Gene Watson Peer’s Quote from Loretta Lynn: February 2022

Gene Watson’s Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as ‘the singer’s singer’ – and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson’s Peers, who were contacted during 2022, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Loretta Lynn, which she submitted to this site on Friday 4 February 2022.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Loretta Lynn who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online ‘celebration of a Lone Star Hero’.

Peggy Sue Wright (personal assistant at Loretta Lynn Enterprises)

Sean Brady would also like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Peggy Sue Wright, personal assistant at Loretta Lynn Enterprises, without whom this Gene Watson ‘Peer’s Quote’ from Loretta Lynn would not have been possible.

Tim Cobb (1933 - Tuesday 14 March 2023)Tim Cobb (Loretta Lynn's long-time dressmaker) (Wednesday 17 December 1958 - Monday 13 March 2023)

Sean Brady would also like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Tim Cobb (Wednesday 17 December 1958 – Monday 13 March 2023), personal assistant at Loretta Lynn Enterprises, without whom this Gene Watson ‘Peer’s Quote’ from Loretta Lynn would not have been possible.

Loretta Lynn

Loretta Lynn
This quote was submitted on Friday 4 February 2022.

‘Gene Watson is one of the greatest singers I’ve ever heard!

Loretta Lynn and Gene Watson in Lanierland, Georgia in 1998
Loretta Lynn and Gene Watson in Lanierland, Georgia in 1998

I love Gene so much!’

Thank you, Loretta Lynn, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Loretta Lynn…

Loretta Lynn

Loretta Lynn was born Loretta Webb in Butcher Hollow, Kentucky on Thursday  14 April 1932, and was acclaimed for her groundbreaking role in country music.

Loretta Lynn was the eldest daughter and second child born to Clara Marie ‘Clary’ (née Ramey: 5 May 1912 – Tuesday 24 November 1981) and Melvin Theodore ‘Ted’ Webb (6 June 1906 – Sunday 22 February 1959).  Ted was a coal miner and subsistence farmer.  Loretta Lynn and her siblings were of Irish and Cherokee descent, although she was not enrolled with any Native tribe.

Loretta Lynn was named after the film star, Loretta Young (6 January 1913 – Saturday 12 August 2000).

The other Webb children are:

Melvin ‘Junior’ Webb (Wednesday 4 December 1929 – Thursday 1 July 1993)
• Herman Webb (Monday 3 September 1934 – Saturday 28 July 2018)
• Willie ‘Jay’ Lee Webb (Friday 12 February 1937 – Wednesday 31 July 1996)
• Donald Ray Webb (Wednesday 2 April 1941 – Friday 13 October 2017)
• Peggy Sue Wright (née Webb: Thursday 25 March 1943)
• Betty Ruth Hopkins (née Webb: Saturday 5 January 1946)
• Crystal Gayle (born Brenda Gail Webb: Tuesday 9 January 1951)

Loretta Lynn’s father died at the age of 52 of black lung disease, a few years after he relocated to Wabash, Indiana, with his wife and younger children.

Through her matriline, Loretta Lynn was a first cousin of fellow country music artist, Patty Loveless (née Ramey).

Oliver Vanetta 'Doolittle' Lynn (Friday 27 August 1926 - Thursday 22 August 1996) and Loretta Lynn
Oliver Vanetta ‘Doolittle’ Lynn (Friday 27 August 1926 – Thursday 22 August 1996) and Loretta Lynn

On Saturday 10 January 1948, 15-year-old Loretta Webb married Oliver Vanetta ‘Doolittle’ Lynn (Friday 27 August 1926 – Thursday 22 August 1996), better known as ‘Doolittle’, ‘Doo’, or ‘Mooney’.  They had met only a month earlier.  The Lynns left Kentucky and moved to the logging community of Custer, Washington when Loretta Lynn was seven months pregnant with the first of their six children.

Loretta Lynn and Oliver Vanetta ‘Doolittle’ Lynn (Friday 27 August 1926 – Thursday 22 August 1996) had six children together;

Betty Sue Lynn (Friday 26 November 1948 – Monday 29 July 2013)
• Jack Benny Lynn (Wednesday 7 December 1949 – Sunday 22 July 1984)
• Ernest Ray ‘Ernie’ Lynn (born Sunday 27 May 1951)
• Clara Marie ‘Cissie’ Lynn (born Monday 7 April 1952)
• Peggy Jean and Patsy Eileen Lynn (born Thursday 6 August 1964; twin daughters named for Loretta Lynn’s sister, Peggy Sue Wright, and her friend, Patsy Cline).

The happiness and heartache of her early years of marriage would help to inspire Loretta Lynn’s songwriting.  In 1953, Doolittle bought Loretta Lynn a $17 Harmony guitar.  Loretta Lynn taught herself to play the instrument and, over the following three years, she worked to improve her guitar playing.  With Doolittle’s encouragement, Loretta Lynn started her own band, Loretta & The Trailblazers, with her brother Jay Lee playing lead guitar.

In the late 1950s, Loretta Lynn began singing in local clubs.  Loretta Lynn won a wristwatch in a televised talent contest in Tacoma, Washington which was hosted by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006).

Loretta Lynn’s performance was seen by Canadian Norm Burley of Zero Records, who co-founded the record company after hearing Loretta sing.

Zero Records president, Canadian Don Grashey (Sunday 1 November 1925 – Monday 12 September 2005), arranged a recording session in Hollywood, where four of Loretta Lynn’s compositions were recorded, including ‘I’m A Honky Tonk Girl’, ‘Whispering Sea’, ‘Heartache Meet Mister Blues’ and ‘New Rainbow’.

Loretta Lynn: 'I'm A Honky Tonk Girl' (written by Loretta Lynn) (Zero Records, 1960) (No.14, 1960)

In February 1960, Loretta Lynn recorded her first record, ‘I’m A Honky Tonk Girl’ (written by Loretta Lynn), for Zero Records, having signed her first recording contract on Tuesday 2 February 1960; the track reached No.14 on the Billboard country music singles chart in the summer of 1960, No.12 in Music Vendor in 1960, and No.30 on Cash Box in 1960.

The Wilburn Brothers (Doyle Wilburn: Monday 7 July 1930 - Saturday 16 October 1982 and Teddy Wilburn: Monday 30 November 1931 - Monday 24 November 2003)

The Lynns toured the United States to promote the record to country music radio stations.  When the Lynns reached Nashville, the song was a hit, and Loretta Lynn began cutting demo records for The Wilburn Brothers Publishing Company.  Through The Wilburns – Doyle Wilburn (Monday 7 July 1930 – Saturday 16 October 1982) and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003) – Loretta Lynn secured a recording contract with Decca Records.

In November 1960, Loretta Lynn saw the formation of the first Loretta Lynn Fan Club.

By the end of 1960, Billboard magazine listed Loretta Lynn as the No.4 ‘Most Promising Country Female Artist’.

Loretta Lynn’s relationship with The Wilburn Brothers, along with her appearances on the hallowed stage of The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, beginning on Saturday 15 October 1960, helped her to become the No.1 female recording artist in country music.

On Tuesday 25 September 1962, Loretta Lynn was inducted as a member of The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville

On Tuesday 25 September 1962, Loretta Lynn was inducted as a member of The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville.

Loretta Lynn: 'Loretta Lynn Sings' (Decca Records, 1963)

On Monday 9 December 1963, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Loretta Lynn Sings’ (Decca Records, 1963), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Success’, which was written by Johnny Mullins (Tuesday 23 October 1923 – Wednesday 16 September 2009) (No.6, 1962) / this track was also recorded by Sinéad O’Connor (Thursday 8 December 1966 – circa Wednesday 26 July 2023), who included it on ‘Am I Not Your Girl’ (Ensign Records / Chrysalis Records, 1992); Sinead O’Connor’s version of the track reached No.11 on the Irish Singles Chart in 1992, No.15 on the Dutch Top 40 Singles Chart (The Netherlands) in 1992, No.21 on the Single Top 100 Chart (The Netherlands) in 1992, No.32 on the New Zealand Recorded Music NZ Chart in 1992, No.28 on the Schweizer Hit Parade Chart (Switzerland) in 1992, No.18 on the United Kingdom Singles C hart in 1992, and No.20 on the Billboard Alternative Airplay Chart in 1992

‘The Other Woman’ (written by Betty Sue Perry) (No.13, 1963)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Loretta Lynn Sings’ (Decca Records, 1963) also included the following tracks:

‘The Minute You’re Gone’, which was written by Jimmy Gateley (Friday 1 May 1931 – Sunday 17 March 1985)
‘Alone With You’, which was written by Roy Drusky (Sunday 22 June 1930 – Thursday 23 September 2004) and Lester Vanadore
‘Why I’m Walkin’, which was written by Melvin Endsley (Tuesday 30 January 1934 – Monday 16 August 2004) and Stonewall Jackson (Sunday 6 November 1932 – Saturday 4 December 2021)
‘Girl That I Am Now’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Act Naturally’, which was written by Voni Morrison and Johnny Russell (Tuesday 23 January 1940 – Tuesday 3 July 2001)
‘World of Forgotten People’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Color of The Blues’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) and Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 – Thursday 26 July 2007)
‘Hundred Proof Heartache’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘I Walked Away From The Wreck’, which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 – Thursday 23 March 2006)
‘Lonesome 7-7203’, which was written by Justin Tubb (Tuesday 20 August 1935 – Saturday 24 January 1998)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Loretta Lynn Sings’ (Decca Records, 1963) included the following:

Willie Ackerman (Monday 1 May 1939 – Thursday 13 December 2012) and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019), Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) and Wayne Moss (electric guitar)
Cecil Lee Brower (28 November 1914 – Sunday 21 November 1965) and Tommy Jackson (Wednesday 31 March 1926 – Sunday 9 December 1979) (fiddle)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Don Helms (Monday 28 February 1927 – Monday 11 August 2008) (steel guitar)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003) (guitar)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Loretta Lynn Sings’ (Decca Records, 1963) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1963.

Loretta Lynn: 'Before I'm Over You' (Decca Records, 1964)

On Monday 22 June 1964, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Before I’m Over You’ (Decca Records, 1964), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Before I’m Over You’ (written by Betty Sue Perry) (No.4, 1963)

‘Wine, Women & Song’ (written by Betty Sue Perry) (No.3, 1964)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Before I’m Over You’ (Decca Records, 1964) also included the following tracks:

‘Singing The Blues’, which was written by Melvin Endsley (Tuesday 30 January 1934 – Monday 16 August 2004)
‘You Don’t Have To Be A Baby To Cry’, which was written by Bob Merrill (Tuesday 17 May 1921 – Tuesday 17 February 1998) and Terence Alister Shand (1 October 1904 – Friday 11 November 1977)
‘Who’ll Help Me Get Over You’ (written by Betty Sue Perry)
‘Loose Talk’, which was written by Freddie Hart (Tuesday 21 December 1926 – Saturday 27 October 2018) and Ann Lucas
‘Where Were You’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘The End of The World’, which was written by Arthur Kent (Friday 2 July 1920 – Monday 26 January 2009) and Sylvia Dee (22 October 1914 – Monday 12 June 1967)
‘My Shoes Keep Walking Back To You’, which was written by Lee Ross and Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 – Tuesday 13 May 1975)
‘Fool No.1’ (written by Kathryn R. Fulton)
‘This Haunted House’, which was written by Oliver Vanetta ‘Doolittle’ Lynn (Friday 27 August 1926 – Thursday 22 August 1996)
‘Get Set For A Heartache’ (written by Joe Deaton and Red Landers)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Before I’m Over You’ (Decca Records, 1964) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019), Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) and Jack Pruett (Wednesday 10 May 1933 – Sunday 4 December 2011) (electric guitar)
Cecil Lee Brower (28 November 1914 – Sunday 21 November 1965) and Tommy Jackson (Wednesday 31 March 1926 – Sunday 9 December 1979) (fiddle)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Don Helms (Monday 28 February 1927 – Monday 11 August 2008) (steel guitar)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Jerry Kennedy and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003) (guitar)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Before I’m Over You’ (Decca Records, 1964) reached No.11 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1964.

Loretta Lynn: 'Songs From My Heart' (Decca Records, 1965)

On Monday 22 February 1965, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Songs From My Heart’ (Decca Records, 1965), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Happy Birthday’ (written by Ron Kitson) (No.3, 1965)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Songs From My Heart’ (Decca Records, 1965) also included the following tracks:

‘When Lonely Hits Your Heart’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘You’ve Made Me What I Am’, which was written by Oliver Vanetta ‘Doolittle’ Lynn (Friday 27 August 1926 – Thursday 22 August 1996)
‘Once A Day’ (written by Bill Anderson)
‘You’re The Only Good Thing’ (written by Jack Toomes)
‘It Just Looks That Way’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘I Don’t Believe I’ll Fall In Love Today’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)
‘Half A Mind’, which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 – Sunday 25 October 1992)
‘Oh, Lonesome Me’, which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 – Monday 17 November 2003)
‘Boys Like You’ (written by Thomas Glaser)
‘When Dreams Go Out of Style’, which was written by Margie Marie Bowes (Tuesday 18 March 1941 – Thursday 22 October 2020)
‘A Wound Time Can’t Erase’ (written by Bill D. Johnson)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Songs From My Heart’ (Decca Records, 1965) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (electric bass guitar, electric guitar)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Don Helms (Monday 28 February 1927 – Monday 11 August 2008) (steel guitar)
Junior Huskey (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Jerry Kennedy, Harold Morrison (Friday 30 January 1931 – Tuesday 21 December 1993), Wayne Moss and Pete Wade (guitar)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (electric guitar)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Songs From My Heart’ (Decca Records, 1965) reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1965.

Loretta Lynn: 'Blue Kentucky Girl' (Decca Records, 1965)

On Monday 14 June 1965, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Blue Kentucky Girl’ (Decca Records, 1965), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Blue Kentucky Girl’, which was written by Johnny Mullins (Tuesday 23 October 1923 – Wednesday 16 September 2009) (No.7, 1965)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Blue Kentucky Girl’ (Decca Records, 1965) also included the following tracks:

‘Then & Only Then’ (written by Bill Anderson)
‘I Still Miss Someone’, which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 – Friday 12 September 2003) and Roy Cash Jr.
‘Night Girl’, which was written by Loretta Lynn and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003)
‘Love’s Been Here & Gone’, which was written by Loretta Lynn and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003)
‘Farther To Go’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘The Race Is On’ (written by Don Rollins)
‘I Won’t Forget You’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)
‘Two Steps Forward’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Send Me The Pillow That You Dream On’, which was written by Hank Locklin (Friday 15 February 1918 – Sunday 8 March 2009)
‘The Beginning of The End’ (written by Betty Sue Perry)
‘Today’, which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 – Tuesday 6 November 2007)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Blue Kentucky Girl’ (Decca Records, 1965) included the following:

Willie Ackerman (Monday 1 May 1939 – Thursday 13 December 2012) and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (electric bass guitar, electric guitar)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Don Helms (Monday 28 February 1927 – Monday 11 August 2008) and Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Junior Huskey (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003) (guitar)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Harold Morrison (Friday 30 January 1931 – Tuesday 21 December 1993) (banjo)
Wayne Moss (guitar, electric guitar)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Blue Kentucky Girl’ (Decca Records, 1965) reached No.14 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1965.

Loretta Lynn & Ernest Tubb: 'Mr. & Mrs. Used To Be' (Decca Records, 1965)

On Monday 2 August 1965, Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 – Thursday 6 September 1984) & Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Mr. & Mrs. Used To Be’ (Decca Records, 1965), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Mr. & Mrs. Used To Be’ (written by Billy Joe Deaton) (No.11, 1964) / this track also reached No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1964

‘Our Hearts Are Holding Hands’ (written by Bill Anderson) (No.24, 1965) / this track also reached No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1965

Loretta Lynn & Ernest Tubb’s ‘Mr. & Mrs. Used To Be’ (Decca Records, 1965) also included the following tracks:

‘I’ll Just Call You Darling’ (written by Johnny Colmus)
‘I Reached For The Wine’, which was written by Joyce Ann Allsup (1939 – Sunday 15 May 2016)
‘My Past Brought Me To You (Your Past Brought You To Me)’ (written by Bill Brock)
‘Are You Mine’, which was written by Don Grashey (Sunday 1 November 1925 – Monday 12 September 2005), Jim Armmadeo and Myrna Petrunka
‘Keep Those Cards & Letters Coming In’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)
‘Just Between The Two of Us’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘We’re Not Kids Anymore’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Love Was Right Here All The Time’ (written by Billy Henson and Charles Snoddy)
‘Two In The Cold’ (written by Ellen Reeves)
‘A Dear John Letter’, which was written by Billy Barton, Lewis Talley and Charles ‘Fuzzy’ Owen (Tuesday 30 April 1929 – Tuesday 12 May 2020)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn & Ernest Tubb’s ‘Mr. & Mrs. Used To Be’ (Decca Records, 1965) included the following:

Buddy Charleton (steel guitar)
Jack Drake (bass)
Jack Greene (Tuesday 7 January 1930 – Thursday 15 March 2013) (drums)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Bill Pursell and Jerry Smith (piano)
Leon Rhodes (Thursday 10 March 1932 – Saturday 9 December 2017), Jerry Shook and Cal Smith (Thursday 7 April 1932 – Thursday 10 October 2013) (guitar)
Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 – Thursday 6 September 1984) (lead vocals, liner notes)

Loretta Lynn & Ernest Tubb’s ‘Mr. & Mrs. Used To Be’ (Decca Records, 1965) reached No.13 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1965.

Loretta Lynn: 'Hymns' (Decca Records, 1965)

On Monday 15 November 1965, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Hymns’ (Decca Records, 1965), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was released as a single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Everybody Wants To Go To Heaven’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track was released as a single in November 1965, but it did not chart

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Hymns’ (Decca Records, 1965) also included the following tracks:

‘Where No One Stands Alone’, which was written by Thomas Mosie Lister (Thursday 8 September 1921 – Thursday 12 February 2015)
‘When They Ring Those Golden Bells’
(traditional)
‘(There’ll Be) Peace In The Valley (For Me)’, which was written by Thomas Andrew Dorsey (1 July 1899 – Saturday 23 January 1993)
‘If I Could Hear My Mother Pray Again’ (written by John Whitfield ‘Whit’ Vaughan)
‘The Third Man’, which was written by Don Helms (Monday 28 February 1927 – Monday 11 August 2008) and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003)
‘How Great Thou Art’, which was written by Stuart Wesley Keene Hine (25 July 1899 – Tuesday 14 March 1989)
‘Old Camp Meetin’ Time’
(traditional)
‘When I Hear My Children Pray’ (written by Les Waldrop) / this track featured guest vocals from Ernest Ray Lynn
‘In The Sweet By & By’ (written by Joseph Philbrick Webster and Sanford Fillmore Bennett)
‘Where I Learned To Pray’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘I’d Rather Have Jesus’
(traditional)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Hymns’ (Decca Records, 1965) included the following:

Mae Boren Axton (Monday 14 September 1914 – Wednesday 9 April 1997) (liner notes)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019), Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) and Wayne Moss (guitar)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Don Helms (Monday 28 February 1927 – Monday 11 August 2008) (steel guitar)
Junior Huskey (bass)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Hymns’ (Decca Records, 1965) reached No.10 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in February 1966.

Loretta Lynn: 'I Like 'Em Country' (Decca Records, 1966)

On Monday 28 March 1966, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘I Like ‘Em Country’ (Decca Records, 1966), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘The Home You’re Tearin’ Down’ (written by Betty Sue Perry) (No.10, 1965)

‘Dear Uncle Sam’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.4, 1965)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘I Like ‘Em Country’ (Decca Records, 1966) also included the following tracks:

‘Two Mules Pull This Wagon’, which was written by Johnny Russell (Tuesday 23 January 1940 – Tuesday 3 July 2001)
‘It’s Been So Long Darlin’, which was written by Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 – Thursday 6 September 1984)
‘Sometimes You Just Can’t Win’ (written by Smokey Stover)
‘If Teardrops Were Pennies’, which was written by Carl Butler (Thursday 2 June 1927 – Friday 4 September 1992)
‘Your Cheatin’ Heart’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
‘Go On & Go’ (written by Betty Sue Perry)
‘Cry, Cry, Cry’, which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 – Friday 12 September 2003)
‘Hurtin’ For Certain’ (written by Richard D. Steadtler)
‘Today Has Been A Day’ (written by Jackie Webb)
‘Jealous Heart’, which was written by Jenny Lou Carson (Wednesday 13 January 1915 – Saturday 16 December 1978)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘I Like ‘Em Country’ (Decca Records, 1966) included the following:

Willie Ackerman (Monday 1 May 1939 – Thursday 13 December 2012) and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (electric bass guitar)
David Briggs and Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Don Helms (Monday 28 February 1927 – Monday 11 August 2008) and Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Kelso Herston, Jerry Kennedy, Wayne Moss and Pete Wade (guitar)
Junior Huskey (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (electric guitar, guitar)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) and Joe Zinkan (bass)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘I Like ‘Em Country’ (Decca Records, 1966) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country albums Chart in 1966.

Loretta Lynn: 'You Ain't Woman Enough' (Decca Records, 1966)

On Monday 12 September 1966, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘You Ain’t Woman Enough’ (Decca Records, 1966), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘You Ain’t Woman Enough’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.2, 1966)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘You Ain’t Woman Enough’ (Decca Records, 1966) also included the following tracks:

‘Put It Off Until Tomorrow’, which was written by Bill Owens (1935 – Wednesday 7 April 2021) and Dolly Parton
‘These Boots Are Made For Walkin’, which was written by Lee Hazlewood (Tuesday 9 July 1929 – Saturday 4 August 2007)
‘God Gave Me A Heart To Forgive’ (written by Iva Cummings, Bob Cummings, Barbara Cummings and Loretta Lynn)
‘Keep Your Change’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Someone Before Me’ (written by Bobby Hicks)
‘The Darkest Day’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Tippy Toeing’, which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 – Tuesday 30 May 2006)
‘Talking To The Wall’, which was written by Warner Hensley McPherson Jr. (Warner Mack) (Friday 5 April 1935 – Tuesday 1 March 2022) and Bill Montague
‘A Man I Hardly Know’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Is It Wrong (For Loving You)’, which was written by Warner Hensley McPherson Jr. (Warner Mack) (Friday 5 April 1935 – Tuesday 1 March 2022)
‘It’s Another World’ (written by Richard D. Statler)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘You Ain’t Woman Enough’ (Decca Records, 1966) included the following:

Willie Ackerman (Monday 1 May 1939 – Thursday 13 December 2012) and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (electric bass guitar)
David Briggs and Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Fred Carter (Sunday 31 December 1933 – Saturday 17 July 2010) and Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (electric guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (acoustic guitar)
Lloyd Green and Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Kelso Herston and Pete Wade (guitar)
Junior Huskey and Joe Zinkan (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘You Ain’t Woman Enough’ (Decca Records, 1966) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1966, and No.140 on the Billboard Top LPs Chart in 1966.

Loretta Lynn: 'Country Christmas' (Decca Records, 1966)

On Monday 17 October 1966, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Country Christmas’ (Decca Records, 1966), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was released as a single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘To Heck With Ole Santa Claus’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track was released as a single in November 1966, but it did not chart

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Country Christmas’ (Decca Records, 1966) also included the following tracks:

‘Country Christmas’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Away In A Manger’
(traditional)
‘Santa Claus Is Coming To Town’, which was written by John Frederick Coots (2 May 1897 – Monday 8 April 1985) and James Lamont ‘Haven’ Gillespie (6 February 1888 – Friday 14 March 1975)
‘Silver Bells’, which was written by Raymond Bernard Evans (4 February 1915 – Thursday 15 February 2007) and Jay Livingston (28 March 1915 – Wednesday 17 October 2001)
‘Blue Christmas’ (written by Billy Hayes and Jay W. Johnson)
‘It Won’t Seem Like Christmas’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘White Christmas’, which was written by Irving Berlin (11 May 1888 – Friday 22 September 1989)
‘Frosty The Snowman’ (written by Steve Nelson and Walter E. Rollins)
‘Christmas Without Daddy’ (written by Jackie Webb)
‘I Won’t Decorate Your Christmas Tree’ (written by Bob Cummings, Barbara Cummings and Loretta Lynn)
‘Gift of The Blues’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Country Christmas’ (Decca Records, 1966) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (electric bass guitar)
Fred Carter (Sunday 31 December 1933 – Saturday 17 July 2010) (guitar, electric guitar)
Jon Corneal and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Junior Huskey (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar, lead electric guitar)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)

Connie Smith recorded Loretta Lynn’s ‘World of Forgotten People’ and included the track on ‘Connie In The Country’ (RCA Camden Records, 1967), an album which was a showcase of unreleased material, which Connie Smith had recorded in the RCA studios in Nashville on Monday 22 August 1966 and Tuesday 23 August 1966.

Connie Smith recorded Loretta Lynn’s ‘You Ain’t Woman Enough (To Take My Man)’ and included the track on ‘Connie In The Country’ (RCA Camden Records, 1967), an album which was a showcase of unreleased material, which Connie Smith had recorded in the RCA studios in Nashville on Monday 22 August 1966 and Tuesday 23 August 1966.

Loretta Lynn: 'Don't Come Home A Drinkin' (With Lovin' On Your Mind)' (Decca Records, 1967)

On Monday 6 February 1967, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Don’t Come Home A Drinkin’ (With Lovin’ On Your Mind)’ (Decca Records, 1967), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Don’t Come Home A Drinkin’ (With Lovin’ On Your Mind)’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Peggy Sue Wells) (No.1 in late 1966) / this track also reached No.54 on the Australian Kent Report Chart in late 1966

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Don’t Come Home A Drinkin’ (With Lovin’ On Your Mind)’ (Decca Records, 1967) also included the following tracks:

‘I Really Don’t Want To Know’, which was written by Howard Barnes and Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 – Monday 16 March 2015)
‘Tomorrow Never Comes’, which was written by Johnny Bond (Tuesday 1 June 1915 – Monday 12 June 1978) and Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 – Thursday 6 September 1984)
‘There Goes My Everything’, which was written by
Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)
‘The Shoe Goes On The Other Foot Tonight’, which was written by William (Billy) Robert Mize (Monday 29 April 1929 – Wednesday 1 November 2017)
‘Saint To A Sinner’ (written by Betty Sue Perry)
‘The Devil Gets His Dues’ (written by Darrell Statler)
‘I Can’t Keep Away From You’ (written by Darrell Statler)
‘I’m Living In Two Worlds’, which was written by Jan Crutchfield (Saturday 26 February 1938 – Thursday 1 November 2012)
‘Get Whatcha Got & Go’ (written by Loretta Lynn, Ron Williams and Leona Williams)
‘Making Plans’, which was written by Voni Morrison and Johnny Russell (Tuesday 23 January 1940 – Tuesday 3 July 2001)
‘I Got Caught’ (written by Loretta Lynn)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Don’t Come Home A Drinkin’ (With Lovin’ On Your Mind)’ (Decca Records, 1967) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (electric bass guitar)
David Briggs and Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Fred Carter (Sunday 31 December 1933 – Saturday 17 July 2010) and Johnny Russell (Tuesday 23 January 1940 – Tuesday 3 July 2001) (guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (acoustic guitar)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Junior Huskey and Joe Zinkan (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar, lead electric guitar)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Don’t Come Home A Drinkin’ (With Lovin’ On Your Mind)’ (Decca Records, 1967) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1967, and No.80 on the Billboard Top LPs Chart in 1967.

Loretta Lynn & Ernest Tubb: 'Loretta Lynn & Ernest Tubb: Singin' Again' (Decca Records, 1967)
Gene Watson & Rhonda Vincent: 'Your Money & My Good Looks' (Upper Management Music, 2011)

On Monday 29 May 1967, Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 – Thursday 6 September 1984) & Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Loretta Lynn & Ernest Tubb: Singin’ Again’ (Decca Records, 1967), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Sweet Thang’, which was written by Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 – Wednesday 24 August 1988) (No.45, 1967) / the original version of this track was recorded by Nat Stuckey, who included it on ‘Nat Stuckey Really Sings’ (Paula Records, 1966); Nat Stuckey’s version of the track reached No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1966 / this track was also recorded by Gene Watson & Rhonda Vincent, who included it on ‘Your Money & My Good Looks‘ (Upper Management Music, 2011)

On Saturday 25 January 2014, Ann M. Stuckey submitted a ‘Peer’s Quote about Gene Watson.

Ernest Tubb & Loretta Lynn’s ‘Loretta Lynn & Ernest Tubb: Singin’ Again’ (Decca Records, 1967) also included the following tracks:

‘We’ll Never Change’ (written by John Earl Clift)
‘Let’s Stop Right Where We Are’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Love Is No Excuse’, which was written by Justin Tubb (Tuesday 20 August 1935 – Saturday 24 January 1998)
‘I’m Not Leavin’ You (It’s All In Your Mind)’ (written by Lucille Cosensza and Johnny Tillotson)
‘Beautiful Unhappy Home’, which was written by Johnny Russell (Tuesday 23 January 1940 – Tuesday 3 July 2001) and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003)
‘One To Ten’ (written by Mildred Burk)
‘Bartender’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Maggie Vaughn)
‘I’m Bitin’ My Fingernails & Thinking of You’, which was written by Ernest Benedict, Lenny Sanders, Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 – Thursday 6 September 1984) and Robert Gene ‘Red’ West (Sunday 8 March 1936 – Tuesday 18 July 2017)
‘Yearning’, which was written by Eddie Eddings and George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013)
‘Beautiful Friendship’, which was written by Andrew Jackson ‘Jack’ Rhodes (12 January 1907 – Wednesday 9 October 1968, Faye Keys and Larry Grounds
‘Thin Grey Line’ (written by Betty Sue Perry)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ernest Tubb & Loretta Lynn’s ‘Loretta Lynn & Ernest Tubb: Singin’ Again’ (Decca Records, 1967) included the following:

Steve Chapman, Cal Smith (Thursday 7 April 1932 – Thursday 10 October 2013) and Pete Wade (guitar)
Buddy Charleton (steel guitar)
Jack Drake and Kelso Herston (bass)
Jack Greene (Tuesday 7 January 1930 – Thursday 15 March 2013) (drums)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 – Thursday 6 September 1984) (lead vocals)
Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003) (liner notes)

Ernest Tubb & Loretta Lynn’s ‘Loretta Lynn & Ernest Tubb: Singin’ Again’ (Decca Records, 1967) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1967.

Loretta Lynn: 'Singin' With Feelin' (Decca Records, 1967)
George Jones: 'Walk Through This World With Me' (Musicor Records, 1967)
Gene Watson: 'My Heroes Have Always Been Country' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2014)

On Monday 9 October 1967, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Singin’ With Feelin’ (Decca Records, 1967), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘If You’re Not Gone Too Long’ (written by Wanda Ballman) (No.7, 1967)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Singin’ With Feelin’ (Decca Records, 1967) also included the following tracks:

‘Bargain Basement Dress’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Dark Moon’, which was written by Ned Miller (Sunday 12 April 1925 – Friday 18 March 2016)
‘If Loneliness Don’t Kill Me’ (written by Bill Henson)
‘It’s Such A Pretty World Today’, which was written by Dale Emerson Noe (Saturday 31 December 1927 – Thursday 4 November 2004)
‘Wanted Woman’, which was written by Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003)
‘Slowly Killing Me’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Secret Love’, which was written by Sammy Fain (17 June 1902 – Wednesday 6 December 1989) and Paul Francis Webster (20 December 1907 – Sunday 18 March 1984)
‘I’ll Sure Come A Long Way Down’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Maggie Vaughn)

‘Walk Through This World With Me’, which was written by Sandra Noreen Seamons (Friday 31 May 1935 – Friday 22 Aug 2014) and Kay Jeanne Savage (passed away on Friday 18 December 2009) / this track was also recorded by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013), who included it on ‘Walk Through This World With Me’ (Musicor Records, 1967); George Jones‘ version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in April 1967 / this track was also recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on ‘My Heroes Have Always Been Country‘ (Fourteen Carat Music, 2014)

‘What Now?’ (written by Jackie L. Hobbs and Frank B. Jones)
‘A Place To Hide & Cry’, which was written by Doyle Wilburn (Monday 7 July 1930 – Saturday 16 October 1982)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Singin’ With Feelin’ (Decca Records, 1967) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (electric bass guitar)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (acoustic guitar)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Junior Huskey and Joe Zinkan (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (lead electric guitar)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Singin’ With Feelin’ (Decca Records, 1967) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1967.

In 1967, Loretta Lynn was named ‘Female Vocalist of The Year’ in the very first Country Music Association (CMA) awards presentation.

Loretta Lynn: 'Who Says God Is Dead' (Decca Records, 1968)

On Monday 29 January 1968, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Who Says God Is Dead’ (Decca Records, 1968), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included the following tracks:

‘Who Says God Is Dead!’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘I Believe’, which was written by Ervin Drake (Thursday 3 April 1919 – Thursday 15 January 2015), Irvin Graham, Jimmy Shirl and Al Stillman (Tuesday 26 June 1906 – Saturday 17 February 1979)
‘Standing Room Only’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Frances Heighton)
‘The Old Rugged Cross’, which was written by George Bennard (4 February 1873 – Friday 10 October 1958)
‘Harp With Golden Strings’ (written by Jimmie Keath and Mrs. Mac McCarty)
‘If You Miss Heaven (You’ll Miss It All)’ (written by Dale Fox)
‘I’m A Gettin’ Ready To Go’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘In The Garden’, which was written by Charles Austin Miles (7 January 1868 – Sunday 10 March 1946)
‘Ten Thousand Angels’ (written by Ray Overholt)
‘He’s Got The Whole World In His Hands’
(traditional)
‘Mama, Why?’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track featured duet vocals from Ernest Ray Lynn

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Who Says God Is Dead’ (Decca Records, 1968) included the following:

The Anita Kerr Singers and The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Larry Estes (drums)
Lloyd Green (steel guitar)
Junior Huskey (bass)
Ernest Ray Lynn (duet vocals on ‘Mama, Why?’)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (lead electric guitar)
Billy Sanford and Jerry Stembridge (guitar)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Who Says God Is Dead’ (Decca Records, 1968) reached No.44 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968.

Loretta Lynn: 'Fist City' (Decca Records, 1968)

On Monday 15 April 1968, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Fist City’ (Decca Records, 1968), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘What Kind of A Girl (Do You Think I Am)’, which was written by Loretta Lynn and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003) (No.5, 1967) / this track also reached No.6 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1967

‘Fist City’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.1 for one week in April 1968)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Fist City’ (Decca Records, 1968) also included the following tracks:

‘Jackson Ain’t A Very Big Town’, which was written by Vic McAlpin (Monday 4 February 1918 – Friday 18 January 1980)
‘You Didn’t Like My Lovin’, which was written by Joe ‘Red’ Hayes (Sunday 4 April 1926 – Friday 2 March 1973), Loretta Lynn and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003)
‘I’ve Got Texas In My Heart’ (written by Mildred Burk and Rose Burk)
‘You Never Were Mine’ (written by Jay Lee Webb)
‘Somebody’s Back In Town’, which was written by Loretta Lynn, Doyle Wilburn (Monday 7 July 1930 – Saturday 16 October 1982) and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003)
‘A Satisfied Mind’, which was written by Joe ‘Red’ Hayes (Sunday 4 April 1926 – Friday 2 March 1973) and Andrew Jackson ‘Jack’ Rhodes (12 January 1907 – Wednesday 9 October 1968)
‘How Long Will It Take?’, which was written by Warner Hensley McPherson Jr. (Warner Mack) (Friday 5 April 1935 – Tuesday 1 March 2022)
‘I Don’t Wanna Play House’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘I’m Shootin’ For Tomorrow’ (written by Loretta Lynn)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Fist City’ (Decca Records, 1968) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (electric bass guitar)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar, acoustic guitar)
Larry Estes and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Junior Huskey and Joe Zinkan (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar, lead electric guitar)
Harold Morrison (Friday 30 January 1931 – Tuesday 21 December 1993) (banjo)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Pete Wade (guitar)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Fist City’ (Decca Records, 1968) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968.

Loretta Lynn: 'Here's Loretta Lynn' (Vocalion Records, 1968)

It was also in April 1968, when Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Here’s Loretta Lynn’ (Vocalion Records, 1968), which included the following tracks, which were originally released on Zero Records:

‘Blue Steel’
‘My Love’
‘Whispering Sea’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘New Rainbow’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Stop’
‘Heartaches Meet Mr. Blues’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Darkest Day’
‘My Angel Mother’
‘My Life Story’
‘Gonna Pack My Troubles’

Loretta Lynn: 'Loretta Lynn's Greatest Hits' (Decca Records, 1968)

In June 1968, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Loretta Lynn’s Greatest Hits’ (Decca Records, 1968), which included the following tracks:

‘Don’t Come Home A Drinkin’ (With Lovin’ On Your Mind)’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Peggy Sue Wells) (No.1, 1967) / this track also reached No.54 on the Australian Kent Report Chart in 1967

‘Before I’m Over You’ (written by Betty Sue Perry) (No.4, 1963)

‘If You’re Not Gone Too Long’ (written by Wanda Ballman) (No.7, 1967)

‘Dear Uncle Sam’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.4, 1965)

‘The Other Woman’ (written by Betty Sue Perry) (No.13, 1963)

‘Wine, Women & Song’ (written by Betty Sue Perry) (No.3, 1964)

‘You Ain’t Woman Enough (To Take My Man)’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.2, 1966)

‘Blue Kentucky Girl’, which was written by Johnny Mullins (Tuesday 23 October 1923 – Wednesday 16 September 2009) (No.7, 1965)

‘Success’, which was written by Johnny Mullins (Tuesday 23 October 1923 – Wednesday 16 September 2009) (No.6, 1962)

‘The Home You’re Tearin’ Down’ (written by Betty Sue Perry) (No.10, 1965)

‘Happy Birthday’ (written by Ron Kitson) (No.3, 1965)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Loretta Lynn’s Greatest Hits’ (Decca Records, 1968) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968.

Loretta Lynn: 'Your Squaw Is On The Warpath' (Decca Records, 1969)

On Monday 17 February 1969, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Your Squaw Is On The Warpath’ (Decca Records, 1969), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘You’ve Just Stepped In (From Stepping Out On Me)’ (written by Don Trowbridge) (No.3, 1968)

‘Your Squaw Is On The Warpath’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.3, 1968) / this track also reached No.17 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1968

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Your Squaw Is On The Warpath’ (Decca Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

‘Living My Lifetime For You’ (written by Glen Johnson)

‘Barney’ (written by Frances Rhodes) / this track was only included on first pressings of the album, was removed from all subsequent pressings and was also excluded from the album’s digital download release

‘Sneakin’ In’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘(This Bottle’s) Taking The Place of My Man’, which was written by Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003)
‘Kaw-Liga’, which was written by Fred Rose (Floyd Jenkins) (24 August 1898 – Wednesday 1 December 1954) and Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
‘Let Me Go, You’re Hurtin’ Me’ (written by Lorene Allen and Loretta Lynn)
‘Harper Valley PTA’, which was written by Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021)
‘I Walk Alone’ (written by Herbert Wilson)
‘He’s Somewhere Between You & Me’, which was written by Loretta Lynn and Doyle Wilburn (Monday 7 July 1930 – Saturday 16 October 1982)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Your Squaw Is On The Warpath’ (Decca Records, 1969) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (electric bass guitar)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (acoustic guitar)
Larry Estes and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Junior Huskey, Norbert Putnam and Joe Zinkan (bass)
The Jordanaires and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003) (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar, lead electric guitar)
Harold Morrison (Friday 30 January 1931 – Tuesday 21 December 1993) (banjo)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Pete Wade (guitar)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Your Squaw Is On The Warpath’ (Decca Records, 1969) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Akbums Chart in 1969.

Ernest Tubb & Loretta Lynn: 'If We Put Our Heads Together' (Decca Records, 1969)

On Monday 9 June 1969, Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 – Thursday 6 September 1984) & Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘If We Put Our Heads Together’ (Decca Records, 1969), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Who’s Gonna Take the Garbage Out?’, which was written by Johnny Tillotson and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003) (No.18, 1969)

‘If We Put Our Heads Together (Our Hearts Will Tell Us What To Do)’ (written by Lorene Allen and Loretta Lynn) / this track was released as a single in September 1969, but it did not chart

Ernest Tubb & Loretta Lynn’s ‘If We Put Our Heads Together’ (Decca Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

‘Holding On To Nothing’, which was written by Jerry Donald Chesnut (Thursday 7 May 1931 – Saturday 15 December 2018)
‘Somewhere Between’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 – Monday 24 April 2006)
‘I Chased You ‘Til You Caught Me’ (written by Wayne D. Walker)
‘Let’s Wait A Little Longer’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015)
‘Won’t You Come Home (& Talk To A Stranger)’, which was written by Wayne Kemp (Sunday 1 June 1941 – Monday 9 March 2015)
‘Let The World Keep On Turnin’, which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006)
‘That Odd Couple’ (written by Betty Amos)
‘Touch & Go’ (written by Darrell Statler)
‘I Won’t Cheat Again On You (If You Won’t Cheat On Me)’ (written by Milton L. Brown)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ernest Tubb & Loretta Lynn’s ‘If We Put Our Heads Together’ (Decca Records, 1969) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) and James Wilkerson (drums)
Steve Chapman and Billy Parker (guitar)
Buddy Charleton (steel guitar)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) and Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Erroll Jernigan (fiddle)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Noel Stanley (bass)
Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 – Thursday 6 September 1984) (lead vocals)

Ernest Tubb & Loretta Lynn’s ‘If We Put Our Heads Together’ (Decca Records, 1969) reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1969.

Loretta Lynn: 'Woman of The World / To Make A Man' (Decca Records, 1969)
Gene Watson: 'No One Will Ever Know' (MCA Records, 1980)
Gene Watson: 'In A Perfect World' (Shanachie Records, 2007)

On Monday 7 July 1969, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Woman of The World / To Make A Man’ (Decca Records, 1969), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Woman of The World (Leave My World Alone)’, which was written by Sharon Higgins (Sunday 6 July 1941 – Friday 3 January 2003) (No.1 for one week in April 1969)

‘To Make A Man (Feel Like A Man)’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.3, 1969)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Woman of The World / To Make A Man’ (Decca Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

‘Johnny One Time’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)
‘If You Were Mine To Lose’ (written by Mickey Jaco)
‘The Only Time I Hurt’ (written by Loretta Lynn)

‘No One Will Ever Know’, which was written by Mel Foree (Tuesday 25 July 1911 – Sunday 28 October 1990) and Fred Rose (Floyd Jenkins) (24 August 1898 – Wednesday 1 December 1954) / this track was also recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on ‘No One Will Ever Know‘ (MCA Records, 1980)

‘Big Sister, Little Sister’ (written by Frances Heighton and Loretta Lynn)

‘Today I Started Loving You Again’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 – Monday 24 April 2006) / the original version of this track was recorded by Merle Haggard, who included it on ‘The Legend of Bonnie & Clyde’ (Capitol Records, 1968); Merle Haggard‘s version of the track was the ‘B-side’ of ‘The Legend of Bonnie & Clyde’ (written by Merle Haggard), which was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in April / May 1968 / this track was also recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on ‘In A Perfect World‘ (Shanachie Records, 2007), with guest harmony vocals from Lee Ann Womack

‘Stand By Your Man’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998) / the original version of this track was recorded by Tammy Wynette, who included it on ‘Stand By Your Man’ (Epic Records, 1969); Tammy Wynette’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for three weeks in November / December 1968

‘One Little Reason’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘I’m Lonesome For Trouble Tonight’, which was written by Loretta Lynn and Doyle Wilburn (Monday 7 July 1930 – Saturday 16 October 1982)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Woman of The World / To Make A Man’ (Decca Records, 1969) included the following:

Willie Ackerman (Monday 1 May 1939 – Thursday 13 December 2012) and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (electric bass guitar)
Larry Butler (Thursday 26 March 1942 – Friday 20 January 2012) and Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar, acoustic guitar)
Lloyd Green and Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Junior Huskey (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Bruce Lehrke (liner notes)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar, lead electric guitar)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Jerry Shook and Pete Wade (guitar)
James Wilkerson (vibes)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Woman of The World / To Make A Man’ (Decca Records, 1969) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1969.

Loretta Lynn: 'Wings Upon Your Horns' (Decca Records, 1970)
Merle Haggard: 'Someday We'll Look Back' (Capitol Records, 1971)

On Monday 5 January 1970, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Wings Upon Your Horns’ (Decca Records, 1970), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Wings Upon Your Horns’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.11, 1970) / this track also reached No.3 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Wings Upon Your Horns’ (Decca Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

‘When I Reach The Bottom (You’d Better Be There)’ (written by Lorene Allen and Loretta Lynn)
‘This Stranger (My Little Girl)’ (written by Ann Burns,
Barbara Fairchild and Rafe Van Hoy)
‘I Only See the Things I Want To See’ (written by Loudilla Johnson and Loretta Lynn)
‘If You Handle The Merchandise’ (written by Peggy Sue Wright)
‘I’m Dynamite’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Big Ole Hurt’ (written by Loretta Lynn)

‘I’d Rather Be Gone’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) / the original version of this track was recorded by Merle Haggard, who included it on ‘Someday We’ll Look Back’ (Capitol Records, 1971)

‘You Wouldn’t Know An Angel (If You Saw One)’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Frances Rhodes)
‘I’ll Still Be Missing You’, which was written by Warner Hensley McPherson Jr. (Warner Mack) (Friday 5 April 1935 – Tuesday 1 March 2022)
‘Let’s Get Back Down To Earth’ (written by Loretta Lynn)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Wings Upon Your Horns’ (Decca Records, 1970) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (electric bass guitar)
Larry Butler (Thursday 26 March 1942 – Friday 20 January 2012), Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) and Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar, acoustic guitar)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Junior Huskey, Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021), Norbert Putnam and Joe Zinkan (bass)
The Jordanaires and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003) (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar, lead electric guitar)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Jerry Shook and Pete Wade (guitar)
James Wilkerson (vibes)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Wings Upon Your Horns’ (Decca Records, 1970) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1970.

Loretta Lynn: 'Loretta Lynn Writes 'Em & Sings 'Em' (Decca Records, 1970)

On Monday June 1970, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Loretta Lynn Writes ‘Em & Sings ‘Em’ (Decca Records, 1970), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘I Know How’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.4, 1970) / this track also reached No.13 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970

‘You Wanna Give Me A Lift’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Peggy Sue Wright) (No.6, 1970) / this track also reached No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Loretta Lynn Writes ‘Em & Sings ‘Em’ (Decca Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

‘What Has The Bottle Done To My Baby’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘The One You Need’ (written by Loretta Lynn)

‘Your Squaw Is On The Warpath’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track was also included on Loretta Lynn’s ‘Your Squaw Is On The Warpath’ (Decca Records, 1969)

‘You Ain’t Woman Enough (To Take My Man)’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
/ this track was also included on Loretta Lynn’s ‘You Ain’t Woman Enough’ (Decca Records, 1966)

‘Crazy Out of My Mind’ (written by Loretta Lynn)

‘Wings Upon Your Horns’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track was also included on Loretta Lynn’s ‘Wings Upon Your Horns’ (Decca Records, 1970)

‘To Make A Man (Feel Like A Man)’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
/ this track was also included on Loretta Lynn’s ‘Woman of The World / To Make A Man’ (Decca Records, 1969)

‘Deep As Your Pocket’ (written by Loretta Lynn)

‘Fist City’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track was also included on Loretta Lynn’s ‘Fist City’ (Decca Records, 1968)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Loretta Lynn Writes ‘Em & Sings ‘Em’ (Decca Records, 1970) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (electric bass guitar)
David Briggs, Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) and Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) and Jerry Stembridge (acoustic guitar)
Ralph Emery (Friday 10 March 1933 – Saturday 15 January 2022) (liner notes)
Larry Estes and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Junior Huskey, Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021), Norbert Putnam and Joe Zinkan (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar, lead electric guitar) (electric guitar)
Harold Morrison (Friday 30 January 1931 – Tuesday 21 December 1993) (banjo)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Jerry Shook and Pete Wade (guitar)
Bob Thompson (banjo)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Loretta Lynn Writes ‘Em & Sings ‘Em’ (Decca Records, 1970) reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1970.

Loretta Lynn: 'Coal Miner's Daughter' (Decca Records, 1971)

On Monday 4 January 1971, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (Decca Records, 1971), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.1 for week in December 1970) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970, and No.83 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1970 In Canada

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (Decca Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

‘Hello Darlin’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) / the original version of this track was recorded by Conway Twitty, who included it on ‘Hello Darlin’ (Decca Records, 1970); Conway Twitty’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for four weeks in June / July 1970

‘Less of Me’, which was written by Glen Campbell (Wednesday 22 April 1936 – Tuesday 8 August 2017)
‘Any One, Any Worse, Any Where’ (written by Lorene Allen and Loretta Lynn)

‘For The Good Times’ (written by Kris Kristofferson) / the original version of this track was recorded by Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 – Monday 16 December 2013), who included it on ‘For The Good Times’ (Columbia Records, 1970); Ray Price‘s version of the track, which was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in September 1970, and No.11 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1970, was awarded ‘Song of The Year’ by the Academy of Country Music (ACM)

‘The Man of The House’ (written by Larry Brinkley and Lee McAlphin)
‘What Makes Me Tick’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Another Man Loved Me Last Night’ (written by Lorene Allen and Peggy Sue Wright)
‘It’ll Be Open Season on You’ (written by Charlie Aldridge)

‘Too Far’, which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 – Wednesday 8 December 1982)

‘Snowbird’, which was written by Gene MacLellan (Wednesday 2 February 1938 – Thursday 19 January 1995) / the original version of this track was recorded by Anne Murray, who included it on ‘Snowbird’ (Capitol Records, 1970); Anne Murray’s version of the track reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1970, and No.8 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1970

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (Decca Records, 1971) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (electric bass guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar, acoustic guitar)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Junior Huskey and Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar, lead electric guitar)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar, Dobro)
Jerry Stembridge (acoustic guitar)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 – Wednesday 18 May 2005) (banjo)
Pete Wade (guitar)
Doyle Wilburn (Monday 7 July 1930 – Saturday 16 October 1982) (liner notes)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (Decca Records, 1971) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971.

Loretta Lynn’s bestselling 1976 autobiography, ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’, was made into an Academy Award-winning film of the same title in 1980, which starred Sissy Spacek and Tommy Lee Jones.  Sissy Spacek won the Academy Award for ‘Best Actress’ for her role as Loretta Lynn.

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty: 'It's Only Make Believe' (Decca Records, 1971)

On Monday 1 February 1971, Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) saw the release of ‘It’s Only Make Believe’ (Decca Records, 1971), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘After The Fire Is Gone’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004) (No.1 for two weeks in March / April 1971) / this track, which also reached No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1971, and No.56 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1971, earned Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty a Grammy Award

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘It’s Only Make Believe’ (Decca Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

‘It’s Only Make Believe’, which was written by Jack Nance and Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘We’ve Closed Our Eyes To Shame’, which was written by Doyle Wilburn (Monday 7 July 1930 – Saturday 16 October 1982) and Betty Sue Perry
‘I’m So Used To Loving You’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘Will You Visit Me On Sunday?’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)
‘Don’t Tell Me You’re Sorry’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Pickin’ Wild Mountain Berries’ (written by Robert McRee, Ed Thomas and Cliff Thomas)
‘Take Me’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013)
‘The One I Can’t Live Without’ (written by James Perry Pulliam and Frances Rhodes)
‘Hangin’ On’, which was written by Ira Allen and William (Billy) Robert Mize (Monday 29 April 1929 – Wednesday 1 November 2017)
‘Working Girl’ (written by Benjamin ‘Benny Joy’ Eidson and Rodney Smith)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘It’s Only Make Believe’ (Decca Records, 1971) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (acoustic guitar)
John Hughey (Wednesday 27 December 1933 – Sunday 18 November 2007) (steel guitar)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Tommy Markham (drums)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Jerry Smith (piano)
Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) (lead vocals)
Herman Wade (electric guitar)

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘It’s Only Make Believe’ (Decca Records, 1971) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971, and was the duo’s highest-charting album on that chart.

Loretta Lynn: 'I Wanna Be Free' (Decca Records, 1971)

On Monday 3 May 1971, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘I Wanna Be Free’ (Decca Records, 1971), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘I Wanna Be Free’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.3, 1971) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1971, and No.94 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1971

Loretta Lynn’s ‘I Wanna Be Free’ (Decca Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

Help Me Make It Through The Night’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)
‘See That Mountain’ (written by Connie Moore)

‘When You Leave My World’, which was written by Sharon Higgins (Sunday 6 July 1941 – Friday 3 January 2003)
‘Put Your Hand In The Hand’, which was written by Gene MacLellan (Wednesday 2 February 1938 – Thursday 19 January 1995)
‘If I Never Love Again (It Will Be Too Soon)’, which was written by Loretta Lynn and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003)
‘Me & Bobby McGee’, which was written by Fred Foster (Sunday 26 July 1931 – Wednesday 20 February 2019) and Kris Kristofferson
‘When You’re Poor’ (written by Tracy Lee)
‘Rose Garden’, which was written by Joe South (Wednesday 28 February 1940 – Wednesday 5 September 2012)
‘Drive You Out of My Mind’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Lorene Allen)
‘I’m One Man’s Woman’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Peggy Sue Wells)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘I Wanna Be Free’ (Decca Records, 1971) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar, acoustic guitar)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Junior Huskey and Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar, lead electric guitar)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar, Dobro)
Dale Sellers and Pete Wade (guitar)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 – Wednesday 18 May 2005) (banjo)
Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003) (liner notes)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘I Wanna Be Free’ (Decca Records, 1971) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971.

Loretta Lynn: 'You're Lookin' At Country' (Decca Records, 1971)

On Monday 20 September 1971, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘You’re Lookin’ At Country’ (Decca Records, 1971), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘You’re Lookin’ At Country’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.5, 1971) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1971

Loretta Lynn’s ‘You’re Lookin’ At Country’ (Decca Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

‘Love Whatcha Got At Home’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Peggy Sue Wright)
‘Take Me Home, Country Roads’, which was written by Bill Danoff, John Denver (Friday 31 December 1943 – Sunday 12 October 1997) and Mary Catherine ‘Taffy’ Nivert-Danoff
‘Kinfolks Holler’ (written by Venda Holliday)
‘Close My Eyes’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Indian Lake’, which was written by Tony Romeo (Sunday 25 December 1938 – Friday 23 June 1995)
‘I’d Rather Be Sorry’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)
‘From Now On’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘You Can’t Hold On To Love’ (written by Glen Johnson)
‘Country Girl (Just Home From Town)’ (written by Venda Holliday)
‘I Burnt The Little Roadside Tavern Down’ (written by Bill Howard)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘You’re Lookin’ At Country’ (Decca Records, 1971) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar, electric bass guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar, acoustic guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Junior Huskey and Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar, lead electric guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Dale Sellers, Jerry Shook and Dave Thornhill (guitar)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 – Wednesday 18 May 2005) (banjo)
Pete Wade (guitar, electric guitar)
Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003) (liner notes)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘You’re Lookin’ At Country’ (Decca Records, 1971) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971.

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty: 'Lead Me On' (Decca Records, 1972)

On Monday 17 January 1972Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) saw the release of ‘Lead Me On’ (Decca Records, 1972), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Lead Me On’ (written by Leon Copeland) (No.1 for one week in 1972) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1972

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Lead Me On’ (Decca Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

‘When I Turn Off My Lights (Your Memory Turns On)’, which was written by Tommy Markham and L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)
‘Never Ending Song of Love’, which was written by Delaney Bramlett (Saturday 1 July 1939 – Saturday 27 December 2008)
‘Playing House Away From Home’ (written by Bill Rhodes)
‘You’re The Reason’, which was written by Bobby Edwards (Monday 18 January 1926 – Tuesday 31 July 2012), Terry Fell and Fred Henley
‘How Far Can We Go?’ ((written by Bobby Hicks and Kenny Starr)
‘You Blow My Mind’ (written by Billy Ed Wheeler)

‘Easy Loving’, which was written by Freddie Hart (Tuesday 21 December 1926 – Saturday 27 October 2018) / the original version of this track was recorded by Freddie Hart, who included it on ‘Easy Loving’ (Capitol Records, 1971); Freddie Hart‘s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country  music singles chart for three weeks in September 1971, and No.17 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1971

‘Back Street Affair’ (written by Jimmy Rule and Billy Wallace)
‘I Wonder If You Told Her About Me’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘Get Some Loving Done’, which was written by Jimmy Peppers (passed away on Monday 18 February 2019)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Lead Me On’ (Decca Records, 1972) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (acoustic guitar)
John Hughey (Wednesday 27 December 1933 – Sunday 18 November 2007) (steel guitar)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Tommy Markham (drums)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Jerry Smith (piano)
Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) (lead vocals)
Herman Wade (electric guitar)

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Lead Me On’ (Decca Records, 1972) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.

Loretta Lynn: 'One's On The Way' (Decca Records, 1972)

On Monday 6 March 1972, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘One’s On The Way’ (Decca Records, 1972), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘One’s On The Way’, which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 – Monday 10 May 1999) (No.1 for two weeks in February 1972) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1972

Loretta Lynn’s ‘One’s On The Way’ (Decca Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

‘The Morning After Baby Let Me Down’, which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 – Wednesday 9 March 2016)
‘It’ll Feel Good When It Quits Hurtin’ (written by Roni Rivers and Shirley Tackitt)
‘Blueberry Hill’, which was written by Al Lewis (18 April 1901 – Tuesday 4 April 1967), Vincent Rose (13 June 1880 – Saturday 20 May 1944) and Larry Stock (1896 – Friday 4 May 1984)
‘Love’s On The Loose’ (written by Billy Arr)
‘L-O-V-E, Love’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Maggie Vaughn)
‘He’s All I Got’ (written by Gary US Bonds and Jerry Williams)
‘I Can’t See Me Without You’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘It’s Not The Miles You Traveled’ (written by Dave Hall and Louis Redding)
‘Too Wild To Be Tamed’ (written by Tracey Lee)
‘I’m Losing My Mind’ (written by Smiley Burnette)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘One’s On The Way’ (Decca Records, 1972) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar, electric bass guitar)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) and Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar, acoustic guitar)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Junior Huskey and Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar, lead electric guitar)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Dave Thornhill (guitar)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘One’s On The Way’ (Decca Records, 1972) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.

Loretta Lynn: 'God Bless America Again' (Decca Records, 1972)

On Monday 5 June 1972, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘God Bless America Again’ (Decca Records, 1972), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included the following tracks:

May God Bless America Again’ (written by Bobby Bare and Boyce Hawkins) / this track featured guest vocals from Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘Just A Closer Walk With Thee’ (traditional)
‘Six Feet of Sod’ (written by Betty Sue Perry)
‘I Feel Like Traveling On’ (written by James D. Vaughn)
‘Gethsemane’ (written by B.L. Smith and W.B. Waldrop)
‘Softly & Tenderly’ (written by Will L. Thompson)
‘Working For The Lord’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘If God Is Dead (Who’s That Living In My Soul)’ (written by Lawrence Reynolds)
‘I Pray My Way Out of Trouble’, which was written by Loretta Lynn and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003)
‘Just A Little Talk With Jesus’ (written by Cleavant Derricks)
‘Living In God’s Country’, which was written by Don Helms (Monday 28 February 1927 – Monday 11 August 2008), Doyle Wilburn (Monday 7 July 1930 – Saturday 16 October 1982) and Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘God Bless America Again’ (Decca Records, 1972) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar, electric bass guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022), Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) and Pete Wade (guitar)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Junior Huskey (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Oliver Vanetta ‘Doolittle’ Lynn (Friday 27 August 1926 – Thursday 22 August 1996) (liner notes)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar, Dobro)
Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) (recitation on ‘God Bless America Again’)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘God Bless America Again’ (Decca Records, 1972) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.

Loretta Lynn: 'Here I Am Again' (Decca Records, 1972)

On Monday 2 October 1972, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Here I Am Again’ (Decca Records, 1972), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Here I Am Again’, which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 – Monday 10 May 1999) (No.3, 1972) / this track also reached No.3 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1972

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Here I Am Again’ (Decca Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

‘My Kind of Man’ (written by Darrell Statler)
‘Manhattan, Kansas’ (written by Joe Allen)
‘Be Proud of Your Man’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)
‘There’s A Built-In Trouble Maker In Every Man’, which was written by Elkin Rippy, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 – Friday 5 December 1986) and Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017)
‘Love Takes A Long Time Dyin’ (written by Rick Craig and Bobby Hicks)

‘Delta Dawn’, which was written by Larry Collins and Alex Harvey (Monday 10 March 1947 – Saturday 4 April 2020) / this track was also recorded by Helen Reddy (Saturday 25 October 1941 – Tuesday 29 September 2020), who included it on ‘Long Hard Climb’ (Capitol Records, 1973); Helen Maxine Reddy’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart, for one week, in 1973 / this track was also recorded by Tanya Tucker, who included it on her debut album, ‘Delta Dawn’ (Columbia Records, 1972); Tanya Tucker‘s version of the track reached No.6 on the Billboard country music singles chart in April 1972

‘The Best Years of My Life’, which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 – Wednesday 9 March 2016)
‘Where Do Babies Go?’ (written by Lorene Allen and Kenny Starr)
‘A Woman A Day’ (written by Venda Holliday)
‘I Miss You More Today’ (written by Lorene Allen and Loretta Lynn)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Here I Am Again’ (Decca Records, 1972) included the following:

Willie Ackerman (Monday 1 May 1939 – Thursday 13 December 2012) and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
Clara Butcher (liner notes)
Jimmy Capps (Thursday 25 May 1939 – Monday 1 June 2020) and Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (acoustic guitar)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar, Dobro)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Here I Am Again’ (Decca Records, 1972) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.

Loretta Lynn: 'Entertainer of The Year' (MCA Records, 1973)

On Monday 26 February 1973, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Entertainer of The Year’ (Decca Records, 1973), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Rated X’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.1 for one week in February / March 1973) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1973

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Entertainer of The Year’ (Decca Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

Til The Pain Outwears The Shame’ (written by Wiley J. Smith)
‘Ruby, Madge & Mable’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)
‘Legend In My Mind’ (written by Paul Richey and Theresa Beaty)
‘Ain’t It Funny’ (written by Tracey Lee)
‘Yesterday Will Come Again Tonight’, which was written by Glenn Ray McGuirt (1938 – Thursday 11 June 2020) and Jermiah Stone
‘Hanky Panky Woman’ (written by Jim Owen and Lois Johnson)
‘I’m All He’s Got (But He’s Got All of Me)’ (written by Wiley J. Smith)
‘I’m Paying For My Raising’ (written by Doris Hutchins and Harold J. Norrid)
‘Possessions’ (written by Martha Baker and S. Burnett)
‘I Need Someone To Hold Me (When I Cry)’ (written by Raymond A. Smith)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Entertainer of The Year’ (Decca Records, 1973) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (acoustic guitar)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001), Jerry Shook, Herman Wade and Pete Wade (guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, vibes)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Doctor Elkin L. Rippy (liner notes)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Jerry Smith (piano)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar, Dobro)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Entertainer of The Year’ (Decca Records, 1973) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty: 'Louisiana Woman, Mississippi' (MCA Records, 1973)

On Monday 9 July 1973Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) saw the release of ‘Louisiana Woman, Mississippi’ (MCA Records, 1973), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Louisiana Woman, Mississippi Man’ (written by Becki Bluefield and Jim Owen) (No.1 for one week in August 1973) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1973

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Louisiana Woman, Mississippi’ (MCA Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

For Heaven’s Sake’ (written by Lorene Allen, Frankie Fuller and Maggie Vaughn)
‘Release Me’, which was written by Edward Monroe ‘Eddie’ Miller (Wednesday 10 December 1919 – Monday 11 April 1977) and W.S. Stevenson (1900 – 1978)
‘You Lay So Easy On My Mind’ (written by Charles Fields, Bobby G. Rice and Donald Riis)
‘Our Conscience, You & Me’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)
‘As Good As A Lonely Girl Can Be’, which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 – Tuesday 30 May 2006)
‘Bye Bye Love’, which was written by Felice Bryant (Friday 7 August 1925 – Tuesday 22 April 2003) and Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 – Thursday 25 June 1987)
‘Living Together Alone’ (written by Sandy Burnett and Joe McClure)
‘What Are We Gonna Do About Us?’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘If You Touch Me’, which was written by Joe StampleyCarmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 – Friday 5 December 1986) and Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017)
‘Before Your Time’, which was written by Tommy Markham and Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Louisiana Woman, Mississippi’ (MCA Records, 1973) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (acoustic guitar)
John Hughey (Wednesday 27 December 1933 – Sunday 18 November 2007) (steel guitar)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Tommy Markham (drums)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
The Nashville Sounds (background vocals)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)(lead vocals)

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Louisiana Woman, Mississippi’ (MCA Records, 1973) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.

Loretta Lynn: 'Love Is The Foundation' (MCA Records, 1973)

On Monday 13 August 1973, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Love Is The Foundation’ (MCA Records, 1973), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Love Is The Foundation’ (written by William Cody Hall) (No.1 for two weeks in July 1973) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1973

‘Hey Loretta’, which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 – Monday 10 May 1999) (No.3, 1973) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1973

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Love Is The Foundation’ (MCA Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

‘What Sundown Does To You’ (written by Carl Knight)
‘I Love You, I Love You’, which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 – Monday 17 November 2003)
‘Just To Satisfy (The Weakness In A Man)’ (written by Carol Jones)
‘There’s More To Leaving Than Just Saying Goodbye’ (written by Bob Hampton and Kenny Starr)
‘Satin Sheets’, which was written by John Edward Volinkaty (Friday 27 August 1943 – Friday 4 September 1992)
‘Why Me’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)
‘Five Fingers Left’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘I Gave Everything (That A Girl In Love Should Never Give)’, which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 – Wednesday 8 December 1982)
‘You’re Still Lovin’ Me’ (written by Jay Lee Webb and John Wilson)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Love Is The Foundation’ (MCA Records, 1973) included the following:

Willie Ackerman (Monday 1 May 1939 – Thursday 13 December 2012) and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (electric guitar)
Lloyd Green and Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Jerry Kennedy, Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001), Jerry Shook and Pete Wade (guitar)
Billy Linneman and Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, vibes)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022)
Kenny Starr (liner notes)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Love Is The Foundation’ (MCA Records, 1973) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973.

Loretta Lynn: 'Loretta Lynn's Greatest Hits, Volume II' (MCA Records, 1974)

On Monday 13 May 1974, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Loretta Lynn’s Greatest Hits, Volume II’ (MCA Records, 1974), which included the following tracks:

‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.1 for week in December 1970) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970, and No.83 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1970 In Canada

‘I Wanna Be Free’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.3, 1971) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1971, and No.94 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1971

‘Wings Upon Your Horns’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.11, 1970) / this track also reached No.3 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970

‘Fist City’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.1 for one week in April 1968)

‘You’re Lookin’ At Country’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.5, 1971) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1971

‘Ain’t It Funny’ (written by Tracey Lee) / this track was an album track, which was included on Loretta Lynn’s ‘Entertainer of The Year’ (Decca Records, 1973)

‘One’s On The Way’, which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 – Monday 10 May 1999) (No.1 for one week in ) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1971

‘Your Squaw Is On The Warpath’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.3, 1968) / this track also reached No.17 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1968

‘What Sundown Does To You’ (written by Carl Knight) / this track was an album track, which was included on Loretta Lynn’s ‘Love Is The Foundation’ (MCA Records, 1973)

‘Hey Loretta’, which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 – Monday 10 May 1999) (No.3, 1973) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1973

‘Love Is The Foundation’ (written by William Cody Hall) (No.1 for two weeks in July 1973) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1973

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Loretta Lynn’s Greatest Hits, Volume II’ (MCA Records, 1974) included the following:

Pete Axthelm (liner notes)
Willie Ackerman (Monday 1 May 1939 – Thursday 13 December 2012), Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) and Larry Estes (drums)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar, electric bass guitar)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997), Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Jerry Smith (piano)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Junior Huskey, Billy Linneman, Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021), Norbert Putnam and Joe Zinkan (bass)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar, lead electric guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Harold Morrison (Friday 30 January 1931 – Tuesday 21 December 1993) and Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 – Wednesday 18 May 2005) (banjo)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Dave Thornhill and Pete Wade (guitar)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Loretta Lynn’s Greatest Hits, Volume II’ (MCA Records, 1974) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty: 'Country Partners' (MCA Records, 1974)

On Monday 10 June 1974Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) saw the release of ‘Country Partners’ (MCA Records, 1974), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘As Soon As I Hang Up The Phone’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) (No.1 for one week in August 1974) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1974, and No.57 on the Australian Kent Music Report Chart in 1974

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Country Partners’ (MCA Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

‘Don’t Mess Up A Good Thing’ (written by Oliver Sain)
‘Love’s Not Where Love Should Be’ (written by Tracey Lee)
‘Two Lonely People’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)
‘I Changed My Way’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)   
‘Country Bumpkin’, which was written by Don Wayne (Tuesday 30 May 1933 – Monday 12 September 2011)
‘Spiders & Snakes’ (written by Jim Stafford and David Bellamy)
‘I’m Gettin’ Tired of Losing You’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)   
‘Sweet Things I Remember About You’ (written by Darlene Shofner)
‘It All Falls Down’ (written by Kenny Starr)
‘Lifetime Before’ (written by William Cody Hall and Bill Hayes)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Country Partners’ (MCA Records, 1974) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (acoustic guitar)
John Hughey (Wednesday 27 December 1933 – Sunday 18 November 2007) (steel guitar)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Tommy Markham (drums)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar)
The Nashville Sounds (background vocals)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) (lead vocals)

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Country Partners’ (MCA Records, 1974) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

Loretta Lynn: 'They Don't Make 'Em Like My Daddy' (MCA Records, 1974)

On Monday 2 September 1974, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘They Don’t Make ‘Em Like My Daddy’ (MCA Records, 1974), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘They Don’t Make ‘Em Like My Daddy’, which was written by Jerry Donald Chesnut (Thursday 7 May 1931 – Saturday 15 December 2018) (No.4, 1974) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1974

‘Trouble In Paradise’, which was written by Kenny O’Dell (born Kenneth Gist Jr.) (Wednesday 21 June 1944 – Monday 27 March 2018) (No.1 for one week in November 1974) / this track also reached No.14 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1974

Loretta Lynn’s ‘They Don’t Make ‘Em Like My Daddy’ (MCA Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

‘Behind Closed Doors’, which was written by Kenny O’Dell (born Kenneth Gist Jr.) (Wednesday 21 June 1944 – Monday 27 March 2018)
‘If You Love Me (Let Me Know)’ (written by John Rostill)
‘I’ve Never Been This Far Before’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘We’ve Already Tasted Love’, which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 – Tuesday 30 May 2006)
‘Out of Consideration’ (written by Lorene Allen and James Owen)
‘I Love’, which was written by Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021)
‘Don’t Leave Me Where You Found Me’ (written by Don Choate)
‘Ain’t Love A Good Thing’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)
‘Nothin’, which was written by Jimmy Peppers (passed away on Monday 18 February 2019)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘They Don’t Make ‘Em Like My Daddy’ (MCA Records, 1974) included the following:

Willie Ackerman (Monday 1 May 1939 – Thursday 13 December 2012) and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988), Lloyd Green and Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Jerry Kennedy (guitar, Dobro)
Billy Linneman and Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) and Pete Wade (guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, vibes)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
George Vecsey (liner notes)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘They Don’t Make ‘Em Like My Daddy’ (MCA Records, 1974) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

Loretta Lynn: 'Back To The Country' (MCA Records, 1975)

On Monday 3 February 1975, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Back To The Country’ (MCA Records, 1975), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘The Pill’ (written by Lorene Allen, Don McHan, T.D. Bayless and Loretta Lynn) (No.5, 1975) / this track, despite being banned by a number of radio stations, also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1975, No.70 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1975, and No.49 on the Canadian RPM Top Singles Chart in 1975

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Back To The Country’ (MCA Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

‘Will You Be There?’ (written by Gene Dunlop and Lee Miller)
‘It’s Time To Pay The Fiddler’, which was written by Don Wayne (Tuesday 30 May 1933 – Monday 12 September 2011) and Walter Haynes
‘Paper Roses’ (written by Janice Torre and Fred Spielman)
‘You Love Everybody But You’, which was written by Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021)
‘Mad Mrs. Jesse Brown’ (written by Ronnie Rogers)
‘Back To The Country’ (written by Tracey Lee)
‘The Hands of Yesterday’, which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 – Wednesday 9 March 2016)

‘I Can Help’ (written by Billy Swan) / the original version of this track was recorded by Billy Swan, who included it on ‘I Can Help’ (Monument Records, 1974); Billy Swan‘s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in December 1974, No.1 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1974, and No.6 on the United Kingdom pop music singles chart in 1974

‘Another You’, which was written by Jimmy Peppers (passed away on Monday 18 February 2019)
‘Jimmy On My Mind’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Back To The Country’ (MCA Records, 1975) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (electric guitar, bass guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (rhythm guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
The Jordanaires and Millie Kirkham (background vocals)
Billy Linneman and Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (lead electric guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Jerry Smith (piano)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Pete Wade (rhythm guitar)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Back To The Country’ (MCA Records, 1975) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty: 'Feelings' (MCA Records, 1975)

On Monday 9 June 1975Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) saw the release of ‘Feelins’ (MCA Records, 1975), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Feelins’ (written by Troy Seals, Don Goodman and Will Jennings) (No.1 for ) / this track also reached No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1975

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Feelins’ (MCA Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

‘Dyn-O-Mite’, which was written by Don Wayne (Tuesday 30 May 1933 – Monday 12 September 2011) and Jay Marshall
‘Back Home Again’, which was written by John Denver (Friday 31 December 1943 – Sunday 12 October 1997)
‘I’ll Never Get Tired (of Saying I Love You)’ (written by Kenny L. Starr)
‘Little Boy Love’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘She’s About A Mover’, which was written by Doug Sahm (Thursday 6 November 1941 – Thursday 18 November 1999)
‘Let Me Be There’ (written by John Rostill)
‘You Done Lost Your Baby’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘Store Up Love’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)
‘Some Kind of A Woman’, which was written by Jimmy Peppers (passed away on Monday 18 February 2019) and Tommy Cash

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Feelins’ (MCA Records, 1975) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

Loretta Lynn: 'Home' (MCA Records, 1975)

On Monday 11 August 1975, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Home’ (MCA Records, 1975), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Home’, which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 – Tuesday 30 May 2006) (No.10, 1975)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Home’ (MCA Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

‘Before The Next Teardrop Falls’, which was written by Vivian Keith and Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005) / the original version of this track was recorded by Freddy Fender (Friday 4 June 1937 – Saturday 14 October 2006), who included it on ‘Before The Next Teardrop Falls’ (Dot Records, 1974); Freddy Fender’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in March 1975, and reached No.1 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in May 1975

this track was also recorded, as a non-album track, by Gene Watson, for Wide World Records in 1969; Gene Watson’s version of the track was subsequently included on ‘Only Memories: Spotlight On New World Records’ (Collectibles Records, 1996), a various artists compilation, which focused on material from New World Records, and was released by Collectibles Records on Tuesday 25 June 1996

‘The Window Up Above’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013)
‘(Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song’, which was written by Larry Butler (Thursday 26 March 1942 – Friday 20 January 2012) and Lincoln Wayne ‘Chips’ Moman (Saturday 12 June 1937 – Monday 13 June 2016)
‘You Take Me To Heaven Every Night’, which was written by Jimmy Peppers (passed away on Monday 18 February 2019)
‘Wrong Road Again’ (written by Allen Reynolds)

‘Always Wanting You’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) / the original version of this track was recorded by Merle Haggard, who included it on ‘Keep Movin’ On’ (Capitol Records, 1975); Merle Haggard‘s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in April 1975

‘No Place Else To Go’, which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 – Monday 10 May 1999)
‘He’s Only Everything’, which was written by Faron Young (Thursday 25 February 1932 – Tuesday 10 December 1996) and Billy Joe Deaton (1935 – Saturday 31 October 2009)
‘Bring Some of It Home’ (written by Lola Jean Dillon)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Home’ (MCA Records, 1975) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022), Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) and Pete Wade (guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Lloyd Green and Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
The Jordanaires (background vocals)
Mike Leech (bass)
Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021) (drums)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, vibes)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Jerry Smith (piano)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Home’ (MCA Records, 1975) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

Loretta Lynn: 'When The Tingle Becomes A Chill' (MCA Records, 1976)
Heather Myles: 'Sweet Little Dangerous' (Demon Records, 1996)

On Monday 2 February 1976, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘When The Tingle Becomes A Chill’ (MCA Records, 1976), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘When The Tingle Becomes A Chill’ (written by Lola Jean Dillon) (No.2, 1976) / this track was also recorded by Heather Myles, who included it on ‘Sweet Little Dangerous’ (Demon Records, 1996)

‘Red, White & Blue’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.20, 1976)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘When The Tingle Becomes A Chill’ (MCA Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

‘You Love You’, which was written by Jerry Donald Chesnut (Thursday 7 May 1931 – Saturday 15 December 2018)
‘Leaning On Your Love’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘All I Want From You Is Away’, which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 – Tuesday 30 May 2006)
‘Rhinestone Cowboy’ (written by Larry Weiss)
‘Turn Me Anyway But Loose’ (written by Kenton Riley and Randy Burnett)
‘Daydreams About Night Things’ (written by John Schweers)
‘She’ll Never Know’ (written by Lorene Allen and Ray Buzzeo)
‘Just Get Up & Close The Door’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘When The Tingle Becomes A Chill’ (MCA Records, 1976) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
Johnny Christopher, Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) and Pete Wade (guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Lloyd Green and Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
The Jordanaires and The Nashville Edition (background vocals)
Mike Leech (bass)
Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021) (drums)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, vibes)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘When The Tingle Becomes A Chill’ (MCA Records, 1976) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty: 'United Talent' (MCA Records, 1976)

On Monday 7 June 1976Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) saw the release of ‘United Talent’ (MCA Records, 1976), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘The Letter’, which was written by Charles Haney and Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) (No.3, 1976) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1976

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘United Talent’ (MCA Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

‘Just Lead The Way’ (written by Jimmie Peters and Mark McNair)
‘Let Your Love Flow’ (written by Larry E. Williams)
‘God Bless America Again’ (written by Bobby Bare and Boyce Hawkins)
‘Run Through The Wringer’ (written by Gail Bingham and Olen Bingham)
‘Barroom Habits’, which was written by Wayne Kemp (Sunday 1 June 1941 – Monday 9 March 2015)
‘We’re Caught Between A Love & A Love Affair’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)and Lola Jean Dillon
‘I’m Gonna Roll You Like A Wheel’, which was written by Vic McAlpin (Monday 4 February 1918 – Friday 18 January 1980)
‘We’ll Finish Up Falling In Love’, which was written by Eugene David Dobbins (Monday 19 March 1934 – Sunday 23 November 2008) and Johnny Wilson
‘The Only Way Around It (Is Right Through The Middle)’, which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 – Tuesday 30 May 2006)

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘United Talent’ (MCA Records, 1976) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.

Loretta Lynn: 'Somebody Somewhere' (MCA Records, 1976)

On Monday 4 October 1976, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Somebody Somewhere’ (MCA Records, 1976), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Somebody Somewhere (Don’t Know What He’s Missin’ Tonight)’ (written by Lola Jean Dillon) (No.1 for two weeks in November 1976)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Somebody Somewhere’ (MCA Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

‘Sundown Tavern’ (written by Tracey Lee)
‘The Games That Daddies Play’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘While He’s Making Love (I’m Making Believe)’ (written by Frances Rhodes)
‘Crawling Man’ (written by David Wilkins)
‘Me & Ole Crazy Bill’ (written by Bill Dees and Wes Helm)
‘I’ll Leave The Leavin’ Up To You’ (written by Ken Jones and Lamar Morris)
‘Your Woman, Your Friend’ (written by Peggy Forman)
‘Playing With Fire’ (written by Lola Jean Dillon)
Blue Eyed Kentucky Girl’, which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 – Tuesday 30 May 2006)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Somebody Somewhere’ (MCA Records, 1976) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (rhythm guitar)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (lead guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Somebody Somewhere’ (MCA Records, 1976) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.

It was also in 1976 when Loretta Lynn saw the release of her autobiography, ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’, with the help of writer George Vecsey; the book became a No.1 bestseller, making Loretta Lynn the first country music artist to make The New York Times ‘Best Seller’ list.

Loretta Lynn: 'I Remember Patsy' (MCA Records, 1977)

On Monday 4 April 1977Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘I Remember Patsy’ (MCA Records, 1977), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

She’s Got You’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010) (No.1 for one week in April 1977) / the original version of this track was recorded by Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 – Tuesday 5 March 1963), who included it on ‘Sentimentally Yours’ (Decca Records, 1962 / MCA Records, 1973 / MCA Records, 1988); Patsy Cline’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for five weeks in March / April 1962, No.14 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1962, No.3 on the Billboard Easy Listening Chart in 1962, and No.43 on the United Kingdom Singles Chart in 1962

‘Why Can’t He Be You’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010) (No.7, 1976) / the original version of this track was recorded by Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 – Tuesday 5 March 1963) on Wednesday 5 September 1962, and was released as the B-side to Patsy Cline’s 1962 single, ‘Heartaches’.  While the A-side reached No.73 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart, ‘Why Can’t He Be You’ reached a peak position on the Billboard Bubbling Under Hot 100 singles chart, stalling at No.7.  The track did not appear on an official album until the release of Patsy Cline’s ‘Greatest Hits’ (Decca Records, 1967)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘I Remember Patsy’ (MCA Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

‘Walkin’ After Midnight’, which was written by Alan Block and Donn Hecht (1930 – Friday 18 October 2002) / the original version of this track was recorded by Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 – Tuesday 5 March 1963), who included it on ‘Patsy Cline’ (Decca Records, 1957 / MCA Records, 1988); Patsy Cline’s version of the track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1957, and No.12 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1957

‘Faded Love’, which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 – Tuesday 13 May 1975), John Wills and Billy Jack Wills / the original version of this track was recorded by Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 – Tuesday 5 March 1963) in 1963, and was released as a single, reaching No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1963, and No.96 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1963 / the track was subsequently included on Patsy Cline’s ‘Greatest Hits’ (Decca Records, 1967)

‘I Fall To Pieces’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010)and Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) / the original version of this track was recorded by Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 – Tuesday 5 March 1963), who included it on ‘Showcase’ (Decca Records, 1961 / MCA Records, 1973 / MCA Records, 1988); Patsy Cline’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1961, and No.12 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1961

‘Crazy’ (written by Willie Nelson) / the original version of this track was recorded by Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 – Tuesday 5 March 1963), who included it on ‘Showcase’ (Decca Records, 1961 / MCA Records, 1973 / MCA Records, 1988); Patsy Cline’s version of the track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1961, and No.9 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1961 / the track also reached No.14 on the United Kingdom & Irish pop music singles charts in 1991

‘Sweet Dreams’, which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 – Monday 17 November 2003) / the original version of this track was recorded by Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 – Tuesday 5 March 1963) in early 1963, and was released as a single, reaching No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1963, and No.44 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1963 / the track was subsequently included on ‘The Patsy Cline Story’ (Decca Records, 1963 / MCA Records, 1988)

‘Back In Baby’s Arms’, which was written by Bob Montgomery (Wednesday 12 May 1937 – Thursday 4 December 2014) / the original version of this track was recorded by Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 – Tuesday 5 March 1963) in early 1963, and was written specifically for Patsy Cline; it was never released as a single, and was subsequently included on ‘The Patsy Cline Story’ (Decca Records, 1963 / MCA Records, 1988)

‘Leavin’ On Your Mind’, which was written by Wayne Walker and Webb Pierce (Monday 8 August 1921 – Sunday 24 February 1991) / the original version of this track was recorded by Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 – Tuesday 5 March 1963) in early 1963, and was released as a single, reaching No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1963, and No.83 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1963 / the track was subsequently included on ‘The Patsy Cline Story’ (Decca Records, 1963 / MCA Records, 1988)

‘I Remember Patsy…A Conversation’ / this track was an except from an interview from circa 1976 , an exact recording date for which is unknown

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘I Remember Patsy’ (MCA Records, 1977) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
David Briggs, Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Bobby Wood (piano)
Johnny Christopher, Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) and Pete Wade (guitar)
Lloyd Green and Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
The Jordanaires (backing vocals)
Mike Leech (bass)
Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021) (drums)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, vibes)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘I Remember Patsy’ (MCA Records, 1977) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty: 'Dynamic Duo' (MCA Records, 1977)

On Monday 6 June 1977Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) saw the release of ‘Dynamic Duo’ (MCA Records, 1977), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘I Can’t Love You Enough’, which was written by Troy Seals and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004) (No.2, 1977) / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1977

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Dynamic Duo’ (MCA Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

‘We’re Much Too Close’, which was written by Troy Seals and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004)
‘Soulshake’ (written by Mira Smith and Margaret Lewis)
‘The Bed I’m Dreaming On’ (written by Lola Jean Dillon)
‘Hey, Good Lookin’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
‘Get It On’ (written by Raymond A. Smith)
‘Where Old Loves Gather Dust’, which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 – Tuesday 30 May 2006)
‘We Can Try It One More Time’, which was written by Bill Rhodes and Rayburn Anthony (1937 – Saturday 21 April 2018)
‘Hide & Seek’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)

Gene Watson & Rhonda Vincent: 'Your Money & My Good Looks' (Upper Management Music, 2011)

 

‘You Could Know As Much About A Stranger’ (written by Nadine Bryant) / the original version of this track was recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on Love in The Hot Afternoon‘ (Capitol Records, 1975)

this track was also recorded by Billie Jo Spears (Friday 14 January 1938 – Wednesday 14 December 2011), who included it on ‘Standing Tall’ (United Artists Records, 1980)

this track was re-recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on ‘Gene Watson: Then & Now‘ (Koch Records Nashville, 2005)

this track was also recorded by Gene Watson & Rhonda Vincent, who included it on ‘Your Money & My Good Looks‘ (Upper Management Music, 2011)

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Dynamic Duo’ (MCA Records, 1977) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.

Loretta Lynn: 'Out of My Head & Back In My Bed' (MCA Records, 1978)

On Monday 13 February 1978, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Out of My Head & Back In My Bed’ (MCA Records, 1978), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Out of My Head & Back In My Bed’ (written by Peggy Forman) (No.1 for two weeks in January / February 1978)

‘Spring Fever’ (written by Lola Jean Dillon) (No.12, 1978)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Out of My Head & Back In My Bed’ (MCA Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

‘Three Riddles’ (written by John Adrian)
‘The Dead Is A Risin’ (written by Ken Jones)
‘Old Rooster’ (written by Tracey Lee)
‘Black-Eyed Peas & Blue-Eyed Babies’ (written by Susie McCoy)
‘You Snap Your Fingers (& I’m Back In Your Hands)’ (written by John Schweers)
‘His Lovin’ Told Me He Was Gone’, which was written by Blake Mevis (1949 – Wednesday 9 February 2022), William C. Hall and Bill Haynes
‘I’m Gonna Do Somebody Right’ (written by Casey Kelly and Julie Didier)
‘God Bless The Children’ (written by Dallas Cody)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Out of My Head & Back In My Bed’ (MCA Records, 1978) included the following:

Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
The Jordanaires and The Nashville Edition (background vocals)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Out of My Head & Back In My Bed’ (MCA Records, 1978) reached No.16 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty: 'Honky Tonk Heroes' (MCA Records, 1978)

On Monday 26 June 1978Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) saw the release of ‘Honky Tonk Heroes’ (MCA Records, 1978), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘From Seven ‘Til Ten’, which was written by Troy Seals and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004) (No.6, 1978) / this track also reached No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1978

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Honky Tonk Heroes’ (MCA Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

‘I’ve Already Loved You In My Mind’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘The Last of It All’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004) and Lola Jean Dillon
‘How High Can You Build A Fire’ (written by John Riggs)
‘Fire of Two Old Flames’, which was written by Troy Seals and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004)

‘You’re The Reason Our Kids Are Ugly’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)and Lola Jean Dillon / this track was also recorded by Cyndi Lauper, who included it on ‘Detour’ (Sire Records / Rhino Records / Atlantic Records, 2016); Cyndi Lauper’s version of the track was a duet with Vince Gill

‘We’ve Made It Legal’ (written by Marie Wilson, Sudie Calloway and Lorene Mann)
‘How Can You Keep From Lovin’ (A Woman Like That)’, which was written by Dean Sanford and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004)
‘Live It Up’ (written by Norris Wilson, Ross Faith and Pal Rakes)
‘Country Blues’ (written by Marilyn Allyn and Jo-el Sonnier)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Honky Tonk Heroes’ (MCA Records, 1978) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
Carol Lee Cooper, The Jordanaires, The Nashville Edition, and L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004) (backing vocals)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (rhythm guitar)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
John Hughey (Wednesday 27 December 1933 – Sunday 18 November 2007) (steel guitar)
Tommy ‘Porkchop’ Markham (drums)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (lead guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Honky Tonk Heroes’ (MCA Records, 1978) reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978, and No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1978.

Loretta Lynn: 'We've Come A Long Way, Baby' (MCA Records, 1979)

On Monday 15 January 1979, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘We’ve Come A Long Way, Baby’ (MCA Records, 1979), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘We’ve Come A Long Way, Baby’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)and Shirl Milete (No.10, 1979)

‘I Can’t Feel You Anymore’ (written by Theresa Beaty and Meredith Stewart) (No.3, 1979)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘We’ve Come A Long Way, Baby’ (MCA Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

‘Easy Street’, which was written by Kenny O’Dell (born Kenneth Gist Jr.) (Wednesday 21 June 1944 – Monday 27 March 2018)
‘The Lady That Lived Here Before’ (written by Vera Lakey)
‘Lullabies To A Memory’ (written by Lola Jean Dillon)
‘True Love Needs To Keep In Touch’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Sanger D. ‘Whitey’ Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 – Saturday 12 January 2019)
‘My Conscience Goes To Sleep’ (written by Carl Knight)
‘No Love Left Inside of Me’, which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 – Monday 10 May 1999)
‘Between The Preacher & The Lawyer’ (written by Lola Jean Dillon)
‘Standing At Our Bedroom Door’ (written by Theresa Beaty)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘We’ve Come A Long Way, Baby’ (MCA Records, 1979) reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1979.

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty: 'Diamond Duet' (MCA Records, 1979)

On Monday 22 October 1979Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) saw the release of ‘Diamond Duet’ (MCA Records, 1979), which was produced by David Barnes, Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

You Know Just What I’d Do’, which was written by Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023) and Jerry Foster (No.9, 1979) / this track also reached No.5 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1979

‘It’s True Love’ (written by Randy Goodrum) (No.5, 1980) / this track also reached No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1980

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Diamond Duet’ (MCA Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

‘That’s All That Matters’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010)
‘Hit The Road, Jack’ (written by Percy Mayfield)
‘Baby, Don’t Get Hooked On Me’, which was written by Mac Davis (Wednesday 21 January 1942 – Tuesday 29 September 2020)
‘Even A Fool Would Let Go’, which was written by Kerry Michael Chater (Tuesday 7 August 1945 – Tuesday 1 February 2022) and Tom Snow
‘The Sadness of It All’ (written by Russell Wolfe III)
‘What’s A Little Love Between Friends?’, which was written by Billy Burnette and Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 – Thursday 18 December 2014)
‘Rising Above It All’, which was written by Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023) and Jerry Foster
‘You Never Cross My Mind’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016), Deborah Allen and Rafe Van Hoy

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Diamond Duet’ (MCA Records, 1979) included the following:

David Barnes (arrangements)
Johnny Christopher (acoustic guitar)
Mike Leech (bass)
Jerry Irby Carrigan (Monday 13 September 1943 – Saturday 22 June 2019) (drums, percussion)
Cindy Reynolds (harp)
Bobby Wood (keyboards)
Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (lead guitar)
John Hughey (Wednesday 27 December 1933 – Sunday 18 November 2007) (steel guitar)
The Sheldon ‘Shelly’ Kurland (Saturday 9 June 1928 – Wednesday 6 January 2010) Strings (strings)
Dennis Solee (woodwinds)
Duane West, Janie Fricke, Lea Jane Berinati and Tom Brannon (backing vocals)

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Diamond Duet’ (MCA Records, 1979) reached No.22 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1979.

Loretta Lynn: 'Loretta' (MCA Records, 1980)

On Monday 3 March 1980, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Loretta’ (MCA Records, 1980), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

I’ve Got A Picture of Us On My Mind’, which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 – Tuesday 30 May 2006)(No.5, 1980)

‘Pregnant Again’ (written by Lee Pockriss and Marl Sameth) (No.35, 1980)

‘Naked In The Rain’ (written by Buddy Cannon and Kenny Starr) (No.30, 1980)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Loretta’ (MCA Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

‘Sweet, Sweet Daddy’, which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 – Tuesday 30 May 2006)
‘It’s Too Late To Love Me Now’, which was written by Eugene David Dobbins (Monday 19 March 1934 – Sunday 23 November 2008), Johnny Wilson and Rory Bourke
‘You’re A Cross I Can’t Bear’ (written by Hank Riddle)
‘I’ve Been Lonely So Long’ (written by Bruce Frazier and Joey Scarbury)
‘It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels’, which was written by Joseph Denton ‘Jay’ Miller (Friday 5 May 1922 – Saturday 23 March 1996)
‘I Should Be Over You By Now’ (written by Theresa Beaty)
‘The Fool Wouldn’t Listen’ (written by Jerri Kelly)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Loretta’ (MCA Records, 1980) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
James Caddell, Jean Chapman, Joey Scarbury and Joan Sliwin (backing vocals)
Jerry Kirby Carrigan (Monday 13 September 1943 – Saturday 22 June 2019), Gene Chrisman and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
John Christopher, Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022), Pete Wade and Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (guitar)
Mike Leech (bass)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Bobby Wood (piano)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 – Monday 29 December 2014) (electric bass)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Loretta’ (MCA Records, 1980) reached No.24 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.

Loretta Lynn and Sissy Spacek

On Wednesday 5 March 1980, the film ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ debuted in Nashville and soon became the No.1 box office hit in the United States.  The film, which starred Sissy Spacek as Loretta Lynn and Tommy Lee Jones as her husband, Doolittle ‘Mooney’ Lynn, received seven Academy Award nominations, winning the ‘Best Actress’ Oscar for Sissy Spacek, a ‘Gold’ album for the soundtrack album, a Grammy Award nomination for Sissy Spacek, Country Music Association (CMA) and Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards, and several Golden Globe awards.

Loretta Lynn: 'Lookin' Good' (MCA Records, 1980)

On Monday 13 October 1980, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Lookin’ Good’ (MCA Records, 1980), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

Cheatin’ On A Cheater’ (written by Johnny Wilson and Woody Bomar) (No.20, 1980)

‘Somebody Led Me Away’ (written by Lola Jean Dillon) (No.20, 1981)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Lookin’ Good’ (MCA Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

‘Take Your Time In Leavin’ (written by Jerri Kelly)
‘Sometimes I Go Crazy’ (written by Vicki Sallen and Gene Dunlap)
‘Workin’ Man’, which was written by Ted Harris (Monday 2 August 1937 – Sunday 22 November 2015)
‘I Don’t Feel Like Living Today’ (written by Peggy Forman)
‘Everybody’s Lookin’ For Somebody New’ (written by James K.C. Ross and Len Chiriacka)
‘Cracker Jack Jewelry’, which was written by Van Stephenson (Wednesday 4 November 1953 – Sunday 8 April 2001), Johnny Slate and Danny Morrison (Sunday 22 April 1945 – Tuesday 14 February 2012)
‘What Am I Gonna Do?’ (written by Kim Carnes and Dave Ellingson)
‘Until I Met You’ (written by Hank Riddle)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Lookin’ Good’ (MCA Records, 1980) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
David Briggs, Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Bobby Wood (piano) (piano)
Gene Chrisman and Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021) (drums)
Johnny Christopher, Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022), Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001), Pete Wade and Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (guitar)
Sonny Garrish, Lloyd Green and Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Mike Leech (bass)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
The Nashville Sounds (backing vocals)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Lookin’ Good’ (MCA Records, 1980) reached No.17 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty: 'Two's A Party' (MCA Records, 1981)

On Monday 2 February 1981Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) saw the release of ‘Two’s A Party’ (MCA Records, 1981), which was produced by Ron Chancey, Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Lovin’ What Your Lovin’ Does To Me’, which was written by Jane Crouch (1920 – Wednesday 17 December 2008) and Toni Dae (No.7, 1981) / the track also reached No.5 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1981

‘I Still Believe In Waltzes’, which was written by Bob Morrison, Johnny MacRae (1929 – Wednesday 3 July 2013) and Michael Hughes (No.2, 1981) / this track also reached No 3 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1981

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Two’s A Party’ (MCA Records, 1981) also included the following tracks:

‘Two’s A Party’ (written by Rafe Van Hoy)
‘The State of Our Union’ (written by Chip Hardy and Jim Rushing)
‘I’d Rather Have What We Had’ (written by Bobby Braddock)
‘Oh Honey, Oh Babe’, which was written by Bob Morrison and Johnny MacRae (1929 – Wednesday 3 July 2013)
‘Right In The Palm of Your Hand’ (written by Bob McDill)
‘Silent Partner’ (written by Tom Damphier)
‘We’ve Been Strong Long Enough’, which was written by Paul Craft (Friday 12 August 1938 – Saturday 18 October 2014)
‘If I Ever Had To Say Goodbye To You’ (written by Steve Gibb)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Two’s A Party’ (MCA Records, 1981) included the following:

Bergen White (string arrangements)
John Christopher (acoustic guitar)
Paul Uhrig (bass)
Clay Caire (drums)
Jerry Kirby Carrigan (Monday 13 September 1943 – Saturday 22 June 2019) (drums, percussion)
Samuel Levine (flute)
Eberhard Ramm (French horn)
Shane Keister (keyboards)
Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (lead guitar)
John Hughey (Wednesday 27 December 1933 – Sunday 18 November 2007) (steel guitar)
The Sheldon ‘Shelly’ Kurland (Saturday 9 June 1928 – Wednesday 6 January 2010) Strings (strings)
Loretta Lynn and Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)(lead vocals)
Donna McCroy, Duane West, Jackie Cusic, Lea Jane Berinati, Tom Brannon, Vicki Hampton and Yvonne Hodges (backing vocals)

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Two’s A Party’ (MCA Records, 1981) reached No.28 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1981.

In May 1981, Elvis Costello & The Attractions recorded Loretta Lynn’s’ ‘Honky Tonk Girl’, but the track was not included on ‘Almost Blue’ (United Kingdom: F-Beat Records, 1981 / United States: Columbia Records, 1981), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015).

However, Loretta Lynn’s ‘Honky Tonk Girl’ was included on a re-issue, on Rhino Records, on Tuesday 3 August 2004, of Elvis Costello & The Attractions’ ‘Almost Blue’ (United Kingdom: F-Beat Records, 1981 / United States: Columbia Records, 1981).

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 - Saturday 5 June 1993)

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)

For four consecutive years, between 1972 and 1975, Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) were named ‘Vocal Duo of The Year’ by the Country Music Association (CMA).

The Academy of Country Music (ACM) named Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) ‘Best Vocal Duet’ in 1971, 1974, 1975 and 1976.

The American Music Awards selected Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) as the ‘Favourite Country Duo’ in 1975, 1976 and 1977.

The fan-voted Music City News readers voted Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) the No.1 duet every year between 1971 and 1981.

In addition to their five No.1 singles, Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) also had seven other Top 10 hit singles between 1976 and 1981.

Loretta Lynn: 'I Lie' (MCA Records, 1982)

On Monday 1 February 1982, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘I Lie’ (MCA Records, 1982), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘I Lie’ (written by Thomas William Damphier) (No.9, 1982)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘I Lie’ (MCA Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

‘If I Ain’t Got It (You Don’t Need It)’, which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004)
‘There Stands The Glass’, which was written by Russ Hall (December 1911 – June 1992), Mary Jean Shurtz (17 June 1906 – Monday 20 July 1964) and Audrey Greisham
‘I Wanted You To Leave’ (written by Barbara Hart)
‘Stronger Than You Ever Thought I’d Be’ (written by Mitch Johnson and Robert John Jones)
‘Step Right Up & Break My Heart’ (written by Justin Dickens and Bill Curry)
‘Save Me’ (written by John E. Moffatt)
‘Going’s Been Coming’ (written by Theresa Beaty)
‘Where Love Goes When It’s Gone’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)
‘A Motel Match’ (written by Mitch Johnson and Theresa Beaty)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘I Lie’ (MCA Records, 1982) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
David Briggs, Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Bobby Wood (piano)
James Caddell, Jean Ann Chapman, The Dottie Dee Singers, The Jordanaires, The Nashville Sounds, Joel Scarbury and Joan Sliwin (backing vocals)
Jimmy Capps (Thursday 25 May 1939 – Monday 1 June 2020), Johnny Christopher, Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022), Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001), Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 – Wednesday 18 May 2005), Pete Wade and Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (guitar)
Gene Chrisman, Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) and Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021) (drums)
Sonny Garrish and Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Mike Leech and Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
The Sheldon ‘Shelly’ Kurland (Saturday 9 June 1928 – Wednesday 6 January 2010) Strings (strings)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘I Lie’ (MCA Records, 1982) reached No.33 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.

Loretta Lynn: 'Making Love From Memory' (MCA Records, 1982)

On Monday 6 September 1982, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Making Love From Memory’ (MCA Records, 1982), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Making Love From Memory’ (written by Nilda Daniel and Sidney L. Linard) (No.19, 1982)

‘Breakin’ It’ (written by Mark Germino) (No.39, 1982)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Making Love From Memory’ (MCA Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

‘Don’t It Feel Good?’ (written by William C. Hall)
‘I Shouldn’t Enjoy Enjoying You So Much’, which was written by Bobby Harden (Thursday 27 June 1935 – Tuesday 30 May 2006), Mitch Johnson and Lola Jean Dillon
‘There’s All Kinds of Smoke In The Barroom’, which was written by Don Wayne (Tuesday 30 May 1933 – Monday 12 September 2011)
‘Love The Day Away’ (written by Thomas William Damphier)
‘When We Get Back Together’ (written by Nancy Dolman and Gordon Waszek)
‘Then You’ll Be Free’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘I Don’t Want To Hear It Anymore’ (written by Glen Clark)
‘Deeper & Deeper’ (written by Thomas William Damphier)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Making Love From Memory’ (MCA Records, 1982) included the following:

David Briggs (synthesizer, piano)
Jimmy Capps (Thursday 25 May 1939 – Monday 1 June 2020), Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) and Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 – Wednesday 18 May 2005) (rhythm guitar)
Gene Chrisman (drums)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums, backing vocals)
The Jordanaires, Millie Kirkham, and The Nashville Sounds (backing vocals)
Mike Leech and Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001), Pete Wade and Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (electric guitar)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
The Nashville String Machine (strings)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Dennis Solee (saxophone)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Making Love From Memory’ (MCA Records, 1982) did not chart on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart.

In 1983, Loretta Lynn was inducted into The Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame

In 1983, Loretta Lynn was inducted into The Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame.

Loretta Lynn: 'Lyin', Cheatin', Woman Chasin', Honky Tonkin', Whiskey Drinkin' You' (MCA Records, 1983)

On Monday 30 May 1983, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Lyin’, Cheatin’, Woman Chasin’, Honky Tonkin’, Whiskey Drinkin’ You’ (MCA Records, 1983), which was produced by Ron Chancey and Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

Lyin’, Cheatin’, Woman Chasin’, Honky Tonkin’, Whiskey Drinkin’ You’, which was written by Eugene David Dobbins (Monday 19 March 1934 – Sunday 23 November 2008) and Pat McManus (No.53, 1983)

‘Walking With My Memories’ (written by Fred Koller and Mike Pace) (No.59, 1983)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Lyin’, Cheatin’, Woman Chasin’, Honky Tonkin’, Whiskey Drinkin’ You’ (MCA Records, 1983) also included the following tracks:

‘The Heart To Start Over’ (written by Bob House and Jim Rushing)
‘Starlight, Starbright’ (written by Bud Lee and Jim Rushing)
‘I Feel Like I Could Fall In Love With Anyone Tonight’, which was written by Thomas William Damphier and Sharon Higgins (Sunday 6 July 1941 – Friday 3 January 2003)
‘My Love’s Not A One Night Thing’ (written by Frank Knapp and Lynne Van Deren)
‘Heart of The Matter’ (written by Jim Rushing and Don Schultz)
‘Touch Me With More Than Your Hands’ (written by Buzz Rabin)
‘The Next Time’, which was written by Jerry Donald Chesnut (Thursday 7 May 1931 – Saturday 15 December 2018)
‘It’s Gone’ (written by Janis Carnes, Rick Carnes and Mitch Johnson)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Lyin’, Cheatin’, Woman Chasin’, Honky Tonkin’, Whiskey Drinkin’ You’ (MCA Records, 1983) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (bass guitar)
David Briggs, Ron Oates, Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Bobby Wood (piano, keyboards)
Kenneth Buttrey, Eugene Chrisman and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Jimmy Capps (Thursday 25 May 1939 – Monday 1 June 2020), Johnny Christopher, Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022), Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001), Dale Sellers, Jerry Shook and Pete Wade (guitar)
Sonny Garrish and Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Mike Leech, Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) and Joe Osborn (bass)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Mark Morris (percussion)
The Nashville String Machine (strings)
Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (electric guitar)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Lyin’, Cheatin’, Woman Chasin’, Honky Tonkin’, Whiskey Drinkin’ You’ (MCA Records, 1983) reached No.60 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.

Sissy Spacek: 'Hangin' Up My Heart' (Atlantic Records, 1983)

It was also in 1983, when Sissy Spacek saw the release of her debut album, ‘Hangin’ Up My Heart’ (Atlantic Records, 1983), which was produced by Rodney Crowell; one of the included tracks was ‘Smooth Talkin’ Daddy’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Sissy Spacek).

Loretta Lynn: 'Just A Woman' (MCA Records, 1985)

On Monday 8 July 1985, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Just A Woman’ (MCA Records, 1985), which was produced by Jimmy Bowen and Loretta Lynn, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Heart Don’t Do This To Me’ (written by Kin Vassy and Justin Wilde) (No.19, 1985)

‘Wouldn’t It Be Great’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.72, 1985)

‘Just A Woman’, which was written by Stewart Harris (Tuesday 12 August 1958 – Sunday 30 April 2023) and Carlotta McGee (No.82, 1986)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Just A Woman’ (MCA Records, 1985) also included the following tracks:

‘Stop The Clock’ (written by Bobby Braddock, Ron Hellard and Bucky Jones)
‘When I’m In Love All Alone’ (written by Dave Loggins and Judy Rodman)
‘I Can’t Say It On The Radio’ (written by Chris Waters and Tom Shapiro)
‘I’ll Think of Something’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘Adam’s Rib’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Take Me In Your Arms & Hold Me’ (written by Tom Damphier)
‘One Man Band’ (written by Don Ruth and Timmy Toppan)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Just A Woman’ (MCA Records, 1985) included the following:

Larry Byrom, Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) and Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (guitar)
Chip Hardy and John A. Hobbs (Saturday 11 February 1928 – Wednesday 12 June 2019) (keyboards)
David Hungate (bass guitar)
David Innis (synthesizer)
Jana King, Donna Rhodes, Perry Rhodes and Ned Wimmer (backing vocals)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 – Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Mark O’Connor (fiddle, mandola)
Gove Scrivenor (autoharp)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Just A Woman’ (MCA Records, 1985) reached No.63 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.

In 1988, Loretta Lynn was inducted into The Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville.

In 1988, Loretta Lynn was inducted into The Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville.

k.d. lang: 'Shadowland' (Warner Bros. Records, 1988)

In 1988, k.d. lang saw the release of ‘Shadowland’ (Sire Records / Warner Bros. Records, 1988), which was produced by Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998); one of the included tracks was ‘The Honky Tonk Angels’ Medley’ of ‘In The Evening (When The Sun Goes Down)’ (written by Leroy Carr and Don Raye), ‘You Nearly Lose Your Mind’ (written by Ernest Tubb) & ‘Blues Stay Away From Me’ (written by Alton Delmore, Rabon Delmore, Wayne Raney and Henry Glover), which featured guest vocals from Loretta Lynn, Kitty Wells (Saturday 30 August 1919 – Monday 16 July 2012) and Brenda Lee.

Loretta Lynn: 'Who Was That Stranger' (MCA Records, 1988)

On Tuesday 24 May 1988, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Who Was That Stranger’ (MCA Records, 1988), which was produced by Jimmy Bowen, Chip Hardy and Loretta Lynn, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Who Was That Stranger’, which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004)Don Cook and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) (No.57, 1988)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Who Was That Stranger’ (MCA Records, 1988) also included the following tracks:

‘Your Used To Be’ (written by Toni Dae)
‘Married Ladies’ (written by Walter Carter and Sandi Lifson)
‘You’re Gonna Catch Heaven (When I Get You Home)’, which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 – Wednesday 1 July 2015)
‘Mountain Climber’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Fly Away’, which was written by Frank Dycus (Tuesday 5 December 1939 – Friday 23 November 2012)
‘Walk On Water’ (written by Larry Alderman and Janet McLaughlin)
‘Elzie Banks’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Still In The Ring’ (written by Michael Garvin and Bucky Jones)
‘Survivor’ (written by John Moffat)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Who Was That Stranger’ (MCA Records, 1988) included the following:

Paul Anastasio (fiddle)
Eddie Bayers (drums)
Mike Caldwell (harmonica)
Béla Fleck (banjo)
Bill Hullett (Dobro, acoustic guitar)
David Hungate (bass guitar)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals, background vocals)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 – Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Peggy Sue and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Matt Rollings (piano)
Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) (acoustic guitar)
Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (electric guitar)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Who Was That Stranger’ (MCA Records, 1988), which reached No.63 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988, was Loretta Lynn’s first album to be issued on CD at the time of its release.

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty: 'Making Believe' (MCA Records, 1988)

On Monday 5 September 1988Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) saw the release of ‘Making Believe’ (MCA Records, 1988), which was produced by Jimmy Bowen, Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998), David Barnes, Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Making Believe’, which was written by Jimmy Work (Saturday 29 March 1924 – Saturday 22 December 2018) / this track was released as a single in September 1988, but it did not chart

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Making Believe’ (MCA Records, 1988) also included the following tracks:

‘I Can’t Help It (If I’m Still In Love With You)’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
‘Faded Love’, which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 – Tuesday 13 May 1975) and John Wills
‘Half As Much’, which was written by Curley Williams (Wednesday 3 June 1914 – Saturday 5 September 1970)
‘Please Help Me I’m Falling In Love’, which was written by Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 – Monday 16 March 2015) 
and Hal Blair

‘Hey, Good Lookin’ ‘, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953) / this track was originally included on Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Dynamic Duo’ (MCA Records, 1977)

‘Release Me’, which was written by Edward Monroe ‘Eddie’ Miller (Wednesday 10 December 1919 – Monday 11 April 1977) and W.S. Stevenson (1900 – 1978) / this track was originally included on Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Louisiana Woman, Mississippi Man’ (MCA Records, 1973)

‘Back Home Again’, which was written by John Denver (Friday 31 December 1943 – Sunday 12 October 1997) / this track was originally included on Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Feelins’ (MCA Records, 1975)

‘As Soon As I Hang Up The Phone’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) / this track was originally included on Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Country Partners’ (MCA Records, 1974)

‘It’s True Love’ (written by Randy Goodrum) / this track was originally included on Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Diamond Duet’ (MCA Records, 1979)

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘Making Believe’ (MCA Records, 1988) reached No.62 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988.

Randy Travis: 'Heroes & Friends' (Warner Bros. Records, 1990)
Little Jimmy Dickens: 'Country Music Hall of Fame' (King Records, 1982)
Merle Haggard: 'Going Where The Lonely Go' (Epic Records, 1982)

  

On Friday 31 August 1990Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Heroes & Friends’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1990); one of the included tracks was ‘Shopping For Dresses’, which was written by Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 – Friday 2 January 2015) and Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016), and was a duet with Loretta Lynn.

Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 – Friday 2 January 2015) recorded ‘Shopping For Dresses’, which was written by Little Jimmy Dickens and Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016), and included the track on ‘Country Music Hall of Fame’ (King Records, 1982).

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) recorded ‘Shopping For Dresses’, which was written by Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 – Friday 2 January 2015) and Merle Haggard, and included the track on ‘Going Where The Lonely Go’ (Epic Records, 1982).

Vernon Oxford: '100% Country' (Montana Country, 1990)
Loretta Lynn: 'Loretta Lynn Sings' (Decca Records, 1963)

Vernon Oxford (Sunday 8 June 1941 – Friday 18 August 2023) recorded Loretta Lynn’s ‘World of Forgotten People’ and included the track on ‘100% Country’ (Montana Country, 1990); the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Loretta Lynn Sings’ (Decca Records, 1963).

Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton & Tammy Wynette: 'Honky Tonk Angels' (Columbia Records, 1993)

On Tuesday 2 November 1993, Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton & Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998) saw the release of ‘Honky Tonk Angels’ (Columbia Records, 1993), which was produced by Steve Buckingham and Dolly Parton, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Silver Threads & Golden Needles’, which was written by Andrew Jackson ‘Jack’ Rhodes (12 January 1907 – Wednesday 9 October 1968) and Dick Reynolds (No.68, 1993)

Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton & Tammy Wynette’s ‘Honky Tonk Angels’ (Columbia Records, 1993) also included the following tracks:

It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels’, which was written by Joseph Denton ‘Jay’ Miller (Friday 5 May 1922 – Saturday 23 March 1996) / this track featured guest vocals from Kitty Wells (Saturday 30 August 1919 – Monday 16 July 2012)

‘Put It Off Until Tomorrow’, which was written by William Earl ‘Bill’ Owens (1935 – Wednesday 7 April 2021) and Dolly Parton
‘Please Help Me I’m Falling (In Love With You)’, which was written by Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 – Monday 16 March 2015) and Hal Blair
‘Sittin’ On The Front Porch Swing’ (written by Buddy Sheffield)
‘Wings of A Dove’, which was written by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 – Sunday 22 July 2001)
‘I Forgot More Than You’ll Ever Know’, which was written by Cecil Allen Null (Tuesday 26 April 1927 – Sunday 26 August 2001)
‘Wouldn’t It Be Great’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘That’s The Way It Could Have Been’, which was written by Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998)
‘Let Her Fly’ (written by Dolly Parton)

‘Lovesick Blues’, which was written by Cliff Friend (1 October 1893 – Thursday 27 June 1974) and Irving Mills (16 January 1894 – Sunday 21 April 1985) / this track featured guest vocals from Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 – Tuesday 5 March 1963)

‘I Dreamed of A Hillbilly Heaven’, which was written by Hal Southern and Eddie Dean (9 July 1907 – Thursday 4 March 1999)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton & Tammy Wynette’s ‘Honky Tonk Angels’ (Columbia Records, 1993) included the following:

Eddie Bayers (drums)
Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) (tic-tac on ‘Lovesick Blues’)
Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 – Wednesday 7 January 1998)(producer on ‘Lovesick Blues’) / this track was recorded by Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 – Tuesday 5 March 1963) on Wednesday 27 January 1960
Steve Buckingham (producer)
Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 – Tuesday 5 March 1963) (guest vocals on ‘Lovesick Blues’)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 – Wednesday 31 December 1997) (piano on ‘Lovesick Blues’)
Jimmy Day (Tuesday 9 January 1934 – Friday 22 January 1999) (steel guitar on ‘Lovesick Blues’)
Richard Dennison, Vicki Hampton, and Louis Dean Nunley (of The Jordanaires) (Thursday 15 October 1931 – Friday 26 October 2012) (background vocals)
Hank Garland (Tuesday 11 November 1930 – Monday 27 December 2004) (electric guitar on ‘Lovesick Blues’)
Steve Gibson (guitar, tic-tac)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums on ‘Lovesick Blues’)
Roy Huskey Jr. (Monday 17 December 1956 – Saturday 6 September 1997) (upright bass)
Loretta Lynn and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998) (lead vocals, harmony vocals)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (electric guitar on ‘Lovesick Blues’)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (upright bass on ‘Lovesick Blues’)
Farrell Morris (vibes)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 – Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Jennifer O’Brien-Enoch (background vocals, vocal co-ordinator)
Dolly Parton (lead vocals, harmony vocals, producer)
Tom Robb (bass)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Billy Sanford (guitar)
Adam Steffy (mandolin)
Bruce Watkins (acoustic guitar)
Cindy Reynolds Watt (harp)
Kitty Wells (Saturday 30 August 1919 – Monday 16 July 2012) (guest vocals on ‘It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels’)

Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton & Tammy Wynette’s ‘Honky Tonk Angels’ (Columbia Records, 1993) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1993, No.42 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1993, No.6 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1993, and No.44 on the Canadian RPM Top Albums Chart in 1993.

Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton & Tammy Wynette’s ‘Honky Tonk Angels’ (Columbia Records, 1993) was nominated for ‘Album of The Year’ at the 1994 TNN Music City News Country Awards, while ‘Silver Threads & Golden Needles’ was nominated for ‘Vocal Collaboration of The Year.  ‘Silver Threads & Golden Needles’ also received a nomination at the 37th Annual Grammy Awards for ‘Best Country Collaboration With Vocals’, and ‘Vocal Event of The Year at the 28th Annual Country Music Association Awards.

Loretta Lynn: 'Making More Memories' (Nashville Sound, 1994)

On Tuesday 8 February 1994, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Making More Memories’ (Nashville Sound, 1994), which was produced by Kenny Starr, and included one track, which was released as a single on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘We Need To Make More Memories’ (written by Kenny Starr and Gene Dunlap) / this track was released as a single in 1994, but it did not chart

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Making More Memories’ (Nashville Sound, 1994) also included the following tracks:

‘Until I Met You’ (written by Hank Riddle)
‘God Bless The Children’ (written by Barbara Clarkson)
‘Love Is The Foundation’ (written by William C. Hall)
‘Ships Still Come In’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Lorene Allen)
‘One Day (Let’s Take The Time)’ (written by Kenny Starr and Gene Dunlap)
‘Brand New Ray of Sunshine’ (written by William C. Hall)
‘What Eyes You’re Looking Through’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Kenny Starr)
‘You Want Me To Walk On Water’ (written by Larry Alderman and Janet McLaughlin)
‘Jesus Rocks Me’ (written by Kenny Starr)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Making More Memories’ (Nashville Sound, 1994) was only sold for a limited time at Loretta Lynn’s Ranch, Ernest Tubb Record Stores, and at live appearances by Loretta Lynn.  The album was also available for mail order through the Loretta Lynn Fan Club.

Loretta Lynn only promoted ‘Making More Memories’ (Nashville Sound, 1994) once, during a live show on The Nashville Network (TNN), on Wednesday 18 May 1994.

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Making More Memories’ (Nashville Sound, 1994) sold approximately 2,000 copies.  A music video for the track, ‘We Need To Make More Memories’, was filmed on location at Loretta Lynn’s home in Hurricane Mills, Tennessee; this was Loretta Lynn’s first solo music video and featured her entire immediate family.

Loretta Lynn dedicated ‘Making More Memories’ (Nashville Sound, 1994) to her husband, Oliver Vanetta ‘Doolittle’ Lynn (Friday 27 August 1926 – Thursday 22 August 1996); the album’s cover shows Loretta Lynn with her grand-daughter, Megan.

Loretta Lynn: 'Still Country' (Audium Records / Koch Records, 2000)

On Tuesday 12 September 2000, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Still Country’ (Audium Records / Koch Records, 2000), which was produced by Randy Lynn Scruggs (Monday 3 August 1953 – Tuesday 17 April 2018), and included three tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Country In My Genes’ (written by Larry Cordle, Betty Key and Larry Shell) (No.72, 2000)

‘I Can’t Hear The Music’ (written by Kendal Franceschi, Cody James and Loretta Lynn) / this track was released as a single in 2000, but it did not chart

‘Table For Two’, which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004) and Vince Gill / this track was released as a single in 2001, but it did not chart

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Still Country’ (Audium Records / Koch Records, 2000) also included the following tracks:

‘On My Own Again’, which was written by Randy Lynn Scruggs (Monday 3 August 1953 – Tuesday 17 April 2018)
‘God’s Country’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Working Girl’, which was written by Matraca Berg, Dolly Parton and Randy Lynn Scruggs (Monday 3 August 1953 – Tuesday 17 April 2018)
‘Hold Her’, which was written by Irene Kelley and Don Wayne (Tuesday 30 May 1933 – Monday 12 September 2011)
‘Don’t Open That Door’ (written by Robin Lee Bruce, Coley McCabe and Jerry Salley)
‘Somewhere Someone’s Falling In Love’, which was written by Donnie Fritts and John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020)
‘The Blues Ain’t Workin’ On Me’ (written by Tom Shapiro and George Teren)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Still Country’ (Audium Records / Koch Records, 2000) included the following:

Matraca Berg, Carolyn Dawn Johnson, Liana Manis, Dennis Wilson, Chris Young and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Dan Dugmore (electric guitar, steel guitar)
Glen Duncan (fiddle, mandolin)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Steve Gibson (electric guitar)
John A. Hobbs (Saturday 11 February 1928 – Wednesday 12 June 2019) (mandolin, piano, synthesizer)
Paul Leim (drums, percussion)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Lloyd Maines (steel guitar)
Ron ‘Snake’ Reynolds (percussion)
Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 – Wednesday 28 March 2012) (banjo)
Randy Lynn Scruggs (Monday 3 August 1953 – Tuesday 17 April 2018) (banjo, 12-string guitar, acoustic guitar)
Glenn Worf (acoustic bass guitar, bass guitar, upright bass)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Still Country’ (Audium Records / Koch Records, 2000) reached No.37 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2000.

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Still Country’ (Audium Records / Koch Records, 2000) was re-released in 2004 with a bonus DVD which featured two music videos for ‘Country In My Genes’.

Loretta Lynn: 'Van Lear Rose' (Interscope Records, 2004)

On Tuesday 27 April 2004, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Van Lear Rose’ (Interscope Records, 2004), which was produced by Jack White, and included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘Miss Being Mrs.’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track was released as a single in 2004, but it did not chart

‘Portland, Oregon’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track was released as a single in 2004, but it did not chart / this track was a duet with Jack White

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Van Lear Rose’ (Interscope Records, 2004) also included the following tracks:

‘Van Lear Rose’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Trouble On The Line’, which was written by Loretta Lynn and Oliver Vanetta ‘Doolittle’ Lynn (Friday 27 August 1926 – Thursday 22 August 1996)
‘Family Tree’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Have Mercy’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘High On A Mountain Top’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Little Red Shoes’ (lyrics written by Loretta Lynn / music written by Jack White)
‘God Makes No Mistakes’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Women’s Prison’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘This Old House’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Mrs. Leroy Brown’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Story of My Life’ (written by Loretta Lynn)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Van Lear Rose’ (Interscope Records, 2004) included the following:

Loretta Lynn (lead vocals, acoustic guitar)
David Feeny (pedal steel guitar, Dobro, percussion, background vocals)
Patrick Keeler (drums, percussion, background vocals)
‘Little’ Jack Lawrence (bass guitar, percussion, background vocals)
Dan John Miller (acoustic guitar, percussion, background vocals)
Dirk Powell (fiddle, bowed bass, banjo)
Jack White (electric guitar, acoustic guitar, organ, piano, percussion, background vocals, duet vocals on ‘Portland, Oregon’)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Van Lear Rose’ (Interscope Records, 2004) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2004, No.24 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2004, No.1 on the United Kingdom Country Albums Chart in 2004, No.23 on the Swedish Albums Chart in 2004, and No.32 on the Norwegian Albums Chart in 2004.

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Van Lear Rose’ (Interscope Records, 2004) was widely praised by critics, received glowing reviews and universal acclaim, and became the most successful crossover album of Loretta Lynn’s extraordinary career.

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Van Lear Rose’ (Interscope Records, 2004) was initially intended as a musical experiment, blending the styles of Loretta Lynn and producer Jack White; the title refers to Loretta Lynn’s origins as the daughter of a miner working the Van Lear coal mines.

On Tuesday 5 June 2007, Marty Stuart saw the release of ‘Compadres: An Anthology of Duets’ (Hip-O Records, 2007); one of the included tracks was ‘Will You Visit Me on Sunday?’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022), and was a duet with Loretta Lynn.

Elvis Costello

Elvis Costello recorded Loretta Lynn’s ‘Pardon Me, Madam, My Name Is Eve’ (co-written with Elvis Costello) and included the track on ‘Momofuku’ (Lost Highway Records, 2008).

Elvis Costello

Elvis Costello recorded Loretta Lynn’s ‘I Felt The Chill Before The Winter Came’ (co-written with Elvis Costello) and included the track on ‘Secret, Profane & Sugarcane’ (Hear Music / Universal Music Group, 2009).

In 2010, at the Country Music Association (CMA) Awards, Loretta Lynn was honoured for her 50-year country music career.

Beccy Cole recorded Loretta Lynn’s ‘You Ain’t Woman Enough To Take My Man’ and included the track on ‘Preloved’ (Beccy Cole Music Pty Ltd. / ABC Music, 2010); the track featured guest vocals from Amber Lawrence.

Various Artists: 'Coal Miner's Daughter: A Tribute To Loretta Lynn' (Columbia Records, 2010)

On Tuesday 9 November 2010, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter: A Tribute To Loretta Lynn’ (Columbia Records, 2010), which was produced by Mark Bright, Buddy Cannon, John Carter Cash, Blake Chancey, Steve Earle, Byron Gallimore, Chad Howat, Eric Liljestrand, Patsy Lynn, Buddy Miller, Tom Overby, Robert J. Ritchie, Keith Stegall, Jack White, and Gretchen Wilson, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (written by Loretta Lynn) (No.55, 2010) / this track featured vocals from Loretta Lynn, Sheryl Crow and Miranda Lambert / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (Decca Records, 1971); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in December 1970, No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970, and No.83 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1970

‘Coal Miner’s Daughter: A Tribute To Loretta Lynn’ (Columbia Records, 2010) also included the following tracks:

‘Don’t Come Home A Drinkin’ (With Lovin’ On Your Mind)’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Peggy Sue Wells) / this track featured vocals from Gretchen Wilson / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Don’t Come Home A Drinkin’ (With Lovin’ On Your Mind)’ (Decca Records, 1967); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart in late 1966, and No.54 on the Australian Kent Report Chart in late 1966

‘I’m A Honky Tonk Girl’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track featured vocals from Lee Ann Womack / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn in February 1960 for Zero Records, having signed her first recording contract on Tuesday 2 February 1960; Loretta Lynn’s version of the track reached No.14 on the Billboard country music singles chart in the summer of 1960, No.12 in Music Vendor in 1960, and No.30 on Cash Box in 1960

‘Rated X’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track featured vocals from The White Stripes / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Entertainer of The Year’ (Decca Records, 1973); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in February / March 1973, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1973

‘You’re Lookin’ At Country’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track featured vocals from Carrie Underwood / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘You’re Lookin’ At Country’ (Decca Records, 1971); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1971, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1971

‘Louisiana Woman, Mississippi Man’ (written by Becki Bluefield and Jim Owen) / this track featured vocals from Alan Jackson and Martina McBride / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993), who included it on ‘Louisiana Woman, Mississippi’ (MCA Records, 1973); Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in August 1973, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1973

‘You Ain’t Woman Enough (To Take My Man)’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track featured vocals from Paramore / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘You Ain’t Woman Enough’ (Decca Records, 1966); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1966

‘Love Is The Foundation’ (written by William Cody Hall) / this track featured vocals from Faith Hill / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included on ‘Love Is The Foundation’ (MCA Records, 1973); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in July 1973, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1973

‘After The Fire Is Gone’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004) / this track featured vocals from Steve Earle and Allison Moorer / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993), who included it on ‘It’s Only Make Believe’ (Decca Records, 1971); Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in March / April 1971, No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1971 and No.56 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1971

‘If You’re Not Gone Too Long’ (written by Wanda Ballman) / this track featured vocals from Reba McEntire with The Time Jumpers / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Singin’ With Feelin’ (Decca Records, 1967); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track reached No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1967

‘I Know How’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track featured vocals from Kid Rock / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Loretta Lynn Writes ‘Em & Sings ‘Em’ (Decca Records, 1970); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track reached No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1970, and No.13 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970

‘Somebody Somewhere (Don’t Know What He’s Missin’ Tonight)’ (written by Lola Jean Dillon) / this track featured vocals from Lucinda Williams / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Somebody Somewhere’ (MCA Records, 1976); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in November 1976

‘Coal Miner’s Daughter: A Tribute To Loretta Lynn’ (Columbia Records, 2010) reached No.14 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2010, and No.46 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2010.

Nanci Caroline Griffith: 'Intersection' (Proper Records / Hell No, 2012)

Nanci Caroline Griffith (Monday 6 July 1953 – Friday 13 August 2021) recorded Loretta Lynn’s ‘High On A Mountain Top’ and included the track on ‘Intersection’ (Proper Records / Hell No, 2012).

Loretta Lynn: 'Van Lear Rose' (Interscope Records, 2004)

The original version of ‘High On A Mountain Top’ (written by Loretta Lynn) was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included the track on ‘Van Lear Rose’ (Interscope Records, 2004).

In 2013, Loretta Lynn was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama.

Willie Nelson: 'To All The Girls...' (Legacy Recordings, 2013)

On Tuesday 15 October 2013, Willie Nelson saw the release of ‘To All The Girls…’ (Legacy Recordings, 2013), which was produced by Buddy Cannon; one of the included tracks was ‘Somewhere Between’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016), and was a duet with Loretta Lynn.

Jamie O'Neal: 'Eternal' (Shanachie Records, 2014)

Jamie O’Neal recorded Loretta Lynn’s ‘Don’t Come Home A Drinkin’ (With Lovin’ On Your Mind)’ (co-written with Peggy Sue Wells) and included the track on ‘Eternal’ (Shanachie Records, 2014).

Loretta Lynn: 'Full Circle' (Sony Legacy, 2016)

On Friday 4 March 2016, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Full Circle’ (Sony Legacy, 2016), which was produced by Loretta Lynn’s daughter, Patsy Lynn Russell, and John Carter Cash, the son of Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 – Friday 12 September 2003) and June Carter Cash (Sunday 23 June 1929 – Thursday 15 May 2003); the album included four tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘Everything It Takes’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Todd Snider) / this track was released as a single in 2016, but it did not chart / this track was a duet with Elvis Costello

‘Who’s Gonna Miss Me?’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Lola Jean Dillon) / this track was released as a single in 2016, but it did not chart

‘Everybody Wants To Go To Heaven’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track was released as a single in 2016, but it did not chart / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Hymns’ (Decca Records, 1965); this original track was released as a single in November 1965, but it did not chart

‘Lay Me Down’ (written by Mark Marchetti, husband of Loretta Lynn’s daughter, Peggy) / this track was released as a single in 2016, but it did not chart

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Full Circle’ (Sony Legacy, 2016) also included the following tracks:

‘Whispering Sea Introduction’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
‘Whispering Sea’ (written by Loretta Lynn)
/ the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn for Zero Records in 1960 as the B-side of her first single, ‘I’m A Honky Tonk Girl’

‘Secret Love’, which was written by Sammy Fain (17 June 1902 – Wednesday 6 December 1989) and Paul Francis Webster (20 December 1907 – Sunday 18 March 1984) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Singin’ With Feelin’ (Decca Records, 1967)

‘Black Jack David’, which was written by Alvin Pleasant (A.P.) Delaney Carter (15 December 1891 – Monday 7 November 1960)
‘Always on My Mind’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015), Johnny Christopher and Mark James
‘Wine Into Water’, which was written by T. Graham Brown, Bruce Burch (Friday 30 January 1953 – Saturday 12 March 2022) and Ted Hewitt
‘In The Pines’ (unknown author)
‘Band of Gold’ (written by Bob Musel and Jack Taylor)

‘Fist City’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Fist City’ (Decca Records, 1968); this original track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in April 1968

‘I Never Will Marry’, which was written by Alvin Pleasant (A.P.) Delaney Carter (15 December 1891 – Monday 7 November 1960)

‘Lay Me Down’ (written by Mark Marchetti) / this track was a duet with Willie Nelson

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Full Circle’ (Sony Legacy, 2016) included the following:

Ronnie Bowman and Jon Randall (background vocals)
Mike Bub and Mark Fain (upright bass)
Sam Bush, Ronnie McCoury and Pat McLaughlin (mandolin)
Shawn Camp (acoustic guitar, mandolin)
Laura Cash and Randy Lynn Scruggs (Monday 3 August 1953 – Tuesday 17 April 2018) (acoustic guitar)
Elvis Costello (duet vocals on ‘Everything It Takes’)
Dennis Crouch (bass guitar, upright bass)
Paul Franklin and Robby Turner (pedal steel guitar)
Tony Harrell (piano)
Jamie Hartford (electric guitar)
Rick Lonow (drums)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Willie Nelson (duet vocals on ‘Lay Me Down’)
Will Smith (autoharp)
Bryan Sutton (banjo, acoustic guitar)
Laura Weber (fiddle, acoustic guitar, background vocals)
Jeff White (acoustic guitar, background vocals)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Full Circle’ (Sony Legacy, 2016) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2016, No.19 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2016, No.37 on the Canadian Albums Chart in 2016, No.1 on the United Kingdom Albums Chart in 2016, No.23 on the Dutch Albums Chart in 2016, and No.54 on the Australian Albums Chart in 2016.

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Full Circle’ (Sony Legacy, 2016) received a nomination for ‘Best Country Album’ at the 59th Annual Grammy Awards.

In 2018, Loretta Lynn was named ‘Artist of A Lifetime’ by Country Music Television (CMT).

Loretta Lynn: 'Wouldn't It Be Great' (Sony Legacy, 2018)

On Friday 28 September 2018, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Wouldn’t It Be Great’ (Sony Legacy, 2018), which was produced by Loretta Lynn’s daughter, Patsy Lynn Russell, and John Carter Cash, the son of Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 – Friday 12 September 2003) and June Carter Cash (Sunday 23 June 1929 – Thursday 15 May 2003); the album included three tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘Wouldn’t It Be Great?’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track was released as a single in August 2018, but it did not chart / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Just A Woman’ (MCA Records, 1985); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track reached No.19 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1985 / the track was also recorded by Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton & Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998), who included it on ‘Honky Tonk Angels’ (Columbia Records, 1993)

‘Ruby’s Stool’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Shawn Camp) / this track was released as a single in September 2018, but it did not chart

‘Ain’t No Time To Go’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Patsy Lynn Russell) / this track was released as a single in September 2018, but it did not chart

‘I’m Dying For Someone To Live For’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Shawn Camp)

‘Another Bridge To Burn’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Lola Jean Dillon)

‘God Makes No Mistakes’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Van Lear Rose’ (Interscope Records, 2004)

‘These Ole Blues’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Patsy Lynn Russell)

‘My Angel Mother’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn in 1960 for Zero Records, and was also included on Loretta Lynn’s ‘Here’s Loretta Lynn’ (Vocalion Records, 1968)

‘Don’t Come Home A Drinkin’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Peggy Sue Wells) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Don’t Come Home A Drinkin’ (Decca Records, 1967)

‘The Big Man’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Shawn Camp)
‘Lulie Vars’
(traditional arrangement by Loretta Lynn)

‘Darkest Day’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn in 1960 as her third single for Zero Records, and was also included on Loretta Lynn’s ‘You Ain’t Woman Enough’ (Decca Records, 1966)

‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (Decca Records, 1971); the original version of this track was was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in December 1970, No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970, and No.83 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1970 / this track was also recorded by Loretta Lynn, Sheryl Crow and Miranda Lambert, and was included on ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter: A Tribute To Loretta Lynn’ (Columbia Records, 2010)

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Wouldn’t It Be Great’ (Sony Legacy, 2018) included the following:

Ronnie Bowman and John Randall (background vocals)
Mike Bub, Dennis Crouch, Mark Fain and Byron House (upright bass)
Sam Bush (fiddle)
Trey Call (second engineer, research, production assistant)
Shawn Camp (acoustic guitar, background vocals, mandolin)
John Carter Cash (producer, liner notes)
Charlie Chadwick (cello)
Paul Franklin and Lloyd Green (steel guitar)
Tony Harrell (piano)
Jamie Hartford (electric guitar, mandolin)
Rick Lonow (drums)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals, background vocals)
Ronnie McCoury (mandolin)
Pat McLaughlin (mandolin, acoustic guitar)
Larry Perkins (banjo)
Patsy Lynn Russell (producer)
Randy Lynn Scruggs (Monday 3 August 1953 – Tuesday 17 April 2018) and Jeff White (acoustic guitar)
Bryan Sutton (banjo, acoustic guitar)
Robby Turner (Dobro, steel guitar)
Laura Weber White (acoustic guitar, fiddles)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Wouldn’t It Be Great’ (Sony Legacy, 2018) reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2018, No.2 on the Billboard Top Americana/Folk Albums Chart in 2018, and No.78 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2018.

Crystal Gayle: 'You Don't Know Me: Classic Country' (Southpaw Musical Productions, 2019)

In Friday 6 September 2019, Crystal Gayle saw the release of ‘You Don’t Know Me: Classic Country’ (Southpaw Musical Productions, 2019); one of the included tracks was ‘Put It Off Until Tomorrow’, which was written by Bill Owens (1935 – Wednesday 7 April 2021) and Dolly Parton, and featured Loretta Lynn and her sister, Peggy Sue.

Loretta Lynn: 'I Remember Patsy' (MCA Records, 1977)

In 2020, Loretta Lynn saw the release of a non-album single, ‘I Fall To Pieces’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010) and Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002), and was released to promote Loretta Lynn’s book, ‘Me & Patsy Kickin’ Up Dust: My Friendship With Patsy Cline’.

The original version of ‘I Fall To Pieces’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010) and Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002), was recorded by Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 – Tuesday 5 March 1963), who included it on ‘Showcase’ (Decca Records, 1961 / MCA Records, 1973 / MCA Records, 1988); Patsy Cline’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1961, and No.12 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1961.

Loretta Lynn: 'Still Woman Enough' (Legacy Recordings, 2021)

On Friday 19 March 2021, Loretta Lynn saw the release of ‘Still Woman Enough’ (Legacy Recordings, 2021), which was produced by Loretta Lynn’s daughter, Patsy Lynn Russell, and John Carter Cash, the son of Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 – Friday 12 September 2003) and June Carter Cash (Sunday 23 June 1929 – Thursday 15 May 2003); the album included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track was released as a single in January 2021, but it did not chart / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (Decca Records, 1971); Loretta Lynn’s original version was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in December 1970), No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970, and No.83 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1970 / Loretta Lynn, with Miranda Lambert and Sheryl Crow, recorded the track and included it on ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter: A Tribute To Loretta Lynn’ (Columbia Records, 2010) / Loretta Lynn also recorded the track for ‘Wouldn’t It Be Great’ (Sony Legacy, 2018)

‘One’s On The Way’, which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 – Monday 10 May 1999) / this track was duet with Margo Price, and was released as a single in February 2021, but it did not chart / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘One’s On The Way’ (Decca Records, 1972); Loretta Lynn’s original version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in February 1972, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1972

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Still Woman Enough’ (Legacy Recordings, 2021) also included the following tracks:

‘Still Woman Enough’ (written by Loretta Lynn and Patsy Lynn Russell) / this track featured guest vocals from Reba McEntire and Carrie Underwood

‘Keep On The Sunny Side’, which was written by Alvin Pleasant (A.P.) Delaney Carter (15 December 1891 – Monday 7 November 1960)

‘Honky Tonk Girl’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn in February 1960 and was released as her first single on Zero Records; the track reached No.14 on the Billboard country music singles chart in the summer of 1960, No.12 in Music Vendor in 1960, and No.30 on Cash Box in 1960

‘I Don’t Feel At Home Anymore’ (traditional arrangement by Loretta Lynn)
‘Old Kentucky Home’ (written by Stephen Foster and Loretta Lynn)
‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’
(recitation) (written by Loretta Lynn)

‘I Wanna Be Free’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘I Wanna Be Free’ (Decca Records, 1971); Loretta Lynn’s original version of the track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1971, No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1971, and No.94 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1971

‘Where No One Stands Alone’, which was written by Thomas Mosie Lister (Thursday 8 September 1921 – Thursday 12 February 2015) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Hymns’ (Decca Records, 1965)

‘I’ll Be All Smiles Tonight’ (written by T.B. Ransom)
‘I Saw The Light’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)

‘My Love’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn in 1960 for Zero Records, but this recording was not released until 1968, when it was included on the compilation album, ‘Here’s Loretta Lynn’ (Vocalion Records, 1968)

‘You Ain’t Woman Enough’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track featured guest vocals from Tanya Tucker / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘You Ain’t Woman Enough’ (Decca Records, 1966); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1966

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn’s ‘Still Woman Enough’ (Legacy Recordings, 2021) included the following:

Mike Bub (upright bass, bass)
Shawn Camp (mandolin, acoustic guitar, background vocals)
John Carter Cash (electric guitar, acoustic guitar)
Charlie Chadwick (cello)
Matt Combs (fiddle)
Dennis Crouch, Dave Roe and Mark W. Winchester (upright bass)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Tony Harrell (piano)
Jamie Hartford (electric guitar, acoustic guitar)
Rick Lonow (drums)
Loretta Lynn (lead vocals)
Ronnie McCoury (mandolin)
Pat McLaughlin (mandolin, acoustic guitar)
Larry Perkins (banjo)
Margo Price (lead vocals on ‘One’s On The Way’)
Suzi Ragsdale (background vocals)
Randy Lynn Scruggs (Monday 3 August 1953 – Tuesday 17 April 2018) (acoustic guitar)
Will Smith (autoharp)
Tanya Tucker (lead vocals on ‘You Ain’t Woman Enough’)
Robby Turner (Dobro, steel guitar)
Reba McEntire and Carrie Underwood (lead vocals on ‘Still Woman Enough’)
Pete Wade (electric guitar)
Jeff White (acoustic guitar)
Laura Weber White (acoustic guitar, fiddle, background vocals)

Loretta Lynn’s ‘Still Woman Enough’ (Legacy Recordings, 2021) reached No.9 on th Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2021, No.3 on the United Kingdom Albums Chart in 2021, and No.83 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2021.

Loretta Lynn and her long-time dressmaker, Tim Cobb (photo taken on Thursday 19 December 2019)

Loretta Lynn and her long-time dressmaker, Tim Cobb (1933 – Tuesday 14 March 2023), pictured together on Thursday 19 December 2019

The album cover for ‘Still Woman Enough’ (Legacy Recordings, 2021) featured Loretta Lynn wearing a newly designed couture dress inspired by the dress she wore on the cover of her 1971 album, ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (Decca Records, 1971); the dress was specifically created for the album by Loretta Lynn’s long-time dressmaker, Tim Cobb (1933 Tuesday 14 March 2023).

Tayla Lynn: 'Tayla Lynn Sings Loretta Lynn' (Heart of Texas Records, 2021)

On Monday 5 April 2021, Tayla Lynn (Loretta Lynn’s granddaughter) saw the release of ‘Tayla Lynn Sings Loretta Lynn’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2021), which included the following tracks:

‘You Ain’t Woman Enough’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘You Ain’t Woman Enough’ (Decca Records, 1966); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1966

‘Somebody Somewhere (Don’t Know What He’s Missin’ Tonight)’ (written by Lola Jean Dillon) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Somebody Somewhere’ (MCA Records, 1976); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in November 1976

‘Black-Eyed Peas & Blue-Eyed Babies’ (written by Susie McCoy) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Out of My Head & Back In My Bed’ (MCA Records, 1978)

‘Here I Am Again’, which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 – Monday 10 May 1999) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Here I Am Again’ (Decca Records, 1972); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1972, and No.3 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1972

‘Fist City’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Fist City’ (Decca Records, 1968); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in April 1968

‘Sweet Thang’, which was written by Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 – Wednesday 24 August 1988) / this track was a duet with Tony Booth / the original version of this track was recorded by Nat Stuckey, who included it on ‘Nat Stuckey Really Sings’ (Paula Records, 1966); Nat Stuckey’s version of the track reached No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1966 / this track was also recorded by Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 – Thursday 6 September 1984) & Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Loretta Lynn & Ernest Tubb: Singin’ Again’ (Decca Records, 1967); Ernest Tubb & Loretta Lynn’s version reached No.45 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1967 / this track was also recorded by Gene Watson & Rhonda Vincent, who included it on ‘Your Money & My Good Looks‘ (Upper Management Music, 2011)

‘God Bless The Children’ (written by Dallas Cody) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Out of My Head & Back In My Bed’ (MCA Records, 1978)

‘Old Rooster’ (written by Tracey Lee) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Out of My Head & Back In My Bed’ (MCA Records, 1978)

‘The Pill’ (written by Lorene Allen, Don McHan, T.D. Bayless and Loretta Lynn) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Back To The Country’ (MCA Records, 1975); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track, despite being banned by a number of country music radio stations reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1975, No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1975, No.70 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1975, and No.49 on the Canadian RPM Top Singles Chart in 1975

‘Wings Upon Your Horns’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Wings Upon Your Horns’ (Decca Records, 1970); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track reached No.11 on the Billboard country music singles chart 1970, and No.3 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970

‘It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels’, which was written by Joseph Denton ‘Jay’ Miller (Friday 5 May 1922 – Saturday 23 March 1996) / this track was a duet with Loretta Lynn / the original version of this track was recorded by Kitty Wells (Saturday 30 August 1919 – Monday 16 July 2012), who included it on ‘Country Hit Parade’ (Decca Records, 1956); Kitty Wells’ version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1952, and No.27 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1952 / this track was also recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Loretta’ (MCA Records, 1980)

‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / this track was a duet with Patsy Lynn / the original version of this track was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter’ (Decca Records, 1971); Loretta Lynn’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in December 1970), No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1970, and No.83 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1970

‘Everybody Wants To Go To Heaven’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / ‘Who Says God Is Dead’ (written by Loretta Lynn) / the original version of ‘Everybody Wants To Go To Heaven’ was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Hymns’ (Decca Records, 1965); Loretta Lynn’s version of ‘Everybody Wants To Go To Heaven’ was released as a single in November 1965, but it did not chart on the Billboard country music singles chart / the original version of ‘Who Says God Is Dead’ was recorded by Loretta Lynn, who included it on ‘Who Says God Is Dead’ (Decca Records, 1968)

‘Greetings From Loretta’ / 30-seconds of spoken words from Loretta Lynn

Loretta Lynn

Loretta Lynn received numerous awards and other accolades for her groundbreaking role in country music, including awards from both the Country Music Association (CMA) and Academy of Country Music (ACM) as a duet partner and an individual artist.

Loretta Lynn was nominated eighteen times for a Grammy Award, and won three times.  Loretta Lynn is the most awarded female country recording artist and the only female Academy of Country Music (ACM) ‘Artist of The Decade’ (the 1970s).

Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 - Tuesday 4 October 2022)

Loretta Lynn
Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022

Revered country music icon, Loretta Lynn, passed away on Tuesday 4 October 2022 at her home in Hurricane Mills, Tennessee.  Loretta Lynn was 90 years old.

Loretta Lynn’s oldest son, Jack Benny Lynn (Wednesday 7 December 1949 – Sunday 22 July 1984), died in a drowning accident in 1984.

Loretta Lynn’s songwriter daughter, Betty Sue Lynn (Friday 26 November 1948 – Monday 29 July 2013), passed away in 2013.

Loretta Lynn was survived by her son, Ernest Ray Lynn, who worked as her opening act on the road.

Loretta Lynn was also survived by her daughters, Cissy, and her singing twins, Peggy and Patsy, as well as by 27 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren.

Loretta Lynn’s family asked for privacy during this time, as they grieved.

An announcement regarding a memorial would be forthcoming in a public announcement.  In lieu of flowers, the family asked for donations to be made to The Loretta Lynn Foundation.

Loretta Lynn

• Visit Loretta Lynn’s official site at lorettalynn.com
Visit Loretta Lynn’s Ranch at lorettalynnranch.net
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