Gene Watson Peer’s Quote from Melba Montgomery: February 2014

Gene Watson’s Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as ‘the singer’s singer’ – and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson’s Peers, who were contacted during 2014, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Melba Montgomery, which she submitted to this site on Tuesday 4 February 2014.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Melba Montgomery who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online ‘celebration of a Lone Star Hero’.


Sean Brady would also like to say ‘thank you’ to Melissa Barrett (Melba Montgomery’s daughter) at Curiousity Creatives in Nashville, without whom this Gene Watson ‘Peer’s Quote’ from Melba Montgomery would not have been possible.


Melba Montgomery

Melba Montgomery
This quote was submitted on Tuesday 4 February 2014.

‘I’ve always loved Gene Watson’s singing since I first heard him sing ‘Love In The Hot Afternoon‘.

Gene is a great country singer and still sings as good as he did when he first started’

Thank you, Melba Montgomery, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Melba Montgomery…

Melba Montgomery

Melba Montgomery, who was born in Iron City, Tennessee on Friday 14 October 1938 and raised in Alabama, is one of country music’s favourites.


Melba Montgomery entered a number of talent contests as a teenager, but the most important was a 1958 win in a Pet Milk-sponsored contest at the WSM radio studio in Nashville.  Following that performance, Melba Montgomery spent several years as a member of the band of Roy Acuff (Tuesday 15 September 1903 – Monday 23 November 1992).


The single, ‘We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds’, was Melba Montogmery’s first national hit in the United States, and was the most successful recording from the George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) / Melba Montgomery duet pairing; the song reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in July 1963, and spent twenty-three weeks in the Billboard chart’s Top 40, which was one of the longer runs of any country single released during the 1960s.


Melba Montgomery has recorded for a variety of record labels, including United Artists Records, Capitol Records, Elektra Records and Musicor Records.


Melba Montgomery has recorded duets with George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013), Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 – Wednesday 26 January 2011) and Gene Pitney (Monday 17 February 1941 – Wednesday 5 April 2006).

Melba Montgomery has written songs for a number of country music artists, including George Strait, Reba McEntire, Mark Chesnutt and Tracy Byrd.


Melba Montgomery has traveled and performed in every state within the United States, Canada, and many foreign countries, including England, Scotland, Holland, Switzerland, Germany, Italy, France, North Africa, Australia and Spain.

Melba Montgomery has entertained thousands in London at The Wembley Country Music Festival at Wembley Stadium, The Golden Nugget in Las Vegas, along with State Fairs and Rodeos all across the United States.

Melba Montgomery has been a frequent guest on many television shows, including ‘Hee Haw’, ‘The Mike Douglas Show’, ‘Pop Goes The Country’, ‘Porter Wagoner Show’, ‘Family Reunion’ and ‘Nashville Now’.

Melba Montgomery has also appeared many times on the hallowed stage of The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville.


Melba Montgomery
Melba Montgomery
Solo Career

In 1962, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘I’m No Longer In Your Heart’, a non-album single, which did not chart.


Melba Montgomery: 'America's No.1 Country and Western Girl Singer' (United Artists Records, 1964)

In February 1964, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘America’s No.1 Country & Western Girl Singer’ (United Artists Records, 1964), which was produced by Pappy Daily (Saturday 8 February 1902 – Saturday 5 December 1987), and included the following tracks:

‘Big Big Heartaches’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

‘I’ve Come A Long Way’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

‘It’s Not The Same’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Don’t Make Me Change’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘I’m Never Gonna Be The Same’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

‘Before She Changed Your Mind’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Mood I’m In’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

‘Blues Are Closing In’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘We Re-opened An Old Love’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)

‘Don’t Make Me Build Another Wall’, which was written by Melba Montgomery, Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974) and Bill Hayes

‘Listen Arms’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)

‘Blues No One Can Describe’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

Personnel involved in the recording of Melba Montgomery’s ‘America’s No.1 Country & Western Girl Singer’ (United Artists Records, 1964) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) and Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) and Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 – Wednesday 29 July 2015) (steel guitar)
Harold Bradley ‘Shot’ Jackson (Saturday 4 September 1920 – Thursday 24 January 1991) (Dobro)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Tommy Jackson (Wednesday 31 March 1926 – Sunday 9 December 1979) (fiddle)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)


Melba Montgomery: 'Down Home' (United Artists Records, 1964)

In August 1964, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Down Home’ (United Artists Records, 1964), which was produced by Pappy Daily (Saturday 8 February 1902 – Saturday 5 December 1987), and included four tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds’ (written by Melba Montgomery) (No.3, 1963) / this track was a duet with George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013)

‘Hall of Shame’, which was written by George Riddle (Sunday 1 September 1935 – Saturday 19 July 2014) (No.26, 1963)

‘The Greatest One of All’, which was written by George Riddle (Sunday 1 September 1935 – Saturday 19 July 2014) (No.22, 1963)

‘Face’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Bill Hayes) / this track was released as a single in 1963, but it did not chart

Melba Montgomery’s ‘Down Home’ (United Artists Records, 1964) also included the following tracks:

‘Lies Can’t Hide What’s On My Mind’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

‘Why Does The Lady Cry’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Before She Changed Your Mind’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘I’ll Always Keep On Loving You’, which was written by Country Johnny Mathis (Sunday 28 September 1930 – Tuesday 27 September 2011)

‘I Can’t Change Overnight’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) and Johnny Mathis

‘There’s A Friend In The Way’ (written by Oney Wheeler) / this track was a duet with George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013)

‘What’s Bad For You Is Good For Me’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

‘Don’t Make Me Build Another Wall’, which was written by Melba Montgomery, Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974) and Bill Hayes

Personnel involved in the recording of Melba Montgomery’s ‘Down Home’ (United Artists Records, 1964) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) and Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) and Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 – Wednesday 29 July 2015) (steel guitar)
Harold Bradley ‘Shot’ Jackson (Saturday 4 September 1920 – Thursday 24 January 1991) (Dobro)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Tommy Jackson (Wednesday 31 March 1926 – Sunday 9 December 1979) (fiddle)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)


Dottie West & Melba Montgomery: 'Queens of Country Music' (Starday Records, 1965)

In 1965, Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 – Wednesday 4 September 1991) & Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Queens of Country Music’ (Starday Records, 1965), which included the following tracks:

‘I Fall To Pieces’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) and Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010) / this track was performed by Dottie West

‘Hands You’re Holding Now’, which was written by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 – Wednesday 8 December 1982) / this track was performed by Dottie West

‘Loose Talk’, which was written by Freddie Hart (Tuesday 21 December 1926 – Saturday 27 October 2018) and Ann Lucas / this track was performed by Dottie West and Lloyd Estel ‘Cowboy’ Copas (Tuesday 15 July 1913 – Tuesday 5 March 1963)

‘Crazy’ (written by Willie Nelson) / this track was performed by Dottie West

‘Will Your Lawyer Talk To God’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) and Richard Johnson / this track was performed by Dottie West

‘No Time Will I Ever’ (written by Paul Blevins) / this track was performed by Dottie West

‘Just Another Fool (Along The Way)’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and Joe ‘Red’ Hayes (Sunday 4 April 1926 – Friday 2 March 1973) / this track was performed by Melba Montgomery

‘Happy You, Lonely Me’ (written by Melba Montgomery) / this track was performed by Melba Montgomery

‘From These Arms of Mine’ (written by Melba Montgomery) / this track was performed by Melba Montgomery

‘Your Picture (Keeps Smiling Back To Me)’ (written by Melba Montgomery) / this track was performed by Melba Montgomery

‘I’m No Longer In Your Heart’, which was written by Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 – Wednesday 26 January 2011) and Ira Louvin (Monday 21 April 1924 – Sunday 20 June 1965) / this track was performed by Melba Montgomery

‘Somewhere Some Night (I’ll Find My Baby)’, which was written by Carl Montgmery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974) / this track was performed by Melba Montgomery


Melba Montgomery: 'I Can't Get Used To Being Lonely' (United Artists Records, 1965)

In July 1965, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘I Can’t Get Used To Being Lonely’ (United Artists Records, 1965), which was produced by Pappy Daily (Saturday 8 February 1902 – Saturday 5 December 1987), and included the following tracks:

‘I Can’t Get Used To Being Lonely’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘I’ll Wait ‘Til Seven’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Constantly’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘From Then ‘Til Now’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Better Than Now’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘You Introduced Me To The Blues’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘I Saw It (For Myself)’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Bill Hayes)

‘White Lightning’, which was written by J.P. Richardson (Friday 24 October 1930 – Tuesday 3 February 1959) / the original version of this track was recorded by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013), who included it on ‘George Jones Sings White Lightning & Other Favorites’ (Mercury Records, 1959); George Jones‘ version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart in April 1959, and reached No.73 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1959

‘Yearning (To Kiss You)’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) and Eddie Eddings

‘Your Kind of Loving Won’t Do’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) and George Riddle (Sunday 1 September 1935 – Saturday 19 July 2014)

‘Another’s Love Slipped In’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Big Joke’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

Personnel involved in the recording of Melba Montgomery’s ‘I Can’t Get Used To Being Lonely’ (United Artists Records, 1965) included the following:

Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001), Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) and Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) and Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 – Wednesday 29 July 2015) (steel)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Tommy Jackson (Wednesday 31 March 1926 – Sunday 9 December 1979) (fiddle)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
The Jordanaires (vocals)


Melba Montgomery: 'Hallelujah Road' (Musicor Records, 1966)

In July 1966, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Hallelujah Road’ (Musicor Records, 1966), which was produced by Pappy Daily (Saturday 8 February 1902 – Saturday 5 December 1987), and included the following tracks:

‘Better Life Is Waiting’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

‘I’m Set Free’ (written by Paul Wayne)

‘King of Kings’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘I Believe He’s The Son of God’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

‘Key To Happiness’ (written by Paul Wayne and Estel Spurlock)

‘Call On God’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

‘Crossing Over Jordan’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

‘Life Beyond Death’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)

‘Greatest Friend of All’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)

‘Hallelujah Road’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Sinners Don’t Say Someday You Will’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Dead Shall Live Again’, which was written by Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)


Melba Montgomery: 'Country Girl' (Musicor Records, 1966)

In November 1966, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Country Girl’ (Musicor Records, 1966), which was produced by Pappy Daily (Saturday 8 February 1902 – Saturday 5 December 1987), and included the following tracks:

‘Happy Tears’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)

‘He Stayed Away’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘I’ll Give A Lovin’ To You’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘He’s Out There Lonely’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)

‘Don’t Let Me Wake Up Lonely’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘My Man Happy’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Nobody But You’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Day I Doubted You’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006)

‘My Room Is Like A River’ (written by Earl Montgomery and Jesse Thompson)

‘There’s No Need To Do It’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Love Is Where The Heart Is’ (written by Melba Montgomery, Earl Montgomery and Bill Hayes)

‘Big Tears Are Comin’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022), Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999) and Buddy Mize


Melba Montgomery: 'Melba Toast' (Musicor Records, 1967)

In March 1967, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Melba Toast’ (Musicor Records, 1967), which was produced by Pappy Daily (Saturday 8 February 1902 – Saturday 5 December 1987), and included the following tracks:

‘My Number of Heartaches Is Unknown’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘You Put Me Here’ (written by Lola Jean Dillon)

‘Your Tears Are Telling On You’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)

‘Won’t Take Long’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Tell Me Your Troubles’ (written by Ron Behunin and Judy Lynn)

‘He Wrote Forgive Me For Loving Her’, which was written by Earl Montgomery and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

‘Things You Mean To Me’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)

‘We’re Two Broken Hearts’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Twilight Years’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)

‘Plenty To Go Around’ (written by Ron Behunin and Judy Lynn)


Melba Montgomery: 'Don't Keep Me Lonely Too Long' (Musicor Records, 1967)

It was also in March 1967 when Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Don’t Keep Me Lonely Too Long’ (Musicor Records, 1967), which was produced by Pappy Daily (Saturday 8 February 1902 – Saturday 5 December 1987), and included the following tracks:

‘Won’t Take Long’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Too Much of Nothing’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Day Your Memory Came To Town’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)

‘Heart Remind Me’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘My Tiny Music Box’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Don’t Keep Me Lonely Too Long’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Great Big Hurtin’ Heart’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)

‘I Don’t Have Enough Faith In Me’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Baby’s Coming Home’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)

‘I’m Learning How To Live Alone’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)


Melba Montgomery: 'I'm Just Living' (Musicor Records, 1967)

In December 1967, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘I’m Just Living’ (Musicor Records, 1967), which was produced by Pappy Daily (Saturday 8 February 1902 – Saturday 5 December 1987), and included the following tracks:

‘I Love To Put Me On’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Buddy Mize

‘Our Little Man’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)

‘I Hold The Record’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘World Didn’t Cost Me A Dime’, which was written by Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

‘What Can I Tell The Folks Back Home’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)

‘Right Time To Lose My Mind’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘I’m Just Living’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘He’s Gone’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)

‘Lonelier & More In Love Each Day’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)

‘South of Lonesome’, which was written by Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)


Melba Montgomery: 'The Big Beautiful Country World' (Capitol Records, 1969)

In October 1969, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘The Big Beautiful Country World’ (Capitol Records, 1969), which was produced by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 – Saturday 31 July 2010), and included the following tracks:

‘As Far As My Forgettin’s Got’ (written by Sherry Bryce)

‘Love of The Common People’ (written by Ronnie Wilkins and John Hurley)

‘Lonely Street’, which was written by Carl Robert Belew (Tuesday 21 April 1931 – Wednesday 31 October 1990), W.S. Stevenson (1900 – 1978) and Kenny Sowder

‘Foolin’ Around’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) and Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006)

‘He Called Me Baby’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)

‘Mr. Walker, It’s All Over’ (written by Gene Crysler)

‘My Arms’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Dan Lomax

‘You Let Me In’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Point of No Concern’ (written by Chris Cavanaugh and Travis Franklin)

‘Johnny One Time’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)


Melba Montgomery: 'Don't Keep Me Lonely Too Long' (Capitol Records, 1970)

In May 1970, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Don’t Keep Me Lonely Too Long’ (Capitol Records, 1970), which was produced by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 – Saturday 31 July 2010), and included the following tracks:

‘Aching Breaking Heart’ (written by Roe Hall)

‘Hungry Eyes’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) / the original version of this track was recorded by Merle Haggard, who included it on ‘A Portrait of Merle Haggard’ (Capitol Records, 1969); Merle Haggard‘s version of the track, which was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in May 1969, featured backing vocals from Glen Campbell (Wednesday 22 April 1936 – Tuesday 8 August 2017)

‘Say You’ll Never Leave Me’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Thorns In A Bed of Roses’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Where Do We Go From Here’, which was written by Jerry Donald Chesnut (Thursday 7 May 1931 – Saturday 15 December 2018)

‘Don’t Keep Me Lonely Too Long’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Together Again’, which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006)

‘Walk On Me’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)

‘Closer She Gets’ (written by Kent Westberry and Merv Shiner)

‘Sad Situation’ (written by Clyde Pitts and Billy Deaton)


Melba Montgomery: 'Melba Montgomery' (Elektra Records, 1973)

In October 1973, Melba Montgomery saw the release of a self-titled album, ‘Melba Montgomery’ (Elektra Records, 1973), which was produced by Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Wrap Your Love Around Me’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Jack Solomon) (No.38, 1973)

‘He’ll Come Home’ (written by Danny Samson and Ruby VanNoy) (No.58, 1974)

Melba Montgomery’s self-titled album, ‘Melba Montgomery’ (Elektra Records, 1973), also included the following tracks:

‘Papa Was Kind’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010)

‘See No Evil’ (written by Irwin Levine and Russell Brown)

‘Hands Off’, which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 – Wednesday 25 May 2005)

‘I Love Him Because He Is That Way’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Lorene Allen)

‘Blood Red & Goin’ Down’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)

‘Country Written Up & Down Her Face’ (written by Sorrells Pickard)

‘Keep Me Warm’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010)

‘Let Me Show You How I Can’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Satin Sheets’, which was written by John Edward Volinkaty (Friday 27 August 1943 – Friday 4 September 1992) / the original version of this track was recorded by Bill Anderson & Jan Howard (Friday 13 March 1929 – Saturday 28 March 2020), who included it on ‘Bill & Jan Or Jan & Bill’ (Decca Records, 1972) / the track was then famously recorded by Jeanne Pruett, who included it on ‘Satin Sheets’ (MCA Records, 1973); Jeanne Pruett’s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for three weeks in May / June 1973, and reached No.28 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1973

‘Why Me’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)the original version of this track was recorded by Kris Kristofferson, who included it on ‘Jesus Was a Capricorn’ (Monument Records, 1972); Kris Kristofferson‘s version of the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in July 1973


Melba Montgomery: 'No Charge' (Elektra Records, 1974)

In April 1974, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘No Charge’ (Elektra Records, 1974), which was produced by Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘No Charge’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) (No.1 for one week in May / June 1974) / the track also reached No.39 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1974, No.47 on the Canadian RPM Top Singles Chart in 1974, and No.24 on the Canadian RPM Adult Contemporary Chart in 1974

Melba Montgomery’s ‘No Charge’ (Elektra Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

‘I Think I’d Like To Love Again’ (written by Larry Ballard)

‘Then To Know’ (written by Sorrells Pickard)

‘My Feel Good Sure Feels Fine’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Jack Solomon)

‘Loving You Was All I Ever Needed’ (written by Stan Kesler and Bill Wood)

‘How Are Things In Tulsa’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004)

‘Hickman County Blues’ (written by David Allan Coe)

‘Country Gold’ (written by Bill Emerson)

‘Stay ‘Til I Don’t Love You Anymore’ (written by John Virgin)

‘I Can’t Move No Mountain’ (written by Ruby VanNoy and Danny Samson)

‘I’ll Give You All of Me Then’ (written by Buzz Rabin)

‘Love I Need You’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Jack Solomon)


Melba Montgomery: 'Don't Let The Good Times Fool You' (Elektra Records, 1975)

In April 1975, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Don’t Let The Good Times Fool You’ (Elektra Records, 1975), which was produced by Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988), and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Your Pretty Roses Come Too Late’, which was written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice (Wednesday 19 April 1939 – Saturday 28 October 2023) (No.67, 1974)

‘If You Want The Rainbow’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) (No.59, 1974)

‘Don’t Let The Good Times Fool You’, which was written by Gary Sanford Paxton (Thursday 18 May 1939 – Sunday 17 July 2016) and Ron Hellard (No.15, 1975)

‘Searchin’ (For Someone Like You)’ (written by Pee Wee Maddux) (No.45, 1975)

Melba Montgomery’s ‘Don’t Let The Good Times Fool You’ (Elektra Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

‘It Sure Gets Lonely’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Jack Solomon)

‘Hiding In The Darkness Of My Mind’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)

‘He Don’t Make Me Cry’ (written by Sorrells Pickard)

‘I’ll Be Your Lady’ (written by David Allan Coe)

‘I Hope I Never Have To Sing That Song’ (written by Daniel Huce and Ruby Hice)

‘Give A Little Love Away’ (written by Earl Montgomery and Emyly Mitchell)

‘Mama’s Hands’, which was written by Larry Kingston (Sunday 10 August 1941 – Sunday 20 February 2005) and Frank Dycus (Tuesday 5 December 1939 – Friday 23 November 2012)


Melba Montgomery: 'Greatest Gift of All' (Elektra Records, 1975)

In October 1975, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Greatest Gift of All’ (Elektra Records, 1975), which was produced by Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988), and included the following tracks:

‘He Loved You Right Out of My Mind’, which was written by Gary Sanford Paxton (Thursday 18 May 1939 – Sunday 17 July 2016)

‘Like A Wild Fire’ (written by Pam Rose)

‘Greatest Gift of All’ (written by John Virgin)

‘You & Me & Spring In Tennessee’ (written by Sorrells Pickard)

‘He’ll Be Worth Every Tear I’ve Shed’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Jack Solomon)

‘AW Flitter’, which was written by Gary Sanford Paxton (Thursday 18 May 1939 – Sunday 17 July 2016)

‘May God Be With Me’ (written by Chip Taylor)

‘Lord, Make Him Want To Stay’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)

‘Way Down By The River’, which was written by Melba Montgomery, Pam Rose and Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988)

‘If I Ever Needed Someone’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Jack Solomon)

‘I Bet I Would Have Loved You Way Back Then’ (written by Sorrells Pickard)

Personnel involved in the recording of Melba Montgomery’s ‘Greatest Gift of All’ (Elektra Records, 1975) included the following:

Billy Sanford and Pete Wade (guitar)
Tommy Allsup (Tuesday 24 November 1931 – Wednesday 11 January 2017), Jack Solomon and Pam Rose (acoustic guitar)
Dennis Digby (bass guitar)
Larry Sasser and Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) and Randy Hillman (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) and Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021) (drums)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022), Ron Oats and Thomas Bailey ‘Bunky’ Keels (Thursday 11 January 1934 – Monday 29 November 2004) (piano)
Jeff Tweel (electric piano)
Buddy Spicher, Marvin Chantry, Gary Vanosdale, Stephen Smith, Roy Christensen, Brenton Banks and George Binkley (strings)


In 1975, Melba Montgomery saw the release, on Elektra Records, of ‘Love Was The Wind’ (written by Michael Clark), a non-album single, which reached No.67 on the Billboard country music singles chart.


Melba Montgomery: 'Melba Montgomery' (Elektra Records, 1977)

In April 1977, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Melba’ (Elektra Records, 1977), which was produced by Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Never Ending Love Affair’, which was written by Roger D. Bowling (Sunday 3 December 1944 – Sunday 26 December 1982), Larry Butler (Thursday 26 March 1942 – Friday 20 January 2012) and Steve Tutsie (No.83, 1977)

‘Angel of The Morning’ (written by Chip Taylor) (No.22, 1977) / the original version of this track was recorded by Juice Newton, who included it on ‘Juice’ (Capitol Records, 1981); Juice Newton’s version of the track reached No.22 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1981, and No.21 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1981

Melba Montgomery’s ‘Melba’ (Elektra Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

‘Your Love Sure Saved Me From Myself’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010)

‘There’s Nothing I Don’t See In You’ (written by Jeff Tweel)

‘Everybody’s Got A Special Song’ (written by Michael Clark)

‘Before The Pain Comes’, which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 – Wednesday 1 July 2015) and Danny Morrison (Sunday 22 April 1945 – Tuesday 14 February 2012)

‘We’ve Been Lyin’ Here Too Long’ (written by Jeff Tweel and Jan Dyer)

‘Pinkerton’s Flowers’ (written by Pam Rose)

‘Leavin’ Me In Your Mind’, which was written by Jeff Tweel and Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 – Friday 29 July 1988)

‘Hope For Your Happiness’, which was written by Linda Hargrove (Thursday 3 February 1949 – Sunday 24 October 2010)


Melba Montgomery: 'I Still Care' (Phonorama Records, 1983)

In 1983, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘I Still Care’ (Phonorama Records, 1983), which included the following tracks:

‘Silver Threads & Golden Needles’ (written by Jack Rhodes and Dick Reynolds)

‘I Never Will Outgrow My Love For You’ (written by Paul Huffman, Buck Jones and Joan Keller)

‘Making Believe’, which was written by Jimmy Work (Saturday 29 March 1924 – Saturday 22 December 2018)

‘Let’s All Go Down To The River’ (written by Earl Montgomery and Sue Richards)

‘Pass Me By (If You’re Only Passing Through)’, which was written by Hillman Hall (1938 – 1989)

‘Crawdad Song’ (traditional)

‘He Thinks I Still Care’ (written by Dickey Lee and Steve Duffy) / the original version of this track was recorded by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013), who included it on ‘The New Favourites of George Jones’ (United Artists Records, 1962); George Jones‘ version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for six weeks in 1962

‘Jambalaya (On The Bayou)’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)

‘Searching (For Someone Like You)’ (written by Pee Wee Maddux)

‘Lonely Street’, which was written by Carl Robert Belew (Tuesday 21 April 1931 – Wednesday 31 October 1990), W.S. Stevenson (1900 – 1978) and Kenny Sowder


Melba Montgomery: 'Melba Montgomery' (Audiograph Records, 1983)

It was also in 1983 when Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Melba Montgomery’ (Audiograph Records, 1983), which included the following tracks:

‘Don’t Let The Good Times Fool You’, which was written by Gary Sanford Paxton (Thursday 18 May 1939 – Sunday 17 July 2016) and Ron Hellard

‘One of These Days’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Angel of The Morning’ (written by Chip Taylor) (No.22, 1977) / the original version of this track was recorded by Juice Newton, who included it on ‘Juice’ (Capitol Records, 1981); Juice Newton’s version of the track reached No.22 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1981, and No.21 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1981

‘We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds’ (written by Melba Montgomery) / the original version of this track was recorded by George Jones & Melba Montgomery, who included it on ‘What’s In Our Heart’ (United Artists Records, 1963); George Jones & Melba Montgomery‘s version of the track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1963

‘Falling In Trouble’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘No Charge’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002) / the original version of this track was recorded by Melba Montgomery, who included it on ‘No Charge’ (Elektra Records, 1974); Melba Montgomery’s original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in May / June 1974, No.39 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1974, No.47 on the Canadian RPM Top Singles Chart in 1974, and No.24 on the Canadian RPM Adult Contemporary Chart in 1974

‘It Sure Gets Lonely’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Jack Solomon)

‘I Love Him Because He’s That Way’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Lorene Allen)

‘I Still Love You’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Some Things I Want To Sing About’ (written by Roger Murrah)


Melba Montgomery: 'Do You Know Where Your Man Is' (Playback Records, 1992)

In 1992, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Do You Know Where Your Man Is’ (Playback Records, 1992), which included the following tracks:

‘Do You Know Where Your Man Is’ (written by Dave Gibson, Raymond Smith and Carol Chase)

‘We Must Be Crazy’ (written by Ken Morris) / this track was a duet with Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 – Wednesday 26 January 2011)

‘It All Comes With Goodbye’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Edwin Rowell)

‘Your Heart Turned Left (& I Was On The Right)’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)

‘Are You Sincere’ (written by Wayne P. Walker)

‘Heartaches By The Number’, which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)

‘Goin’ Quietly Crazy’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Kent Westberry)

‘You’re On My Heart Again’ (written by Bob DiPiero, John Scott Sherrill and Dennis Robbins)

‘You Got Me Where I Wanna Be’ (written by Melba Montgomery, Kathy Louvin and Pam Hayes)


Melba Montgomery: 'This Time Around' (CMC Records, 1997)

In 1997, Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘This Time Around’ (CMC Records, 1997), which was produced by Jack Solomon, and included the following tracks:

‘Hello Heart’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Billy Yates)

‘I’m Not Over You’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Carl Jackson)

‘These Old Walls’ (written by Connie Harrington)

‘I Didn’t Make This Bed’ (written by Melba Montgomery, Dennis Morgan and Kathy Louvin)

‘We’re Making A Comeback’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Robert Alley)

‘You Beat All I’ve Ever Seen’ (written by Melba Montgomery, Kathy Louvin and Kostas)

‘This Time Around’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Jerry Salley)

‘Bridge On Memory Lane’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘If It Ain’t Broke, Don’t Fix It’, which was written by Melba Montgomery, Rayburn Thomas Anthony (1937 – Saturday 21 April 2018) and James Johnson

‘You’re Coldest Memory’ (written by Melba Montgomery)


Melba Montgomery
Melba Montgomery
Collaboration

George Jones & Melba Montgomery: 'What's In Our Heart' (United Artists Records, 1963)

In November 1963, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) & Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘What’s In Our Heart’ (United Artists Records, 1963), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds’ (written by Melba Montgomery) (No.3 in July 1963) / this track was Melba Montogmery’s first national Billboard country music hit single in the United States, and was the most successful recording from the George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) & Melba Montgomery duet pairing; the song spent twenty-three weeks in the Billboard Top 40, which was one of the longer runs of any country single released during the 1960s

‘Let’s Invite Them Over’ (written by Oney Wheeler) (No.17, 1963)

‘What’s In Our Hearts’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) and Country Johnny Mathis (Sunday 28 September 1930 – Tuesday 27 September 2011) (No.20, 1963)

‘Multiply The Heartaches’ (written by Kathy Dee) (No.25, 1964)

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) & Melba Montgomery‘s ‘What’s In Our Heart’ (United Artists Records, 1963) also included the following tracks:

‘Suppose Tonight Would Be Our Last’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013)

‘I Let You Go’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

‘She’s My Mother’, which was written by Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 – Wednesday 26 January 2011), Ira Louvin (Monday 21 April 1924 – Sunday 20 June 1965) and Eddie Hill

‘Until Then’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

‘Don’t Go’ (written by Oney Wheeler)

‘Now Tell Me’ (written by Pete Hunter)

‘There’s A Friend In The Way’ (written by Oney Wheeler)

‘Flame In My Heart’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) and Bernard Spurlock

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) & Melba Montgomery‘s ‘What’s In Our Heart’ (United Artists Records, 1963) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1964.


George Jones & Melba Montgomery: 'Bluegrass Hootenanny' (United Artists Records, 1964)

In March 1964, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) & Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Bluegrass Hootenanny’ (United Artists Records, 1964), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Please Be My Love’ (written by Monroe Fields and Carl Sauceman) (No.31, 1964)

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) & Melba Montgomery‘s ‘Bluegrass Hootenanny’ (United Artists Records, 1964) also included the following tracks:

‘Dixieland For Me’ (written by Curtis McPeake and David Watkins)

‘Once More’ (written by Dusty Owens)

‘Will There Ever Be Another’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

‘I’d Jump The Mississippi’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) and Country Johnny Mathis (Sunday 28 September 1930 – Tuesday 27 September 2011)

‘I Dreamed My Baby Came Home’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) and Country Johnny Mathis (Sunday 28 September 1930 – Tuesday 27 September 2011)

‘Rollin’ In My Sweet Baby’s Arms’, which was written by Lester Flatt (Friday 19 June 1914 – Friday 11 May 1979)

‘Blue Moon of Kentucky’, which was written by Bill Monroe (Wednesday 13 September 1911 – Monday 9 September 1996)

‘House of Gold’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)

‘Wait A Little Longer Please Jesus’, which was written by Hazel Marie Houser (Saturday 3 June 1922 – Friday 14 June 1996) and Chester Smith

‘I Can’t Get Over You’ (written by Joe Barber)

‘I’ll Be There To Welcome You Home’, which was written by Melba Montgomery and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974)

Personnel involved in the recording of George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) & Melba Montgomery‘s ‘Bluegrass Hootenanny’ (United Artists Records, 1964) included the following:

Harold Bradley (Saturday 2 January 1926 – Thursday 31 January 2019) and Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) and Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 – Wednesday 29 July 2015) (steel guitar)
Harold Bradley ‘Shot’ Jackson (Saturday 4 September 1920 – Thursday 24 January 1991) (Dobro)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Curtis McPeake (banjo)
Tommy Jackson (Wednesday 31 March 1926 – Sunday 9 December 1979) (fiddle)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) & Melba Montgomery‘s ‘Bluegrass Hootenanny’ (United Artists Records, 1964), reached No.12 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1964.


Gene Pitney & Melba Montgomery: 'Being Together' (Musicor Records, 1965)

In December 1965, Gene Pitney (Monday 17 February 1941 – Wednesday 5 April 2006) & Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Being Together’ (Musicor Records, 1965), which included one track, which was a hit single on the country music singles chart:

‘Baby, Ain’t That Fine’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) (No.15, 1965)

Gene Pitney (Monday 17 February 1941 – Wednesday 5 April 2006) & Melba Montgomery‘s ‘Being Together’ (Musicor Records, 1965) also included the following tracks:

‘Being Together’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)

‘If I Were’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘We Haven’t Tried’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)

‘This Precious Love’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)

‘There’s Gonna Be More Loving’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)

‘Don’t Put An End To Me’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘I’m Looking For The Man’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)

‘Lay Down Your Arms’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)

‘Everybody Knows But You & Me’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)

‘King & Queen’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘June Is As Cols As December’ (written by Marge Barton)


Gene Pitney, George Jones & Melba Montgomery: 'Famous Country Duets' (Musicor Records, 1966)

In January 1966, Gene Pitney (Monday 17 February 1941 – Wednesday 5 April 2006), George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) & Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Famous Country Duets’ (Musicor Records, 1966), which was produced by Pappy Daily (Saturday 8 February 1902 – Saturday 5 December 1987), and included the following tracks:

‘Baby, Ain’t That Fine’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)

‘If I Were’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘I’ve Got A New Heartache’, which was written by Wayne P. Walker and Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 – Monday 16 December 2013)

‘I’m A People’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)

‘That’s All It Took’, which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013), Darrell Edwards and Charlotte Grier

‘Simply Divine’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Feudin’ & Fightin’ (written by Larry Brittain)

‘King & Queen’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘My Shoes Keep Walking Back To You’, which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 – Tuesday 13 May 1975) and Lee Ross

‘I’m Looking For The Man’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)

‘Your Old Standby’ (written by Jim Eanes and Wayne Perry)

‘Being Together’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)


George Jones & Melba Montgomery: 'Blue Rose of Kentucky' (United Artists Records, 1966)

In February 1966, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) & Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Blue Rose of Kentucky’ (United Artists Records, 1966), which included the following tracks:

‘Blue Moon of Kentucky’, which was written by Bill Monroe (Wednesday 13 September 1911 – Monday 9 September 1996)

‘Hall of Shame’, which was written by George Riddle (Sunday 1 September 1935 – Saturday 19 July 2014)

‘Wait A Little Longer Please Jesus’, which was written by Hazel Marie Houser (Saturday 3 June 1922 – Friday 14 June 1996)

‘Magic Valley’ (written by M. Moore)

‘I’ll Be There To Welcome You Home’, which was written by Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974) and Melba Montgomery

‘Before She Changed Your Mind’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘I Let You Go’, which was written by Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 – Friday 20 December 1974) and Melba Montgomery

‘You Comb Her Hair’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010) and Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 – Sunday 3 March 2002)

‘Now Tell Me’ (written by P. Hunter)

‘Don’t Make Me Build Another Wall’ (written by B. Hayes)

‘What’s In Our Hearts’, which was written by Country Johnny Mathis (Sunday 28 September 1930 – Tuesday 27 September 2011) and George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013)

‘There’s No Justice’, which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 – Thursday 11 September 1969)


George Jones & Melba Montgomery: 'Close Together (As You and Me)' (Musicor Records, 1966)

In November 1966, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) & Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Close Together (As You and Me)’ (Musicor Records, 1966), which was produced by Pappy Daily (Saturday 8 February 1902 – Saturday 5 December 1987), and included one track, which was a hit single on the country music singles chart:

‘Come Together (As You and Me)’ (written by Earl Montgomery) (No.70, 1966)

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) & Melba Montgomery‘s ‘Close Together (As You and Me)’ (Musicor Records, 1966) also included the following tracks:

‘From Here To The Door’, which was written by Don Chapel (1931 – Sunday 6 December 2015)

‘Living On Easy Street’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)

‘As of Now’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Feudin’ & Fightin’ (written by Larry Brittain)

‘Long As We’re Dreaming’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Developing My Pictures’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Let’s Both Have A Cry’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)

‘Heartaches For A Day’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Simply Divine’ (written by Melba Montgomery)


George Jones & Melba Montgomery: 'Party Pickin' (Musicor Records, 1967)

In August 1967, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) & Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Party Pickin’ (Musicor Records, 1967), which was produced by Pappy Daily (Saturday 8 February 1902 – Saturday 5 December 1987), and included one track, which was a hit single on the country music singles chart:

‘Party Pickin’, which was written by Alex Zanetis (Monday 15 May 1922 – Tuesday 13 September 2005) (No.24, 1967)

George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) & Melba Montgomery‘s ‘Party Pickin’ (Musicor Records, 1967) also included the following tracks:

‘Day I Lose My Mind’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)

‘Living On Easy Street’ (written by Melba Montgomery and Earl Montgomery)

‘From Here To The Door’, which was written by Don Chapel (1931 – Sunday 6 December 2015)

‘I’ll Be Loving You’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Buddy Mize

‘Long Walk Off A Tall Rock’ (written by Ron Behunin)

‘We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Everybody Oughta Sing A Song’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)

‘They Bought The House Next Door’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Let’s Get Together (One More Time)’, which was written by Don Chapel (1931 – Sunday 6 December 2015)


Charlie Louvin & Melba Montgomery: 'Something To Brag About' (Capitol Records, 1971)

In January 1971, Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 – Wednesday 26 January 2011) & Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Something To Brag About’ (Capitol Records, 1971), which was produced by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 – Saturday 31 July 2010), and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Something To Brag About’ (written by Bobby Braddock) (No.18, 1971)

Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 – Wednesday 26 January 2011) & Melba Montgomery‘s ‘Something To Brag About’ (Capitol Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

‘Let’s Help Each Other To Forget’ (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)

‘Holding On To Nothin’, which was written by Jerry Donald Chesnut (Thursday 7 May 1931 – Saturday 15 December 2018)

‘For The Good Times’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)

‘Are You Teasing Me’, which was written by Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 – Wednesday 26 January 2011) and Ira Louvin (Monday 21 April 1924 – Sunday 20 June 1965)

‘Baby, You’ve Got What It Takes’, which was written by Brook Benton (Saturday 19 September 1931 – Saturday 9 April 1988), Clyde Otis (Thursday 11 September 1924 – Tuesday 8 January 2008) and Murray Stein

‘We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Whatever Happened To Happiness’, which was written by Jerry Crutchfield (Friday 10 August 1934 – Tuesday 11 January 2022)

‘My Baby’s Gone’, which was written by Hazel Marie Houser (Saturday 3 June 1922 – Friday 14 June 1996)

‘If We Don’t Make It’ (written by Paul Richey)


Charlie Louvin & Melba Montgomery: 'Baby, You've Got What It Takes' (Capitol Records, 1971)

In July 1971, Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 – Wednesday 26 January 2011) & Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘Baby You’ve Got What It Takes’ (Capitol Records, 1971), which was produced by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 – Saturday 31 July 2010), and included the following tracks:

‘Baby You’ve Got What It Takes’, which was written by Brook Benton (Saturday 19 September 1931 – Saturday 9 April 1988), Clyde Otis (Thursday 11 September 1924 – Tuesday 8 January 2008) and Murray Stein

‘We Sure Can Love Each Other’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998)

‘Don’t Believe Me’ (written by Lorene Allen, Jay Breese and Jerry Wooten)

‘Let Me Put It Another Way’ (written by Helen Cornelius)

‘When I Stop Dreaming’, which was written by Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 – Wednesday 26 January 2011) and Ira Louvin (Monday 21 April 1924 – Sunday 20 June 1965)

‘Did You Ever’ (written by Bobby Braddock)

‘One By One’ (written by Johnny Wright, Jack Anglin and Jim Anglin)

‘New Dreams & Sunshine’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)

‘After The Fire Is Gone’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)

‘Take Me Where Goodbye Began’ (written by Dick Burt and Patti Johnson)

Charlie Louvin & Melba Montgomery‘s ‘Baby, You’ve Got What It Takes’ (Capitol Records, 1971) reached No.45 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1971.


George Jones & Melba Montgomery: 'The Only Duets Ever Recorded' (Musicor Records, 1972)

In 1972, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) & Melba Montgomery saw the release of ‘The Only Duets Ever Recorded’ (Musicor Records, 1972), which was produced by Pappy Daily (Saturday 8 February 1902 – Saturday 5 December 1987), and included the following tracks:

‘Long As We’re Dreaming’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Let’s Both Have A Cry’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)

‘Simply Divine’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Day I Lose My Mind’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)

‘We Must Have Been Out Of Our Minds’ (written by Melba Montgomery)

‘Let’s Get Together (One More Time)’, which was written by Don Chapel (1931 – Sunday 6 December 2015)

‘Close Together’ (written by Earl Montgomery)

‘Long Walk Off A Tall Rock’ (written by Ron Behunin)

‘I’ll Be Loving You’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Buddy Mize

‘Feudin’ & Fightin’ (written by Larry Brittain)


Melba Montgomery
Melba Montgomery
Songwriting

Eddy Arnold: 'Turn The World Around' (RCA Victor Records, 1967)

Eddy Arnold (Wednesday 15 May 1918 – Thursday 8 May 2008) recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘Don’t Keep Me Lonely Too Long’ and included the track on ‘Turn The World Around’ (RCA Victor Records, 1967).


Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 – Wednesday 4 September 1991) recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘Don’t Keep Me Lonely Too Long’ and included the track on ‘With All My Heart & Soul’ (RCA Records, 1967).


Connie Smith: 'Soul of Country Music' (RCA Victor Records, 1967)

Connie Smith recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘Don’t Keep Me Lonely Too Long’ and included the track on ‘Soul of Country Music’ (RCA Victor Records, 1967).


Connie Smith: 'Back In Baby's Arms' (RCA Victor Records, 1969)

Connie Smith recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘I Can’t Get Used To Being Lonely’ and included the track on ‘Back In Baby’s Arms’ (RCA Victor Records, 1969).


Connie Smith: 'Dream Painter' (RCA Victor Records, 1973)

Connie Smith recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘Don’t Keep Me Lonely Too Long’ and included the track on ‘Dream Painter’ (RCA Victor Records, 1973).


Kris Kristofferson & Rita Coolidge recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds’ and included the track on ‘Breakaway’ (Monument Records, 1974).


Tracy Byrd: 'Tracy Byrd' (MCA Nashville Records, 1993)

Tracy Byrd recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘An Out of Control Raging Fire’ (co-written with Kostas) and included the track on ‘Tracy Byrd’ (MCA Nashville Records, 1993); the track featured duet vocals from Dawn Sears (Thursday 7 December 1961 – Thursday 11 December 2014).


George Allison: 'It Ain't Easy Bein' Me' (Playback Records, 1994)

George Allison recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘It Ain’t Home’ (co-written with Kathy Louvin) and included the track on ‘It Ain’t Easy Bein’ Me’ (Playback Records, 1994).


Tracy Byrd: 'Love Lessons' (MCA Nashville Records, 1995)

Tracy Byrd recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘Don’t Need That Heartache’ (co-written with Kostas) and included the track on ‘Love Lessons’ (MCA Nashville Records, 1995).


Reba McEntire: 'What If It''s You' (MCA Records, 1996)

Reba McEntire recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘Close To Crazy’ (co-written with Jerry Salley) and included the track on ‘What If It”s You’ (MCA Records, 1996).


Rhonda Vincent: 'Trouble Free' (Giant Records, 1996)

Rhonda Vincent recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘You Beat All I’ve Ever Seen’ (co-written with Kostas and Kathy Louvin) and included the track on ‘Trouble Free’ (Giant Records, 1996).

Rhonda Vincent: 'Trouble Free' (Giant Records, 1996)

Rhonda Vincent recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘An Old Memory (Found It’s Way Back Home Again)’ (co-written with Jerry Salley) and included the track on ‘Trouble Free’ (Giant Records, 1996).


Sara Evans: 'Three Chords & The Truth' (RCA Nashville Records, 1997)

Sara Evans recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘If You Ever Want My Lovin’ (co-written with Sara Evans and Billy Yates) and included the track on ‘Three Chords & The Truth’ (RCA Nashville Records, 1997).


Kathy Robertson: 'To Roy Nichols With Love...' (Cowgirl Records, 1997)

Kathy Robertson recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds’ and included the track on ‘To Roy Nichols With Love…’ (Cowgirl Records, 1997); the track featured guest vocals from Chris Gaffney (Tuesday 3 October 1950 – Thursday 17 April 2008).


Terri Clark: 'How I Feel' (Mercury Nashville Records, 1998)

Terri Clark recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘Cure For The Common Heartache’ (co-written with Leslie Satcher and Larry Cordle) and included the track on ‘How I Feel’ (Mercury Nashville Records, 1998), an album which was produced by Keith Stegall.


Randy Travis: 'You & You Alone' (DreamWorks Nashville Records, 1998)

Randy Travis recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘You & You Alone’ (co-written with Leslie Satcher and Tim Ryan Rouillier) and included the track on ‘You & You Alone’ (DreamWorks Nashville Records, 1998).


George Strait: 'Always Never The Same' (MCA Records, 1999)

George Strait recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘What Do You Say To That’ (co-written with Jim Lauderdale) and included the track on ‘Always Never The Same’ (MCA Records, 1999); the track reached No.4 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 1999, and No.45 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1999.

George Strait: 'Always Never The Same' (MCA Records, 1999)

George Strait recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘That’s The Truth’ (co-written with Steve Leslie) and included the track on ‘Always Never The Same’ (MCA Records, 1999).


Reba McEntire: 'So Good Together' (MCA Records, 1999)

Reba McEntire recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘Roses’ (co-written with Leslie Satcher) and included the track on ‘So Good Together’ (MCA Records, 1999).


Randy Travis: 'A Man Ain't Made of Stone' (DreamWorks Nashville Records, 1999)

Randy Travis recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘A Heartache In The Works’ (co-written with Chet Biggers) and included the track on ‘A Man Ain’t Made of Stone’ (DreamWorks Nashville Records, 1999).


John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds’ and included the track on ‘In Spite of Ourselves’ (Oh Boy Records, 1999); the track featured guest vocals from Melba Montgomery.

John Prine (Thursday 10 October 1946 – Tuesday 7 April 2020) recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘Milwaukee Here I Come’ and included the track on ‘In Spite of Ourselves’ (Oh Boy Records, 1999); the track featured guest vocals from Melba Montgomery.


David Ball: 'Play' (Warner Bros. Records, 1999)

David Ball recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘What Do You Say To That’ (co-written with by Jim Lauderdale) and included the track on ‘Play’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1999).


Patty Loveless: 'Mountain Soul' (Epic Records, 2001)

Patty Loveless recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘An Out of Control Raging Fire’ (co-written with Kostas) and included the track on ‘Mountain Soul’ (Epic Records, 2001); this track was a duet with Travis Tritt.


Vern Gosdin: 'Back In The Swing of Things' (GoldRhyme Music Publishing & Recording, 2004)

Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 – Tuesday 28 April 2009) recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds’ and included the track on ‘Back In The Swing of Things’ (GoldRhyme Music Publishing & Recording, 2004); Vern Gosdin‘s version of the track was a duet with LaDonna Kay.


Jim Lauderdale: 'The Bluegrass Diaries' (Yep Roc Records, 2007)

Jim Lauderdale recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘All Roads Lead Back To You’ and included the track on ‘The Bluegrass Diaries’ (Yep Roc Records, 2007), which won a Grammy Award for ‘Best Bluegrass Album’ in 2008.

Jim Lauderdale: 'The Bluegrass Diaries' (Yep Roc Records, 2007)

Jim Lauderdale recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘Ain’t No Way To Run’ and included the track on ‘The Bluegrass Diaries’ (Yep Roc Records, 2007), which won a Grammy Award for ‘Best Bluegrass Album’ in 2008.


Karen Lynne: 'Heart Songs, Laugh Lines' (Shoestring Records, 2011)

Karen Lynne recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘You Beat All I’ve Ever Seen’ (co-written with Kostas and Kathy Louvin) and included the track on ‘Heart Songs, Laugh Lines’ (Shoestring Records, 2011).


Joe Paul Nichols: 'Friends In High Places' (Heart of Texas Records, 2011)

In 2011, Joe Paul Nichols saw the release of ‘Friends In High Places’ (Heart of Texas Records, 2011); one of the included tracks was ‘Nobody’s Darlin’ But Mine’, which was written by Jimmie Davis (11 September 1899 – Sunday 5 November 2000), and was a duet with Melba Montgomery.


'The Marty Stuart Show'

On Friday 6 December 2013, Melba Montgomery appeared as a special guest, along with Marty Stuart and Connie Smith, on ‘The Marty Stuart Show’, which aired on television in the United States in February 2014.


Rhonda Vincent: 'Only Me' (Upper Management Music, 2014)

Rhonda Vincent recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds’ and included the track on (Disc 1 of a 2-CD set) ‘Only Me’ (Upper Management Music, 2014).


In February 2014, at the time of the acquisition of this Gene Watson ‘Peer’s Quote’, Melba Montgomery was writing songs which were being recorded by numerous artists each year, and she was continuing to sing at various events.


Lonesome River Band: 'Mayhayley's House' (Mountain Home Music Company, 2017)

Lonesome River Band recorded Melba Montgomery’ ‘As The Crow Flies’ (co-written with Billy Yates) and included the track on ‘Mayhayley’s House’ (Mountain Home Music Company, 2017).


Connie Smith: 'The Cry of The Heart' (Fat Possum Records, 2021)

Connie Smith recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘I’m Not Over You’ (co-written with Carl Jackson) and included the track on ‘The Cry of The Heart’ (Fat Possum Records, 2021).


Wyatt Massingille: 'Wyatt Massingille' (Massingille Enterprises, 2022)

Wyatt Massingille recorded Melba Montgomery’s ‘We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds’ and included the track on ‘Wyatt Massingille’ (Massingille Enterprises, 2022); the track was a duet with Georgette Jones.


Melba Montgomery

• Like Melba Montgomery on Facebook