Gene Watson’s Peers: Quote from Justin Trevino: April 2021

Gene Watson’s Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as ‘the singer’s singer’ – and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson’s Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2021, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Justin Trevino, which he submitted to this site on Friday 9 April 2021.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Justin Trevino who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online ‘celebration of a Lone Star Hero’.

Justin Trevino

Justin Trevino
This quote was submitted on Friday 9 April 2021.

‘I’ve always loved Gene’s singing.

He is one of the artists who continued to record genuine country music during the 1980s when hardcore country was hard to come by.

It is always a pleasure when we get to work together.

The last time I saw him was at a Country Family Reunion taping in 2018.

Gene Watson: 'Reflections' (Capitol Records, 1978)

I remember he sang ‘Pick The Wildwood Flower‘ (written by Joe Allen) that day.

Gene Watson performing 'Pick The Wildwood Flower' (written by Joe Allen) on 'Country's Family Reunion' in December 2018 (photo also includes Darrell McCall, Justin Trevino, EmiSunshine and Rhonda Vincent)

Gene Watson performing ‘Pick The Wildwood Flower‘ (written by Joe Allen) on ‘Country’s Family Reunion’ in December 2018 (photo also includes Darrell McCall, Justin Trevino, EmiSunshine and Rhonda Vincent)

I was seated so close to him and the band I could almost reach out and shake his hand.  What was so cool about that was I could hear his voice eminating from his body more so than the PA system.

All I could think in that moment was how many times I had listened to that record and how amazing it was to hear that voice coming directly from the man himself.

He truly is one of the best country vocalists of all time’

Thank you, Justin Trevino, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Justin Trevino…

Justin Trevino

Justin Trevino, who hails from Lockhart, Texas continues to live up to his name, more than three decades after he picked up a guitar for the first time at the age of seven – not only his reputation for musical excellence, but also his first name, which was chosen by his father.

Justin Tubb (Tuesday 20 August 1935 - Saturday 24 January 1998)

Justin Tubb
Tuesday 20 August 1935 – Saturday 24 January 1998

Justin Trevino’s Dad, Joaquin, was a hardcore country music fan, and named his son after his favourite songwriter and singer, Justin Tubb (Tuesday 20 August 1935 – Saturday 24 January 1998).

Perhaps Justin Trevino’s name alone sealed his fate that day in 1973 when he entered the world via Brownsville, Texas.  However, Justin Trevino also had heaped helpings of both ‘nature’ and ‘nurture’ on his side.  Besides being born with the capacity for singing and songwriting, Justin Trevino received plenty of nurturing from his parents.  As a young boy, Justin Trevino was immersed in country music.  His folks didn’t believe in hiring babysitters, so when they went to the honky tonks, they had Justin Trevino in tow.

‘My earliest memory of being in the beer joints is probably five years old.  I think I was going into them before that’.

Justin Trevino, blind since birth, says no one really worried about such a young boy being in a bar.  ‘In my case, it probably had as much to do with not being able to see.  When I was in those places, I was with my Dad at all times.  I wasn’t up running around.  I was the kind to stay put, drink my soda water and talk to whoever wanted to talk – especially if they wanted to talk about country music.  The old-timers, they were kind of amazed that a kid was that interested in old country music’.

Justin Trevino could hardly be otherwise.  He was steeped in the music at home, too.

‘My dad was a big collector of country music albums.  He had several hundred by the time I was born.  Some of my earliest – and best – memories are of sitting around home while he played those records for me.  And, even though he didn’t really have a voice for singing, Dad’s idea of a lullaby was to sing me a country song.  We never went anywhere without country music, either.  The glove box in our car was always stuffed full of his favourites on 8-track’.

It wasn’t long, however, before the young Justin Trevino did begin to fully understand and appreciate country music on his own.  By the age of five or six, Justin Trevino had already begun pestering his folks to buy him a guitar.  When Justin Trevino was seven years old, they honoured his request and arranged for him to take lessons.  Following three years of guitar lessons, Justin Trevino had already become so proficient that he could learn and play new music ‘by ear’.  Singing began as a by-product.  As Justin Trevino learned and played guitar chords, singing along was simply a way for him to give those chords a purpose.  Although he is well respected today as a bass guitarist, most of Justin Trevino’s followers are drawn to his singing – which he has developed without a single vocal lesson.

Justin Trevino grew up while artists like Curtis Potter (Thursday 18 April 1940 – Saturday 23 January 2016), Darrell McCall and Justin Tubb (Tuesday 20 August 1935 – Saturday 24 January 1998) were still commonly heard on the air on American country music radio, and he shared their appreciation for the country shuffle.

Johnny Bush at KNEL Radio in Brady, Texas on Friday 30 December 2016

Justin Trevino’s favourite – the big one – was Texas country music legend, Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020).

Justin Trevino recalled, ‘The first time I heard him sing, I said to myself, ‘My God, there’s a singer for ya.  When I was ten, I set out to collect all of his records and they were all out of print.  It took me a few years, but I got them’.

By the time he was thirteen years old, Justin Trevino had formed his own band, Sunset Country.  The group played honky tonks in and around Austin, most notably a monthly gig at Henry’s Bar & Grill in North Austin.

Four years later, Justin Trevino landed the gig he wanted most: leading the Sunday afternoon jam session at Harry Weiss’ Red Eye Saloon, which was inside San Antonio’s Eisenhauer Road Flea Market.  Justin Trevino knew that his idol, Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020), sometimes came to sit in.  One day after Weiss heard Justin Trevino singing ‘Whiskey River’ (written by Willie Nelson), Johnny Bush‘s signature song, he remarked how much the young man sounded like Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020) and promised to introduce the two of them.  Weiss made good on that promise a couple of weeks later.

‘I’m up there singing that afternoon and Johnny gets up on the stage and announces, ‘Ladies and gentlemen, I’m a little under the weather.  I’ve got a real bad cold, I’m kinda hoarse, and I can’t sing.  I’ve been told that this young man knows all my songs.  What I’m gonna do is sit here and play lead guitar, and he’s gonna sing my songs.  So you can look at me and listen to him’.

Justin Trevino started with ‘Undo The Right’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010) and Willie Nelson.  By the time he finished forty-five minutes later, Justin Trevino and Johnny were fast friends.  These days, Johnny considers Justin to be like a son to him, and he is quick to tell people, ‘Justin was my biggest fan until I heard him sing.  Then I became his!’

In the early 1990s, while continuing to perform with his own band, Justin Trevino also played bass for Don Walser (Friday 14 September 1934 – Wednesday 20 September 2006), Cornell Hurd, and later with Darrell McCall.

Justin Trevino: 'Get A Bottle, Turn The Cap' (written by Justin Trevino) / 'If Teardrops Were Pennies', which was written by Carl Butler (Thursday 2 June 1927 - Friday 4 September 1992) / (Misty Records, 1991) / produced by Don Jones and Billy Martin
Justin Trevino: 'Get A Bottle, Turn The Cap' (written by Justin Trevino) / 'If Teardrops Were Pennies', which was written by Carl Butler (Thursday 2 June 1927 - Friday 4 September 1992) / (Misty Records, 1991) / produced by Don Jones and Billy Martin

In 1991, Justin Trevino saw the release, on Lockhart, Texas-based Misty Records, of a non-album single, which was produced by Don Jones and Billy Martin; the ‘A’ side was ‘Get A Bottle, Turn The Cap’ (written by Justin Trevino) and the ‘B’ side was ‘If Teardrops Were Pennies’, which was written by Carl Butler (Thursday 2 June 1927 – Friday 4 September 1992).

In 1994, while still continuing to do shows on his own and with the other bands, Justin Trevino began a nine-year run as a ‘Bandolero’ in Johnny Bush‘s band.  Justin Trevino played bass and sang harmony throughout the nine years; but nearly from the beginning, he also opened the shows with forty-five minutes as lead vocalist before Johnny came on stage.

In Texas country music circles, it’s a huge source of pride for musicians to be able to say they’ve been a Bandolero.  They all have their reasons.  For Justin Trevino, however, it wasn’t just about the thrill of playing with a Texas legend who was also his idol, mentor and good friend.

Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020) wasn’t Justin Trevino’s only musical benefactor.  Although he sometimes sat in on bass for Don Walser (Friday 14 September 1934 – Wednesday 20 September 2006), Justin Trevino was never an official member of Don’s band.  Nonetheless, Don Walser (Friday 14 September 1934 – Wednesday 20 September 2006) took Justin Trevino under his wing.  Don Walser (Friday 14 September 1934 – Wednesday 20 September 2006) prompted Justin Trevino to record a demo so he could pitch it to his new record label.

Don Walser’s band helped with the recording.  Don Walser’s record label didn’t pick up Justin Trevino’s recordings, but Justin Trevino released the album himself, two years later, in 1998.  The title track from that album, ‘Texas Honky Tonk’ (Neon Nightmare Records, 1998), is still considered by many to be Jusin Trevino’s signature song, and it is certainly one of the most requested at Justin Trevino’s performances.

Justin Trevino: 'Texas Honky Tonk' (Neon Nightmare Records, 1998)

Justin Trevino’s ‘Texas Honky Tonk’ (Neon Nightmare Records, 1998), which was produced by Justin Trevino at his own recording studio in Martindale, Texas and included the following tracks:

‘Tonight Carmen’
‘Texas Honky Tonk’
‘Walk Me To The Door’ / this track featured guest vocals from Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020)
‘Love Me’
‘I Turn To Wine’
‘Wrong Company’ / this track featured guest vocals from Kathy Timm
‘Take Me As I Am’
‘Let Old Mother Nature Have Her Way’
‘Lord Forgive’
‘Last Love’
‘Forbidden Love’
‘There Goes My Everything’
‘What A Way To Live’ / this track featured guest vocals from Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020)
‘This Song’s Just For You’

Personnel involved in the recording of Justin Trevino’s ‘Texas Honky Tonk’ (Neon Nightmare Records, 1998) included the following:

Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020) and Lisa Pankratz (drums)
Howard Kalish (fiddle)
Justin Trevino (lead vocals, harmony vocals, lead guitar, rhythm guitar, bass, mandolin)
Cody Nicolas and Ted Lacey (piano)
Rick Price and Scott Walls (steel guitar)

Justin Trevino: 'Loud Music & Strong Wine' (Neon Nightmare Records, 2000)

On Tuesday 22 August 2000, Justin Trevino saw the release of ‘Loud Music & Strong Wine’ (Neon Nightmare Records, 2000), which was produced by Justin Trevino at his own recording studio in Martindale, Texas and included the following tracks:

‘Loud Music & Strong Wine’, which was written by Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020)
‘One More Drink & Then I’ll Go’, which was written by Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020) and Jim Owen / this track featuured guest vocals from Johnny Bush
‘My Heart Has Finally Said Goodbye’, which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004) and Leona Williams
‘Two Arms, Two Lips, Too Lonely, Too Long’ (written by Jim Owen)
‘Teardrops Don’t Lie’ (written by Justin Trevino)
‘You’d Be Home By Now’ (written by Leona Williams and Ron Williams) / this track featured guest vocals from Leona Williams
‘Somebody’s Old Memory Is Mine’ (written by Leona Williams and Ron Williams)
‘To Save My Wife’ (written by Jim Owen)
‘I Only Make You Happy When I Cry’ (written by Justin Trevino)
‘She Went A Little Bit Farther’, which was written by Merle Kilgore (Thursday 9 August 1934 – Sunday 6 February 2005) / this track featured guest vocals from Jake Hooker
‘I’d Know You Anywhere’, which was written by Justin Tubb (Tuesday 20 August 1935 – Saturday 24 January 1998)
‘Your Memory Against Mine’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Undo The Right’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010) and Willie Nelson / this track featured guest vocals from Jake Hooker
‘If I Ever Need A Lady’ (written by Gene Crysler)
‘Torn Between Love & Desire’ (written by Jim Owen)
‘Odds & Ends’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)

The Cornell Hurd Band: 'A Stagecoach Named Desire' (Behemoth Records, 2001)

On Tuesday 16 January 2001, The Cornell Hurd Band saw the release of ‘A Stagecoach Named Desire’ (Behemoth Records, 2001); two of the included tracks were ‘I’m The Man’ (written by Bernard Spurlock) and ‘The Genitalia of A Fool’ (written by Cornell Hurd, Paul Skelton, Justin Trevino and Blackie White), both of which featured guest vocals from Justin Trevino.

Justin Trevino: 'Traveling, Singing Man' (Texas Music Group / Lone Star Records, 2001)

On Tuesday 20 February 2001, Justin Trevino saw the release of ‘Traveling, Singing Man’ (Texas Music Group / Lone Star Records, 2001), which was produced by Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020) and Justin Trevino, included the following tracks:

‘Alright I’ll Sign The Papers’, which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017)
‘She Knows My Weaknesses’ (written by Kent Finlay)
‘Travelin’ Singin’ Man’, which was written by Justin Tubb (Tuesday 20 August 1935 – Saturday 24 January 1998)
‘Brand New Mister Me’ (written by Ronald McCown)
‘Where Were You’, which was written by Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020)
‘Who Will Buy The Wine’, which was written by William (Billy) Robert Mize (Monday 29 April 1929 – Wednesday 1 November 2017)
‘So Easy To Forgive Her’
‘Leavin’ & Sayin’ Goodbye’ (written by Jeannie Seely)
‘Unloved, Unwanted’ (written by Irene Stanton and Wayne Walker)
‘Feel Again’
‘You Can’t Get Here From There’ (written by Glenn Barber)
‘Waltz of The Wind’, which was written by Fred Rose (Floyd Jenkins) (24 August 1898 – Wednesday 1 December 1954)
‘One More Drink & Then I’ll Go’ (written by Jim Owen)

In 2002, Amber Digby saw the release of her debut album, ‘Music From The Honky Tonks’ (Amber Digby Independent Release, 2002), which was recorded in Austin, Texas and was co-produced by Amber Digby and Justin Trevino, and led to international tours of Sweden, Slovenia and Australia.

Amber Digby‘s debut album, ‘Music From The Honky Tonks’ (Amber Digby Independent Release, 2002), which was subsequently released by Brady, Texas-based Heart of Texas Records in 2007, included the following tracks:

‘I’m Ashamed of You’ (written by Bill Anderson)
‘It’s A Cowboy Lovin’ Night’ (written by Ronnie Rogers)
‘If You See My Baby’, which was written by Edward Monroe ‘Eddie’ Miller (Wednesday 10 December 1919 – Monday 11 April 1977) and Bob Morris
‘Close Up The Honky Tonks’, which was written by Red Simpson (Tuesday 6 March 1934 – Friday 8 January 2016)
‘Here I Am Again’, which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 – Monday 10 May 1999)
‘So Easy To Forgive Him (So Hard To Forget)’, which was written by Dicky Overbey (Monday 11 May 1942 – Saturday 4 October 2014)
‘Somebody Somewhere (Don’t Know What He’s Missin’ Tonight)’ (written by Lola Jean Dillon)
‘Three Years’, which was written by Dicky Overbey (Monday 11 May 1942 – Saturday 4 October 2014)
‘The One You Slip Around With’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) and Charles ‘Fuzzy’ Owen (Tuesday 30 April 1929 – Tuesday 12 May 2020)
‘Into My Arms Again’, which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 – Sunday 25 October 1992)
‘You’re Still On My Mind’ (written by Luke McDaniel)
‘Foolin’, which was written by Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 – Sunday 20 March 2011)
‘Threshold’ (written by Bill Anderson)
‘Just Get Up & Close The Door’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010)

Justin Trevino: 'The Scene of The Crying' (Lone Star Records, 2002)

On Tuesday 12 November 2002, Justin Trevino saw the release of ‘The Scene of The Crying’ (Lone Star Records, 2002), which included the following tracks:

‘Two Empty Glasses’, which was written by Kenneth Cambell and Jack Greene (Tuesday 7 January 1930 – Thursday 15 March 2013)
‘The Scene of The Crying’
‘Three’s A Crowd’, which was written by Darrell Edwards, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) and Herbie Treece
‘What Have We Done’ (written by Wendell Goodman and Wanda Jackson) / this track featured guest vocals from Wanda Jackson
‘You’ll Never Get A Better Chance (Than This)’, which was written by Justin Tubb (Tuesday 20 August 1935 – Saturday 24 January 1998)
‘Sound That A Breaking Heart Makes’ (written by Ernie Reed)
‘Rest of My Years’, which was written by Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 – Wednesday 19 February 2003) under his real name of Donnie Young
‘She Didn’t Colour Daddy’ (written by Scott Turner and Royal Warren)
‘Day Dreamin’ (written by Bill Cantrell, Quinton Claunch and Bud Deckelman) / this track featured guest vocals from Jimmy C. Newman (Monday 29 August 1927 – Saturday 21 June 2014)
‘Then & Only Then’ (written by Bill Anderson)
‘I Saw A Man Dying Today’ (written by Levi Mullen)
‘Old Faithful’, which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017)

Personnel involved in the recording of Justin Trevino’s ‘The Scene of The Crying’ (Lone Star Records, 2002) included the following:

Bobby Flores (Sunday 18 June 1961 – Thursday 23 June 2022) (fiddle)
Dickey Overbey (Monday 11 May 1942 – Saturday 4 October 2014) (pedal steel)

After having two of his own albums under his belt, Justin Trevino began recording and producing for other artists who were interested in making traditional country records.  It wasn’t long before Justin Trevino’s friend, Tracy Pitcox, approached Justin about engineering and producing albums for Tracy Pitcox’s newly formed record label, Heart of Texas Records.

Although Tracy Pitcox and the artists on his Heart of Texas Records label are still chief clients for Justin Trevino, he also engineers and produces albums for quality traditional country musicians who are independent or on other record labels.  Justin Trevino runs his recording and production business from a building constructed on the Heart of Texas Music Association campus in Brady, Texas; Brady has been home to Justin and Sissy (Elizabeth), his wife, since 2008.

In 2003, Bobby Flores (Sunday 18 June 1961 – Thursday 23 June 2022) saw the release of ‘Just For The Record’ (Yellow Rose Records, 2003), which was produced by Bobby Flores, and included the following tracks:

‘One More Time’
‘I’d Fight The World’
‘Just For The Record’
‘Bubbles In My Beer’
‘I’ll Find A Way’
‘Same Two Lips’
‘Spicher Waltz’
‘I Don’t Know Why I Keep Loving You’
‘I Lie A Lot’
‘Be A Good Girl (‘Til I Get Back In Town)’
‘Soft Rain’
‘Your Old Love Letters’
‘I’m Still Not Over You’ (written by Willie Nelson)
‘Oh, Lonesome Me’

Personnel involved in the recording of Bobby Flores‘ ‘Just For The Record’ (Yellow Rose Records, 2003) included the following:

Jim Loessberg, Phil Dalmolin, Dan Dreeben, Bill Green, Jerrad Green, John ‘Smiley’ Reynolds and Larry Roberson (drums)
Allen Chapman, Gerald Connell, Jake Hooker and Justin Trevino (bass)
Randy Reinhard (piano)
Tommy Nash, Richard Wolfe and Bobby Flores (Sunday 18 June 1961 – Thursday 23 June 2022) (guitars)
Randy Reinhard, Jerry Blanton, Gary Carpenter, Tommy Detamore, Jim Loessberg, Dicky Overbey (Monday 11 May 1942 – Saturday 4 October 2014), Rick Price, Herb Steiner and Bobby Flores (Sunday 18 June 1961 – Thursday 23 June 2022) (steel guitar)
John Schattenberg, Ron Knuth, Reggie Rueffer and Bobby Flores (Sunday 18 June 1961 – Thursday 23 June 2022) (fiddles)
Thomas Detamore III (vibes)
Jake Hooker, Justin Trevino and Billy Mata (harmony vocals, guest vocals)
Richard Wolfe (guest vocalist)

Justin Trevino: 'Too Many Heartaches' (Heart of Texas Records, 2004)

In 2004, Justin Trevino saw the release of ‘Too Many Heartaches’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2004), which was recorded at Justin Trevino’s recording studio in San Marcos, Texas and included the following tracks:

‘Texas Honky Tonk’ (written by Justin Trevino)
‘Stranger In Our Home’ (written by Justin Trevino)
‘Five Minutes of The Latest Blues’, which was written by Justin Tubb (Tuesday 20 August 1935 – Saturday 24 January 1998) / this track featured guest vocals from Mona McCall
‘Tonight She Hits The Honky Tonks Again’ (written by Justin Trevino)
‘I Turn To The Wine’ (written by Justin Trevino)
‘The End’ (written by Justin Trevino)
‘Love Is No Excuse’, which was written by Justin Tubb (Tuesday 20 August 1935 – Saturday 24 January 1998)
‘Too Many Heartaches’ (written by Justin Trevino)
‘Forbidden Love’ (written by Justin Trevino)
‘Don’t Leave The Leaving Up To Me’ (written by Levi Mullen and Justin Trevino)
Face To The Wall’ / this track featured guest vocals from Darrell McCall
‘Honky Tonk Atmosphere’ (written by Justin Trevino)

Justin Trevino: 'More Loud Music & Strong Wine' (Heart of Texas Records, 2005)

On Wednesday 2 November 2005, Justin Trevino saw the release of ‘More Loud Music & Strong Wine’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2005), which included the following tracks:

‘Loud Music & Strong Wine’
‘One More Drink & Then I’ll Go’ / this track featured guest vocals from Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020)
‘My Heart Has Finally Said Goodbye’
‘Two Arms, Two Lips, Too Lonely, Too Long’
‘Teardops Don’t Lie’
‘You’d Be Home By Now’ / this track featured guest vocals from Leona Williams
‘Somebody’s Old Memory Is Mine’
‘To Save My Wife’
‘I Only Made You Happy When I Cry’
‘She Went A Little Bit Farther’ / this track featured guest vocals from Jake Hooker
‘I’d Know You Anywhere’
‘Your Memory Against Mine’
‘Undo The Right’ / this track featured guest vocals from Jake Hooker
‘If I Ever Need A Lady’
‘Torn Between Love & Desire’
‘Odds & Ends’ / this track featured guest vocals from Curtis Potter (Thursday 18 April 1940 – Saturday 23 January 2016)
‘Least I Can Do Is Try’
‘We Could’
‘Tribute To Kitty Wells’
‘Right Where You Want Me’
‘Sing A Sad Song’
‘Neon Nightmare’

Justin Trevino: 'Before You Say Amen' (Heart of Texas Records, 2006)

On Monday 24 April 2006, Justin Trevino saw the release of ‘Before You Say Amen’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2006), which included the following tracks:

‘Heart That Will Never Break Again’
‘Where We’ll Never Grow Old’
‘Where The Roses Never Fade’
‘When They Ring Those Golden Bells’
‘I Saw A Man’
‘In The Garden’
‘If I Could Hear My Mother Pray Again’
‘The Old Rugged Cross’
‘Family Bible’
‘Crumbs From The Table’
‘Life’s Railway To Heaven’
‘Remind Me Dear Lord’ / this track featured v ocals from Mona McCall
‘How Great Thou Art’
‘Before You Say Amen’

On Thursday 27 July 2006, Amber Digby saw the release of ‘Here Come The Teardrops’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2006), which was recorded at Justin Trevino’s studio in Martindale, Texas, released by the Brady, Texas-based Heart of Texas Records, and included the following tracks:

‘Hinges On The Door’, which was written by Thomas Baker Knight Jr. (Tuesday 4 July 1933 – Wednesday 12 October 2005)

‘If You Were Me’, which was written by Jerry Donald Chesnut (Thursday 7 May 1931 – Saturday 15 December 2018) and Hal Bynum (Saturday 29 September 1934 – Thursday 2 June 2022)

‘Bitter They Are, Harder They Fall’ (written by Larry Gatlin)

Larry Gatlin recorded ‘Bitter They Are, Harder They Fall’ (written by Larry Gatlin) and included the track on ‘The Pilgrim’ (Capitol Records, 1976); Gene Watson recorded ‘Bitter They Are, Harder They Fall’ (written by Larry Gatlin) and included the track on ‘Because You Believed in Me‘ (Capitol Records, 1976), and re-recorded the track and included it on ‘Real Country Music‘ (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016).

‘Flame In My Heart’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) and Bernard Spurlock
‘Another Man Loved Me Last Night’ (written by Peggy Sue Wells and Lorene Allen)
‘Jealously Insane’, which was written by Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020)
‘Just In Case’ (written by Hugh Moffatt)
‘Weak In The Knees’ (written by Guyanne McCall and Justin Trevino)
‘Man I Hardly Knew’, which was written by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022)
‘Moment of Weakness’ (written by Guyanne McCall)
‘If Anyone Ought To Know’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 – Monday 24 April 2006)
‘Loser’s Game’ (written by Guyanne McCall)

Personnel involved in the recording of Amber Digby‘s ‘Here Come The Teardrops’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2006) included the following:

Dave Biller (former guitar player with Dale Watson) and Justin Trevino (guitar)
Dicky Overbey (Monday 11 May 1942 – Saturday 4 October 2014) (steel guitar, Dobro)
Jake Hooker (bass)
Jim Loessberg (drums)
Bobby Flores (Sunday 18 June 1961 – Thursday 23 June 2022) (fiddle)
Ron Huckabee (piano)
Leona Williams (vocals)

Amber Digby: 'Music From The Honky Tonks' (Heart of Texas Records, 2007 / Amber Digby Music, 2002)

On Monday 29 January 2007, Amber Digby saw the release of ‘Music From The Honky Tonks’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2007); the album was produced by Justin Trevino and was recorded at Justin Trevino’s studio in Martindale, Texas.

Amber Digby‘s ‘Music From The Honky Tonks’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2007), which had previously been released independently by Amber Digby in 2002, included the following tracks:

‘I’m Ashamed of You’ (written by Bill Anderson)
‘It’s A Cowboy Lovin’ Night’ (written by Ronnie Rogers)
‘If You See My Baby’, which was written by Edward Monroe ‘Eddie’ Miller (Wednesday 10 December 1919 – Monday 11 April 1977) and Bob Morris
‘Close Up The Honky Tonks’, which was written by Red Simpson (Tuesday 6 March 1934 – Friday 8 January 2016)
‘Here I Am Again’, which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 – Monday 10 May 1999)
‘So Easy To Forgive Him (So Hard To Forget)’, which was written by Dicky Overbey (Monday 11 May 1942 – Saturday 4 October 2014)
‘Somebody Somewhere (Don’t Know What He’s Missin’ Tonight)’ (written by Lola Jean Dillon)
‘Three Years’, which was written by Dicky Overbey (Monday 11 May 1942 – Saturday 4 October 2014)
‘The One You Slip Around With’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) and Charles ‘Fuzzy’ Owen (Tuesday 30 April 1929 – Tuesday 12 May 2020)
‘Into My Arms Again’, which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 – Sunday 25 October 1992)
‘You’re Still On My Mind’ (written by Luke McDaniel)
‘Foolin’, which was written by Ralph E. Mooney (Sunday 16 September 1928 – Sunday 20 March 2011)
‘Threshold’ (written by Bill Anderson)
‘Just Get Up & Close The Door’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010)

Personnel involved in the recording of Amber Digby‘s ‘Music From The Honky Tonks’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2007) included the following:

Levi Mullen (guitar)
Justin Trevino (guitar, bass)
Dicky Overbey (Monday 11 May 1942 – Saturday 4 October 2014) (steel guitar)
John Reynolds (drums)
Bobby Flores (Sunday 18 June 1961 – Thursday 23 June 2022) (fiddle)
Debra Hurd (piano)

Justin Trevino: 'Take One As Needed For Pain' (Heart of Texas Records, 2007)

On Friday 26 October 2007, Justin Trevino saw the release of ‘Take One As Needed For Pain’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2007), which included the following tracks:

‘When She Does Me Right’
‘I Just Lost My Favorite Girl’
‘We Don’t’ (written by Jeannie Seely)
‘This Time We’re Going To Make It’ (written by Guyanne McCall and Justin Trevino) / this track featured guest vocals from Heather Myles
‘My First Night Without You’
‘Take One As Needed For Pain’ (written by Jeannie Seely and Justin Trevino)
‘Play Now, Pay Later’
‘She’ll Keep Bringing All Her Love To Me’ (written by Lou Rochelle)
‘I’ll Go Down Swinging’
‘Neon Sun’
‘I Did It All On My Own’, which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004)
‘Where Do You Take A Broken Heart?’, which was written by Gary Lumpkin and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 – Friday 5 December 1986)

In 2008, Amber Digby saw the release of ‘Passion, Pride & What Might Have Been’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2008), which immediately received rave reviews.

The project, which was recorded at Justin Trevino’s Soundlabs Studio in Martindale, Texas featured Amber Digby‘s band members and showcased Amber Digby‘s talents as a producer; she shared co-producing duties with Justin Trevino.

Amber Digby‘s ‘Passion, Pride & What Might Have Been’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2008) included the following tracks:

‘How You Drink The Wine’ (written by Ronal McCown)
‘Love Is The Foundation’ (written by William Hall)
‘I Can’t Get Used To Being Lonely’ (written by Melba Montgomery)
‘Deep As Your Pocket’, which was written by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022)
‘She Didn’t Color Daddy’ (written by Scott Turner and Ray Warren)
‘One Kiss Away From Loneliness’ (written by Paul Williams and Sam Humphrey)
‘Soakin’ Wet’, which was written by Don Chapel (1931 – Sunday 6 December 2015)
‘Let Me Be The Judge’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘Bring Your Love Back To Me’ (written by Carl Trantham)
‘Take Me Back Again’, which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006)
‘You Snap Your Fingers (& I’m Back In Your Hands)’ (written by John Schweers)
‘We’re The Kind of People (That Make The Jukebox Play)’, which was written by Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 – Wednesday 19 February 2003) and Aubrey Mayhew (Sunday 2 October 1927 – Sunday 22 March 2009)

Personnel involved in the recording of Amber Digby‘s ‘Passion, Pride & What Might Have Been’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2008) included the following:

Randy Lindley (guitar)
Dicky Overbey (Monday 11 May 1942 – Saturday 4 October 2014) (steel guitar)
Jake Hooker (bass)
Damion O’Grady, Dave Biller, Rick Price and Tom Lewis (drums)

In 2010, Amber Digby saw the release of ‘Another Way To Live’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2010); the album, which was produced by Justin Trevino and recorded at Justin Trevino’s Soundlabs Studio in Martindale, Texas, included the following tracks:

‘There Must Be Another Way To Live’, which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017)
‘Just Someone I Used To Know’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013)
‘This Heart of Mine (Can Never Say Goodbye)’ (written by Bobby Osborne and Pete Goble)
‘Sound of A Heartache’, which was written by Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020)
‘One Step Beyond’ (written by Willie Nelson)
‘Soul Survivor’ (written by Dennis McCall and Amber Digby)
‘Lie To Him’ (written by Amber Digby and Justin Trevino)
‘After It Breaks’ (written by Amber Digby and Dani Flowers)
‘I’m Not Your Kind of Girl’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Red Steagall
‘Please Be My Love’ (written by Monroe Fields and Carl Sauceman)
‘Wrong Number’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) and Dicky Overbey (Monday 11 May 1942 – Saturday 4 October 2014)
‘Silent Night (After The Fight)’ (written by John Schweers)

Personnel involved in the recording of Amber Digby‘s ‘Another Way To Live’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2010) included the following:

Randy Lindley (guitar)
Dicky Overbey (Monday 11 May 1942 – Saturday 4 October 2014) (steel guitar)
Justin Trevino and Jake Hooker (bass)
Tom Lewis (drums)
Reggie Rueffer (fiddle)
Jarrod Bonta (piano)

In May 2010, Amber Digby & Justin Trevino saw the release of ‘Keeping Up Appearances’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2010); the album, which was produced by Justin Trevino, and recorded at Heart of Texas Studios in Brady, Texas, included the following tracks:

‘Keeping Up Appearances’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Wish I Didn’t Have To Miss You’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010) and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004)
‘Right Combination’, which was written by Porter Wagoner (Friday 12 August 1927 – Sunday 28 October 2007)
‘That Makes Two of Us’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘High As The Mountains’, which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006)
‘Lead Me On’ (written by Leon Copeland)
‘Wrong Company’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)
‘Just Between The Two of Us’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Which One Is To Blame’ (written by Bobby Bare)
‘Slowly But Surely’, which was written by Charles ‘Fuzzy’ Owen (Tuesday 30 April 1929 – Tuesday 12 May 2020)
‘After The Fire Is Gone’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)
‘Kickin’ Our Hearts Around’ (written by Wanda Jackson)
‘How’s The World Treating You’, which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 – Thursday 25 June 1987) and Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 – Saturday 30 June 2001)
‘Flame In My Heart’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) and Bernard Spurlock

Personnel involved in the recording of Amber Digby & Justin Trevino’s ‘Keeping Up Appearances’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2010) included the following:

Randy Lindley (guitar)
Dicky Overbey (Monday 11 May 1942 – Saturday 4 October 2014) (steel guitar)
Jake Hooker (bass)
Jim Loessberg (drums)
Bobby Flores (Sunday 18 June 1961 – Thursday 23 June 2022) and Reggie Rueffer (fiddle)
Ronnie Huckabee and Jarrod Bonta (piano)

Curtis Potter: 'The Potter's Touch' (Heart of Texas Records, 2010)

Curtis Potter (Thursday 18 April 1940 – Saturday 23 January 2016) recorded Justin Trevino’s ‘The End’ and included the track on ‘The Potter’s Touch’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2010).

Justin Trevino: 'Two of The Usual' (Heart of Texas Records, 2011)

In 2011, Justin Trevino saw the release of ‘Two of The Usual’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2011), which included the following tracks:

‘Two of The Usual’ (written by Fred Carter Jr.)
‘I’ll Go To A Stranger’, which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004) and Ray Pennington (Friday 22 December 1933 – Wednesday 7 October 2020)
‘Begging To You’, which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 – Wednesday 8 December 1982)
‘I’ve Had It’ (written by Dewey Groom, Jordan McBay and Claude McBride)
‘Anyone Who Knows Me’ (written by Diane McCall, Mona McCall and Justin Trevino)
‘Better Class of Losers’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) and Ron Peterson / this track featured guest vocals from Tony Booth
‘Accidentally On Purpose’, which was written by Darrell Edwards and George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013)
‘Who’ll Be The First’ (written by Bobby George and Vern Stovall)
‘Does He Love You Like I Do?’ (written by Scott Turner and Charlie Williams)
‘Chalk One Up For You’, which was written by Dicky Overbey (Monday 11 May 1942 – Saturday 4 October 2014)
‘Gold Watch & Chain’, which was written by Alvin Pleasant (A.P.) Delaney Carter (15 December 1891 – Monday 7 November 1960)
‘I Have To Lie’ (written by Ernie Reed)

In January 2013, Amber Digby saw the release of ‘The World You’re Living In’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2013), which was produced by Justin Trevino, and included the following tracks:

‘It’s A Long Way From Heaven (To The World You’re Living In)’ (written by Jimmie Helms and Sharon Higgins)
‘One More Thing I Wished I’d Said’ (written by Amber Digby and Vince Gill)
‘How Can I Unlove You’, which was written by Joe South (Wednesday 28 February 1940 – Wednesday 5 September 2012)
‘She’d Already Won Your Heart’ (written by Amber Digby and Dani Flowers)
‘Saturday Night’ (written by Bill Anderson and Amber Digby)
‘You Leave Again’ (written by Amber Digby and Sean Locke)
‘One I Can’t Live Without’ (written by James Pullman and Alma Rhodes) / this track featured guest vocals from Vince Gill
‘It Won’t Be Long (& I’ll Be Hating You)’, which was written by Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 – Wednesday 19 February 2003), Aubrey Mayhew (Sunday 2 October 1927 – Sunday 22 March 2009) and Billy Merrin
‘Where Will You Go’ (written by Amber Digby)

‘My Imagination’ (written by Jimmy Johnson)
‘We Loved It Away’, which was written by Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 – Friday 5 December 1986) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 – Saturday 31 July 2010) / this track featured guest vocals from Randy Lindley
‘If It Ain’t Love (Let’s Leave It Alone)’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)
‘You Put Me Here’ (written by Dale Dodson and Amber Digby)
‘Little Darlin’ (written by Lloyd Green) / this track featured Lloyd Green

Justin Trevino: 'Justin Trevino Sings Johnny Bush' (Heart of Texas Records, 2015)

In 2015, Justin Trevino saw the release of ‘Justin Trevino Sings Johnny Bush’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2015), which was produced by Justin Trevino, and included the following tracks:

‘One Night At A Johnny Bush Dance’
‘Warmth of The Wine’
‘Conscience Turn Your Back’
‘You’ll Never Leave Me Completely’
‘When My Conscience Hurts The Most’
‘Cold, Cold Hands’
‘Tonight I’m Going Home To An Angel’
‘Back From The Wine’
‘Tonight We Steal Heaven Again’
‘I Leaned Over Backwards For You’
‘It’s The Last Time I’ll Ever Cheat On You’
‘Texas Dance Hall Girl’
‘Lord, Let A Lie Come True’
‘Whiskey River’ (written by Willie Nelson)

Justin Trevino: 'A Salute To Ray Price & The Cherokee Cowboys' (Heart of Texas Records, 2017)

In 2017, Justin Trevino saw the release of ‘A Salute To Ray Price & The Cherokee Cowboys’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2017), which included the following tracks:

‘Walk Me To The Door’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘I Won’t Mention It Again’ (written by Cam Mullins and Carolyn Jean Yates)
‘Different Kind of Flower’
‘You Took My Happy Away’ (written by Willie Nelson)
‘I’m Still Not Over You’ (written by Willie Nelson)
‘Sittin’ & Thinkin’, which was written by Charlie Rich (Wednesday 14 December 1932 – Tuesday 25 July 1995)
‘Take Back Your Old Love Letters’
‘The Twenty-Fourth Hour’, which was written by Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 – Monday 16 December 2013)
‘Heartaches By The Number’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) / this track featured harmony vocals from Myra Rolen
‘Let Me Talk To You’, which was written by Danny Dill (Friday 19 September 1924 – Thursday 23 October 2008) and Donald D. Davis
‘Please Talk To My Heart’
‘Are You Sure’
‘I Gotta Have My Baby Back’, which was written by Floyd Tillman (Tuesday 8 December 1914 – Friday 22 August 2003) / this track featured guest vocals from Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 – Monday 16 December 2013)
‘I’ll Be There (If You Ever Want Me)’, which was written by Rusty Gabbard and Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 – Monday 16 December 2013)
‘Danny Boy’
‘Pride’
‘Soft Rain’
‘I’ve Got A New Heartache’
‘One More Time’, which was written by Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017)
‘For The Good Times’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)

Personnel involved in the recording of Justin Trevino’s ‘A Salute To Ray Price & The Cherokee Cowboys’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2017) included the following:

Justin Trevino (lead vocals, harmony vocals, electric bass, acoustic guitar)
Jake Hooker (upright bass)
Levi Mullen (acoustic guitar)
T Bonta, Debra Mueller Hurd and Floyd Domino (piano)
John Smiley Reynolds (drums)
Dicky Overbey (Monday 11 May 1942 – Saturday 4 October 2014) and Randy Reinhard (steel guitar)
Bobby Flores (Sunday 18 June 1961 – Thursday 23 June 2022), Reggie Rueffer, Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) and Ernie Reed (fiddle)
Dave Biller, Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004), Duane Boman and Charlie Walton (lead guitar)

Amber Digby: 'Heroes, Mentors & Friends: The Legends Project' (Heart of Texas Records, 2020)

On Wednesday 25 March 2020, Amber Digby saw the release of ‘Heroes, Mentors & Friends: The Legends Project’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2020), which was produced by Tommy Detamore and Justin Trevino, and featured duets with some of Amber Digby‘s most influential heroes and mentors in country music; the album included the following tracks:

‘Texas Dancehall Girl’, which was written by Justin Tubb (Tuesday 20 August 1935 – Saturday 24 January 1998) / this track featured guest vocals from Jerry Naill / the original version of this track was recorded, as a non-album single, by Jimmy Naill, for Americountry Records in 1973

‘You Go Around’, which was written by Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021) and Johnny Rodriguez / this track featured guest vocals from Johnny Rodriguez / the original version of this track was recorded by Johnny Rodriguez, who included it on ‘Introducing Johnny Rodriguez’ (Mercury Records, 1973)

‘It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels’, which was written by Joseph Denton ‘Jay’ Miller (Friday 5 May 1922 – Saturday 23 March 1996) / this track featured guest vocals from Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022) / this track was also recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Loretta’ (MCA Records, 1980)

‘I’m Hangin’ Around’ / this track featured guest vocals from The Whites / the original version of this track was recorded by The Whites, who included it on ‘Old Familiar Feeling’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1983); The Whites’ version of the track reached No.9 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1983

‘Today Is Not The Day’ / this track featured guest vocals from Jeannie Seely

‘It Should Be Easier Now’ (written by Willie Nelson) / this track featured guest vocals from Willie Nelson / the original version of this track was recorded by Willie Nelson, who included it on ‘Country Willie – His Own Songs’ (RCA Victor Records, 1965)

‘I’ll Warm By The Flame’ (written by Buzz Rabin and J.H. Johnson) / this track featured guest vocals from Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020) / the original version of this track was recorded by Johnny Bush, who included it on ‘Undo The Right’ (Stop Records, 1968)

‘The Heart He Kicks Around’, which was written by Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 – Wednesday 19 February 2003) / this track featured guest vocals from Jeannie C. Riley / the original version of this track was recorded by Jeannie C. Riley, who included it on ‘Sock & Soul’ (Little Darlin’ Records, 1968)

‘Take Back It’s Over’ / this track featured guest vocals from Larry Gatlin

‘Soft Lights & Hard Country Music’, which was written by Sanger D. ‘Whitey’ Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 – Saturday 12 January 2019) / this track featured guest vocals from Moe Bandy / the original version of this track was recorded by Moe Bandy, who included it on ‘Soft Lights & Hard Country Music’ (Columbia Records, 1978); Moe Bandy‘s version of the track reached No.13 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978, and No.15 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1978

‘Under These Conditions’, which was written by Vince Gill and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004) / this track featured guest vocals from Vince Gill/ the original version of this track was recorded by Vince Gill, who included it on ‘I Still Believe In You’ (MCA Nashville Records, 1992)

During the course of his country music career, Justin Trevino has had the opportunity, through his association with Brady, Texas-based Heart of Texas, to get on stage with a number of acclaimed country music artists, including Johnny Bush (Sunday 17 February 1935 – Friday 16 October 2020), Darrell McCallTony Booth, Tayla Lynn and Amber Digby.

Justin Trevino enjoys hosting the Ernest Tubb Midnite Jamboree during his occasional trips to Nashville.

Justin Trevino enjoys singing, playing, recording, fostering and supporting true Texas country music.

Tayla Lynn: 'Tayla Lynn Sings Loretta Lynn' (Heart of Texas Records, 2021)

In 2021, Tayla Lynn saw the release of ‘Tayla Lynn Sings Loretta Lynn’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2021), which was produced by Justin Trevino, and included the following tracks:

‘You Ain’t Woman Enough (To Take My Man)’, which was written by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘You Ain’t Woman Enough’ (Decca Records, 1966); Loretta Lynn‘s version of the track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1966

‘Somebody Somewhere (Don’t Know What He’s Missin’ Tonight)’ (written by Lola Jean Dillon) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022), who included it on ‘Somebody Somewhere’ (MCA Records, 1976); Loretta Lynn‘s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in November 1976

‘Blackeyed Peas & Blue Eyed Babies’ (written by Susie McCoy) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022), who included it on ‘Out of My Head & Back In My Bed’ (MCA Records, 1976)

‘Here I Am Again’, which was written by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Here I Am Again’ (Decca Records, 1972); Loretta Lynn‘s version of the track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1972, and No.3 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1972

‘Fist City’, which was written by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Fist City’ (Decca Records, 1968); Loretta Lynn‘s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in April 1968

‘Sweet Thang’, which was written by Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 – Wednesday 24 August 1988) / this track featured guest vocals from Tony Booth / the original version of this track was recorded by Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 – Thursday 6 September 1984) & Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022), who included it on ‘Ernest Tubb & Loretta Lynn Singin’ Again’ (Decca Records, 1967); Ernest Tubb & Loretta Lynn‘s version of the track reached No.45 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1967

‘God Bless The Children’ (written by Dallas Cody) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022), who included it on ‘Out of My Head & Back In My Bed’ (MCA Records, 1976)

‘Old Rooster’ (written by Tracey Lee) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022), who included it on ‘Out of My Head & Back In My Bed’ (MCA Records, 1976)

‘The Pill’, which was written by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Back To The Country’ (MCA Records, 1975); Loretta Lynn‘s version of the track reahed No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1975, No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1975, and No.70 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1975

‘Wings Upon Your Horns’, which was written by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Wings Upon Your Horns’ (Decca Records, 1970); Loretta Lynn‘s version of the track reached No.11 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969, and No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1969

‘It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels’, which was written by Joseph Denton ‘Jay’ Miller (Friday 5 May 1922 – Saturday 23 March 1996) / this track featured guest vocals from Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022) / the original version of this track was recorded by Kitty Wells (Saturday 30 August 1919 – Monday 16 July 2012), whose version was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for six weeks in 1952, and was subsequently included on Kitty Wells’ ‘Country Hit Parade’ (Decca Record, 1956)

‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’, which was written by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022) / this track featured guest vocals from Patsy Lynn / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (Decca Records, 1971); Loretta Lynn‘s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in December 1970, No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970, and No.83 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1970

‘Everybody Wants To Go To Heaven’, which was written by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Hymns’ (Decca Records, 1965); the track was released as a single on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1965, but it did not chart / ‘Who Says God Is Dead’, which was written by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Who Says God Is Dead’ (Decca Records, 1968)

‘Greetings From Loretta’

Justin Trevino

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