Gene Watson Peer’s Quote from Mel McDaniel: February 2011

Gene Watson’s Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as ‘the singer’s singer’ – and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson’s Peers, who were contacted during 2011, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Mel McDaniel, which he submitted to this site on Sunday 13 February 2011.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Mel McDaniel who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online ‘celebration of a Lone Star Hero’.

Mel McDaniel



Mel McDaniel
This quote was submitted on Sunday 13 February 2011.

‘One of my best friends and one fine singer!

Gene Watson is a man I’ve respected for many years.

Gene, you’re still ‘Fourteen Carat’ to me’

Thank you, Mel McDaniel, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Mel McDaniel…

Mel McDaniel

Mel McDaniel was born on Sunday 6 September 1942; the son of a truck driving father, Mel McDaniel grew up in Okmulgee, Oklahoma and was inspired to play music after seeing Elvis Presley (Tuesday 8 January 1935 – Tuesday 16 August 1977) perform on television.

When he was fourteen years old, Mel McDaniel taught himself the guitar chords to ‘Frankie & Johnny’ and performed at a high-school talent contest.

Mel McDaniel first performed on stage at Halloween in 1958 in Okmulgee, Oklahoma.  From there, he had an unsuccessful trip to Nashville, followed by quite a bit of success in Anchorage, Alaska where he honed his performing skills at King X’s Lounge.

After two years in Alaska, Mel McDaniel returned to Nashville where he landed a job as a demo singer and songwriter with Combine Music.

Billy 'Crash' Craddock: 'Crash' (Dot Records, 1976)

One of the demos which Mel McDaniel sang on was ‘A Tear Fell’ (written by Eugene Randolph and Dorian Burton), which was recorded by Billy ‘Crash’ Craddock, who included the track on ‘Crash’ (Dot Records, 1976); the track reached No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart, for Billy ‘Crash’ Craddock, in 1977.

Hoyt Axton: 'Southbound' (A&M Records, 1975)

In 1975, Hoyt Axton (Friday 25 March 1938 – Tuesday 26 October 1999) & Arlo Guthrie recorded Mel McDaniel’s ‘Roll Your Own’; the track was included on Hoyt Axton’s ‘Southbound’ (A&M Records, 1975).

Commander Cody (George Frayne IV (Wednesday 19 July 1944 – Sunday 26 September 2021) & His Lost Planet Airmen recorded Mel McDaniel’s ‘Roll Your Own’ and included the track on ‘Tales From The Ozone’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1975).

Between 1975 and 1977, Mel McDaniel saw the release of a number of non-album singles, which included the following:

‘Lazy Me’, which was written by JJ Cale (Monday 5 December 1938 – Friday 26 July 2013) / this track, which was released on Galway Records in 1975, but it did not chart

‘Have A Dream On Me’ (written by Bob Morrison)
(Capitol Records) (No.51, 1976)

‘I Thank God She Isn’t Mine’, which was written by Bob Morrison and Johnny MacRae (1929 – Wednesday 3 July 2013)
(Capitol Records) (No.70, 1976)

‘All The Sweet’ (written by J. Zerface, B. Zerface and Bob Morrison)
(Capitol Records) (No.39, 1977)

Mel McDaniel: 'Gentle to Your Senses' (Capitol Records, 1977)

With the help of music publisher Bob Beckham, Mel McDaniel signed to Capitol Records in 1976 and saw the release of his first single; ‘Have A Dream On Me’ (written by Bob Morrison), which reached No.51 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1976, was included on Mel McDaniel’s debut album, ‘Gentle To Your Senses’ (Capitol Records, 1977), which was released in September 1977.

Mel McDaniel’s debut album, ‘Gentle To Your Senses’ (Capitol Records, 1977), included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Gentle To Your Senses (Easy On Your Mind)’ (written by L. Williams) (No.18, 1977)

‘Soul of A Honky Tonk Woman’ (written by Bob Morrison and H. Coleman) (No.27, 1977)

‘God Made Love’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006), Mel McDaniel, Johnny MacRae (1929 – Wednesday 3 July 2013) and Len Pollard (No.11, 1977)

Mel McDaniel’s debut album, ‘Gentle To Your Senses’ (Capitol Records, 1977), also included the following tracks:

‘I’ll Just Take It Out In Love’ (written by Bob McDill)
‘Roll Your Own’ (written by Mel McDaniel)
‘T.J.’s Last Ride’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006)
‘Takin’ My Dreams Out On You’, which was written by Bob Morrison and Johnny MacRae (1929 – Wednesday 3 July 2013)
‘Plastic Girl’ (written by Kent Finlay)
‘Reachin’ High For Rainbows’ (written by J. Vann)
‘Have A Dream On Me’ (written by Bob Morrison)

Mel McDaniel’s debut album, ‘Gentle To Your Senses’ (Capitol Records, 1977), reached No.45 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.

Conway Twitty: 'Georgia Keeps Pulling on My Ring' (MCA Records, 1978)

Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) recorded Mel McDaniel’s ‘Grandest Lady of Them All’ and included the track on ‘Georgia Keeps Pulling On My Ring’ (MCA Records, 1978); the track reached No.16 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978.

Mel McDaniel: 'Mello' (Capitol Records, 1978)

In August 1978, Mel McDaniel saw the release of ‘Mello’ (Capitol Records, 1978), which was produced by Johnny MacRae (), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘The Farm’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006) (No.80, 1978)

‘Bordertown Woman Blues’, which was written by Max D. Barnes ()
(No.26, 1978)

Mel McDaniel’s ‘Mello’ (Capitol Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

‘Dim The Lights (& Pour The Wine)’ (written by Bob Morrison and J. Harris)
‘It’s About Time’ (written by C. Francis and W. Francis)
‘Love Is A Miracle’ (written by J. Christopher and Layng Martine Jr.)
‘Black & White Memory’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006)
‘Every Square Has An Angle’ (written by Zerface and Bob Morrison)
‘The Grandest Lady of Them All’ (written by Bob Morrison and Mel McDaniel)
‘Oklahoma Wind’, which was written by Alan Rush and Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006) / this was the track after which Mel McDaniel named his backing band
‘They’ll Never Take Her Love From Me’, which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 – Thursday 11 September 1969)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mel McDaniel’s ‘Mello’ (Capitol Records, 1978) included the following:

Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006) (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Eberhard Ramm (French Horn)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (mandolin, fiddle)
Chip Young and Dale Sellers (acoustic guitar)
Bill Justis (strings arrangements)
The Tennessee Sailpossums (backing vocals)
Alan Rush (bass guitar)
Jerry Shook (electric guitar)
Bobby Ogdin (keyboards, vibraphone, synthesizer)
Randy Cullers (percussion)
Stu Basore (steel guitar)
The Sheldon ‘Shelly’ Kurland (Saturday 9 June 1928 – Wednesday 6 January 2010) Strings (strings)

In 1979, Mel McDaniel saw the release of three non-album tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Love Lies’ (written by C. Black and S. Barrett) (Capitol Records) (No.33, 1979)

‘Play Her Back To Yesterday’ (written by Bob Morrison and M. Hughes)
(Capitol Records) (No.24, 1979)

‘Lovin’ Starts Where Friendship Ends’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006) and A. Rush
(Capitol Records) (No.27, 1979)

Kenny Rogers: 'Kenny' (United Artists Records, 1979)
Kenny Rogers: 'Short Stories' (Liberty Records, 1985)

Kenny Rogers (Sunday 21 August 1938 – Friday 20 March 2020) recorded Mel McDaniel’s ‘Goodbye Marie’, which was co-written with Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006), and included the track on ‘Kenny’ (United Artists Records, 1979); a remixed version of the track was included on Kenny Rogers’ ‘Short Stories’ (Liberty Records, 1985).

Johnny Rodriguez: 'Rodriguez was Here' (Mercury Records, 1979)

Johnny Rodriguez recorded Mel McDaniel’s ‘Goodbye Marie’, which was co-written with Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006), and included the track on ‘Rodriguez Was Here’ (Mercury Records, 1979).

Bobby Goldsboro: 'Bobby Goldsboro' (Curb Records, 1980)

Bobby Goldsboro recorded Mel McDaniel’s ‘Goodbye Marie’, which was co-written with Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006), and included the track on ‘Bobby Goldsboro’ (Curb Records, 1980); the track reached No.17 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1981.

Mel McDaniel: 'I'm Countrified' (Capitol Records, 1980)
Alan Jackson: 'Under The Influence' (RCA Records, 1999)

In October 1980, Mel McDaniel saw the release of ‘I’m Countrified’ (Capitol Records, 1980), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Hello Daddy, Good Morning Darling’ (written by Roger Murrah, Keith Stegall and Scott Anders) (No.39, 1980)

‘I’m Countryfied’, which was written by Ronny Scaife (1947 – Wednesday 3 November 2010) and Danny Hogan
(No.23, 1980)

‘Louisiana Saturday Night’ (written by Bob McDill)
 (No.7, 1981)

‘Right In The Palm of Your Hand’ (written by Bob McDill)
 (No.10, 1981) / this track was also recorded by Alan Jackson, who included it on ‘Under The Influence’ (RCA Records, 1999)

Mel McDaniel’s ‘I’m Countrified’ (Capitol Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

‘If I Keep On Going Crazy’ (written by Roger Murrah and Jim McBride)
‘Who’s Been Sleeping In My Bed’ (written by Danny Hogan and Frank Newberry)
‘Cold Hard Facts of Love’ (written by Mel McDaniel)
‘Ten Years, Three Kids, Two Loves, Too Late’ (written by Roger Murrah and Jim McBride)
‘Goodbye, Marie’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006) and Mel McDaniel
‘My Ship’s Comin’ In’ (written by Danny Hogan, Henry Carter and Randy Wilkes)

Mel McDaniel’s ‘I’m Countrified’ (Capitol Records, 1980) reached No.24 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.

Mel McDaniel: 'Take Me to The Country' (Capitol Records, 1982)

In April 1982, Mel McDaniel saw the release of ‘Take Me To The Country’ (Capitol Records, 1982), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Preaching Up A Storm’ (No.19, 1981)

‘Take Me To The Country’, which was written by Ronny Scaife (1947 – Wednesday 3 November 2010), Don Singleton and Larry Rogers
(No.10, 1982)

‘Big Ole Brew’, which was written by Russell Smith (Friday 17 June 1949 – Friday 12 July 2019)
 (No.4, 1982)

‘I Wish I Was In Nashville’
(No.20, 1982)

Mel McDaniel’s ‘Take Me To The Country’ (Capitol Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

‘It’s Like Falling In Love (Over & Over Again)’ (written by Roger Murrah, Scott Anders and Alves)
‘Stars’, which was written by Ronnie Scaife (1947 – Wednesday 3 November 2010) and J. Hayes
‘Some Things I Want To Sing About’ (written by Roger Murrah)
‘When You Held Me In Your Arms’
‘We’ve Got A Good Love Going On’
‘Big Time’

Mel McDaniel’s ‘Take Me To The Country’ (Capitol Records, 1982) reached No.43 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.

Mel McDaniel: 'Naturally Country' (Capitol Records, 1983)

In May 1983, Mel McDaniel saw the release of ‘Naturally Country’ (Capitol Records, 1983), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Old Man River (I’ve Come To Talk Again)’ (No.22, 1983)

‘Hot Time In Old Town Tonight’
(No.39, 1983)

Mel McDaniel’s ‘Naturally Country’ (Capitol Records, 1983) also included the following tracks:

‘Gathering’
‘Mountain Eyes’
‘Some Folks Are Dying To Live Like This’
‘Nobody Said It Was Easy’
‘Livin’ For The Weekend’
‘Just Because It Feels Good’
‘Hard Earned Country Livin’
‘Maximum Living On A Minimum Wage’

Mel McDaniel’s ‘Naturally Country’ (Capitol Records, 1983) reached No.63 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.

Mel McDaniel: 'Mel McDaniel with Oklahoma Wind' (Capitol Records, 1984)

In February 1984, Mel McDaniel saw the release of ‘Mel McDaniel With Oklahoma Wind’ (Capitol Records, 1984), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘I Call It Love’ (written by Bob McDill) (No.9, 1983)

‘Where’d That Woman Go’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) and Alex Harvey (Monday 10 March 1947 – Saturday 4 April 2020)
(No.49, 1984)

‘Most of All, I Remember You’, which was written by Ronny Scaife (1947 – Wednesday 3 November 2010) and Phil Thomas (1944 – Saturday 5 January 2019)
(No.59, 1984)

Mel McDaniel’s ‘Mel McDaniel With Oklahoma Wind’ (Capitol Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

‘Come Early Morning’ (written by Bob McDill)
‘Callin’ Me Back’ (written by Ronnie Rogers)
‘Cheatin’s Only Cheatin’ (written by Doc James)
‘Gunfighter’s Song’, which was written by Mel McDaniel and Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006)
‘All Around The Water Tank’ (written by Bob Miller)
‘Born To The Night’, which was written by Herb McCullough (Thursday 18 May 1944 – Tuesday 5 May 2015)
‘You’ve Got Another Thing Comin’ If You Think I’m Comin’ Back To Take Another Drink of Your Wine, which was written by T. Cain and Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006)

Mel McDaniel’s ‘Mel McDaniel With Oklahoma Wind’ (Capitol Records, 1984) reached No.64 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.

Mel McDaniel: 'Let It Roll' (Capitol Records, 1984)

In December 1984, Mel McDaniel saw the release of ‘Let It Roll’ (Capitol Records, 1984), which was produced by Jerry Kennedy, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Baby’s Got Her Blue Jeans On’ (written by Bob McDill) (No.1 for one week in February / March 1985)

‘Let It Roll (Let It Rock)’, which was written by Chuck Berry (Monday 18 October 1926 – Saturday 18 March 2017)
 (No.6, 1985)

Mel McDaniel’s ‘Let It Roll’ (Capitol Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

‘Mississippi (Roll On Forever)’ (written by Bob McDill)
‘A Little More Country’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006)
‘Lovelight’ (written by Bob McDill)
‘You Sneaky Thing You’ (written by Bob McDill)
‘Hustler’ (written by C. Kalb Jr. and C. Kalb)
‘Dreamin’ With You’ (written by Mel McDaniel and R. Cutlers)
‘My Ol’ Four Wheel Drive’, which was written by Herb McCullough (Thursday 18 May 1944 – Tuesday 5 May 2015) and S. McCullough
‘I Can Never Get You Off My Mind’, which was written by Joe Chambers (passed away on Wednesday 28 September 2022) and Larry Jenkins

Personnel involved in the recording of Mel McDaniel’s ‘Let It Roll’ (Capitol Records, 1984) included the following:

Chip Young and Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar)
Bergen White, Buzz Cason, Jana King, Judy Rodman, Louis Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 – Friday 26 October 2012), Tom Brannon and Trish Williams (backing vocals)
Mike Leech (bass)
Gene Chrisman and Jerry Kirby Carrigan (Monday 13 September 1943 – Saturday 22 June 2019) (drums)
Jerry Kennedy and Pete Wade (electric guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 – Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
David Briggs (synthesizer, organ)

Mel McDaniel’s ‘Let It Roll’ (Capitol Records, 1984) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.

Mel McDaniel: 'Stand Up' (Capitol Records, 1985)

In October 1985, Mel McDaniel saw the release of ‘Stand Up’ (Capitol Records, 1985), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Stand Up’ (written by Bruce Channel, Ricky Ray Rector and Sonny Throckmorton) (No.5, 1985)

‘Shoe String’, which was written by Sam Hogin (1950 – Monday 9 August 2004) and D. Gillon
(No.22, 1986)

‘Doctor’s Orders’
(No.53, 1986)

Mel McDaniel’s ‘Stand Up’ (Capitol Records, 1985) also included the following tracks:

‘Reminders’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997) and John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 – Thursday 1 February 2001)
‘Make It With The Blues’, which was written by Herb McCullough (Thursday 18 May 1944 – Tuesday 5 May 2015)
‘If You Still Want A Fool Around’, which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)
‘Thank You, Nadine’, which was written by Lionel Alton Delmore (Tuesday 19 March 1940 – Monday 20 May 2002)
‘Worn Out Shoe’ (written by Dave Moordigian)
‘Love Is Goin’ Round’ (written by S.D. Mills and M. Germino)
‘Whatever Gets You Through The Night’ (written by Bruce Channel, Kieran Kane and Rory Bourke)

Mel McDaniel’s ‘Stand Up’ (Capitol Records, 1985) reached No.25 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.

On Saturday 11 January 1986, Mel McDaniel became the 62nd member of The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville and made frequent appearances on the show.

Mel McDaniel: 'Just Can't Sit Down Music' (Capitol Records, 1986)

In September 1986, Mel McDaniel saw the release of ‘Just Can’t Sit Down Music’ (Capitol Records, 1986), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Stand On It’ (written by Bruce Springsteen) (No.12, 1986)

‘Oh, What A Night’ (written by Bob McDill and Dickey Lee)
(No.56, 1987)

Mel McDaniel’s ‘Just Can’t Sit Down Music’ (Capitol Records, 1986) also included the following tracks:

‘Love Will’
‘Memphis Might As Well Be On The Moon’
‘Lower On The Hog’
’57 Chevy & You’
‘Just Can’t Sit Down Music’ (written by Jon Vezner and M. Henley)
‘In Oklahoma’ (written by Mel McDaniel)
‘Oh, Naomi’ (written by R. Fagan and M. James)
‘Chain Smokin’ (written by Bob McDill)

Mel McDaniel’s ‘Just Can’t Sit Down Music’ (Capitol Records, 1986) reached No.25 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1986.

Mel McDaniel: 'Greatest Hits' (Capitol Records, 1986)

It was also in September 1986 when Mel McDaniel saw the release of his first ‘Greatest Hits’ collection; ‘Greatest Hits’ (Capitol Records, 1986) included the following tracks, three of which were previously unreleased:

‘Louisiana Saturday Night’ (written by Bob McDill) (No.7, 1981)

‘Anger & Tears’ (written by R. Smith and G. Chase)
(No.49, 1986) / this track was previously unreleased

‘Stand Up’ (written by Bruce Channel, Ricky Ray Rector and Sonny Throckmorton)
(No.5, 1985)

‘Hello Daddy, Good Morning Darling’ (written by Roger Murrah, Keith Stegall and Scott Anders) (No.39, 1980)

‘Let It Roll (Let It Rock)’, which was written by Chuck Berry (Monday 18 October 1926 – Saturday 18 March 2017) (No.6, 1985)

‘Baby’s Got Her Blue Jeans On’ (written by Bob McDill)
 (No.1 for one week in February / March 1985)

‘Old Man River (I’ve Come To Talk Again)’
 (No.22, 1983)

‘Love Is Everywhere’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006)
(No.60, 1987) / this track was previously unreleased

‘Big Ole Brew’, which was written by Russell Smith (Friday 17 June 1949 – Friday 12 July 2019)
 (No.4, 1982)

‘Do You Want To Say Goodbye’
/ this track was previously unreleased

Mel McDaniel’s ‘Greatest Hits’ (Capitol Records, 1986), reached No.43 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1986.

Mel McDaniel: 'Now You're Talking' (Capitol Records, 1988)
Mel McDaniel: 'Rockabilly Boy' (Capitol Records, 1989)

Before he departed Capitol Records in mid-1989, Mel McDaniel saw the release of his final two albums for the label; ‘Now You’re Talking’ (Capitol Records, 1988) and ‘Rockabilly Boy’ (Capitol Records, 1989).

Mel McDaniel: 'Now You're Talking' (Capitol Records, 1988)

In June 1988, Mel McDaniel saw the release of his penultimate album for Capitol Records, ‘Now You’re Talking’ (Capitol Records, 1988), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Now You’re Talkin’, which was written by Ronny Scaife (1947 – Wednesday 3 November 2010), Don Singleton and Phil Thomas (1944 – Saturday 5 January 2019) (No.64, 1987)

‘Ride This Train’
(No.58, 1988)

‘Real Good Feel Good Song’, which was written by Richard Fagan (Thursday 24 April 1947 – Friday 5 August 2016) and Larry Alderman
 (No.9, 1988)

‘Henrietta’
(No.62, 1988)

Mel McDaniel’s penultimate album for Capitol Records, ‘Now You’re Talking’ (Capitol Records, 1988), also included the following tracks:

‘She’s A Lover of Lost Causes’
‘Under My Skin’
‘Hey, Y’all’
‘Sunday Mornin’ Preachers’
‘Jump Into Love’
‘Bye Bye Johnny’

Mel McDaniel’s penultimate album for Capitol Records, ‘Now You’re Talking’ (Capitol Records, 1988), reached No.51 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988.

Mel McDaniel: 'Rockabilly Boy' (Capitol Records, 1989)

In June 1989, Mel McDaniel saw the release of his final album for Capitol Records, ‘Rockabilly Boy’ (Capitol Records, 1989), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Walk That Way’ (written by R. Grissum and S. Munsey Jr.) (No.54, 1989)

‘Blue Suede Blues’, which was written by Fagan, Ryan and James
(No.70, 1989)

‘You Can’t Play The Blues (In An Air Conditioned Room)’ (written by G. Kennedy and R. Fagan)
(No.80, 1989)

Mel McDaniel’s final album for Capitol Records, ‘Rockabilly Boy’ (Capitol Records, 1989), also included the following tracks:

‘Reverend Luther & The Madam’
‘Way You Do The Things You Do’
‘Country Heart’
‘Tractor’
‘Still Got You Baby’ (written by Bob McDill and Dickey Lee)
‘Rockabilly Boy’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006)
‘Oklahoma Shines’ (written by Jerry Fuller)

Mel McDaniel: 'Country Pride' (DPI Records, 1990)

In 1990, Mel McDaniel signed with DPI Records, an independent record label, and saw the release, on Monday 13 May 1991, of the critically acclaimed ‘Country Pride’ (DPI Records, 1990), which was produced by Roger Murrah and Keith Stegall, and included the following tracks:

‘Country Pride’ (written by John Schweers, Keith Stegall and Roger Murrah)
‘The Annual Blount County Snuff Dipper’s Ball’ (written by Roger Murrah)
‘Turtles & Rabbits’ (written by Keith Stegall and Roger Murrah)
‘(If I Live To Be A Hundred) I’ll Die Young’, which was written by Mae Boren Axton (Monday 14 September 1914 – Wednesday 9 April 1997), Ed Hunnicutt and Roger Allan Wade
‘You Can’t Go Back’ (written by Keith Stegall and Roger Murrah)
‘My Ex-Life’ (written by Bob McDill and Layng Martine Jr.)
‘I’ll Keep Your Memory Around’, which was written by written by Keith Stegall, Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 – Friday 1 July 2011) and Roger Murrah
‘Losing You Wouldn’t Hurt At All’ (written by JB Rudd and Roger Murrah)
‘That Ole Gravel Road (Was Easy Street)’ (written by Billy Lawson and Roger Murrah)
‘Mama’s Bible’ (written by Mel McDaniel)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mel McDaniel’s critically acclaimed, ‘Country Pride’ (DPI Records, 1990), included the following:

Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Bobby Ogdin and Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (keyboards)
Jimmy Capps (Thursday 25 May 1939 – Monday 1 June 2020) (acoustic guitar)
Paul Franklin and Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Dave Pomeroy (bass)
Jerry Kroon (drums)
Kirk ‘Jelly Roll’ Johnson and Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Denny Henson and Roger Murrah (back-up singers)

Mel McDaniel: 'Baby's Got Her Blue Jeans On' (Branson Entertainment, 1993)

On Wednesday 7 July 1993, Mel McDaniel saw the release of ‘Baby’s Got Her Blue Jeans On’ (Branson Entertainment, 1993), which included the following tracks:

‘C’mon Sixty-Five’ (written by Jackson Leap)
‘Louisiana Moon’ (written by Bob Carlisle and Randy Thomas)
‘Mama’s Bible’ (written by Mel McDaniel)
‘Baby’s Got Her Blue Jeans On’ (written by Bob McDill)
‘Stand Up’ (written by Bruce Channel, Ricky Ray Rector and Sonny Throckmorton)
‘Big Ole Brew’, which was written by Russell Smith (Friday 17 June 1949 – Friday 12 July 2019)
‘Let It Roll (Let It Rock)’, which was written by Chuck Berry (Monday 18 October 1926 – Saturday 18 March 2017) (No.6, 1985)
‘Louisiana Saturday Night’ (written by Bob McDill) (No.7, 1981)
‘Stand On It’ (written by Bruce Springsteen) (No.12, 1986)
‘Hello Daddy, Good Morning Darling’ (written by Roger Murrah, Keith Stegall and Scott Anders) (No.39, 1980)
‘Out of The Question’, which was written by Layng Martine Jr. and Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)
‘Inseparable’ (written by Dennis Morgan and Jo-El Sonnier)

On Thursday 14 November 1996, Mel McDaniel had a near-fatal fall into an orchestra pit, which he suffered while he was performing at a show at Heymann Performing Arts Center in Lafayette, Louisiana.  This event ended his touring career and he underwent several surgeries thereafter.  Mel McDaniel never recovered from his injuries.

Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame

In 2006, Mel McDaniel was was inducted into Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame, along with the induction of his classmate, Leon Russell (Thursday 2 April 1942 – Sunday 13 November 2016).

Mel McDaniel & Oklahoma Wind: 'Reloaded: Tried, True & New' (Aspirion Records, 2006)

On Tuesday 25 April 2006, Mel McDaniel & Oklahoma Wind saw the release of ‘Reloaded: Tried, True & New’ (Aspirion Records, 2006), which included one track, which was released as a single on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘Horseshoes & Hand Grenades’ (written by Michael Patrick Heeney and Trent Summar) / this track was released as a single in 2006, but it did not chart

Mel McDaniel & Oklahoma Wind’s ‘Reloaded: Tried, True & New’ (Aspirion Records, 2006) also included the following tracks:

‘Baby’s Got Her Blue Jeans On’ (written by Bob McDill)
‘Doo-Ma-Flatchey’ (written by Billy Lawson)
‘Help Me Make It Through The Night’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)
‘Louisiana Saturday Night’ (written by Bob McDill)
‘Jukin’ (written by Dickey Betts)
‘I Can Live With It, If You Can Live Without It’ (written by Mel McDaniel)
‘Shoeshine Man’, which was written by Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021)
‘You Really Never Loved Her Anyway’ (written by Jay Knowles and Trent Summar)
‘She Knows What To Do With A Saturday Night’ (written by Gary Nicholson and Trent Summar)
‘My Plastic Girl’ (written by Kent Finlay)
‘Stand Up’ (written by Bruce Channel, Ricky Ray Rector and Sonny Throckmorton)

Gene Watson & Mel McDaniel backstage at The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville on Thursday 2 April 2009

Gene Watson & Mel McDaniel backstage at The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville on Thursday 2 April 2009

On Tuesday 16 June 2009, Mel McDaniel suffered a heart attack, and was put in a medically induced coma in a Nashville area hospital.  Mel McDaniel’s wife, Peggy, requested the prayers of the singer’s fans, saying his situation was ‘not good’.  Mel McDaniel recovered from his heart attack.

On Tuesday 28 September 2010, Mel McDaniel made his last appearance on the hallowed stage of The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, when the fabled Tennessee venue re-opened after sustaining flood damage in May 2010.

On Saturday 19 February 2011, Mel McDaniel entered hospital and was diagnosed with lung cancer.

On Wednesday 9 March 2011, Gene Watson’s Fan Site received this sad news from Barry, Manager for Mel McDaniel:

‘Mel McDaniel has been diagnosed with stage 3b terminal lung cancer and only has a short time.  Mel thought a lot of The Gene Watson Fan Site; just thought that you might want to announce his last album, which was completed the day before he entered the hospital (on Friday 18 February 2011).

Thank you again & God Bless,
Barry, Manager to Mr. McDaniel’

Mel McDaniel: 'Mel McDaniel: The Last Ride' (Creative & Dreams Music Network, 2012)

‘Mel McDaniel: The Last Ride’ (Creative & Dreams Music Network, 2012) was the final career album by Mel McDaniel, which was recorded in late February 2011; Mel McDaniel entered the hospital on the final day of the recording and insisted on completing the album before he went.

Mel McDaniel’s ‘Mel McDaniel: The Last Ride’ (Creative & Dreams Music Network, 2012) included the following tracks:

‘Baby’s Got Her Blue Jeans On’ (written by Bob McDill)
‘My Plastic Girl’ (written by Kent Finlay)
‘Stand Up’ (written by Bruce Channel, Ricky Ray Rector and Sonny Throckmorton)
‘Help Me Make It Through The Night’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)
‘Roll Your Own’ (written by Mel McDaniel)
The Grandest Lady of Them All’ (written by Mel McDaniel)
‘Chain Smokin’
‘The Last Ride’
‘Damn The Loser (Mary’s Song)’
‘Like A Motel 6’
‘Sugar Mountain’
‘The Gunfighter’

On the evening of Thursday 31 March 2011, family and friends of country music icon Mel McDaniel confirmed that he had succumbed to cancer; The Grand Ole Opry member passed away at his home in Tennessee and was 68 years old.

On Wednesday 13 April 2011, a public memorial service for Mel McDaniel was held between 2:00pm and 4:00pm CST at The Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville.  In lieu of flowers, Mel McDaniel’s family requested that memorial donations be made to The Opry Trust Fund in Nashville.

Mel McDaniel
Sunday 6 September 1942 – Thursday 31 March 2011

Commander Cody & His Lost Planet Airmen: 'Roll Your Own' (Klondike Records, 2016)

Commander Cody & His Lost Planet Airmen recorded Mel McDaniel’s ‘Roll Your Own’ and included the track on ‘Roll Your Own’ (Klondike Records, 2016).

Mel McDaniel

• Visit Mel McDaniel at Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame & Museum