Gene Watson Peer’s Quote from Lynn Anderson: May 2014

Gene Watson’s Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as ‘the singer’s singer’ – and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson’s Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2014, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Lynn Anderson, which she submitted to this site on Thursday 15 May 2014.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Lynn Anderson who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online ‘celebration of a Lone Star Hero’.

Lynn Anderson

Lynn Anderson
This quote was submitted on Thursday 15 May 2014.

‘Howdy!

I’ve had several occasions to stand on the edge of the stage and watch Gene Watson sing ‘real’ country music.

He’s the ‘real’ thing.

Gene Watson: 'Reflections' (Capitol Records, 1978)

When he eases back to hit the ending of ‘Farewell Party‘, which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 – Thursday 26 July 2007), he reminds me so much of the cool confidence of Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 – Monday 16 December 2013).

Gene Watson: 'My Heroes Have Always Been Country' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2014))

I can’t wait to hear his version of ‘Don’t You Believe Her‘, which was written by Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 – Wednesday 24 August 1988).

Gene is a great guy, and a great addition to country music!’

Thank you, Lynn Anderson, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Lynn Anderson…

Lynn Anderson

Lynn Anderson was born in Grand Forks, North Dakota on Friday 26 September 1947 and was raised in California.

Lynn Anderson’s love of country music can be attributed to her mother, country music songwriting great, Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011), who composed such country music hit single as ‘The Fugitive’ and ‘My Friends Are Gonna Be Strangers’ for Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016).  Merle Haggard‘s band, The Strangers, was named after the latter hit.  Lynn Anderson’s father, Casey Anderson (Saturday 23 January 1926 – Monday 26 November 2018), also composed songs.

Lynn Anderson’s first foray into the country music world was when, as a teenager, she entered a singing contest, which was sponsored by the ‘Country Corners’ program in Sacramento.

In her late teens, Lynn Anderson became a regular on a top rated network show. When she signed with the Lawrence Welk Show, Lynn became the only country music performer featured weekly on national television.

By the time she turned twenty years old, Lynn Anderson had been with a national recording company for three years, scoring a string of country music hit singles: ‘Promises, Promises’ (No.4, 1967), ‘That’s A No No’ (No.2, 1969), ‘Rocky Top’ (No.2, 1969) and ‘I’ve Been Everywhere’ (No.16, 1970).

Lynn Anderson: 'Ride Ride Ride' (Chart Records, 1967)

In March 1967, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Ride Ride Ride’ (Chart Records, 1967), which was produced by Slim Williamson, and included four tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘In Person’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) / this track was released as a single in 1967, but it did not chart

‘Ride Ride Ride’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) (No.36, 1967)

‘If I Kiss You (Will You Go Away)’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) (No.5, 1967)

‘Too Much of You’ (written by Gene Hood) (No.28, 1967)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Ride Ride Ride’ (Chart Records, 1967) also included the following tracks:

‘Then Go’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Beggars Can’t Be Choosers’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘In Person’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘It’s Only Lonely Me’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) and Casey Anderson (Saturday 23 January 1926 – Monday 26 November 2018)
‘If This Is Love’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘There Oughta Be A Law’ (written by Betty Jo Gibson)
‘It Makes You Happy’ (written by Gene Hood)
‘Tear By Tear’ (written by Jerry Lane)
‘My Heart Keeps Walkin’ The Floor’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Ride Ride Ride’ (Chart Records, 1967) reached No.25 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1967.

Lynn Anderson: 'Promises Promises' (Chart Records, 1967)

In December 1967, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Promises Promises’ (Chart Records, 1967), which was produced by Slim Williamson, and included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Promises Promises’ (written by Wiley Smith and Carlyle Hughey) (No.4, 1967)

‘No Another Time’ (written by Jerry Lane and Slim Williamson) (No.8, 1968)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Promises Promises’ (Chart Records, 1967) also included the following tracks:

‘The Worst Is Yet To Come’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Crying’, which was written by Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 – Tuesday 6 December 1988) and Joe Melson
‘Love of The Common People’ (written by Ronnie Wilkins and John Hurley)
‘Penny For Your Thoughts’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘I’ve Been Everywhere’, which was written by 
Geoff Mack (Wednesday 20 December 1922 – Friday 21 July 2017)
‘Paper Mansions’, which was written by Ted Harris (1937 – Sunday 22 November 2015)
‘Two Rolls of Scotch Tape’ (written by Betty Jo Gibson)
‘Sing A Sad Song’, which was written by Wynn Stewart (Thursday 7 June 1934 – Wednesday 17 July 1985)
‘Hundred Times Today’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Lie A Little’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Promises Promises’ (Chart Records, 1967) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968.

Lynn Anderson: 'Big Girls Don't Cry' (Chart Records, 1968)

In July 1968, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Big Girls Don’t Cry’ (Chart Records, 1968), which was produced by Slim Williamson, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Big Girls Don’t Cry’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) (No.12, 1968)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Big Girls Don’t Cry’ (Chart Records, 1968) also included the following tracks:

‘Pick of The Week’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Honey’ (written by Bobby Russell)
‘Just Between The Two of Us’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘I Live To Love You’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘(All My Friends Are Gonna Be) Strangers’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Pillow That Whispers’ (written by Cal Veale)
‘Ring of Fire’, which was written by Merle Kilgore (Thursday 9 August 1934 – Sunday 6 February 2005) and June Carter (Sunday 23 June 1929 – Thursday 15 May 2003)
‘Come On Home’, which was written by Jack Rhodes (
1908 – 1968) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 – Saturday 31 July 2010)
‘Wandering Mind’, which was written by Leon Ashley (
Monday 18 May 1936 – Sunday 20 October 2013) and Margie Singleton
‘You Mean The World To Me’, which was written by 
Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘I Keep Forgettin’ That I Forgot About You’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Big Girls Don’t Cry’ (Chart Records, 1968) reached No.11 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968.

Lynn Anderson: 'The Best of Lynn Anderson' (Chart Records, 1968)

In December 1968, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘The Best of Lynn Anderson’ (Chart Records, 1968), which was produced by Slim Williamson, and included the following tracks:

‘Ride Ride Ride’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) (No.36, 1966)

‘Too Much of You’ (written by Gene Hood) (No.28, 1967)

‘If I Kiss You (Will You Go Away)’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) (No.5, 1967)

‘(All My Friends Are Gonna Be) Strangers’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) / this track was originally included on Lynn Anderson’s ‘Big Girls Don’t Cry’ (Chart Records, 1968)

‘No Another Time’ (written by Jerry Lane and Slim Williamson) (No.8, 1968)

‘Sing A Sad Song’, which was written by Wynn Stewart (Thursday 7 June 1934 – Wednesday 17 July 1985) / this track was originally included on Lynn Anderson’s ‘Promises Promises’ (Chart Records, 1967)

‘Promises Promises’ (written by Wiley Smith and Carlyle Hughey) (No.4, 1967)

‘I Live To Love You’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) / this track was originally included on Lynn Anderson’s ‘Big Girls Don’t Cry’ (Chart Records, 1968)

‘I’ve Been Everywhere’, which was written by Geoff Mack (Wednesday 20 December 1922 – Friday 21 July 2017) / this track was originally included on Lynn Anderson’s ‘Promises Promises’ (Chart Records, 1967)

‘Big Girls Don’t Cry’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) (No.12, 1968)

‘Beggars Can’t Be Choosers’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) / this track was originally included on Lynn Anderson’s ‘Ride Ride Ride’ (Chart Records, 1967)

‘There Oughta Be A Law’ (written by Betty Jo Gibson) / this track was originally included on Lynn Anderson’s ‘Ride Ride Ride’ (Chart Records, 1967)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘The Best of Lynn Anderson’ (Chart Records, 1968) reached No.29 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1969.

Lynn Anderson: 'With Love From Lynn' (Chart Records, 1969)

In March 1969, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘With Love From Lynn’ (Chart Records, 1969), which was produced by Slim Williamson, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Flattery Will Get You Everywhere’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) (No.11, 1968)

‘Our House Is Not A Home’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Shirley Mayo (No.18, 1969)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘With Love From Lynn’ (Chart Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

‘All You Add Is Love’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Stand By Your Man’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998)
‘Too Many Dollars, Not Enough Sense’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Million Shades Of Blue’ (written by Gene Hood)
‘Only Baby That’ll Walk The Line’, which was written by Ivy J. Bryant and Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Be Quiet Mind’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Flower of Love’, which was written by Leon Ashley (Monday 18 May 1936 – Sunday 20 October 2013) and Margie Singleton
‘Wave Bye Bye To The Man’ (written by Betty Jo Gibson and Buck Lindsay)
‘Wife You Save May Be Your Own’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘The Auctioneer’ (written by Leroy Van Dyke and Buddy Black)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘From Lynn With Love’ (Chart Records, 1969) reached No.22 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1969.

Lynn Anderson: 'At Home With Lynn' (Chart Records, 1969)

In July 1969, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘At Home With Lynn’ (Chart Records, 1969), which was produced by Slim Williamson, and included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Where’s The Playground Bobby’ (written by Jimmy Webb) / this track was released as a single in 1969, but it did not chart

‘That’s A No No’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005) (No.2, 1969)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘At Home With Lynn’ (Chart Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

‘Take Me Home’ (written by Betty Jo Gibson)
‘Games People Play’, which was written by Joe South (Wednesday 28 February 1940 – Wednesday 5 September 2012)
‘Singing My Song’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015), Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998)
‘I’m Alright’ (written by Bill Anderson)
‘Full House’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Buck Maxwell
‘If Silence Is Golden’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Mr. Walker, It’s All Over’ (written by Gene Crysler)
‘Jim Dandy’ (written by Lincoln Chase)
‘I Used To Know All Those Things’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘At Home With Lynn’ (Chart Records, 1969) reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1969.

Lynn Anderson: 'Songs That Made Country Girls Famous' (Chart Records, 1969)

In November 1969, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Songs That Made Country Girls Famous’ (Chart Records, 1969), which was produced by Slim Williamson, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels’ (written by Jimmy D. Miller) (No.20, 1969)

‘Ride Ride Ride’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) (No.36, 1969)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Songs That Made Country Girls Famous’ (Chart Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

‘Once A Day’ (written by Bill Anderson)
‘I Fall To Pieces’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) and Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010)
‘You Ain’t Woman Enough (To Take My Man)’, which was written by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022)
‘Mama Spank’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)

‘Dark Moon’, which was written by Ned Miller (Sunday 12 April 1925 – Friday 18 March 2016)
‘Here Comes My Baby Back Again’, which was written by Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 – Wednesday 4 September 1991) and Bill West (1933 – Thursday 19 September 2013)
‘Harper Valley P.T.A.’, which was written by
Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021)
‘Don’t Touch Me’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010)
‘Your Good Girl’s Gonna Go Bad’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Songs That Made Country Girls Famous’ (Chart Records, 1969) reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1970.

Lynn Anderson: 'Uptown Country Girl' (Chart Records, 1970)

In February 1970, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Uptown Country Girl’ (Chart Records, 1970), which was produced by Slim Williamson, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘I’ve Been Everywhere’, which was written by Geoff Mack (Wednesday 20 December 1922 – Friday 21 July 2017) (No.16, 1969)

‘He’d Still Love Me’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Hugh X. Lewis (No.15, 1970)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Uptown Country Girl’ (Chart Records, 1970) also included following tracks:

‘Wave Bye Bye To The Man’ (written by Betty Jo Gibson and Buck Lindsay)
‘He Even Woke Me Up To Say Goodbye’, which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 – Sunday 29 September 2002) and Doug Gilmore
‘Morgen Wirst Du Wieder Bei Mir Sein’ (written by Heinz Geitz and Kurt Hertha)
‘Partly Bill’ (written by Vance Bulla and Steve Allen)
‘Ways To Love A Man’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015), Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998)
‘Okie From Muskogee’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and
Roy Edward Burris (Tuesday 27 October 1931 – Tuesday 19 April 2011)
‘Then Go’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Ich Hab Einen Boy In Germany’ (written by Helmut Flohr and Herbert Falk)

In 1970, Lynn Anderson left the roster at Chart Records, and signed a recording contract with Columbia Records.

Lynn Anderson: 'Stay There 'Til I Get There' (Columbia Records, 1970)

In May 1970, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Stay There ‘Til I Get There’ (Columbia Records, 1970), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Stay There ‘Til I Get There’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.3, 1970)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Stay There ‘Til I Get There’ (Columbia Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

‘Words’, which was written by Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb, CBE (Thursday 22 December 1949 – Sunday 12 January 2003) and Robin Gibb, CBE (Thursday 22 December 1949 – Sunday 20 May 2012)
‘Country Girl’ (written by Myra Smith and Margaret Lewis)
‘When You Hurt Me More Than I Love You’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘Don’t Leave The Leaving Up To Me’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Good’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘True Love’s A Blessing’, which was written by Sonny James (
Wednesday 1 May 1929 – Monday 22 February 2016) and Carole Smith
‘I’d Run A Mile To You’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Mac Curtis
‘Honey Come Back’ (written by Jim Webb)
‘Fancy’ (written by Bobbie Gentry)
‘Someday Soon’, which was written by Ian Tyson (Monday 25 September 1933 – Thursday 29 December 2022)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Stay There ‘Til I Get There’ (Columbia Records, 1970) reached No.28 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1970.

Lynn Anderson: 'No Love At All' (Columbia Records, 1970)

In August 1970, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘No Love At All’ (Columbia Records, 1970), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘No Love At All’ (written by Wayne C. Thompson and Johnny Christopher) (No.15, 1970)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘No Love At All’ (Columbia Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

‘Time’s Just Right’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘Woman Lives For Love’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 – Thursday 8 June 2017) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 – Saturday 31 July 2010)
‘Husband Hunting’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Hello Darlin’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘Heavenly Sunshine’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 – Saturday 31 July 2010)
‘It’s My Time’, which was written by
John D. Loudermilk (Saturday 31 March 1934 – Wednesday 21 September 2016)
‘Tomorrow Never Comes’, which was written by Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 – Thursday 6 September 1984) and Johnny Bond
‘All Day Sucker’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) and Casey Anderson (Saturday 23 January 1926 – Monday 26 November 2018)

‘I Found You Just In Time’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘Alabam’ (written by Lloyd Copas)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘No Love At All’ (Columbia Records, 1970) reached No.22 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1970.

Lynn Anderson: 'I'm Alright' (Chart Records, 1970)

In September 1970, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘I’m Alright’ (Chart Records, 1970), which was produced by Slim Williamson, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘I’m Alright’ (written by Bill Anderson) (No.20, 1970)

‘Rocky Top’, which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 – Thursday 25 June 1987) and Felice Bryant (Friday 7 August 1925 – Tuesday 22 April 2003) (No.17, 1970)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘I’m Alright’ (Chart Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

‘Love Me Love Me’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 – Saturday 31 July 2010)
‘Try A Little Kindness’ (written by Bobby Austin and Curt Sapaugh)
‘My Friend’, which was written by Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 – Tuesday 6 December 1988) and Bill Dees
‘Haunted House’ (written by Robert Geddins)
‘Seven Lonely Days’ (written by Earl Shuman, Alden Shuman and Marshall Brown)
‘Down In The Boondocks’, which was written by Joe South (Wednesday 28 February 1940 – Wednesday 5 September 2012)
‘Pillow That Whispers’ (written by Cal Veale)
‘If The Creek Don’t Rise’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘I’m Alright’ (Chart Records, 1970) reached No.33 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1970.

Lynn Anderson: 'Rose Garden' (Columbia Records, 1970)

In December 1970, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Rose Garden’ (Columbia Records, 1970), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included one track, which a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Rose Garden’, which was written by Joe South (Wednesday 28 February 1940 – Wednesday 5 September 2012) (No.1 for five weeks in December 1970 / January 1971) / this track also reached No.3 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1971, featured guest vocals from The Jordanaires, and was a hit single in sixteen countries worldwide / Lynn Anderson won a Grammy Award for her vocal performance, and Joe South earned two Grammy Award nominations for the song, ‘Best Country Song’ and ‘Song of The Year’ / Both the single and the ‘Rose Garden’ album sold in excess of one million copies

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Rose Garden’ (Columbia Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

‘For The Good Times’ (written by Kris Kristofferson) / this track featured guest vocals from The Nashville Edition

‘Another Lonely Night’, which was written by 
Jan Crutchfield (Saturday 26 February 1938 – Tuesday 30 October 2012) and Larry Butler (Thursday 26 March 1942 – Friday 20 January 2012) / this track featured guest vocals from The Nashville Edition

‘I Don’t Wanna Play House’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
/ this track featured guest vocals from The Nashville Edition

‘Snowbird’, which was written by Gene MacLellan (Wednesday 2 February 1938 – Thursday 19 January 1995)
/ this track featured guest vocals from The Nashville Edition

‘Your Sweet Love Lifted Me’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 – Saturday 31 July 2010)
/ this track featured guest vocals from The Jordanaires

‘Sunday Morning Coming Down’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)
/ this track featured guest vocals from The Nashville Edition

‘I Still Belong To You’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
/ this track featured guest vocals from The Nashville Edition

‘I Wish I Was A Little Boy Again’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Darrell Edwards
/ this track featured guest vocals from The Nashville Edition

‘It’s Only Make Believe’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) and Jack Nance
/ this track featured guest vocals from The Nashville Edition

‘Nothing Between Us’ (written by Lynn Anderson)
/ this track featured guest vocals from The Nashville Edition

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Rose Garden’ (Columbia Records, 1970) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971, and No.19 on the Billboard Top Pop Albums Chart in 1971.

Lynn Anderson: 'You're My Man' (Columbia Records, 1971)

In July 1971, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘You’re My Man’ (Columbia Records, 1971), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘You’re My Man’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.1 for two weeks in June 1971) / this track also reached No.63 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1971

Lynn Anderson’s ‘You’re My Man’ (Columbia Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

‘I Can Spot A Cheater’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Paul Tanner
‘I’m Gonna Write A Song’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘Cry Cry Again’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) and Dick Land
‘Knock Three Times’ (written by Irwin Levine and Russell Brown)
‘Flying Machine’ (written by Robert Jenkins)
‘Proud Mary’ (written by John C. Fogerty)
‘Help Me Make It Through The Night’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)
‘Put Your Hand In The Hand’, which was written by Gene MacLellan (Wednesday 2 February 1938 – Thursday 19 January 1995)
Joy To The World’, which was written by Hoyt Axton (Friday 25 March 1938 – Tuesday 26 October 1999)
‘I Might As Well Be Here Alone’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Faron Young (Thursday 25 February 1932 – Tuesday 10 December 1996)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘You’re My Man’ (Columbia Records, 1971) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971, and No.99 on the Billboard Top Pop Albums Chart in 1971.

Lynn Anderson: 'How Can I Unlove You' (Columbia Records, 1971)

In October 1971, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘How Can I Unlove You’ (Columbia Records, 1971), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘How Can I Unlove You’, which was written by Joe South (Wednesday 28 February 1940 – Wednesday 5 September 2012) (No.1 for three weeks in October / November 1971) / the track also reached No.63 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1971

Lynn Anderson’s ‘How Can I Unlove You’ (Columbia Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

‘Don’t Say Things You Don’t Mean’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘You’ve Got A Friend’ (written by Carole King)
‘Easy Lovin’, which was written by Freddie Hart (
Tuesday 21 December 1926 – Saturday 27 October 2018)
‘Here I Go Again’, which was written by Ted Harris (1937 – Sunday 22 November 2015)
‘What’s Made Milwaukee Famous (Has Made A Fool Out of Me)’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘Take Me Home Country Roads’, which was written by John Denver (Friday 31 December 1943 – Sunday 12 October 1997), Bill Danoff and Taffy Nivert
‘There’s Never Been Anyone Like You’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘All Day Sucker’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) and Casey Anderson (Saturday 23 January 1926 – Monday 26 November 2018)
‘That’s What Loving You Has Meant To Me’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘Simple Words’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)

Personnel involved in the recording of Lynn Anderson’s ‘How Can I Unlove You’ (Columbia Records, 1971) included the following:

Billy Sanford, Pete Wade, Tommy Allsup (Tuesday 24 November 1931 – Wednesday 11 January 2017) and Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) (guitar)
Lloyd Green (steel guitar)
Roy Huskey (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Hargus ‚ÄėPig‚Äô Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Larry Butler (Thursday 26 March 1942 – Friday 20 January 2012) (piano, organ)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, vibes)
The Jordanaires and The Nashville Edition (vocals)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘How Can I Unlove You’ (Columbia Records, 1971) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971, and No.132 on the Billboard Top pop music albums chart in 1971.

Lynn Anderson: 'The Christmas Album' (Columbia Records, 1971)

In November 1971, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘The Christmas Album’ (Columbia Records, 1971), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included the following tracks:

‘Ding A Ling The Christmas Bell’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘Jingle Bell Rock’ (written by Joe Beal and Jim Boothe)
‘Spirit of Christmas’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Rudolph The Red Nosed Reindeer’, which was written by Johnny Marks (Wednesday 10 November 1909 – Tuesday 3 September 1985)
‘Soon It Will Be Christmas Day’, which was written by 
Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus’ (written by Tommie Connor)
‘Rockin’ Around The Christmas Tree’, which was written by Johnny Marks (Wednesday 10 November 1909 – Tuesday 3 September 1985)
‘Mr. Mistletoe’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)
‘Whistle & A Whisker Away’ (written by Bill Hayes and Lee Hayes)
‘Frosty The Snowman’ (written by Jack Rollins and Steve Nelson)
‘Don’t Wish Me Merry Christmas’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘The Christmas Album’ (Columbia Records, 1971) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972, and No.132 on the Billboard Top pop music albums chart in 1972.

Lynn Anderson: 'Cry' (Columbia Records, 1972)

In March 1972, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Cry’ (Columbia Records, 1972), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Cry’ (written by Churchill Koleman) (No.3, 1972) / this track also reached No.71 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop pop music singles chart in 1972

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Cry’ (Columbia Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

‘Never Ending Song of Love’, which was written by Delaney Bramlett (Saturday 1 July 1939 – Saturday 27 December 2008)
‘Ask Any Woman’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Bedtime Story’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘I Won’t Mention It Again’ (written by Cam Mullins)
‘Tonight My Baby’s Coming Home’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘Cotton Jenny’, which was written by Gordon Lightfoot (Thursday 17 November 1938 – Sunday 1 May 2023)
‘Kiss Away’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘When You Say Love’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘We Can Make It’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘We’ve Got To Get It On Again’ (written by Donald Addrisi)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Cry’ (Columbia Records, 1972) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Album)s Chart in 1972, and No.114 on the Billboard Top pop music albums chart in 1972.

Lynn Anderson: 'Listen To A Country Song' (Columbia Records, 1972)

In July 1972, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Listen To A Country Song’ (Columbia Records, 1972), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Listen To A Country Song’ (written by James Massina and Alan Garth) (No.4, 1972)

‘Fool Me’, which was written by Joe South (Wednesday 28 February 1940 – Wednesday 5 September 2012) (No.4, 1972)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Listen To A Country Song’ (Columbia Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

‘Reason To Believe’, which was written by Tim Hardin (Tuesday 23 December 1941 – Monday 29 December 1980)
‘There’s A Party Goin’ On’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘Everybody’s Reaching Out For Someone’ (written by Dickey Lee and Allen Reynolds)
‘If I Can’t Be Your Woman’ (written by Gary Stoval and Kent Sprague)
‘Just Keep It Up & See What Happens’, which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 – Monday 6 May 2002)
‘Take Me To Your World’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘You’re Everything’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘It Don’t Do No Good To Be A Good Girl’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘That’s What Loving You Has Meant To Me’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Listen To A Country Song’ (Columbia Records, 1972) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1972.

Lynn Anderson: 'Keep Me In Mind' (Columbia Records, 1973)

In January 1973, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Keep Me In Mind’ (Columbia Records, 1973), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Keep Me In Mind’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 – Saturday 31 July 2010) (No.1 for one week in March / April 1973)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Keep Me In Mind’ (Columbia Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

‘Pass Me By (If You’re Only Passing Through)’, which was written by Hillman Hall (1938 -1989)
‘I Believe In Music’, which was written by
Mac Davis (Wednesday 21 January 1942 – Tuesday 29 September 2020)
‘Just Between The Two of Us’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘All Or Nothing of Me’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023)
‘The City of New Orleans’, which was written by Steve Goodman (Sunday 25 July 1948 – Thursday 20 September 1984)
‘Home Is Where I Hang My Head’ (written by Lynn Anderson)
‘A Perfect Match’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005) / this track featured Glenn Sutton
‘Who Could I Turn To’, which was written by Hal Bynum (Saturday 29 September 1934 – Thursday 2 June 2022)
‘Half A Dozen Tricycle Motors’ (written by Murry Kellum and S. Ledet)
‘Rodeo Cowboy’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Keep Me In Mind’ (Columbia Records, 1973) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in mid-1973.

Lynn Anderson: 'Top of The World' (Columbia Records, 1973)

In June 1973, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Top of The World’ (Columbia Records, 1973), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Top of The World’ (written by John Bettis and Richard Carpenter) (No.2, 1973) / this track also reached No.74 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1973

‘Sing About Love’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.3, 1973)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Top of The World’ (Columbia Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

‘Danny’s Song’ (written by Kenny Loggins)
‘Nobody Wins’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)
‘The Night The Lights Went Out In Georgia’, which was written by Bobby Russell (Friday 19 April 1940 – Thursday 19 November 1992)
‘I’m Still Loving You’, which was written by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 – Saturday 31 July 2010) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘Kids Say The Darndest Things’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘Killing Me Softly With His Song’ (written by Charles Fox and Norman Gimbel)
‘A Thing Called Love’, which was written by Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 – Monday 1 September 2008)
‘Fickle Fortune’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Lonely Women Make Good Lovers’ (written by Spooner Oldham and Freddy Weller)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Top of The World’ (Columbia Records, 1973) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1973, and No.179 on the Billboard Top 200 albums chart in 1973.

Lynn Anderson: 'Smile For Me' (Columbia Records, 1974)

In March 1974, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Smile For Me’ (Columbia Records, 1974), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Smile For Me’ (written by Rory Bourke) (No.15, 1974)

‘Talkin’ To The Wall’ (written by Wayne McPherson) (No.7, 1974)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Smile For Me’ (Columbia Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

‘Let Me Be There’ (written by John Rostill)
‘Tomorrow’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘I’m Not That Good At Goodbye’, which was written by Don Williams (
Saturday 27 May 1939 – Friday 8 September 2017) and Bob McDill
‘Born In Love’ (written by C. Thomason)
‘It Must Be Love This Time’, which was written by Jim Weatherly (Wednesday 17 March 1943 – Wednesday 3 February 2021)
‘Love of My Life’, which was written by
Kenny O’Dell (born Kenneth Gist Jr.) (Wednesday 21 June 1944 – Monday 27 March 2018)
‘A Man Like Your Daddy’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘I Want To Be A Part of You’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘Drifting Apart’ (written by H. Gurnes)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Smile For Me’ (Columbia Records, 1974) reached No.14 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

Lynn Anderson: 'What A Man My Man Is' (Columbia Records, 1974)

In November 1974, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘What A Man My Man Is’ (Columbia Records, 1974), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘What A Man, My Man Is’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.1 for one week in December 1974 / January 1975) / this track also reached No.93 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1974

Lynn Anderson’s ‘What A Man My Man Is’ (Columbia Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

‘I Honestly Love You’, which was written by Peter Allen (Thursday 10 February 1944 – Thursday 18 June 1992) and Jeff Barry
‘Everything’s Falling In Place (For Me & You)’ (written by Murry Kellum and Larry Cheshire)
‘Tell Me A Lie’ (written by Barbara Wyrick and Charles Buckins)
‘Someone To Finish What You Started’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)
‘Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool (written by Howard Greenfield and Jack Keller)
‘I Won’t Go Back To Denver’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)
‘Please Don’t Tell Me How The Story Ends’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)
‘Walk Me To The Door’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
‘Where Is All That Love You Talked About’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), Gene Vowel and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)
‘I Feel Like A New Man Today’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘What A Man My Man Is’ (Columbia Records, 1974) reached No.18 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

Lynn Anderson: 'I've Never Loved Anyone More' (Columbia Records, 1975)

In August 1975, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘I’ve Never Loved Anyone More’ (Columbia Records, 1975), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘I’ve Never Loved Anyone More’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010) and Michael Nesmith (Wednesday 30 December 1942 – Friday 10 December 2021) (No.14, 1975)

‘He Turns It Into Love Again’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), Murry Kellum and L. Cheshier (No.13, 1975)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘I’ve Never Loved Anyone More’ (Columbia Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

‘I’m Growing Up All Over Again’ (written by Tommy Boyce and Janet McMahan)
‘Faithless Love’ (written by John David Souther)
‘Best Kept Secret In Santa Fe’ (written by M. Leiken and G. Sklerov)
‘He Worshipped Me’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘I’m Not Lisa’ (written by Jessi Colter)
‘Love Has No Pride’ (written by Eric Kaz and Libby Titus)
‘We Got It All Together Now’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘Life’s No Bed of Roses’ (written by Lynn Anderson)
‘Good Ole Country Song’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘I’ve Never Loved Anyone More’ (Columbia Records, 1975) reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

Lynn Anderson: 'All The King's Horses' (Columbia Records, 1976)

In March 1976, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘All The King’s Horses’ (Columbia Records, 1976), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Paradise’, which was written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) (No.26, 1975)

‘All The King’s Horses’ (written by Johnny Cunningham) (No.20, 1976)

‘Rodeo Cowboy’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.44, 1976)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘All The King’s Horses’ (Columbia Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

‘Lyin’ Eyes’, which was written by Glenn Frey (Saturday 6 November 1948 – Tuesday 19 January 2016) and Don Henley
‘Long Long Time’ (written by Gary White)
‘If All I Have To Do Is Just Love You’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)
‘Dixieland, You Will Never Die’ (written by Johnny Cunningham)
‘That’s All Se Wrote’ (written by J. Fuller)
‘Tomorrow’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘I Want To Be A Part of You’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘All The King’s Horses’ (Columbia Records, 1976) reached No.28 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.

Lynn Anderson: 'Wrap Your Love All Around Your Man' (Columbia Records, 1977)

In January 1977, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Wrap Your Love All Around Your Man’ (Columbia Records, 1977), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Sweet Talkin’ Man’ (written by Johnny Cunningham) (No.23, 1976)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v=QDZEPPHTftI

‘Wrap Your Love All Around Your Man’ (written by Johnny Cunningham) (No.12, 1977) / this track was promoted on the highly-popular American television series, ‘Starsky & Hutch’; Lynn Anderson and the song were featured in an episode of the show, which brought great exposure to the title track

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Wrap Your Love All Around Your Man’ (Columbia Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

‘Feelings’ (written by Morris Albert)
‘Let Your Love Flow’ (written by Larry E. Williams)
‘Little Bit More’ (written by Bobby Gosh)
‘Big News In Tennamock Georgia’ (written by Johnny Cunningham)
‘This Country Girl Is Woman Wise’ (written by Johnny Cunningham)
‘You’ve Got Me To Hold On To’ (written by Dave Loggins)
‘I’ll Be Loving You’ (written by Gary Allan and Bobby Vinton)
‘I Couldn’t Be Lonely Even If I Wanted To’, which was written by Larry Cheshire and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Wrap Your Love All Around Your Man’ (Columbia Records, 1977) reached No.28 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.

Lynn Anderson: 'I Love What Love Is Doin' To Me' (Columbia Records, 1977)

In August 1977, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘I Love What Love Is Doin’ To Me’ (Columbia Records, 1977), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘I Love What Love Is Doin’ To Me’ (written by Johnny Cunningham) (No.22, 1977)

‘He Ain’t You’ (written by B. Burg, D. Denehofheinz, J. Barry and L. Hartman) (No.19, 1977)

‘We Got Love’ (written by L. Keith, S. Pippin, H. Forness and R. Culbertson) (No.26, early 1978)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘I Love What Love Is Doin’ To Me’ (Columbia Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

‘Desperado’, which was written by Glenn Frey (Saturday 6 November 1948 – Tuesday 19 January 2016) and Don Henley
‘The Angel In Your Arms’ (written by T. Woodford, C. Ivey and T. Brasfield)
‘It’s Your Love That Keeps Me Going’ (written by L. Cheshier)
‘My World Begins & Ends With You’ (written by S. Pippin and L. Keith)
‘Right Time of The Night’, which was written by Peter McCann ()
‘Sunshine Man’ (written by Johnny Cunningham)
‘Will I Ever Hear Those Church Bells Ring’ (written by Johnny Cunningham)

The album graphics for Lynn Anderson’s ‘I Love What Love Is Doin’ To Me’ (Columbia Records, 1977) are notable, featuring a paper doll of Lynn Anderson, along with accompanying ‘clothes’ on the front and back covers.  The LP record also included a paper insert reproducing the doll and clothes, so that buyers could have a Lynn Anderson paper doll without cutting the record cover.  This unique package makes the record LP release sought after by paper doll collectors, as well as country music fans.

Lynn Anderson’s ‘I Love What Love Is Doin’ To Me’ (Columbia Records, 1977) was Lynn Anderson’s last album release with her husband Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) at the production helm; Lynn and Glenn divorced shortly before the release of the album.

Lynn Anderson’s ‘I Love What Love Is Doin’ To Me’ (Columbia Records, 1977) reached No.38 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.

Lynn Anderson: 'From The Inside' (Columbia Records, 1978)

In September 1978, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘From The Inside’ (Columbia Records, 1978), which was produced by Steve Gibson, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Rising Above It All’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023) (No.44, 1978)

‘Last Love of My Life’, which was written by Patricia Karen Bunch (Thursday 22 June 1939 – Monday 30 January 2023) (No.43, 1978)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘From The Inside’ (Columbia Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

‘Touch & Go’ (written by Eddy Raven)
‘Bucket To The South’ (written by Gail Davies)
‘Sometimes When We Touch’ (written by Dan Hill and Barry Mann)
‘From The Inside’ (written by A. Wayne)
‘I Know You’re The Rain’, which was written by Rory Bourke and Charlie Black (Wednesday 23 November 1949 – Friday 23 April 2021)
‘Fairytale’ (written by P. Greedus)
‘When You Marry For Money’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Love Me Back’ (written by Bob McDill)

Lynn Anderson: 'Outlaw Is Just A State of Mind' (Columbia Records, 1979)

In March 1979, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Outlaw Is Just A State of Mind’ (Columbia Records, 1979), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Isn’t It Always Love’ (written by Karla Bonoff) (No.10, 1979)

‘I Love How You Love Me’ (written by Barry Mann and Larry Kolber) (No.18, 1979)

‘Sea of Heartbreak’, which was written by Paul Hampton and Hal David (Wednesday 25 May 1921 – Saturday 1 September 2012) (No.33, 1979)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Outlaw Is Just A State of Mind’ (Columbia Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

‘Child With You Tonight’ (written by Susan Sheridan and David Wolfert)
‘This Night Won’t Last Forever’ (written by Roy Freeland and Bill LaBounty)
‘I Am Alone’ (written by Aaron Gordon)
‘Say You Will’ (written by Steve Nelson and David Wolfert)
‘Outlaw Is Just A State of Mind’ (written by Susan Sheridan and David Wolfert)
‘Come As You Are’ (written by Laura Allan)
‘Come Running’ (written by Van Morrison)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Outlaw Is Just A State of Mind’ (Columbia Records, 1979) reached No.29 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1979.

Lynn Anderson: 'Even Cowgirls Get The Blues' (Columbia Records, 1980)

In July 1980, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Even Cowgirls Get The Blues’ (Columbia Records, 1980), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Even Cowgirls Get The Blues’ (written by Rodney Crowell) (No.26, 1980)

‘Blue Baby Blue’ (No.27, 1980)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Even Cowgirls Get The Blues’ (Columbia Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

‘Poor Side of Town’ (written by J. Rivers and L. Adier)
‘Shoulder To Shoulder’ (written by H. Gaffney)
‘Give You Up To Give You Back’, which was written by Rory Bourke, Charlie Black (Wednesday 23 November 1949 – Friday 23 April 2021) Jerry Gillespie
‘Lonely Hearts Cafe’ (written by D. Wolfert and S. Sheridan)
‘You Thrill Me’
‘See Through Me’
‘Love Me Tonight’
‘Louisiana 1927’

Personnel involved in the recording of Lynn Anderson’s ‘Even Cowgirls Get The Blues’ (Columbia Records, 1980) included the following:

Steve Gibson, Billy Sanford and Jerry Shook (acoustic guitar)
Lynn Anderson, Sheri Kramer, Lisa Silverman and Diane Tidwell (background vocals)
Jack Williams (bass guitar)
Sonny Garrish (Dobro, steel guitar)
Gunnar Gelotte and Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021) (drums)
Steve Gibson, Jon Goin and Billy Sanford (electric guitar)
Buddy Skipper and Bobby Ogdin (electric piano)
Lynn Anderson (lead vocals)
Bobby Ogdin (organ)
Gunner Gelotte and Farrell Morris (percussion)
David Briggs and Bobby Ogdin (piano)
Shane Keister (synthesizer)
Sheldon ‘Shelly’ Kurland (Saturday 9 June 1928 – Wednesday 6 January 2010) Strings (strings, arranged and conducted by Buddy Skipper)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Even Cowgirls Get The Blues’ (Columbia Records, 1980) reached No.37 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.

It was also in 1980 when Lynn Anderson left the roster at Columbia Records and entered a brief retirement to start a family with her then second husband Harold Stream, and raise her other children.

Lynn Anderson: 'Back' (Permian Records, 1983)

In July 1983, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Back’ (Permian Records, 1983), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘You Can’t Lose What You Never Had’ (written by Michael Garvin, Chris Waters and Tom Shapiro) (No.42, 1983)

‘What I’ve Learned From Loving You’, which was written by Russell Smith (Friday 17 June 1949 – Friday 12 July 2019) and James Hooker (No.18, 1983)

‘You’re Welcome To Tonight’, which was written by Jim Hurt, Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 – Thursday 18 December 2014) and Grant Boatwright (No.9, 1983) / this track was a duet with Gary Morris

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Back’ (Permian Records, 1983) also included the following tracks:

‘Love Comes Around Again’ (written by A. Rhody, J. Patten and N. Head)
‘Your Kisses Lied’ (written by J. Kimball)
‘At This Moment’ (written by B. Vera)
‘Fool For Love’ (written by A. Mitchell)
‘Heartbreak Kid’ (written by Michael Clark)
‘This Time The Heartbreak Wins’ (written by W. Bomar and P. McManus)
‘Mr. Sundown’ (written by Michael Clark and John Bettis)

Personnel involved in the recording of Lynn Anderson’s ‘Back’ (Permian Records, 1983) included the following:

Lynn Anderson, Stephen Brantley, Bruce Dees and Marsha Wood (background vocals)
Larry Paxton (bass guitar)
Clyde Brooks (drums)
Gary Morris (duet vocals on ‘You’re Welcome To Tonight’)
Mark Casstevens, Michael Clark, Bruce Dees, Doyle Grisham, Dann Huff, Dan Roth, Michael Spriggs and Chip Young (Thursday 19 May 1938 – Saturday 20 December 2014) (guitar)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Mitch Humphries and Buddy Skipper (keyboards)
Lynn Anderson (lead vocals)
Sonny Garrish and Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 – Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Michael Clark (synthesizer)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Back’ (Permian Records, 1983) reached No.61 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.

Lynn Anderson: 'What She Does Best' (Mercury Records, 1988)

In 1988, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘What She Does Best’ (Mercury Records, 1988), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Under The Boardwalk’ (written by Kenny Young and Arthur Resnick) (No.24, 1988)

‘What He Does Best’ (written by Thom Schuyler) (No.50, 1988)

‘How Many Hearts’ (No.69, 1989)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘What She Does Best’ (Mercury Records, 1988) also included the following tracks:

‘As Long As The Memory Survives’
‘Somebody’s Shoulder’
‘Martha’
‘Take Me Like A Vacation’
‘It Goes Without Saying’
‘Turn The Page’
‘Odds & Ends (Bits & Pieces)’

Personnel involved in the recording of Lynn Anderson’s ‘What She Does Best’ (Mercury Records, 1988) included the following:

Kenny Bell, Brent Rowan, Billy Sanford and Bruce Watkins (acoustic guitar)
Lynn Anderson, Michael Bonagura, Thomas Cain, Clifford Curry, Duane Hamilton, Allan LeBeouf, Jonell Mosser, Wood Newton, Billy Joe Royal (Friday 3 April 1942 – Tuesday 6 October 2015) and Mervyn Warren (background vocals)
Larry Paxton and Bob Wray (bass guitar)
Sonny Garrish (Dobro, steel guitar)
Clyde Brooks, Jerry Kroon and Steve Turner (drums)
Steve Gibson, Brent Rowan and Dale Sellers (electric guitar)
Rob Hajacos and Bruce Watkins (fiddle, mandolin)
David Briggs, Ron Oates and Bobby Ogdin (keyboards)
Lynn Anderson (lead vocals)
Jerry Kroon and Ron ‘Snake’ Reynolds (passed away on Tuesday 5 October 2021) (percussion)

Lynn Anderson: 'Cowboy's Sweetheart' (Laserlight Records, 1992)

In June 1992, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Cowboy’s Sweetheart’ (Laserlight Records, 1992), which was produced by Ralph Jungheim, and included the following tracks:

‘I Want To Be A Cowboy’s Sweetheart’, which was written by Patsy Montana (Friday 30 October 1908 – Friday 3 May 1996)
‘Ponies’
‘Desperado’, which was written by Glenn Frey (Saturday 6 November 1948 – Tuesday 19 January 2016) and Don Henley
‘Even Cowgirls Get The Blues’ (written by Rodney Crowell)
‘Run For The Roses’, which was written by Dan Fogelberg (Monday 13 August 1951 – Sunday 16 December 2007)
‘Someday Soon’, which was written by Ian Tyson (Monday 25 September 1933 – Thursday 29 December 2022)
‘Don’t Fence Me In’, which was written by Robert Fletcher and Cole Porter (9 June 1891 – Thursday 15 October 1964)
‘The Wayward Wind’, which was written by Stanley Lebowsky Stanley (Friday 26 November 1926 – Sunday 19 October 1986) and Herb Newman
/ this track was a duet with Emmylou Harris
‘Red River Valley’
‘Happy Trails’, which was written by Dale Evans (Thursday 31 October 1912 – Wednesday 7 February 2001)

Personnel involved in the recording of Lynn Anderson’s ‘Cowboy’s Sweetheart’ (Laserlight Records, 1992), included the following:

Lynn Anderson (vocals)
Dan Dugmore (steel guitar)
Jack Hale (arranger, keyboards, leader)
Jim Horn (flute)
Kirk ‘Jelly Roll’ Johnson (harmonica)
Chris Leuzinger (guitar)
Gary Prim and Mike Rojas (piano, keyboards)
Milton Sledge (drums)
Bob Wray (bass)

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Cowboy’s Sweetheart’ (Laserlight Records, 1992) had a more Western music theme than her previous album releases, with songs reflecting this theme. The title of the album, ‘Cowboy’s Sweetheart’, fitted Lynn Anderson’s own personal profile since she used to be a professional equestrian and horse racer during her time spent away from the country music business.

In addition to being a multi-million selling recording artist, Lynn Anderson had been equally successful in the equestrian world. She won sixteen National Championships, four World Championships and several celebrity championships.

Lynn Anderson also produced a TNN (The Nashville Network) Special, ‘American Country Cowboy’s’, which benefited various handicapped groups. Lynn Anderson’s philanthropic interests are longstanding; one of her recordings was chosen as a theme song for the National Christmas Seal Campaign. Lynn Anderson also works with horseback therapy riding programs for adults and children.

Lynn Anderson: 'The Bluegrass Sessions' (DM Records, 2004)

On Tuesday 14 September 2004, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘The Bluegrass Sessions’ (DM Records, 2004), which was produced by Bil VornDick (Thursday 9 March 1950 – Tuesday 5 July 2022), and included bluegrass versions of some of Lynn Anderson’s biggest hit singles, including the following:

‘What A Man, My Man Is’, which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 – Tuesday 17 April 2007) / the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in December 1974 / January 1975, and reached No.93 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1974

‘Rocky Top’, which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 – Thursday 25 June 1987) and Felice Bryant (Friday 7 August 1925 – Tuesday 22 April 2003) / the original version of this track reached No.17 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1970)

‘How Can I Unlove You’, which was written by Joe South (Wednesday 28 February 1940 – Wednesday 5 September 2012) / the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for three weeks in October / November 1971, and reached No.63 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1971

‘Rose Garden’, which was written by Joe South (Wednesday 28 February 1940 – Wednesday 5 September 2012) / the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for five weeks in December 1970 / January 1971, and reached No.3 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1971

‘Paradise’, which was written by John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) / the original version of this track reached No.26 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1975

‘That’s A No No’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005) / the original version of this track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles in 1969

‘Under The Boardwalk’ (written by Kenny Young and Arthur Resnick) / the original version of this track reached No.24 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1988

‘Ride Ride Ride’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) (/ the original version of this track reached No.36 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1967)

‘If I Kiss You (Will You Go Away)’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) / the original version of this track reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1967)

‘Top of The World’ (written by John Bettis and Richard Carpenter) / the original version of this track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1973, and reached No.74 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1973

‘Big Girls Don’t Cry’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) / the original version of this track reached No.12 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1968

‘The Worst Is Yet To Come’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011) / the original version of this track was included on Lynn Anderson’s ‘Promises Promises’ (Chart Records, 1967)

‘Cry’ (written by Churchill Koleman) / the original version of this track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1972, and reached No.71 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop pop music singles chart in 1972

In 2004, Lynn Anderson earned a Grammy Award nomination for ‘The Bluegrass Sessions’ (DM Records, 2004).

In a country music career which spanned over four decades, Lynn Anderson scored eleven No.1 hit singles, eighteen Top 10 hit singles and over fifty Top 40 hit singles.

Lynn Anderson earned a total of seventeen ‘Gold’ albums and won virtually every award available to a female recording artist: Country Music Association (CMA) ‘Female Vocalist of The Year’, Academy of Country Music (ACM) ‘Female Vocalist of The Year’ (twice), American Music Award ‘Favourite Female Vocalist’, Record World’s ‘Artist of The Decade’ (1970 – 1980), Billboard’s ‘Artist of The Decade’ (1970 – 1980) and the prestigious Grammy Award.

After living in Taos, New Mexico for twenty years, Lynn Anderson decided it was time to move back to Nashville.  Lynn Anderson owned several horses and competed at national equestrian events.  Lynn Anderson hit the concert trail two or three times a month, headlining major casinos, performing arts centres, fairs and festivals.

Lynn Anderson: 'Bridges' (Center Sound Productions, 2015)

On Tuesday 9 June 2015, Lynn Anderson saw the release of ‘Bridges’ (Center Sound Productions, 2015), which was produced by Bil VornDick (Thursday 9 March 1950 – Tuesday 5 July 2022), and included one track, which was released as a single on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘Drift Away Gospel’, which was written by Mentor Williams (Tuesday 11 June 1946 – Wednesday 16 November 2016) / this track was released as a single in 2015, but it did not chart

Lynn Anderson’s ‘Bridges’ (Center Sound Productions, 2015) also included the following tracks:

‘Heaven Has A Human Touch’ (written by Kye Fleming and Mike Reid)
‘Get Up, Joseph’ (written by Mike Reid and Allen Shamblin)
/ this track featured guest vocals from The Oak Ridge Boys
‘The Bridge’ (written by Tony Haselton and Adam Wheeler)
‘He Saw It All’ (written by Daryl Mosley)
‘Meanwhile Back At The Cross’, which was written by Chip Davis, Doug Johnson and Kim Williams (
Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016)
‘Sky Full of Angels’ (written by Burton Collins, Clay Mills and Lisa Stewart)
‘My Guardian Angel’, which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 – Monday 31 October 2011)
‘Fishing’ (written by Don Goodman, John Greenbaum and Craig Karp)
‘Wanderer’s Prayer’, which was written by Larry Wayne Clark and Jerry Jeff Walker (Monday 16 March 1942 – Friday 24 October 2020)
‘The Road To Surrender’ (written by Angie Commons, Gary Duffey and Buffy Lawson)
‘Rise Up’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)

Personnel involved in the recording of Lynn Anderson’s ‘Bridges’ (Center Sound Productions, 2015) included the following:

Lynn Anderson (lead vocals)
Chip Davis (background vocals)
Bruce Dees (background vocals, electric guitar)
Mark Fain (bass)
Sonny Garrish (steel Dobro)
Steve Gibson and Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (electric guitar)
Pete Huttlinger (acoustic guitar)
The Martins and The Oak Ridge Boys (guest artists)
Bobby Ogdin (Hammond b3 organ)
Angela Primm, Amaleia Rubble, Lisa Silver and Cindy Richardson-Walker (background vocals)
Jason Roller (fiddle, mandolin)
Milton Smith (strings)
Lynn Williams (drums)

For ‘Bridges’ (Center Sound Productions, 2015), Lynn Anderson enlisted her daughter, Lisa Sutton, to create the artwork for the project.

Lynn Anderson (Friday 26 September 1947 - Thursday 30 July 2015)

On Thursday 30 July 2015, Lynn Anderson passed away at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville; she was 67 years old.

Lynn Anderson had been briefly hospitalised due to pneumonia after vacationing in Italy; the official cause of death was a heart attack.

Lynn Anderson’s funeral service was held at 11:00am on Wednesday 5 August 2015 at Woodlawn-Roesch-Patton Funeral Home & Memorial Park at 660 Thompson Lane in Nashville.

Lynn Anderson’s friend, Brenda Lee, gave a speech, and several doves were released to commemorate her passing.

Lynn Anderson was buried at Woodlawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Nashville, near her mother and father.

Nashville Roses Society

In 2018, Woodlawn Memorial Park Cemetery, referred to as ‘Cemetery of Country Stars’, created ‘The Lynn Anderson Rose Garden’, consisting of 200 Lynn Anderson Hybrid Rose Bushes (named for the singer by the National Rose Society of America), as a place of reflection and meditation, in honour of Lynn Anderson’s signature song.

Lynn Anderson

‚ÄĘ Visit Lynn Anderson’s official site at lynnandersonrosegarden.com