Gene Watson’s ‘Love In The Hot Afternoon & Paper Rosie’ (Hux Records, 2002)

Gene Watson: 'Love In The Hot Afternoon & Paper Rosie' (Hux Records, 2002)

‘Love In The Hot Afternoon & Paper Rosie’
Hux Records 036 (2002)

Gene Watson’s ‘Love In The Hot Afternoon & Paper Rosie’ (Hux Records, 2002) (2-for-1) was released by Hux Records on Tuesday 3 December 2002.  This special CD brought together two pivotal (Capitol Records) albums from the very early days of Gene Watson’s glorious country music career; ‘Love in the Hot Afternoon‘ (Capitol Records, 1975) and ‘Paper Rosie‘ (Capitol Records, 1977).


Gene Watson’s ‘Love In The Hot Afternoon & Paper Rosie’ (Hux Records, 2002) (2-for-1) discography information is presented on the Gene Watson Fan Site for educational purposes only and no infringement of copyright is intended.


About Gene Watson’s ‘Love In The Hot Afternoon & Paper Rosie’…

Sleeve Notes
‘There are a handful of singers who sound great singing just about anything. Sam Cooke (Thursday 22 January 22, 1931 – Friday 11 December 1964), Charlie Rich (Wednesday 14 December 1932 – Tuesday 25 July 1995), George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) – singers whose vocal mastery could, one suspects, transform the proverbial telephone book.

For fans of straight, no-frills country music, Gene Watson has always fallen into that category.  His rich, mellow voice is magnificently expressive and instantly recognisable.  And the two albums on this CD, drawn from the most commercially successful period of his career, certainly capture Watson in his prime.



Love in the Hot Afternoon‘ (1975), his debut on US Capitol, followed hot on the heels of his first national hits, while ‘Paper Rosie‘ (1977) was another early classic and the album that introduced him to British audiences.

In keeping with his songs of blue collar struggles and disappointments, Gene had been working the Texas country circuit for more than a decade before his first major breakthrough.



Gene Watson had also recorded a series of singles for Wide World (who released a Watson album in 1973) and Resco, Texan labels run by Russ Reeder, an important influence on Gene’s early career as his producer and manager.

It seems to have been the Resco single ‘Bad Water’ that first alerted Capitol to Gene’s potential.  The song was a Jackie DeShannon composition originally recorded by The Raelettes, Ray Charles’ backing singers.

By the time Gene signed to Capitol, ‘Love In The Hot Afternoon’ was already available as a Resco single and starting to make waves in Texas, Louisiana and neighbouring states.

A Vincent Wesley Matthews / Kent Westberry ballad of passion in a vividly evoked Southern setting, it had previously been cut by Jim Ed Brown (Sunday 1 April 1934 – Thursday 11 June 2015) and others.

But Reeder’s sparse production, with atmospheric steel guitar and fiddle from Lloyd Green and Buddy Spicher, highlighted Gene’s subtle vocal delivery and, re-promoted as a Capitol release, the record climbed to No.3 on the US country chart in 1975.



Gene had now clearly arrived, and two more hit singles – ‘Where Love Begins’ and ‘You Could Know As Much About A Stranger’ – followed, before the release of the ‘Love in the Hot Afternoon‘ (Capitol Records, 1975) album.

The album featured the three hits, as well as the earlier Resco recordings ‘Bad Water’ and ‘Through The Eyes of Love’.

Other high-spots include the mid-tempo ‘This Just Ain’t No Good Day For Leaving’, a great song by one of Nashville’s finest writers, Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022).

In 1982, another Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) composition, ‘Fourteen Carat Mind’, would give Gene his first – and, to date, only – Billboard No.1 country music hit.



The hits continued with the release of Gene’s second Capitol album, ‘Because You Believed in Me‘ (Capitol Records, 1976), in 1976.



The ‘Paper Rosie‘ (Capitol Records, 1977) album followed in 1977.  The title track, one of Watson’s most memorable recordings, was also one of his biggest hits, though he was initially sceptical about the song’s potential.

Originally recorded by the singer-songwriter Dallas Harms (Thursday 18 July 1935 – Saturday 12 October 2019), it had already been a major hit in Harms‘ native Canada.

Gene recorded the song at the suggestion of a Capitol executive, but was unhappy with the result.

Persuaded to give it another chance, Gene agreed to another session and, with a fresh approach, the song worked.

Watson and Dallas Harms (Thursday 18 July 1935 – Saturday 12 October 2019) became good friends and Gene later had hits with other Dallas Harms compositions, including ‘The Old Man & His Horn’ and ‘Cowboys Don’t Get Lucky All The Time’.

Gene doesn’t write his own material, but he’s always chosen his songs with care and has worked closely with several other notable writers.

These include Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 – Wednesday 9 March 2016), who wrote the early hit ‘Where Love Begins’.



On the ‘Paper Rosie‘ (Capitol Records, 1977) album, Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 – Wednesday 9 March 2016) also contributed the standout tracks ‘Don’t Look At Me (In That Tone of Voice)’ and ‘If The Shoe Fits, Wear It’ (with the great opening line, ‘You brush off the truth as if it was salt on a table’).

Other key tracks on an album full of strong material include covers of Marty Robbins’ ‘You Gave Me A Mountain’, Porter Wagoner‘s ‘Tennessee Sunshine’ and Dolly Parton’s ‘Most of All Why’.

Paper Rosie‘ (Capitol Records, 1977) had special significance to British country fans as Gene’s first United Kingdom release.

Two years later, in June 1979, Gene undertook an 18-date British tour, playing at a host of small venues, from The Floral Pavilion in New Brighton to the 7-11 Club in Kenton, Middlesex.

The tour is still regarded as one of the most memorable by a visiting American artist.  Audiences responded with wild enthusiasm to Gene’s honest, hard country approach, and he gained a large British following that has remained loyal to him through the years.



Gene Watson’s tenure with Capitol came to an end in 1980.  His career seemed in decline but the move to MCA gave it fresh impetus.  After four successful years he moved on to Epic and then Warner Bros.

Throughout the 1980s Gene felt that, while he was a regular on the country charts, his records weren’t getting the promotion they deserved.  The lack of a CMA award certainly suggests that Gene never quite hit it off with the Nashville establishment.

Country acts were crossing over onto the pop charts, and the major companies were looking for new, younger artists to promote.  Gene was unwilling to compromise his music, and to his credit he’s not usually photographed wearing a hat.

His departure from Warner Bros. was also precipitated by an acrimonious legal wrangle with his then manager, Randy Travis‘ wife Lib Hatcher.

Since then Gene has recorded for smaller, independent labels, including Broadland, Step One and RMG.

The major commercial success he enjoyed in the past has eluded him, but he’s retained his musical integrity and, despite health troubles, is still giving it his best shot.



The release in 2001 of a greatest hits compilation on Universal was a reminder of past glories, and also introduced Gene’s vocal genius to a new audience.  Now two of Gene’s classic, long-deleted early albums are brought together on this CD, offering another chance to enjoy the company of one of country music’s greatest voices’.

Alan Gardiner
September 2002′


Overview
The albums, ‘Love in the Hot Afternoon‘ (Capitol Records, 1975) and ‘Paper Rosie‘ (Capitol Records, 1977), were presented as a special 2-on-1 single CD set, complete with comprehensive liner notes, the original artwork from the vinyl releases and full track details.



The original ‘Love in the Hot Afternoon‘ (Capitol Records, 1975) album was produced by Russ Reeder and Bob Webster (1930 – Thursday 22 February 2007) in 1975, and the Recording Engineer was Jim Williamson.



All tracks on the original ‘Paper Rosie‘ (Capitol Records, 1977) album were produced by Russ Reeder in 1977, with the exception of the track ‘Desperation’, which was produced by Russ Reeder and Bob Webster (1930 – Thursday 22 February 2007).

The original ‘Paper Rosie‘ (Capitol Records, 1977) album was recorded at Jack Clement Studios, Nashville, Tennessee and the Recording Engineer was Jim Williams.


Love in the Hot Afternoon‘ (Capitol Records ST11443, 1975)

Original Album Sleeve Notes
‘Gene Watson is a home-grown Texan whose background is pure country, and whose future is simply Superstardom.  He has played music ‚Äėever since I can remember‚Äô and, like the Country greats before him, has juggled working days with nightly gigs in pursuit of that ‘star in the sky’.

A family man with a deep passion for life, he has solidified his sound on his home turf by working the road with Country greats, The Wilburn Brothers, cutting discs for local labels, moving on to territorial stardom, emerging with several hit records in the Houston area and, finally, a regular gig at the Dynasty Club in that city.

His association with the people he has met along the way have repeatedly distinguished themselves in long lasting friendships and mutual respect.  His initial road experience with The Wilburn Brothers has never been forgotten by them.

And when he approached Russ Reeder, then General Manager of the Record Service Co. in Houston, in 1966, he began a lasting friendship and business relationship that has seen them through Gene’s recording debut in 1969 on Wide World Records, subsequent recordings on Reeder’s Resco label in 1972, and finally today in 1975 this fine album for Capitol Records.

After hearing ‘Love In The Hot Afternoon’ for the first time, I immediately recognised the talent that was there and wanted to have this gifted artist on Capitol.  When Gene and Russ proved more than eager, the association was happily established, adding myself and the whole of the Capitol family to that list of friendships that have coloured Gene‚Äôs career.

This first album of Gene’s on Capitol speaks for itself.  It is one of the finest presentations I have heard in my years in the music business and, thankfully, it is only a beginning for Gene and his inevitable climb to Superstardom.

We at Capitol Records owe a debt of gratitude to radio stations KENR, KIKK and KNUS (this latter radio station was listed, in error, as KNUS, when it should have been listed as KNUZ) in Houston for their part in exposing the talents of Gene Watson, to Russ Reeder for his guidance and care in developing those talents and, of course, to Gene Watson himself, whose very talents we speak of.

Welcome to Capitol Records, Gene Watson, a fine artist, showman and of course…a friend’.

Ed Keeley
National Country Field Manager
Capitol Records, Inc’.


Paper Rosie‘ (Capitol Records ST11597, 1977)

Original Album Sleeve Notes
‘There is that particular something in the voice of Gene Watson that reaches out and attracts almost every listener.

Whether its special warmth or extra feeling, it has caused this talented Texan to emerge in the past two years as one of the top new singers in country music.

It started with the album ‘Love in the Hot Afternoon‘ which contained three smash hit singles – the title tune, ‘Where Love Begins’ and ‘You Could Know As Much About A Stranger’.  He followed his initial success with more of the same.



With the release of his second Capitol album, ‘Because You Believed in Me‘, his legions of fans just kept growing.

That album contained two more hits, the title song and ‘Her Body Couldn’t Keep You (Off My Mind)’.

Now Gene is exploring new themes and showing everyone he has no limitations as a singer and total Country entertainer.

With this album he is once again touching the hearts and souls of everyone who takes the time to listen’.


‘Love In The Hot Afternoon & Paper Rosie’
Hux Records 036 (2002)


1 ‘Love In The Hot Afternoon’
Writers: Kent Westberry and Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 – Saturday 22 November 2003)
Publishers: Jack Music Inc. / BMI

Jim Ed Brown (Sunday 1 April 1934 – Thursday 11 June 2015) recorded ‘Love In The Hot Afternoon’, which was written by Kent Westberry and Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 – Saturday 22 November 2003), and included the track on ‘Evening’ (RCA Records, 1972).

Vicki Lawrence: 'Love in The Hot Afternoon', which was written by Kent Westberry and Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 - Saturday 22 November 2003) (Private Stock Records, 1976)

In 1976, Vicki Lawrence recorded ‘Love in The Hot Afternoon’, which was written by Kent Westberry and Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 – Saturday 22 November 2003), and saw the track released as a non-album single, on Private Stock Records, in 1976, but it did not chart.



Gene Watson re-recorded ‘Love In The Hot Afternoon’, which was written by Kent Westberry and Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 – Saturday 22 November 2003), and included the track on ‘The Good Ole Days‘ (Step One Records, 1996).



Gene Watson re-recorded ‘Love In The Hot Afternoon’, which was written by Kent Westberry and Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 – Saturday 22 November 2003), and included the track on ‘Best of the Best: 25 Greatest Hits‘ (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).


2 ‘Through The Eyes of Love’
Writers: ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) and Milton ‘Mitt’ Addington (1924 – 1979)
Publishers: Jack Music Inc. / BMI

Tompall Glaser & The Glaser Brothers: 'Through The Eyes of Love' (MGM Records, 1968)

Tompall Glaser (Sunday 3 September 1933 – Tuesday 13 August 2013) & The Glaser Brothers recorded ‘Through The Eyes of Love’, which was written by ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 – Thursday 8 August 2013) and Milton ‘Mitt’ Addington (1924 – 1979), and included the track on ‘Through The Eyes of Love’ (MGM Records, 1968); the track reached No.27 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1967.


3 ‘Bad Water’
Writers: Jackie DeShannon, Jimmy Holiday (Tuesday 24 July 1934 – Sunday 15 February 1987) and Randy Myers
Publishers: Unart Music Corporation / BMI

Jackie DeShannon: 'Songs' (Capitol Records, 1971)
Jackie DeShannon: 'When You Walk in The Room' (Rock Beat Records, 2011)

Jackie DeShannon recorded ‘Bad Water’, which was written by Jackie DeShannon, Jimmy Holiday (Tuesday 24 July 1934 – Sunday 15 February 1987) and Randy Myers, and included the track on ‘Songs’ (Capitol Records, 1971); the track was also included on ‘When You Walk In The Room’ (Rock Beat Records, 2011).


4 ‘Long Enough To Care’
Writer: Bobby Sykes
Publishers: Sidewalk Productions / BMI


5 ‘Harvest Time’
Writers: Bill Emerson, Lewis Moore and Carrol Dunham
Publishers: Golden Horn Music / ASCAP

Lonesome River Band recorded ‘Harvest Time’ (written by Bill Emerson, Lewis Moore and Carrol Dunham) and included the track on ‘Talkin’ to Myself’ (Sugarhill Records, 2000).


6 ‘Where Love Begins’
Writer: Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 – Wednesday 9 March 2016)
Publishers: Blue Echo Music / ASCAP



Gene Watson re-recorded ‘Where Love Begins’, which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 – Wednesday 9 March 2016), and included the track on ‘Best of the Best: 25 Greatest Hits‘ (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).


7 ‘This Just Ain’t No Good Day For Leaving’
Writers: Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Sanger D. ‘Whitey’ Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 – Saturday 12 January 2019)
Publishers: Acuff-Rose Publishing Inc. / BMI

In 1973, Kenny Seratt (Saturday 20 October 1934 – Wednesday 26 August 2015) recorded ‘This Just Ain’t No Good Day For Leaving’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Sanger D. ‘Whitey’ Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 – Saturday 12 January 2019); the track, which was produced by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016), was subsequently included on ‘The Best of Kenny Seratt, Volume 2’ (Hillside Records, 2011).


8 ‘For The First Time’
Writer: Jessi Colter
Publishers: Baron Music Publishing Company / BMI


9 ‘You Could Know As Much About A Stranger’
Writer: Nadine Bryant
Publishers: Hotel Publishing Company / ASCAP

Jeannie Bryant: 'Love In The Hot Afternoon', which was written by Kent Westberry and Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 - Saturday 22 November 2003) (Nashville Cats Productions Records, 1975)

In 1975, Jeannie Bryant recorded ‘You Could Know As Much About A Stranger’ (written by Nadine Bryant), and saw the track released, in July 1975, as a non-album single, on Nashville Cats Productions Records, in 1975, but the single did not chart.

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty: 'Dynamic Duo' (MCA Records, 1977)

Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022) & Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) recorded ‘You Could Know As Much About A Stranger’ (written by Nadine Bryant) and included the track on ‘Dynamic Duo’ (MCA Records, 1977).

Jeannie Bryant: 'What Our Feelings Have To Say' (Column One Records, 1977)

Jeannie Bryant (sister of Nadine Bryant) recorded ‘You Could Know As Much About A Stranger’ (written by Nadine Bryant) and included the track on ‘What Our Feelings Have To Say’ (Column One Records, 1977).

Billie Jo Spears (Friday 14 January 1938 – Wednesday 14 December 2011) recorded ‘You Could Know As Much About A Stranger’ (written by Nadine Bryant) and included the track on ‘Standing Tall’ (United Artists Records, 1980).



Gene Watson re-recorded ‘You Could Know As Much About A Stranger’ (written by Nadine Bryant) and included the track on ‘Gene Watson: Then & Now‘ (Koch Records Nashville, 2005).



Gene Watson and Rhonda Vincent recorded ‘You Could Know As Much About A Stranger’ (written by Nadine Bryant) and included the track on ‘Your Money & My Good Looks‘ (Upper Management Music, 2011).


10 ‘This Is My Year For Mexico’
Writer: Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 – Saturday 22 November 2003)
Publishers: Jack Music Inc. / BMI


11 ‘Paper Rosie’
Writer: Dallas Harms (Thursday 18 July 1935 – Saturday 12 October 2019)
Publishers: Doubleplay Music / Quality Music
Produced by Russ Reeder

The Osborne Brothers (Sonny Osborne & Bobby Osborne): 'Hillbilly Fever' (CMH Records, 1991)

The Osborne Brothers – Sonny Osborne (Friday 29 October 1937 – Sunday 24 October 2021) and Bobby Osborne (Monday 7 December 1931 – Tuesday 27 June 2023) recorded ‘Paper Rosie’, which was written by Dallas Harms (Thursday 18 July 1935 – Saturday 12 October 2019), and included the track on ‘Hillbilly Fever’ (CMH Records, 1991).

George Hamilton IV: 'Canadian Country Gold & Unmined Treasures' (Broadland International Records, 1995)

George Hamilton IV (Monday 19 July 1937 – Wednesday 17 September 2014) recorded ‘Paper Rosie’, which was written by Dallas Harms (Thursday 18 July 1935 – Saturday 12 October 2019), and included the track on ‘Canadian Country Gold & Unmined Treasures’ (Broadland International Records, 1995).

Don Walser (Friday 14 September 1934 – Wednesday 20 September 2006) recorded ‘Paper Rosie’, which was written by Dallas Harms (Thursday 18 July 1935 – Saturday 12 October 2019), and included the track on ‘Here’s To Country Music’ (Sire Records, 1999).



Gene Watson re-recorded ‘Paper Rosie’, which was written by Dallas Harms (Thursday 18 July 1935 – Saturday 12 October 2019), and included the track on ‘Best of the Best: 25 Greatest Hits‘ (Fourteen Carat Music, 2012).

John Hogan: 'Back To Basics' (Irish Music, 2015)

John Hogan recorded ‘Paper Rosie’, which was written by Dallas Harms (Thursday 18 July 1935 – Saturday 12 October 2019), and included the track on ‘Back To Basics’ (Irish Music, 2015).

Nick Chandler & Delivered: 'Groceries, Gas & Used Cars' (Poor Mountain Records, 2018)

Nick Chandler & Delivered recorded ‘Paper Rosie’, which was written by Dallas Harms (Thursday 18 July 1935 – Saturday 12 October 2019), and included the track on ‘Groceries, Gas & Used Cars’ (Poor Mountain Records, 2018).

The title of Nick Chandler & Delivered’s ‘Groceries, Gas & Used Cars’ (Poor Mountain Records, 2018) was a line taken from ‘Eli Funkelby’, which was written by Robert ‘Bozo’ Darnell (1927 – 1997) and Johnny Harlan, and was included on Gene Watson‚Äôs self-titled debut album, ‘Gene Watson‘ (Wide World Records, 1969 / Stoneway Records, 1973).


‚ÄĘ On Tuesday 13 March 2007, Robert ‘Bozo’ Darnell’s son, Reuben Darnell, submitted a ‘Peer’s Quote’ about Gene Watson.


12 ‘You Gave Me A Mountain’
Writer: Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 – Wednesday 8 December 1982)
Published by Carlin Music Corporation
Produced by Russ Reeder



Gene Watson re-recorded ‘You Gave Me A Mountain’, which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 – Wednesday 8 December 1982), and included the track on ‘Uncharted Mind‘ (Step One Records, 1993).


13 ‘If The Shoe Fits, Wear It’
Writer: Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 – Wednesday 9 March 2016)
Publishers: Blue Echo Music / MCPS
Produced by Russ Reeder


14 ‘Tennessee Sunshine’
Writer: Porter Wagoner (Friday 12 August 1927 – Sunday 28 October 2007)
Publishers: Carlin Music Corporation
Produced by Russ Reeder


15 ‘Desperation’
Writers: G. Simmons and G. Mabry
Publishers: Commercial Hurshel Music
Produced by Russ Reeder and Bob Webster (1930 – Thursday 22 February 2007)


16 ‘Til You Can Make It On Your Own’
Writers: J. McBee and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)
Publishers: Carlin Music Corporation
Produced by Russ Reeder


17 ‘Most of All Why’
Writer: Dolly Parton
Publishers: Carlin Music Corporation
Produced by Russ Reeder


18 ‘Just At Dawn’
Writers: B. Emerson and T. Hamilton
Publishers: Acuff-Rose Music Ltd.
Produced by Russ Reeder


19 ‘Don‚Äôt Look At Me (In That Tone of Voice)’
Writer: Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 РWednesday 9 March 2016)
Publishers: Blue Echo Music / MCPS
Produced by Russ Reeder



Ray Griff
¬†(Monday 22 April 1940 – Wednesday 9 March 2016) recorded ‘Don’t Look At Me (In That Tone of Voice)’ (written by Ray Griff) and included the track on ‘Ray Griff Sings’ (GRT Records, 1972).


20 ‘I‚Äôd Settle For Just Crossing Her Mind’
Writer: Jollie Hollie
Publishers: London Tree Music Ltd.
Produced by Russ Reeder


Tracks 1-10 © 1975 Capitol Records Inc.
Tracks 11-20 © 1977 Capitol Records Inc.
All tracks licensed courtesy of EMI Commercial Markets
Hux thanks: Alan Gardiner, Tony Byworth and Caroline Cook

Photographs courtesy of Tony Byworth Archive


‚ÄĘ Read a Country Music People review of Gene Watson’s ‘Love in The Hot Afternoon & Paper Rosie‘ (Hux Records, 2002)

The review, which was written by Craig Baguley, was published in the February 2003 issue of the United Kingdom monthly publication Country Music People.




‘Love in The Hot Afternoon & Paper Rosie’
Hux Records 036 (2002)

Musician Credits
(on the original ‘Love in the Hot Afternoon‘ album)

Rhythm Guitar: Tommy Allsup (Tuesday 24 November 1931 – Wednesday 11 January 2017), Leon Rhodes (Thursday 10 March 1932 – Saturday 9 December 2017) and Charlie McCoy
Lead Guitar: Jimmy Colvard (1943 – 1977), Pete Wade and Dale Sellers
Steel Guitar: Lloyd Green
Dobro: Lloyd Green
Harmonica: Charlie McCoy
Marimba: Charlie McCoy and Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021)
Piano: Hargus ‚ÄėPig‚Äô Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022)
Fiddle: Buddy Spicher
Bass: Joe Allen, Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 – Monday 29 December 2014) and Leon Rhodes (Thursday 10 March 1932 – Saturday 9 December 2017)
Drums: Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021), Jimmy Isabel and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008)
Horn: Jerry Tuttle
Voices: The Nashville Edition

Musician Credits
(on the original ‘Paper Rosie‘ album)

Guitar: Dale Sellers, Jimmy Colvard (1943 – 1977), Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004) and Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019)
Steel: Lloyd Green
Bass: Joe Allen
Drums: Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) and Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021)
Piano: Hargus ‚ÄėPig‚Äô Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022)
Fiddle: Buddy Spicher and Tommy Williams
Vocals: The Nashville Edition: Joe Babcock, Hurshel Wayne Wiginton (Saturday 29 January 1938 – Monday 6 March 2017), Dolores Edgin and Wendy Suits




On Monday 26 September 2005, England’s Hux Records released ‘Because You Believed in Me‘ (Capitol Records, 1976), along with ‘Beautiful Country‘ (Capitol Records, 1978), as a special 2-for-1 CD set.




On Monday 27 January 2009, England’s Hux Records released ‘Reflections‘ (Capitol Records, 1978), along with ‘Should I Come Home‘ (Capitol Records, 1979), as a special 2-for-1 CD set.




On Monday 9 May 2011, England’s Hux Records¬†released ‘Memories to Burn‘ (MCA Records, 1985), along with ‘Starting New Memories‘ (MCA Records, 1986), in the United Kingdom and Ireland, as a special 2-for-1 CD set; the¬†2-for-1 CD set was released worldwide on Tuesday 17 May 2011.