin’ Rose’, which was written by Noel Sherman (1930 – Monday 4 June 1972) and Joe Sherman
‘It’s Hard To Be A Cowboy These Days’ (written by Conrad Pierce)
‘It’s Hard To Keep A Good Lie Down’ (written by Larry Gatlin)
‘Leavin’ As Fast As I Can Crawl’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010)
‘Marie’ (written by Randy Newman)
‘I Need It Now’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Glenn W. Martin (Thursday 30 June 1932 – Sunday 12 May 2019)
‘Baby, You’re Something’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016), Don Cook and Rafe Van Hoy
‘Make Believe It’s Your First Time’ (written by Bob Morrison and Johnny Wilson)
‘Rest Your Love On Me’ (written by Barry Gibb)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Love Me With All Your Heart’ (Mercury Records, 1978) reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Rodriguez Was Here' (Mercury Records, 1979)

In March 1979, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Rodriguez Was Here’ (Mercury Records, 1979), which was produced by Jerry Kennedy, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Alibis’ (written by Rock Killough and Pat Killough) (No.16, 1979)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Rodriguez Was Here’ (Mercury Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

‘Goodbye Marie’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006) and Mel McDaniel (Sunday 6 September 1942 – Thursday 31 March 2011)
‘She Thinks I Still Care’ (written by
 Dickey Lee and Steve Duffy)
‘Cowboy’ (written by Randy Newman)
‘Flow, River, Flow’ (written by 
Gordon Payne)
‘You’re My World’ (written by 
Carl Sigman, Gino Paoli and Umberto Bindi)
‘Lovin’ Arms’ (written by Tom Jans)
‘I Take A Lot of Pride In What I Am’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘I Wanna Live’, which was written by 
John D. Loudermilk (Saturday 31 March 1934 – Wednesday 21 September 2016)
‘Bridge Over Troubled Water’ (written by 
Paul Simon)
‘No Love At All’ (written by Wayne C. Thompson and Johnny Christopher)


It was also in 1979 when Johnny Rodriguez switched record labels, moving from Mercury Records to Epic Records, where he worked with the legendary producer Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015), who produced some of the biggest names in country music at the time.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Rodriguez' (Epic Records, 1979)

In April 1979, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Rodriguez’ (Epic Records, 1979), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Down On The Rio Grande’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez, Bill Boling and Doug Teasley)
(No.6, 1979)

‘Fools For Each Other’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez and Bill Boling)
(No.17, 1979)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Rodriguez’ (Epic Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

‘Don’t Be Afraid To Say Goodbye’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘When The Honeymoon Ends’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez and Bill Boling)
‘Driftin’ Away’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Mexico Holiday’ (written by Bill Boling)
‘Paid Vacation’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Street Walker’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Hand On My Shoulder’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘I Give My Life A Second Look’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)

Personnel involved in the recording of Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Rodriguez’ (Epic Records, 1979) included the following:

Billy Sanford, Jimmy Capps (Thursday 25 May 1939 – Monday 1 June 2020), Phil Baugh, Tommy Allsup (Tuesday 24 November 1931 – Wednesday 11 January 2017) and Bill Boling (guitar)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988) and Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 – Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 – Monday 29 December 2014) and Kyle Tullis (bass)
Jerry Kirby Carrigan (Monday 13 September 1943 – Saturday 22 June 2019), Jim Isbell and Chris Deal (drums)
Hargus ‚ÄėPig‚Äô Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Shane Keister (piano, keyboards)
Farrell Morris and Nick DiStefano (percussion)
Don Sheffield (trumpet)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Rodriguez’ (Epic Records, 1979) reached No.45 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1979.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Through My Eyes' (Epic Records, 1979)

In October 1979, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Through My Eyes’ (Epic Records, 1979), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘What’ll I Tell Virginia’ (written by Bob McDill) (No.19, 1980)

‘Love, Look At Us Now’, which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 – Sunday 29 September 2002)
(No.29, 1980)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Through My Eyes’ (Epic Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

‘One Sided Love Affair’ (written by Bill Boling)
‘One Affair Later’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)

‘Where Did It Go’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘I’ll Go Back To Her’, which was written by Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 – Wednesday 13 February 2002)
‘One, Two, Three’ (written by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, Eddie Holland and Leonard Borisoff)
‘You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’ (written by Cynthia Weil, Barry Mann and Phil Spector)
‘Whatever Gets Me Through The Night’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘Welcome To Love’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez, Mike Lawler and John Cobb)


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Sketches' (Mercury Records, 1979)

In November 1979, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Sketches’ (Mercury Records, 1979), which was produced by Jerry Kennedy, and included the following tracks:

‘I Fought The Law’ (written by Sonny Curtis)
‘Misty Blue’, which was written by¬†Bob Montgomery (Wednesday 12 May 1937 – Thursday 4 December 2014)
‘It’ll Be Her’, which was written by Billy Ray Reynolds (1940 – Friday 29 November 2019)
‘If You Could Read My Mind’, which was written by¬†Gordon Lightfoot (Thursday 17 November 1938 – Sunday 1 May 2023)
‘I Would Have Loved You All Night Long’, which was written by Glenn W. Martin (Thursday 30 June 1932 – Sunday 12 May 2019)
‘Goodbye’, which was written by¬†Larry Butler (Thursday 26 March 1942 – Friday 20 January 2012) and Buddy Killen (Sunday 13 November 1932 – Wednesday 1 November 2006)
‘Vestido De Blanco’ (written by¬†Michael Racette)
‘To Love Somebody’, which was written by¬†Barry Gibb and Robin Gibb, CBE (Thursday 22 December 1949 – Sunday 20 May 2012)
‘Leave Me Tomorrow, But Love Me Tonight’, which was written by¬†Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 – Sunday 29 September 2002)
‘I’d Be First To Fall In Love’ (written by¬†Johnny Rodriguez)

Charly McClain: 'Women Get Lonely' (Epic Records, 1980)

In April 1980, Charly McClain saw the release of ‘Women Get Lucky’ (Epic Records, 1980); one of the included tracks was ‘I Hate The Way I Love It’ (written by Ava Aldridge), which was a duet with Johnny Rodriguez, and reached No.16 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1979.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Gypsy' (Epic Records, 1980)

In October 1980, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Gypsy’ (Epic Records, 1980), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘North of The Border’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Stephen Allen Davis (Tuesday 4 October 1949 – Monday 26 December 2022)
(No.17, 1980)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Gypsy’ (Epic Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

‘Gypsy’ (written by Billy Reid)
‘Don’t Let The Sun Catch You Cryin’, which was written by Gerard Marsden MBE (Thursday 24 September 1942 – Sunday 3 January 2021), Fred Marsden and Leo Maguire
‘You Beat Any Dream I’ve Ever Had’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015), Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Johnny Rodriguez
‘All American Girl’ (written by Bill Boling)
‘Coal Black Eyes’ (written by Bill Boling)
‘I Think We’ve Let It Slip Away Again’ (written by Bob McDill)
‘Because of You’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘When She Gets Around To Me’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Johnny Rodriguez
‘Stagger Lee’ (written by Lloyd Price and Harold Logan)


Johnny Rodriguez: 'After The Rain' (Epic Records, 1981)

In May 1981, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘After The Rain’ (Epic Records, 1981), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘I Want You Tonight’, which was written by Stephen Allen Davis (Tuesday 4 October 1949 – Monday 26 December 2022) (No.22, 1981)

‘Trying Not To Love You’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
 (No.30, 1981)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘After The Rain’ (Epic Records, 1981) also included the following tracks:

‘The Steal of The Night’, which was written by Eugene David Dobbins (Monday 19 March 1934 – Sunday 23 November 2008), Tommy Rocco and Tim Daniels
‘Crazy Love’ (written by Van Morrison)
‘Fire & Rain’ (written by James Taylor)
‘Mexico Rain’ (written by Michael Hearne)
‘Your Love Isn’t Mine Anymore’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘I Can’t Keep My Hands Off of You’, which was written by Bobby Borchers and Mack Vickery (Wednesday 8 June 1938 – Tuesday 21 December 2004)
‘Nobody’s Better Than You’, which was written by Stephen Allen Davis (Tuesday 4 October 1949 – Monday 26 December 2022)
‘Billy Robb’ (written by Bill Boling)


In 1982, Johnny Rodriguez recorded a duet with Zella Lehr, ‘Most Beautiful Girl (La Chica Mas Linda)’, which was released by Columbia Records.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Biggest Hits' (Epic Records, 1982)
Charly McClain: 'Women Get Lonely' (Epic Records, 1980)

In September 1982, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Biggest Hits’ (Epic Records, 1982), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015), and included the following tracks:

‘Trying Not To Love You’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
 (No.30, 1981)

‘Love Look At Us Now’, which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 – Sunday 29 September 2002)
 (No.29, 1980)

‘North of The Border’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Stephen Allen Davis (Tuesday 4 October 1949 – Monday 26 December 2022)
(No.17, 1980)

‘Born With The Blues’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
/ this track was new to this collection

‘I Hate The Way I Love It’ (written by Ava Aldridge)
(No.16, 1979) / this track, which was duet with Charly McClain, was also included on Charly McClain’s ‘Women Get Lonely’ (Epic Records, 1980)

‘Down On The Rio Grande’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez, Bill Boling and Doug Teasley)
 (No.6, 1979)

‘Fools For Each Other’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez and Bill Boling)
 (No.17, 1979)

‘Mexico Rain’ (written by Michael Hearne)
/ this track was an album track from 1981

‘It’s Not The Same Old You’ (written by Troy Seals and Richard Kerr)


‘What’ll I Tell Virginia’ (written by Bob McDill)
 (No.19, 1980)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Biggest Hits’ (Epic Records, 1982) reached No.30 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.


It was also in 1982 when Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘He’s Not Entitled To Your Love’, a non-album single, which reached No.89 on the Billboard country music singles chart.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'For Every Rose' (Epic Records, 1983)

In August 1983, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘For Every Rose’ (Epic Records, 1983), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Foolin’, which was written by Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 – Sunday 20 March 2011) (No.4, 1983)

‘How Could I Love Her So Much’ (written by Hugh Moffatt)
(No.6, 1983)

‘Back On Her Mind Again’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
(No.35, 1983)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘For Every Rose’ (Epic Records, 1983) also included the following tracks:

‘I’m Not Living With Her Memory Anymore’, which was written by Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021) and Johnny Rodriguez
‘Victim of A Fool’ (written by Billy Barton)
‘My Heart Won’t Pay Me No Mind’ (written by John S. Sherrill and Thomas Cain)
‘Eleven Roses’ (written by Lamar Morris and Darrell McCall)
‘Below The Border’ (written by Bobby Keel, Buck Moore and Jerry Taylor)
‘Somethin’ About A Jukebox’, which was written by Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 – Sunday 20 March 2011) and Gordon Payne
‘Paralyzed’, which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 – Monday 6 May 2002) and Elvis Presley (Tuesday 8 January 1935 – Tuesday 16 August 1977)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘For Every Rose’ (Epic Records, 1983) reached No.30 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Foolin' With Fire' (Epic Records, 1984)

In February 1984, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Foolin’ With Fire’ (Epic Records, 1984), which was produced by Richie Albright, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Too Late To Go Home’ (written by Len Chera) (No.15, 1984)

‘Let’s Leave The Lights On Tonight’ (written by Bob McDill and Rory Bourke)
(No.30, 1984)

‘First Time Burned’ (written by Jim McBride)
(No.63, 1984)

‘Rose of My Heart’ (written by Hugh Moffatt)
(No.60, 1984)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Foolin’ With Fire’ (Epic Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

‘Foolin’ With Fire’ (written by¬†Bob McDill and Rory Bourke)
‘It Took Us All Night Long To Say Goodbye’, which was¬†written by Bob McDill and Wayland D. Holyfield (Sunday 15 March 1942 – Tuesday 7 May 2024)
‘Hand Me Another of Those’, which was written by¬†Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 – Sunday 29 September 2002) and Lee Fry
‘Down In The Boondocks’, which was written by¬†Joe South (Wednesday 28 February 1940 – Wednesday 5 September 2012)
‘No Memories Hangin’ Round’ (written by¬†Rodney Crowell)
‘What A Movie You’d Make’, which was written by Stephen Allen Davis (Tuesday 4 October 1949 – Monday 26 December 2022)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Foolin’ With Fire’ (Epic Records, 1984) reached No.35 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Full Circle' (Epic Records, 1985)

In March 1985, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Full Circle’ (Epic Records, 1985), which was produced by Richie Albright, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Here I Am Again’, which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 – Monday 10 May 1999) (No.69, 1985)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Full Circle’ (Epic Records, 1985) also included the following tracks:

‘If You See Her’, which was written by¬†Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 – Sunday 29 September 2002)
‘All I Can Be Is A Sweet Memory’, which was written by¬†Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)
‘Stone Call’ (written by L. Willoughby, R. Carnes and J. Carnes)
‘Forgiving Her Was Easy’ (written by Willie Nelson)
‘You Look Good In Blue’
‘Trade Some Memories’, which was written by¬†Merle Haggard¬†(Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Somewhere Between’, which was written by¬†Merle Haggard¬†(Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘If I Left It Up To You’, which was written by¬†Merle Haggard¬†(Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Full Circle’

Personnel involved in the recording of Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Full Circle’ (Epic Records, 1985) included the following:

Fred Newell, Jack Eubanks and Leo Jackson (guitar)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 – Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Mike Leech (bass)
Richie Albright (drums)
Hank Singer and Hoot Hester (Monday 13 August 1951 – Tuesday 30 August 2016) (fiddle)
Thomas Keels (keyboards)
Willie Nelson, Gordon Payne, Lynn Anderson (Friday 26 September 1947 – Thursday 30 July 2015) and Yvonne Hodges (vocals)


By the mid-1980s, Johnny Rodriguez was becoming less successful and, in 1986, he left the recording roster at Epic Records.

It was also in 1986 when Johnny Rodriguez saw the release, on Epic Records, of ‘She Don’t Cry Like She Used To’, a non-album single, which reached No.51 on the Billboard country music singles chart.


In 1987, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Our Last Night’, a non-album single, which was a duet with Donna Fargo; however, the track did not appear on the Billboard country music singles chart.


In 1987, Johnny Rodriguez signed with Capitol Records for a brief period of time, and enjoyed his last major hit single, in 1988, with ‘I Didn’t (Every Chance I Had)’ (written by B.P. Baker and K. Palmer), which reached No.12 on the Billboard country music singles chart.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Gracias' (Capitol Records, 1988)

In 1988, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Gracias’ (Capitol Records, 1988), which included five tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘I Didn’t (Every Chance I Had)’ (written by B.P. Baker and K. Palmer) (No.12, 1988)

‘I Wanta Wake Up With You’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
(No.41, 1988)

‘You Might Want To Use Me Again’
(No.44, 1988)

‘No Chance To Dance’
(No.72, 1989)

‘Back To Stay’
(No.78, 1989)

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Gracias’ (Capitol Records, 1988) also included the following tracks:

‘Someday I’m Gonna Finish Leaving You’
‘She Loves Austin’
‘Sweet Courtnita, Sweet Home’
‘Where Do I Go To Surrender’
‘My Memory’s Gonna Serve You Right’


By 1989, Johnny Rodriguez had left the roster at Capitol Records.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Coming Home' (Capitol Records, 1990)

In 1990, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Coming Home’ (Capitol Records, 1990), which included the following tracks:

‘El Senderito’ (written by Juan Barco)
‘Las Penas’ / this track featured guest vocals from David Lee Garza
‘Cuando Vivas Conmigo’ (written by Jos√© Alfredo Jim√©nez)
‘El Venadito’ (public domain)
‘Fue En Un Cafe’ (‘Under The Boardwalk’) (written by Arthur Resnick and Kenny Young)
‘El Paso’, which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 – Wednesday 8 December 1982)
‘No Tengo Remedio’ (written by Memo de Anda)
‘Muchacho Alegre’ / this track featured guest vocals from David Lee Garza
‘Cocula’ (written by Ernesto Cort√°zar and Manuel Esper√≥n)
‘The Wind Beneath My Wings’ (written by Larry Henley and Jeff Silbar)


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Run For The Border' (Intersound Records, 1993)

In August 1993, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Run For The Border’ (Intersound Records, 1993), which included one track, which was released as a single on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Run For The Border’ / this track was released as a single in 1993, but it did not chart

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Run For The Border’ (Intersound Records, 1993) also included the following tracks:

‘She’s Too Pretty To Cry’
‘Bitter Inn’
‘What’s New In Old Mexico’

‘Pass Me By (If You’re Only Passing Through)’, which was written by Hillman Hall (1938 – 1989)
 / the original version of this track reached No.9 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1973

‘You Always Come Back To Hurting Me’, which was written by Johnny Rodriguez and Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021)
/ the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in June 1973

‘Ridin’ My Thumb To Mexico’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
 / the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in October 1973

‘That’s The Way Loves Goes’, which was written by Sanger D. ‘Whitey’ Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 – Saturday 12 January 2019) and Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 – Saturday 19 July 1975)
 / the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in February 1974

‘I Just Can’t Get Her Out of My Mind’ (written by Larry Gatlin)
 / the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in April 1975

‘Just Get Up & Close The Door’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010)
 / the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in August 1975

‘I Wonder If I Ever Said Goodbye’, which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 – Sunday 29 September 2002)
 / the original version of this track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1976

‘Desperado’, which was written by Don Henley and Glenn Frey (Saturday 6 November 1948 – Tuesday 19 January 2016)
 / the original version of this track reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1977


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Super Hits' (Epic Records, 1995)

In September 1995, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Super Hits’ (Epic Records, 1995), which included the following tracks:

‘Let’s Leave The Lights On Tonight’ (written by Bob McDill and Rory Bourke)
 (No.30, 1984)

‘How Could I Love Her So Much’ (written by Hugh Moffatt)
 (No.6, 1983)

‘Foolin’, which was written by Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 – Sunday 20 March 2011)
 (No.4, 1983)

‘Trying Not To Love You’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
 (No.30, 1981)

‘Eleven Roses’ (written by Lamar Morris and
 Darrell McCall) / this track was an album track from 1983, and was not released as a single

‘Back On Her Mind Again’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
 (No.35, 1983)

‘Love Look At Us Now’, which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 – Sunday 29 September 2002)
 (No.29, 1980)

‘North of The Border’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Steve Davis
 (No.17, 1980)

‘Fools For Each Other’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez and Bill Boling)
 (No.17, 1979)

‘Down On The Rio Grande’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez, Bill Boling and Doug Teasley)
 (No.6, 1979)


Johnny Rodriguez: 'You Can Say That Again' (Hightone Records, 1996)

In July 1996, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘You Can Say That Again’ (Hightone Records, 1996), which included one track, which was released as a single on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘You Can Say That Again’ (written by Sam Gay and Lance Strode) / this track was released as a single in 1996, but it did not chart

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘You Can Say That Again’ (Hightone Records, 1996) also included the following tracks:

‘Big Red Sun Blues’ (written by Lucinda Williams)
‘If I’d Left It Up To You’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘It Might Take A While But I’ll Get Over You’, which was written by Shawn Camp and Frank Dycus (Tuesday 5 December 1939 – Friday 23 November 2012)
‘Ever Night About This Time’ (written by Dave Alvin)

‘Corpus Christi Bay’ (written by Robert Earl Keen)

‘Mexico Rain’ (written by Michael Hearne) / the original version of this track was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘After The Rain’ (Epic Records, 1981)


‘There’s Still A Lot of Love In San Antone’, which was written by Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999) and Lou Rochelle
‘The Best Thing Going’ (written by Mike Geiger)
‘When It’s Your Turn To Fall’, which was written by Sanger D. ‘Whitey’ Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 – Saturday 12 January 2019) and Lonnie Williams
‘What A Memory You’ll Make’ (written by Raymond N. ‘Rusty’ Russell)
‘No News Is Good News’ (written by Monte Thomas)


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Funny Things Happen To Fun Lovin' People' (Paula Records, 1996)

In September 1996, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Funny Things Happen To Fun Lovin’ People’ (Paula Records, 1996), which included one track, which was released as a single on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘One Bar At A Time’ (written by Jim Busby) / this track was released as a single in 1996, but it did not chart

Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Funny Things Happen To Fun Lovin’ People’ (Paula Records, 1996) also included the following tracks:

‘I May Fall Again’ (written by Bob Forshee)
‘Funny Things Happen To Fun Lovin’ People’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Someday I’m Gonna Finish Leaving You’ (written by John Schweers) / this track was an album track from 1988, and was not released as a single
‘Empty Arms Hotel’, which was written by Ronnie Samoset (1947 – Sunday 29 July 2018) and Craig Wiseman
‘Still The Same Old Fool’, which was written by Earl Cranston Clark (Saturday 24 November 1945 – Friday 7 July 2017)
‘I’ve Already Seen More Than I Wanna Hear’ (written by Troy Martin, David Nash and Jeff Walikangas)
‘Down In The Boondocks’, which was written by Joe South (Wednesday 28 February 1940 – Wednesday 5 September 2012)
‘I’m Not Up To Feelin’ Down’ (written by David Anthony, Johnny Rodriguez and Jim Wix)
‘Burnin’ Up The Fast Lane’ (written by Alan Syms)


Since 1998, Johnny Rodriguez has toured the United States, and the world, performing in countries including Switzerland, Poland, England, South Korea, Canada and Mexico.

Johnny Rodriguez has also performed concerts at the famed Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, and in Carnegie Hall.


Texas Country Music Hall of Fame, Carthage, Texas

On Saturday 18 August 2007, Johnny Rodriguez was inducted into the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame, which is located in Carthage, Texas.


Johnny Rodriguez & Johnny Bush: 'Texas Legends' (Heart of Texas Records, 2009)

In October 2009, Johnny Rodriguez & Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020) saw the release of ‘Texas Legends’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2009), which included the following tracks:

‘You Lied To Me’ (written by Bill Anderson)
‘Troubles’ (written by Tommy Alverson)
‘Rio Grande Runs Red’ (written by Bart Butler, Mark A. Rone and F.E. Solesbee)
‘Old Wore Out Cowboys’
‘If Cheaters Never Win’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Leona Williams
‘Vamoose Vamonos’ (written by Bart Butler, Bill Green and Billy O’Rourke)
‘What Do I Do With Me Now’ (written by Billy O’Rourke and Mitch Stephens)
‘There’s Somebody Else On Your Mind’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘If I Haven’t Said I Love You’, which was written by Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020), Bill Green and Richard Hill
‘Leaving Lying Down’ (written by Bobby Boyd, Billy O’Rourke and Jay Eric Pfanstiel)
‘Soft Place To Fall’, which was written by Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020) and Freddie Johnson


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Some of Mine, Some of Theirs' (Running Wide Open Productions, 2010)

On Tuesday 23 March 2010, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of ‘Some of Mine, Some of Theirs’ (Runnin Wide Open Productions, 2010), which included the following tracks:

‘Whiskey Trip’
‘The Lord Knows I’m Drinking’ (written by Bill Anderson)
‘Vestida De Blanco’
‘Hello Love, Goodbye’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
‘Where’s My Baby Now’
‘Don’t It Make You Want To Go Home’
‘Ride Me Down Easy’, which was written by Billy Joe Shaver (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Wednesday 28 October 2020)
‘On The Other Side’
‘Sonora’s Death Row’ (written by Blackie Ferrell)
‘Broken Heartsville’


On Saturday 23 October 2010, Johnny Rodriguez received the Institute of Hispanic Culture Pioneer Award, in recognition of his accomplishment as the first major Hispanic singer in country music.


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Johnny Rodriguez: Live From Texas' (Running Wide Records, 2012)

In 2012, Johnny Rodriguez saw the release of his first official ‘live’ concert album; ‘Johnny Rodriguez: Live From Texas’ (Running Wide Records, 2012) was recorded on Friday 22 April 2011 at The Circle T Arena in Hamilton, Texas and included most of his biggest hit singles, in addition to fan favourites and new songs from recent releases:

‘Ridin’ My Thumb To Mexico’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
/ the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in October 1973, and also reached No.70 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1973

‘Down On The Rio Grande’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez, Bill Boling and Doug Teasley)
/ the original version of this track reached No.6 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1979

‘Foolin’, which was written by Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 – Sunday 20 March 2011)
/ the original version of this track reached No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1983

‘The Lord Knows I’m Drinkin’ (written by Bill Anderson)


‘Vestido De Blanco’ (written by Michael Racette)
/ the original version of this track was an album track in 1979

‘I Can’t Help It (If I’m Still In Love With You’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)


‘Ride Me Down Easy’


‘That’s The Way Loves Goes’, which was written by Sanger D. ‘Whitey’ Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 – Saturday 12 January 2019) and Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 – Saturday 19 July 1975)
/ the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in February 1974

‘Just Get Up & Close The Door’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010)
/ the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in August 1975

‘Pass Me By (If You’re Only Passing Through)’, which was written by Hillman Hall (1938 – 1989)
/ the original version of this track reached No.9 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1973


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Johnny Rodriguez: The Definitive Collection - The Mercury Years' (Wrasse Records / Hump Head Country, 2014)

On Tuesday 19 August 2014, England’s Wrasse Records / Hump Head Country released ‘Johnny Rodriguez: The Definitive Collection – The Mercury Years’ (Wrasse Records / Hump Head Country, 2014), a 2-CD set, which included the following tracks:

‘Pass Me By (If You’re Only Passing Through)’, which was written by¬†Hillman Hall (1938 – 1989) (No.9, 1973)

‘You Always Come Back To Hurting Me’, which was written by¬†Johnny Rodriguez and¬†Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021)
(No.1 for one week in June 1973) / this track also reached No.86 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1973

‘Ridin’ My Thumb To Mexico’ (written by Johnny Rodriguez)
(No.1 for two weeks in October 1973) / this track also reached No.70 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1973

‘That’s The Way Loves Goes’, which was written by Sanger D. ‘Whitey’ Shafer¬†(Wednesday 24 October 1934 – Saturday 12 January 2019) and Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 – Saturday 19 July 1975)
 (No.1 for one week in February 1974)

‘Something’, which was written by George Harrison, MBE (Thursday 25 February 1943 – Thursday 29 November 2001)
 (No.6, 1974) / this track also reached No.85 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1974

‘Dance With Me One More Time’¬†(written by Johnny Rodriguez)
(No.2, 1974)

‘We’re Over’, which was written by Cynthia Weil (Friday 18 October 1940 – Thursday 1 June 2023) and Barry Mann
(No.3, 1974)

‘I Just Can’t Get Her Out of My Mind’ (written by¬†Larry Gatlin)
(No.1 for one week in April 1975)

‘Just Get Up & Close The Door’, which was written by¬†Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010)
(No.1 for one week in August 1975)

‘Love Put A Song In My Heart’, which was written by¬†Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
(No.1 for one week in December 1975)

‘I Couldn’t Be Me Without You’, which was written by Billy Joe Shaver (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Wednesday 28 October 2020)
 (No.3, 1975)

‘I Wonder If I Ever Said Goodbye’, which was written by¬†Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 – Sunday 29 September 2002)
(No.2, 1976)

‘Hillbilly Heart’ (written by¬†Dan Penn and Johnny Christopher)
(No.5, 1976)

‘Desperado’, which was written by¬†Don Henley and Glenn Frey (Saturday 6 November 1948 – Tuesday 19 January 2016)
(No.5, 1977)

‘If Practise Makes Perfect’ (written by Larry Gatlin)
(No.5, 1977)

‘We Believe In Happy Endings’¬†(written by Bob McDill)
(No.7, 1978)

‘Love Me With All Your Heart’¬†(written by Sunny Skylar, Mario Rigual and Carlos Rigual)
(No.7, 1978)

‘Alibis’ (written by Rock Killough and Pat Killough)
(No.16, 1979)

‘Savin’ This Love Song For You’ (written by¬†Johnny Rodriguez)
(No.14, 1977)

‘Someone Loves You Honey’ (written by¬†Don Devaney)¬†
/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Songs About Ladies & Love’ (Mercury Records, 1974)

‘I’m Not That Good At Goodbye’, which was written by¬†Bob McDill and¬†Don Williams¬†(Saturday 27 May 1939 – Friday 8 September 2017)¬†
/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Songs About Ladies & Love’ (Mercury Records, 1974)

‘It Took Us All Night Long To Say Goodbye’, which was written by¬†Bob McDill and Wayland D. Holyfield (Sunday 15 March 1942 – Tuesday 7 May 2024)¬†
/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Love Put A Song In My Heart’ (Mercury Records, 1975)

‘You Don’t Know Me’, which was written by¬†Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 – Thursday 23 March 2006) and Eddy Arnold (Wednesday 15 May 1918 – Thursday 8 May 2008)
¬†/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Love Put A Song In My Heart’ (Mercury Records, 1975)

‘Too Many Rivers’, which was written by¬†Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)
¬†/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Just Get Up & Close The Door’ (Mercury Records, 1975)

‘Am I That Easy To Forget’, which was written by Carl Belew (Tuesday 21 April 1931 – Wednesday 31 October 1990) and W.S. Stevenson (1900 – 1978)
/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Just Get Up & Close The Door’ (Mercury Records, 1975)

‘Invitation To The Blues’, which was written by¬†Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 – Sunday 25 October 1992)
¬†/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Just Get Up & Close The Door’ (Mercury Records, 1975)

‘Lyin’ Eyes’, which was written by¬†Don Henley and Glenn Frey (Saturday 6 November 1948 – Tuesday 19 January 2016)
¬†/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Reflecting’ (Mercury Records, 1976)

‘Red Wine & Blue’ (written by¬†Don Goodman, Bud Reneau and Mark Sherrill)¬†
/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Reflecting’ (Mercury Records, 1976)

‘There’ll Always Be Honky Tonks In Texas’ (written by¬†Bobby Bond and Conrad Pierce)¬†
/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Reflecting’ (Mercury Records, 1976)

‘Tell All Your Troubles To Me’¬†(written by¬†Johnny Rodriguez)
¬†/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Just For You’ (Mercury Records, 1977)

‘Hello Love Goodbye’¬†(written by¬†Johnny Rodriguez)
¬†/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Just For You’ (Mercury Records, 1977)

‘Immigrant’, which was written by¬†Merle Haggard¬†(Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)¬†and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004)
¬†/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Just For You’ (Mercury Records, 1977)

‘Run Like A Thief’ (written by¬†John David Souther)
¬†/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Just For You’ (Mercury Records, 1977)

‘Rodeo Rider’¬†(written by¬†Johnny Rodriguez)¬†
/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Just For You’ (Mercury Records, 1977)

‘A Little Bit More’ (written by¬†Bobby Gosh)
¬†/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Practise Makes Perfect’ (Mercury Records, 1977)

‘I’m Gonna Make It After All’ (written by¬†Bob McDill)¬†
/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Practise Makes Perfect’ (Mercury Records, 1977)

‘Mem’ries’, which was written by¬†Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010) and Susan Hargrove
/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Practise Makes Perfect’ (Mercury Records, 1977)

‘Marie’ (written by¬†Randy Newman)
¬†/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Love Me With All Your Heart’ (Mercury Records, 1978)

‘Leavin’ As Fast As I Can Crawl’, which was written by¬†Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010)¬†
/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Love Me With All Your Heart’ (Mercury Records, 1978)

‘I Fought The Law’ (written by Sonny Curtis) / this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Sketches’ (Mercury Records, 1979)

‘Misty Blue’, which was written by Bob Montgomery (Wednesday 12 May 1937 – Thursday 4 December 2014) / this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Sketches’ (Mercury Records, 1979)

‘If You Could Read My Mind’, which was written by¬†Gordon Lightfoot (Thursday 17 November 1938 – Sunday 1 May 2023)¬†/ this track was originally an album track, which was included on¬†Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Sketches’ (Mercury Records, 1979)

‘I Would Have Loved You All Night Long’, which was written by Glenn W. Martin (Thursday 30 June 1932 – Sunday 12 May 2019) / this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Sketches’ (Mercury Records, 1979)

‘Leave Me Tomorrow, But Love Me Tonight’, which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 – Sunday 29 September 2002) / this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Sketches’ (Mercury Records, 1979)

‘Goodbye Marie’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006) and Mel McDaniel (Sunday 6 September 1942 – Thursday 31 March 2011) / this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Rodriguez Was Here’ (Mercury Records, 1979)

‘Lovin’ Arms’ (written by Tom Jans) / this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Rodriguez Was Here’ (Mercury Records, 1979)

‘She Thinks I Still Care’ (written by Dickey Lee and Steve Duffy) / this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Rodriguez Was Here’ (Mercury Records, 1979)

‘No Love At All’ (written by Wayne C. Thompson and Johnny Christopher) / this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Rodriguez Was Here’ (Mercury Records, 1979)

‘Cowboy’ (written by Randy Newman) / this track was originally an album track, which was included on Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Rodriguez Was Here’ (Mercury Records, 1979)


Johnny Rodriguez: 'Johnny Rodriguez & Through My Eyes' (Hux Records, 2015)

On Monday 13 July 2015, England’s¬†Hux Records released Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘Johnny Rodriguez & Through My Eyes’ (Hux Records, 2015) as HUX144.

‘Johnny Rodriguez was the first successful Latin American country music singer, infusing his music with Latin sounds, and even singing verses of songs in Spanish. ¬†Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, he was one of country music’s biggest male stars, recording a string of hit singles.

His songs are stories of the heart and of the spirit; they report from the edge of heartbreak on a world of fevered intensity…moody, thoughtful and passionate. ¬†The two albums on this CD were originally released in 1979 & 1980 and are now being re-issued here together on CD for the first time.

With his unique writing ability, sincere way with a song and honest approach to country music, Johnny Rodriguez emerged as one of the most important country artists to hit Nashville in the early 1970s.  When it comes to singing a country song, hardly anyone does it better than he does.

As you listen to this pair of albums, you’ll hear how that formerly boyish voice had toughened and become more mature. ¬†The songs selected are not only suited to his voice, but to his world; the Southwest of dance halls, mesquite, and barbecue, of car radios and outdoor dances’.

Johnny Rodriguez: 'My Third Album & Songs About Ladies & Love' (Hux Records, 2016)

On¬†Friday 5 February 2016, England’s¬†Hux Records¬†released Johnny Rodriguez’s ‘My Third Album & Songs About Ladies & Love’ (Hux Records, 2016) as¬†HUX148.

‘This is the third Rodriguez re-issue on the¬†Hux¬†label, following on from the recent success of¬†HUX118¬†and¬†HUX144.

The two albums on this CD were both produced by the legendary Jerry Kennedy and feature backing from The Jordanaires and the finest Nashville session musicians, including¬†Harold Bradley¬†(Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019), Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988), Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008), Hargus ‚ÄėPig‚Äô Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022),¬†Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) and¬†Charlie McCoy.

Both albums were both originally released in 1974 on Mercury Records. ¬†This was right in the middle of Rodriguez’ most successful recording period and both of these LPs reached the Top 10 on Billboard’s country music chart.

The booklet which accompanies this CD features extensive liner notes and full recording details’.


Johnny Rodriguez

‚ÄĘ Visit Johnny Rodriguez’s official site at johnnyrodriguezmusic.com