Gene Watson Peer’s Quote from Randy Travis: April 2020

Gene Watson’s Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as ‘the singer’s singer’ – and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson’s Peers, who were contacted during 2020, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Randy Travis, which he submitted to this site on Saturday 18 April 2020.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Randy Travis who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online ‘celebration of a Lone Star Hero’.


Randy Travis & Mary Davis Travis

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Mary Davis Travis, without whom this Gene Watson ‘Peer’s Quote from Randy Travis would not have been possible.

Randy Travis

Randy Travis
This quote was submitted on Saturday 18 April 2020.

‘Randy has always loved Gene, as has the world – with that liquid gold voice and song delivery unmatched in the industry.

Gene is a friend from long ago and is one that Randy considers a cherished part of his career.

The unmistakable voice is as perfect as any, and the longevity of Gene’s success is well deserved.

God bless and keep well my friend, Forever and Ever, Amen!’

Thank you, Randy Travis, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Randy Travis…

Randy Travis

Randy Travis is one of the very few figures in country music who stand out as signposts along the way, the trendsetters who fearlessly predict and influence the future of the genre.

Randy Travis is one of these performers and his impact still reverberates in the modern versus traditional ebb and flow of popular trends.

Blessed with a voice straight from the church altar, Randy Travis immediately reminded fans of country music’s roots when his songs came to popular attention for the first time in the mid-1980s after years of rejection.

A soothing salve in the aftermath of ‘Urban Cowboy’, Randy Travis’ voice helped launch the corrective Neo-traditionalist movement with heartfelt country and gospel songs which sounded so earnest and honest, because it turned out the North Carolina-born singer had lived those hard times and sometimes found the redemption he sang about.


Born Randy Traywick on Monday 4 May 1959, in Marshville, North Carolina, Randy Travis grew up on a rural farm and began performing as a child with his brother Ricky as The Traywick Brothers.  Randy Travis often clashed with his father and dropped out of school, getting into scrapes with the law that continued until he won a country music singing contest at a club in Charlotte, North Carolina.


In 1978, Randy Traywick began recording for Paula Records.  His first single with the label, ‘Dreamin’, was released in April 1978 and failed to chart.  A second single, ‘She’s My Woman’, was released in September 1978 and spent four weeks on the Billboard country music singles chart, peaking at No.91.  A full album on Paula Records was never released.


In 1982, Randy Traywick moved to Nashville in order to pursue a recording deal.


Nashville Palace, 2611 McGavock Pike, Nashville, TN 37214

Randy Traywick was hired at The Nashville Palace to sing and cook.  After initial failures in North Carolina and Nashville, Randy Traywick says he was turned down by every label in town at least once for being too country.


When Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz completed work on ‘On The Other Hand’, they envisioned the track being recorded by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016), George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) or Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 – Wednesday 25 March 2009).

Song plugger, Pat Higson, brought the song to the attention of Dan Seals’ producer, Kyle Lehning, who felt that the song did not suit Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 – Wednesday 25 March 2009) and would fare better in the hands of a then new artist by the name of Randy Travis.

Randy Travis – aka Randy Bruce Traywick – at the time worked as a singer, cook and dishwasher at The Nashville Palace, a nightclub on the outskirts of Opryland complex, which was owned by Randy Travis’ then manager Lib Hatcher.


Randy Ray: 'Randy Ray: Live at The Nashville Palace' (Nashville Palace Records, 1982)

In 1982, Randy Traywick, under the name of Randy Ray, recorded a ‘live’ album at The Nashville Palace, ‘Randy Ray: Live At The Nashville Palace’ (Nashville Palace Records, 1982), with the help of Keith Stegall who, at the time, was a recording artist affiliated with producer, Kyle Lehning.


Keith Stegall
Keith Stegall

Keith Stegall played the album for Kyle Lehning and when Warner Bros. Records A&R chief Martha Sharp caught Randy Traywick / Randy Ray’s live act, she pushed for a recording contract, which was signed in February 1985, for three singles.

In 1985Keith Stegall and Kyle Lehning recorded four tracks with Randy Travis; ‘Prairie Rose’, which was included on the soundtrack of the movie, ‘Rustlers’ Rhapsody’, starring Tom Berenger, ‘Dreaming’, ‘Reasons I Cheat’ (written by Randy Travis) and ‘On The Other Hand’, which was written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz (No.67 in the Autumn / Fall of 1985 and, upon re-release, No.1 for one week in July 1986).

It was also Martha Sharp who renamed her new artist ‘Randy Travis’.


Randy Travis: 'Storms of Life' (Warner Bros. Records, 1986)

Keith Stegall produced two tracks, with Kyle Lehning, for Randy Travis’ ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986), which was released on Friday 6 June 1986; ‘On The Other Hand’, which was written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz (No.67 in the Autumn / Fall of 1985 and, upon re-release, No.1 for one week in July 1986), and ‘Reasons I Cheat’, which was written by Randy Travis.

Randy Travis’ first single, ‘On The Other Hand’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz), barely registered on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1985, but the next single, ‘1982’ (written by Buddy Blackmon and Vip Vipperman), rose to the Billboard Top 10.

Warner Bros. re-released ‘On The Other Hand’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz) and it quickly became Randy Travis’ first No.1 single, beginning a run of 10 out of 12 chart-toppers.

The subsequent album, ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986), was the first of six straight ‘Platinum’ certifications for sales in excess of 1 million units and announced Randy Travis as an exciting new voice.  Randy Travis would win the Horizon Award for ‘Best New Artist’ at the Country Music Association (CMA) Awards in 1986.

Following his work on Randy Travis’ highly acclaimed (major record label) debut album, ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986), Keith Stegall became an in-demand producer.


‘Forever & Ever, Amen’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz), the first single from Randy Travis’ 1987 album ‘Always & Forever’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1987), also went to No.1 and helped Randy Travis score the first of seven career Grammy Awards.  ‘Always & Forever’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1987) also took ‘Album of The Year’ at the 1987 Country Music Association (CMA) Awards, and Randy Travis also won ‘Male Vocalist of The Year’ and ‘Single of The Year’.


Randy Travis: 'No Holdin' Back' (Warner Bros. Records, 1989)
Randy Travis: 'Heroes & Friends' (Warner Bros. Records, 1990)
Randy Travis: 'High Lonesome' (Warner Bros. Records, 1991)

With his next four albums, ‘Old 8×10’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988), ‘No Holdin’ Back’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1989), ‘Heroes & Friends’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1990), and ‘High Lonesome’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1991), Randy Travis would go on to have 16 No.1 songs, charting more than 50, and selling more than 24 million albums.


In the 1990s, Randy Travis pursued an acting career and scored several major motion picture and television roles, including ‘The Rainmaker’ with Matt Damon, and a run of several ‘Touched By An Angel’ episodes.


Randy Travis turned primarily to gospel music around the turn of the century, giving his career an unexpected boost with the release, in 2002, of iconic single ‘Three Wooden Crosses’, which was written by Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016) and Doug Johnson; the song went to No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart and the Christian Chart, and was the 2003 Country Music association (CMA) Awards ‘Song of The Year’.


Randy Travis earned eight ‘Platinum’ certifications and four ‘Gold’ records in his career and is one of country music’s top-selling artists.


The 56-year-old singer’s public performance career was put on hold in 2013 when Randy Travis, who was then living in Texas, suffered a stroke as a result of a viral infection in his heart.  With doctors telling the family that hope was virtually lost, Randy Travis has fought back harder than ever and is now able to walk.  Randy Travis’ speech and singing continue to improve with hopes of being back in front of his loyal fans one day soon.


At the time of the acquisition of the Gene Watson ‘Peer’s Quote’, in April 2020, Randy Travis was living on his ranch in Texas with his wife, Mary Davis-Travis, where he continued physical rehabilitation and had been making special appearances around the United States.


Randy Travis: 'Forever and Ever, Amen: A Memoir of Music, Faith and Braving The Storms of Life' (written with Ken Abraham) (Thomas Nelson Publishing, May 2019)

In May 2019, Randy Travis saw the release of his memoir, ‘Forever and Ever, Amen: A Memoir of Music, Faith and Braving The Storms of Life’, which was authored with Ken Abraham.  The long-awaited, deeply personal story of one of American music’s greatest icons, which was published by Thomas Nelson, is a remarkable tale of the utmost heights of fame and success, the deepest lows of life’s sorrows, and a miraculous return from the brink of death, told as only Randy Travis can.


Randy Travis

In the latter part of 1985, Randy Travis recorded ‘On The Other Hand’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz); the single reached No.67 on the Billboard country music singles chart in the Autumn / Fall of 1985, although it stayed on the Billboard chart for twelve weeks.

Following the release of Randy Travis’ ‘1982’ (written by Buddy Blackmon and Vip Vipperman), which reached No.6 on the Billboard country music singles chart in early 1986 and which took Randy Travis to stardom, Warner Bros. Records re-released ‘On The Other Hand’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz).

On this occasion, the single debuted at No.64 (higher than previously) and eventually reached No.1; the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in July / August 1986.


On Monday 2 June 1986, Randy Travis saw the release of his debut album, ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

Keith Whitley: 'L.A. To Miami' (RCA Records, 1985)

‘On The Other Hand’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz) (No.67, 1985) / this track was produced by Keith Stegall / upon the success of ‘1982’ (written by Buddy Blackmon and Vip Vipperman), this track, upon its re-release, was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in July / August 1986) / this track was also recorded by Keith Whitley (Thursday 1 July 1954 – Tuesday 9 May 1989), who included it on ‘L.A. To Miami’ (RCA Records, 1985)

‘1982’ (written by Buddy Blackmon and Vip Vipperman)
 (No.6, 1985) / this track was produced by Kyle Lehning

‘Diggin’ Up Bones’, which was written by Al Gore, Paul Overstreet and Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 – Wednesday 24 August 1988)
(No.1 for one week in November 1986) / this track was produced by Kyle Lehning

‘No Place Like Home’ (written by Paul Overstreet)
(No.2, 1986) / this track was produced by Kyle Lehning

Randy Travis’ debut album, ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986), also included the following tracks:

‘The Storms of Life’, which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004) and Troy Seals / this track was produced by Kyle Lehning

‘My Heart Cracked (But It Did Not Break)’, which was written by Ronny Scaife (1947 – Wednesday 3 November 2010), Don Singleton and Phil Thomas (1944 – Saturday 5 January 2019)
/ this track was produced by Kyle Lehning

‘Send My Body’ (written by Randy Travis)
/ this track was produced by Kyle Lehning

‘Messin’ With My Mind’, which was written by Joe Allen and Charlie Williams (Friday 20 December 1929 – Thursday 15 October 1992)
/ this track was produced by Kyle Lehning

‘Reasons I Cheat’ (written by Randy Travis)
/ this track was produced by Keith Stegall

‘There’ll Always Be A Honky Tonk Somewhere’, which was written by Steve Clark and Johnny MacRae (1929 – Wednesday 3 July 2013)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ debut album, ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986), included the following:

Baillie & The Boys, Thomas Brannon, Paul Davis (Wednesday 21 April 1948 – Tuesday 22 April 2008), Phil Forrest, Paul Overstreet, Lisa Silver and Diane Stegall (background vocals)
Eddie Bayers, Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 – Monday 24 August 1992) and James Stroud (drums)
Kenny Bell, Mark Casstevens and Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 – Wednesday 18 May 2005) (acoustic guitar)
Dennis Burnside, Shane Keister and Bobby Wood (keyboards)
Larry Byrom (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro)
Steve Gibson, Greg Jennings, Fred Newell and Keith Stegall (electric guitar)
Doyle Grisham (steel guitar)
Mark Hembree (acoustic bass)
Hoot Hester (Monday 13 August 1951 – Tuesday 30 August 2016) and Blaine Sprouse (fiddle)
David Hungate, Michael Rhodes (Wednesday 16 September 1953 – Saturday 4 March 2023) and Jack Williams (bass guitar)
Don Jackson (clarinet)
Kirk ‘Jelly Roll’ Johnson and Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica, percussion)
Kyle Lehning (keyboards, background vocals)
Mark O’Connor (fiddle, mandolin)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)

Randy Travis’ debut album, ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986), reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1986, No.61 on the Canadian RPM Top Albums Chart in 1986, and No.85 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1986.

In October 1986, Randy Travis’ ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986) went ‘Gold’, while the Country Music Association (CMA) honoured Randy Travis with the ‘Horizon Award’ and named ‘On The Other Hand’ as ‘Song of The Year’, while in the Spring of 1987, the Academy of Country Music (ACM) cited ‘On The Other Hand’ as ‘Song of The Year’ and ‘Single of The Year’, and named Randy Travis’ ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986) as the ‘Top Country Album’.


On Monday 4 May 1987, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Always & Forever’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1987), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Forever & Ever, Amen’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz) (No.1 for three weeks in June / July 1987) / this track earned Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz a Grammy Award

George Jones: 'Still The Same Ole Me' (Epic Records, 1981)

‘I Won’t Need You Anymore (Always & Forever)’, which was written by Troy Seals and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004) (No.1 for one week in November 1987) / this track was also recorded by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013), who included it on ‘Still The Same Ole Me’ (Epic Records, 1981)

‘Too Gone Too Long’, which was written by Gene Pistilli (Thursday 27 March 1947 – Tuesday 26 December 2017)
(No.1 for one week in March 1988) / this track was intended to be included on a Gene Watson / George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) duets project, an album which was never recorded

Carrie Underwood: 'Carnival Ride' (Arista Nashville Records, 2007)

‘I Told You So’ (written by Randy Travis) (No.1 for two weeks in June 1988) / this track was also recorded, as a non-album track, by Darrell Clanton, in 1985 / this track was also recorded by Carrie Underwood, as a duet with Randy Travis, and included on her album, ‘Carnival Ride’ (Arista Nashville Records, 2007), from which it was released as a single in January 2009, reaching No.2 on the Billboard Country Songs Chart

Randy Travis’ ‘Always & Forever’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1987) also included the following tracks:

‘My House’ (written by Al Gore and Paul Overstreet)

‘Good Intentions’, which was written by Marvin Coe, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Randy Travis


‘What’ll You Do About Me’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006)
/ this track was also recorded by Steve Earle (No.76, 1984), The Forester Sisters (No.74, 1992) and Doug Supernaw (Monday 26 September 1960 – Friday 13 November 2020) (No.16, 1995)

‘Anything’, which was written by Ronny Scaife (1947 – Wednesday 3 November 2010) and Phil Thomas (1944 – Saturday 5 January 2019)


‘The Truth Is Lyin’ Next To You’, which was written by Susan Longacre and Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997)


‘Tonight We’re Gonna Tear Down The Walls’ (written by Jim Sales and Randy Travis)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘Always & Forever’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1987) included the following:

Baillie & The Boys, Michael Brooks, Sherilyn Huffman, Dennis Locorriere, Paul Overstreet, Lisa Silver, Diane Tidwell and Dennis Wilson (background vocals)
Russ Barenberg (acoustic guitar)
Dennis Burnside (keyboards)
Larry Byrom and Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro)
Paul Franklin (pedabro)
Steve Gibson and Brent Mason (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Doyle Grisham (steel guitar)
David Hungate and Jack Williams (bass guitar)
Kirk ‘Jelly Roll’ Johnson (harmonica)
Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 – Monday 24 August 1992) and James Stroud (drums)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (percussion, harmonica)
Mark O’Connor (fiddle)
Randy Travis (acoustic guitar, lead vocals)

Randy Travis’ ‘Always & Forever’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1987) reached No.16 on the Canadian RPM Top Albums Chart in 1987, and No.19 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1987.

On Saturday 4 June 1988, Randy Travis’ ‘Always & Forever’ completed a remarkable run – 43 weeks at the top of the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart.


Ricky Skaggs recorded Randy Travis’ ‘Lord, She Sure Is Good At Lovin’ Me’ (co-written with Paul Overstreet) and included the track on ‘Comin’ Home To Stay’ (Epic Records, 1988).


On Tuesday 12 July 1988, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Old 8×10’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988) Nashville, which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Honky Tonk Moon’ (written by Dennis O’Rourke) (No.1 for one week in October 1988)

‘Deeper Than The Holler’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
(No.1 for one week in January / February 1989)

Randy Travis: '25th Anniversary Celebration' (Warner Bros. Records, 2011)
Randy Travis: 'Storms of Life' (Warner Bros. Records, 1986)

‘Is It Still Over’, which was written by Ken Bell and Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 – Thursday 18 December 2014) (No.1 for one week in May 1989) / a re-recorded version of this track, which featured guest vocals from Carrie Underwood, was included on Randy Travis’ ’25th Anniversary Celebration’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2011), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and which was released to celebrate 25 years since the release of Randy Travis’ debut album, ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986)

Randy Travis: '25th Anniversary Celebration' (Warner Bros. Records, 2011)
Randy Travis: 'Storms of Life' (Warner Bros. Records, 1986)

‘Promises’ (written by John Lindley and Randy Travis) (No.17, 1989) / a re-recorded version of this track, which featured guest vocals from Shelby Lynne, was included on Randy Travis’ ’25th Anniversary Celebration’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2011), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and which was released to celebrate 25 years since the release of Randy Travis’ debut album, ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986)

Randy Travis’ ‘Old 8×10’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988) also included the following tracks:

‘It’s Out of My Hands’ (written by John Lindley and Randy Travis)

‘Old 8×10’, which was written by Joe Chambers (passed away on Wednesday 28 September 2022) and Larry Jenkins


‘Written In Stone’ (written by Mac McAnally and Don Schlitz)


‘The Blues In Black & White’, which was written by Wayland D. Holyfield (Sunday 15 March 1942 – Tuesday 7 May 2024) and Verlon Thompson


‘Here In My Heart’ (written by David Lynn Jones)


‘We Ain’t Out of Love Yet’, which was written by Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 – Thursday 18 December 2014) and Gene Pistilli (Thursday 27 March 1947 – Tuesday 26 December 2017)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘Old 8×10’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988) included the following:

Baillie & The Boys, Michael Brooks and Dennis Locorriere (background vocals)
Eddie Bayers and Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 – Monday 24 August 1992) (drums)
Dennis Burnside, Shane Keister and Kyle Lehning (piano)
Larry Byrom, Mark Casstevens and Teddy Irwin (acoustic guitar)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro)
Béla Fleck (banjo)
Paul Franklin (Pedabro)
Steve Gibson and Brent Mason (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Doyle Grisham (steel guitar)
David Hungate and Jack Williams (bass guitar)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica, percussion)
Mark O’Connor (fiddle)
Billy Puett (clarinet, bass clarinet)
Dennis Sollee (clarinet)
Randy Travis (lead vocals, acoustic guitar)

Randy Travis’ ‘Old 8×10’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988) reached No.14 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1988, No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988, and No.35 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1988.

The German version of Randy Travis’ ‘Old 8×10’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988), his first release in that country, included the bonus track, ‘Forever & Ever, Amen’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz).

In January 1990, Randy Travis’ ‘Old 8×10’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988) earned Randy Travis three American Music Awards for ‘Favourite Country Male Artist’, ‘Favourite Country Album’, and ‘Favourite Country Single’ for ‘Deeper Than The Holler’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz).


Gene Watson: 'Back In The Fire' (Warner Bros. Records, 1988)

In January 1989, Gene Watson saw the release of ‘Back In The Fire’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988), which was produced by Paul WorleyEd Seay and Gregg Brown; the production assistant was Sharon Eaves (1961 – Friday 25 September 2015).

Gene Watson‘s ‘Back In The Fire’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988) included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Don’t Waste It On The Blues’ (written by Sandy Ramos and Jerry Vandiver) (No.5, 1988) / this track also reached No.6 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1988

‘Back In The Fire’ (written by
Rory Bourke and Mike Reid) (No.20, 1989) / this track also reached No.24 on the Canadian RPM Country Traks Chart in 1989

‘The Jukebox Played Along’, which was written by Ken Bell and Charles William Quillen (Monday 21 March 1938 – Friday 19 August 2022)
(No.25, 1988) / this track also reached No.40 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1989

‘The Great Divide’ (written by John Lindley and Randy Travis
) (No.41, 1988)

Gene Watson‘s ‘Back In The Fire’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988) included the following liner notes from Gene Watson:

‘Very special thanks to Lib Hatcher for all her concern and encouragement.

Without her my career would have probably ended.

She gave me a new ‘beginning’.

I can’t begin to thank her enough for everything.



Thanks to: Randy Travis (for remaining a friend for twelve years and for giving me my favourite song: ‘The Great Divide’), Martha Sharp (for signing me to Warner Bros.), Gregg Brown (for taking time out of his busy schedule and working with me for days on end, selecting and reviewing my music), and to Paul Worley and Nick Hunter and the entire staff at Warner Bros. Records (for being so warm and enthusiastic).

It’s the first time in my career that I’ve had people care so much.

This is a brand new start and career for Gene Watson’

Gene Watson‘s ‘Back In The Fire’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988) reached No.42 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1989.


Odd Jarle Hanssen: 'The Moment of Truth' (Nord Norsk Plateselskap, 1989)

Odd Jarle Hanssen recorded Randy Travis’ ‘The Great Divide’ (co-written with John Lindley) and included the track on ‘The Moment of Truth’ (Nord Norsk Plateselskap, 1989).


Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire' (Warner Bros. Records, 1988) Gene Watson: 'At Last' (Warner Bros. Records, 1991) Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016)

On Friday 11 Novemberr 2016, England’s Morello Records released Gene Watson‘s ‘Back In The Fire’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988), along with Gene Watson‘s ‘At Last‘ (Warner Bros. Records, 1991), as a special ‘2-on-1‘ CD set (WMRLL 66).


On Tuesday 29 August 1989, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘An Old Time Christmas’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1989), his first Christmas album, which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included four tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘White Christmas Makes Me Blue’ (written by Rich Grissom and Neil Patton Rogers) / this track was released as a single in 1986, but it did not chart

‘An Old Time Christmas’ (written by Stewart Harris)
 / this track was released as a single in 1988, but it did not chart

‘How Do I Wrap My Heart Up For Christmas’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Randy Travis)
 / this track was released as a single in 1988, but it did not chart

‘Oh, What A Silent Night’ (written by Mark Collie and Kathy Louvin)
 / this track was released as a single in 1989, but it did not chart

Randy Travis’ ‘An Old Time Christmas’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1989) also included the following tracks:

‘Winter Wonderland’ (written by Felix Bernard and Dick Smith)
‘Meet Me Under The Mistletoe’ (written by Joe Collins, Mark Irwin and Betsy Jackson)
‘Santa Claus Is Coming To Town’, which was written by John Frederick Coots (2 May 1897 – Monday 8 April 1985) and James Lamont ‘Haven’ Gillespie (6 February 1888 – Friday 14 March 1975)
‘God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen’ (traditional)
‘Pretty Paper’ (written by Willie Nelson)
‘The Christmas Song’, which was written by Mel Tormé (Sunday 13 September 1925 – Saturday 5 June 1999) and Robert Wells (Sunday 15 October 1922 – Monday 28 September 1998)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘An Old Time Christmas’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1989) included the following:

Baillie & The Boys, Carol Chase, Sherilyn Huffman, Wendy Suits Johnson, Lisa Silver, Dianne Vanette and Cindy Richardson-Walker (background vocals)
Eddie Bayers, Jerry Kroon, Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 – Monday 24 August 1992) and James Stroud (drums)
Dennis Burnside and Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (keyboards)
Larry Byrom, Mark Casstevens and Teddy Irwin (acoustic guitar)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro)
Steve Gibson (bouzouki, acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Doyle Grisham (steel guitar)
David Hungate and Jack Williams (bass guitar)
Greg Jennings and Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Kirk ‘Jelly Roll’ Johnson (harmonica)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica, percussion)
Farrell Morris (percussion)
Mark O’Connor (fiddle)
Randy Travis (acoustic guitar, lead vocals)

Randy Travis’ ‘An Old Time Christmas’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1989) reached No.49 on the Canadian RPM Top Albums Chart in 1989, No.13 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1989, No.70 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1989, and No.5 on the Billboard Top Holiday Albums Chart in 1989.


Randy Travis: 'No Holdin' Back' (Warner Bros. Records, 1989)

On Tuesday 26 September 1989, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘No Holdin’ Back’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1989), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘It’s Just A Matter of Time’, which was written by Brook Benton (Saturday 19 September 1931 – Saturday 9 April 1988), Belford Hendricks (Tuesday 11 May 1909 – Saturday 24 September 1977) and Clyde Otis (Thursday 11 September 1924 – Tuesday 8 January 2008) (No.1 for one week in December 1989) / this track was also recorded by Brook Benton (No.1 on the Billboard R&B Chart in 1959), Sonny James (Wednesday 1 May 1929 – Monday 22 February 2016) (No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for four weeks in February / March 1970), Gene Watson (recorded as an album track in 1969), and Glen Campbell (Wednesday 22 April 1936 – Tuesday 8 August 2017) (No.7, 1986)

‘Hard Rock Bottom of Your Heart’ (written by Hugh Prestwood)
(No.1 for four weeks in March 1990)

‘He Walked On Water’ (written by Allen Shamblin)
(No.2, 1990)

Randy Travis’ ‘No Holdin’ Back’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1989) also included the following tracks:

‘Mining For Coal’, which was written by Matraca Berg and Ronnie Samoset (1947 – Sunday 29 July 2018)

‘Singing The Blues’, which was written by Melvin Endsley (Tuesday 30 January 1934 – Monday 16 August 2004)
/ the original version of this track was recorded by Marty Robbins (Saturday 26 September 1925 – Wednesday 8 December 1982) (No.1 on the Billboard C&W Best Sellers Chart for thirteen weeks in late 1956 and early 1957)

‘When Your World Was Turning For Me’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022) and Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999)


‘No Stoppin’ Us Now’ (written by Randy Travis)


‘Card Carryin’ Fool’ (written by Byron Hill and Tim Bays)


‘Somewhere In My Broken Heart’ (written by Billy Dean and Richard Leigh)
/ this track was also recorded by Billy Dean, whose version reached No.3 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1991

‘Have A Nice Rest of Your Life’ (written by Verlon Thompson and Mark D. Sanders)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘No Holdin’ Back’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1989) included the following:

Eddie Bayers (drums on ‘No Stoppin’ Us Now’)
Matraca Berg, Carol Chase, Doug Clements, Sherilyn Huffman, Wendy Suits Johnson, Louis Dean Nunley (Thursday 15 October 1931 – Friday 26 October 2012), Lisa Silver, Dianne Vanette, Cindy Richardson-Walker and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Dennis Burnside, John Barlow Jarvis and Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Larry Byrom and Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro)
Béla Fleck (banjo on ‘Hard Rock Bottom of Your Heart’)
Steve Gibson (electric guitar, 12-string electric guitar)
Doyle Grisham (steel guitar)
David Hungate and Jack Williams (bass guitar)
Kirk ‘Jelly Roll’ Johnson (harmonica on ‘He Walked On Water’)
Paul Leim and Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 – Monday 24 August 1992) (drums)
Steve Lindsey (synthesizer and Kurzweil Synthesizer on ‘It’s Just A Matter of Time’)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica, percussion)
Brent Mason and Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) (electric guitar)
Mark O’Connor (fiddle)
Dean Parks (electric guitar solo on ‘It’s Just A Matter of Time’)
Richard Perry (bass vocals on ‘It’s Just A Matter of Time’)
Tom Roady (percussion)
Randy Travis (acoustic guitar, lead vocals)

Randy Travis’ ‘No Holdin’ Back’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1989) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1989, No.33 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1989, and No.55 on the Canadian RPM Top Albums Chart in 1989.


Randy Travis: 'Heroes & Friends' (Warner Bros. Records, 1990)

On Tuesday 11 September 1990, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Heroes & Friends’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1990), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billbooard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘A Few Ole Country Boys’, which was written by Troy Seals and Mentor Williams (Tuesday 11 June 1946 – Wednesday 16 November 2016) (No.8, 1990) / this track was a duet with George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013)

‘Heroes & Friends’ (written by Randy Travis and Don Schlitz)
(No.3, 1991)

‘We’re Strangers Again’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Leona Williams (No.49, 1991) / this track was a duet with Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998) / this track was also included on Tammy Wynette’s ‘Best Loved Hits’ (Epic Records, 1991) / the original version of this track was recorded by Merle Haggard and Leona Williams, who included it on ‘Heart To Heart’ (Mercury Records, 1983)

Randy Travis’ ‘Heroes & Friends’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1990) also included the following tracks:

‘Do I Ever Cross Your Mind’ (written by Dolly Parton) / this track was a duet with Dolly Parton

‘The Birth of The Blues’ (written by Lew Brown, Buddy DeSylva and Ray Henderson)
/ this track was a duet with Willie Nelson

‘All Night Long’, which was written by Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) and Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 – Tuesday 13 May 1975)
/ this track was a duet with Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘The Human Race’, which was written by Tim Menzies, Jimmy Phillips and Eugene David Dobbins (Monday 19 March 1934 – Sunday 23 November 2008)
 / this track was a duet with Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 – Tuesday 28 April 2009)

‘Shopping For Dresses’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Little Jimmy Dickens (Sunday 19 December 1920 – Friday 2 January 2015) / this track was a duet with Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022)

‘Waiting On The Light To Change’ (written by Gary Nicholson and Richard Leigh)
/ this track was a duet with B.B. King (Wednesday 16 September 1925 – Thursday 14 May 2015)

‘Walk Our Own Road’ (written by Bernie Nelson and Lisa Palas)
/ this track was a duet with Kris Kristofferson

‘Smokin’ The Hive’ (written by Byron Hill and J. Remington Wilde)
/ this track was a duet with Clint Eastwood

‘Come See About Me’, which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)
/ this track was a duet with Conway Twitty

‘Happy Trails’, which was written by Dale Evans (Thursday 31 October 1912 – Wednesday 7 February 2001)
 / this track was a duet with Roy Rogers (Sunday 5 November 1911 – Monday 6 July 1998)

‘Heroes & Friends’ (written by Randy Travis and Don Schlitz)
(reprise)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘Heroes & Friends’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1990) included the following:

Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 – Saturday 30 June 2001) (gut string guitar, background vocals)
Kathie BaillieMichael Bonagura Jr., Lib Hatcher, Don Schlitz, Troy Seals, Allen Shamblin, Martha Sharp and Keith Stegall (choir)
Eddie Bayers, Paul Leim, Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 – Monday 24 August 1992) and Carlos Vega (drums)
Barry Beckett, Randy Goodrum and Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Dennis Burnside (piano, electric piano, Wurlitzer)
Larry Byrom, Mark Casstevens, Chris Leuzinger and Fred Tackett (acoustic guitar)
Gary Carter and Jay Dee Maness (steel guitar)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro)
Clint Eastwood (duet vocals on ‘Smokin’ The Hive’)
Steve Gibson (12-string guitar, electric guitar, mandolin)
Bob Glaub, David Hungate and Jack Williams (bass guitar)
Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 – Tuesday 28 April 2009) (duet vocals on ‘The Human Race’)
Doyle Grisham (steel guitar)
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) (duet vocals on ‘All Night Long’)
Sherilyn Huffman, Lisa Silver and Diane Vanette (choir, background vocals)
David Johnson and Mark O’Connor (fiddle)
Kirk ‘Jelly Roll’ Johnson and Mickey Raphael (harmonica)
George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013) (duet vocals on ‘A Few Ole Country Boys’
Nancy Jones (background vocals on ‘A Few Ole Country Boys’)
Shane Keister (organ, piano)
B.B. King (Wednesday 16 September 1925 – Thursday 14 May 2015) (duet vocals and electric guitar on ‘Waiting On The Light To Change’)
Kris Kristofferson (duet vocals on ‘Walk Our Own Road’)
Mike Lawler (banjo, synthesizer)
Kyle Lehning (Wurlitzer)
Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022) (duet vocals on ‘Shopping For Dresses’)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica, percussion)
Brent Mason, Dean Parks and Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Willie Nelson (duet vocals on ‘The Birth of The Blues’)
Dolly Parton (duet vocals on ‘Do I Ever Cross Your Mind’)
Roy Rogers (Sunday 5 November 1911 – Monday 6 July 1998) (duet vocals on ‘Happy Trails’)
Tom Rutledge (fiddle, acoustic guitar)
Denis Solee (clarinet)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)
Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) (duet vocals on ‘Come See About Me’)
Dennis Wilson (background vocals)
Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998) (duet vocals on ‘We’re Strangers Again’)

Randy Travis’ ‘Heroes & Friends’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1990) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1990, No.31 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1990, and No.61 on the Canadian RPM Top Albums Chart in 1990.


Randy Travis: 'High Lonesome' (Warner Bros. Records, 1991)

On Tuesday 27 August 1991, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘High Lonesome’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1991), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Point of Light’ (written by Don Schlitz and Thom Schuyler) (No.3, 1991)

‘Forever Together’ (written by Randy Travis and Alan Jackson)
(No.1, 1991)

Randy Travis: '25th Anniversary Celebration' (Warner Bros. Records, 2011)
Randy Travis: 'Storms of Life' (Warner Bros. Records, 1986)

‘Better Class of Losers’ (written by Randy Travis and Alan Jackson) (No.2, 1991) / a medley of this track, along with ‘She’s Got The Rhythm (& I Got The Blues)’ (written by Randy Travis and Alan Jackson), was included on ’25th Anniversary Celebration’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2011), an album which was released to celebrate 25 years since the release of Randy Travis’ debut album, ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986)

‘I’d Surrender All’ (written by Randy Travis and Alan Jackson)
(No.20, 1992)

Randy Travis’ ‘High Lonesome’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1991) also included the following tracks:

‘Let Me Try’ (written by Chuck Cannon and Allen Shamblin)
‘Oh, What A Time To Be Me’ (written by Randy Travis and Don Schlitz)
‘Heart of Hearts’ (written by Mike Henderson and Kevin Welch)
‘High Lonesome’ (written by Gretchen Peters)
‘Allergic To The Blues’ (written by Alan Jackson and Jim McBride)
‘I’m Gonna Have A Little Talk With Jesus’ (written by Don Schlitz and Randy Travis) / this track featured guest vocals from Take 6

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘High Lonesome’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1991) included the following:

Russ Barenberg, Larry Byrom, Mark Casstevens, Chris Leuzinger, Mac McAnally, Randy Lynn Scruggs (Monday 3 August 1953 – Tuesday 17 April 2018) and Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) (acoustic guitar)
Eddie Bayers, Paul Leim, Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 – Monday 24 August 1992) and Harry Stinson (drums)
Dennis Burnside and Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Carol Chase, Sherilyn Huffman, John Wesley Ryles, Lisa Silver, Dianne Vanette, Cindy Richardson-Walker, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro)
Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 – Wednesday 29 July 2015) and Doyle Grisham (steel guitar)
Steve Gibson and John Willis (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Rob Hajacos and Mark O’Connor (fiddle)
David Hungate (bass guitar, emulator, trombone, trumpet)
Kyle Lehning (Wurlitzer)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica, percussion)
Brent Mason (six-string bass guitar, electric guitar)
Take 6 (background vocals on ‘I’m Gonna Have A Little Talk With Jesus’)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)

Randy Travis’ ‘High Lonesome’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1991) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1991, No.43 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1991, No.10 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1991, and No.61 on the Canadian RPM Top Albums Chart in 1991.


Alan Jackson: 'Don't Rock The Jukebox' (Arista Records, 1991)

Alan Jackson recorded Randy Travis’ ‘From A Distance’ (co-written with Alan Jackson) and included the track on ‘Don’t Rock The Jukebox’ (Arista Records, 1991).


Paul Overstreet recorded Randy Travis’ ‘Lord, She Sure Is Good At Lovin’ Me’ (co-written with Paul Overstreet) and included the track on ‘Love Is Strong’ (RCA Records, 1992).


Randy Travis: 'Greatest Hits, Volume One' (Warner Bros. Records, 1992)

On Tuesday 15 September 1992, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Greatest Hits, Volume One’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1992), which included the following tracks:

‘If I Didn’t Have You’, which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004) and Skip Ewing (No.1, 1992) / this track was previously unreleased

‘1982’ (written by Buddy Blackmon and Vip Vipperman)
 (No.6, 1985)

‘Hard Rock Bottom of Your Heart’ (written by Hugh Prestwood)
(No.1 for four weeks in March 1990)

‘On The Other Hand’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
(No.67, 1985) / this track, upon its re-release, was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in July / August 1986)

‘Honky Tonk Moon’ (written by Dennis O’Rourke)
(No.1 for one week in October 1988)

‘An Old Pair of Shoes’ (written by Jerry Foster, Art Masters and Johnny Morris)
(No.21, 1993) / this track was previously unreleased

‘I Told You So’ (written by Randy Travis)
 (No.1 for two weeks in June 1988)

‘Too Gone Too Long’, which was written by Gene Pistilli (Thursday 27 March 1947 – Tuesday 26 December 2017)
(No.1 for one week in March 1988)

‘Heroes & Friends’ (written by Randy Travis and Don Schlitz)
(No.3, 1991)

‘Deeper Than The Holler’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
(No.1 for one week in January / February 1989)

‘Reasons I Cheat’ (written by Randy Travis)
/ this track was an album track from Randy Travis’ debut album, ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986)

Randy Travis’ ‘Greatest Hits, Volume One’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1992) reached No.14 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1992, and No.44 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1992.


Randy Travis: 'Greatest Hits, Volume Two' (Warner Bros. Records, 1992)

On Tuesday 15 September 1992, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Greatest Hits, Volume Two’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1992), which included the following tracks:

‘Look Heart, No Hands’, which was written by Trey Bruce and Russell Smith (Friday 17 June 1949 – Friday 12 July 2019) (No.1 for two weeks in January 1993) / this track was previously unreleased

‘Forever & Ever, Amen’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
(No.1 for three weeks in June / July 1987)

‘No Place Like Home’ (written by Paul Overstreet)
(No.2, 1986)

‘Is It Still Over’, which was written by Ken Bell and Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 – Thursday 18 December 2014)
(No.1 for one week in May 1989)

‘He Walked On Water’ (written by Allen Shamblin)
(No.2, 1990)

‘Take Another Swing At Me’, which was written by Paul Craft (Friday 12 August 1938 – Saturday 18 October 2014)
/ this track was previously unreleased

‘Promises’ (written by John Lindley and Randy Travis)
(No.17, 1989)

‘Diggin’ Up Bones’, which was written by Al Gore, Paul Overstreet and Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 – Wednesday 24 August 1988)
(No.1 for one week in November 1986)

‘I Won’t Need You Anymore (Always & Forever)’, which was written by Troy Seals and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004)
 (No.1 for one week in November 1987)

‘It’s Just A Matter of Time’, which was written by Brook Benton (Saturday 19 September 1931 – Saturday 9 April 1988), Belford Hendricks (Tuesday 11 May 1909 – Saturday 24 September 1977) and Clyde Otis (Thursday 11 September 1924 – Tuesday 8 January 2008)
(No.1 for one week in December 1989)

‘I’d Do It All Again With You’ (written by Randy Travis)
/ this track was previously unreleased

Randy Travis’ ‘Greatest Hits, Volume Two’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1992) reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1992, No.67 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1992, and No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1992.


Alan Jackson: 'A Lot About Lovin' (A Lot About Livin')' (Arista Records, 1992)

Alan Jackson recorded Randy Travis’ ‘She’s Got The Rhythm (& I Got The Blues)’ (co-written with Alan Jackson) and included the track on ‘A Lot About Lovin’ (A Lot About Livin’)’ (Arista Records, 1992); the track was No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart for one week in December 1992.


Randy Travis: 'Wind In The Wire' (Warner Bros. Records, 1993)

On Tuesday 17 August 1993, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Wind In The Wire’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1993), which was produced by Steve Gibson, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Cowboy Boogie’ (written by Robert Blythe) (No.46, 1993) / this track also reached No.10 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1993

‘Wind In The Wire’ (written by David Wilkie and Stewart MacDougall)
(No.65, 1993)

Randy Travis’ ‘Wind In The Wire’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1993) also included the following tracks:

‘Down At The Old Corral’ (written by Roger Brown and Luke Reed)
‘Blue Mesa’ (written by Roger Brown and Luke Reed)
‘Memories of Santa Fe’ (written by Roger Brown and Rick Peoples)
‘Roamin’ Wyomin’ (written by Roger Brown and Luke Reed)
‘The Old Chisholm Trail’ (traditional)
‘Paniolo Country’ (written by Marcus Shutte Jr.)
‘Hula Hands’ (written by William D. Beasley, J.T. Adams and Jean Norris)
Beyond The Reef’ (written by Jack Pitman)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘Wind In The Wire’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1993) also included the following tracks:

Eddie Bayers and Lonnie Wilson (drums)
Bruce C. Bouton (Dobro, pedal steel guitar)
Mark Casstevens and Randy Lynn Scruggs (Monday 3 August 1953 – Tuesday 17 April 2018) (acoustic guitar)
Glen Duncan and Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Sonny Garrish (pedabro, pedal steel guitar)
Steve Gibson (Dobro, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, mandolin)
David Hungate, Craig Nelson and Martin Pahinui (bass guitar)
John Barlow Jarvis and Gary Prim (keyboards)
Kapena, Karen Taylor-Good, Bergen White, Willie K., Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Cyril Pahinui (slack key guitar)
James Bla Pahinui (ukulele)
Randy Travis (acoustic guitar, lead vocals)
Dick Tunney (accordion)
Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)

Randy Travis’ ‘Wind In The Wire’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1993) reached No.24 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1993, No.121 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1993, and No.5 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1993.

Randy Travis’ ‘Wind In The Wire’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1993) was made to accompany an American television series, which was also called ‘Wind In The Wire’.


Randy Travis: 'This Is Me' (Warner Bros. Records, 1994)

On Tuesday 26 April 1994, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘This Is Me’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1994), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Before You Kill Us All’ (written by Max T. Barnes and Keith Follesé) (No.2, 1994)

‘Whisper My Name’ (written by Trey Bruce)
(No.1, 1994)

‘This Is Me’ (written by Tom Shapiro and Thom McHugh)
(No.5, 1994)

‘The Box’ (written by Randy Travis and Buck Moore)
(No.8, 1995)

Randy Travis’ ‘This Is Me’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1994) also included the following tracks:

‘Honky Tonky Side of Town’, which was written by Jerry Phillips, Troy Seals and Edward F. Setser (1945 – Monday 27 January 2020)

‘That’s Where I Draw The Line’ (written by Trey Bruce and Roger Brown)


‘Small Y’all’ (written by Bobby Braddock)
/ this track was also recorded by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013), who included it on ‘It Don’t Get Any Better Than This’ (MCA Records, 1998)

‘Runaway Train’ (written by Larry Gatlin and Jerry Steve Smith)


‘Gonna Walk That Line’, which was written by Jamie O’Hara (Friday 18 August 1950 – Thursday 7 January 2021) and Kieran Kane


‘Oscar The Angel’ (written by Don Schlitz)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘This Is Me’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1994) included the following:

Dennis Burnside (keyboards)
Larry Byrom (acoustic guitar, electric guitar, slide guitar)
Mark Casstevens, Chris Leuzinger and Biff Watson (acoustic guitar)
Bruce Dees, Sherilyn Huffman, Suzi Ragsdale, John Wesley Ryles, Darrell Scott, Lisa Silver, Verlon Thompson, Dianne Vanette, Cindy Richardson-Walker, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro)
Paul Franklin, Doyle Grisham and Kayton Roberts (Saturday 25 November 1933 – Thursday 13 July 2017) (steel guitar)
Steve Gibson, Brent Mason and Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) (electric guitar)
Jim Hoke (soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone)
David Hungate (bass guitar)
Paul Leim, Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 – Monday 24 August 1992) and Harry Stinson (drums)
Tom Roady (percussion)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Hank Singer (fiddle)
Jay Spell (electric piano)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)

Randy Travis’ ‘This Is Me’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1994) reached No.10 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1994, No.59 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1994, and No.5 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1994.


Daryle Singletary: 'Daryle Singletary' (Giant Records, 1995)

On Tuesday 23 May 1995, Daryle Singletary (Wednesday 10 March 1971 – Monday 12 February 2018) saw the release of his self-titled debut album, ‘Daryle Singletary’ (Giant Records, 1995), which was produced by James Stroud, Randy Travis and David Malloy, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘I’m Living Up To Her Low Expectations’ (written by Bob McDill and Tommy Rocco) (No.39, 1995) / this track also reached No.35 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1995

‘I Let Her Lie’, which was written by Tim Johnson (Friday 29 January 1960 – Sunday 21 October 2012)
 (No.2, 1995) / this track also reached No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1995

‘Too Much Fun’ (written by Curtis Wright and T.J. Knight)
(No.4, 1995) / this track also reached No.10 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1995

‘Workin’ It Out’, which was written by Tim Johnson (Friday 29 January 1960 – Sunday 21 October 2012) and Brett Jones
 (No.50, 1996) / this track also reached No.56 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1996

Daryle Singletary’s self-titled debut album, ‘Daryle Singletary’ (Giant Records, 1995), also included the following tracks:

‘There’s A Cold Spell Moving In’, which was written by Randy Travis, Jerry Foster and Ron Avis (passed away on Monday 20 February 2023)

‘Ordinary Heroes’, which was written by Tim Johnson (Friday 29 January 1960 – Sunday 21 October 2012) and Alex Call

‘A Love That Never Died’ (written by Skip Ewing and Donny Kees)

‘My Heart’s Too Broke (To Pay Attention)’, which was written by Phil Barnhart, Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016) and Lonnie Wilson

‘Would These Arms Be In Your Way’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010), Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 – Tuesday 28 April 2009) and Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 – Wednesday 1 July 2015)

‘What Am I Doing There’ (written by Buddy Brock and Zack Turner)

Personnel involved in the recording of Daryle Singletary’s self-titled debut album, ‘Daryle Singletary’ (Giant Records, 1995), included the following:

Larry Byrom and Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar)
Paul Franklin and Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Dann Huff (electric guitar)
Paul Leim (drums)
Brent Mason (electric guitar, acoustic guitar)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Jimmy Nichols (organ on ‘I Let Her Lie’)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Matt Rollings (piano)
Daryle Singletary (Wednesday 10 March 1971 – Monday 12 February 2018) (lead vocals)
Rhonda Vincent (background vocals on ‘Would These Arms Be In Your Way’)
Glenn Worf (bass guitar)
Curtis Wright and Curtis Young (background vocals)

Daryle Singletary’s self-titled debut album, ‘Daryle Singletary’ (Giant Records, 1995), reached No.44 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Albums Chart in 1995, and No.27 on the Billboard Top Heatseekers Chart in 1995.


Rhonda Vincent: 'Trouble Free' (Giant Records, 1996)

On Tuesday 6 February 1996, Rhonda Vincent saw the release of ‘Trouble Free’ (Giant Records, 1996), which was produced by James Stroud and Michael Landis; one of the included tracks was ‘It Ain’t Nothin’ New’ (written by Larry Cordle, Betty Key and Larry Shell), which was a duet with Randy Travis.


Paul Overstreet recorded Randy Travis’ ‘I’m Gonna Ring Her’ (co-written with Paul Overstreet) and included the track on ‘Time’ (Scarlett Moon Records, 1996).


Randy Travis: 'Full Circle' (Warner Bros. Records, 1996)

On Tuesday 13 August 1996, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Full Circle’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1996), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Are We In Trouble Now’ (written by Mark Knopfler) (No.24, 1996)

‘Would I’ (written by Mark Winchester)
(No.25, 1996)

‘Price To Pay’ (written by Craig Wiseman and Trey Bruce)
(No.60, 1997)

‘King of The Road’, which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 – Sunday 25 October 1992)
(No.51, 1997) / Randy Travis’ version of this track was also featured on the soundtrack of the 1997 film, ‘Traveller’ / the original version of this track was recorded by Roger Miller, who included it on ‘The Return’ (Smash Records, 1965) (United Kingdom Singles Chart: No.1, 1965 / Norwegian Singles Chart: No.1, 1965 / Billboard country music singles chart: No.1, 1965 / Billboard Easy Listening Chart: No.1, 1965 / Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart: No.4, 1965 / Irish Singles Chart: No.5, 1965 / Canadian RPM Top Singles Chart: No.10, 1965 / Dutch Top 40 Singles Chart: No.14, 1965 / Dutch Official Chart: No.5, 1965 / German Official Chart: No.26, 1965 / French TEF/TMP Chart: No.6, 1965)

Randy Travis’ ‘Full Circle’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1996) also included the following tracks:

‘Highway Junkie’ (written by Chris Knight, Annie Tate and Sam Tate)

‘Long On Lonely (Short On Pride)’ (written by Bucky Jones, Bob McDill and Dickey Lee)


‘Future Mister Me’ (written by Randy Travis and John Lindley)


‘Don’t Take Your Love Away From Me’ (written by Verlon Thompson and Mark D. Sanders)


‘If It Ain’t One Thing, It’s Another’ (written by Joe Stampley, Tony Stampley and Bobby Carmichael)


‘I Wish It Would Rain’, which was written by Randy Travis and Ron Avis (passed away on Monday 20 February 2023)


‘I Can Almost Hear Her Wings’ (written by Randy Travis, Eddie Lee and Buck Moore)


‘Ants On A Log’ (written by Skip Ewing and Donny Kees)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘Full Circle’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1996) included the following:

Mike Brignardello (bass guitar)
Robbie Buchanan, Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Matt Rollings (piano)
Dennis Burnside and Steve Nathan (keyboards)
Larry Byrom, Mark Casstevens, Brent Mason and Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) (electric guitar, acoustic guitar)
Dave Carpenter (upright bass)
Alvin Chea, Cherry Sisters (Lisa Silver, Sherry Huffman and Diane Tidwell), Gene Miller, John Wesley Ryles, Mervyn Warren, Dennis Wilson, Curtis Wright and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Dan Dugmore (steel guitar, electric guitar)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar, Dobro)
Steve Gibson and Chris Leuzinger (electric guitar)
David Hungate (bass guitar)
Roy Huskey Jr. (Monday 17 December 1956 – Saturday 6 September 1997) (upright bass)
Paul Leim, Mike Shapiro and Milton Sledge (drums)
Jay Dee Maness (steel guitar)
Dean Parks (acoustic guitar)
Hank Singer (fiddle)
Randy Travis (acoustic guitar, lead vocals)

Randy Travis’ ‘Full Circle’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1996) reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1996, No.77 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1996, and No.10 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1996.


Randy Travis: 'You & You Alone' (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1998)

On Tuesday 21 April 1998, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘You & You Alone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1998), which was produced by Randy Travis, Byron Gallimore and James Stroud, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Out of My Bones’ (written by Gary Burr, Robin Lerner and Sharon Vaughn) (No.2, 1998)

‘The Hole’ (written by Skip Ewing and James Dean Hicks)
(No.9, 1998)

‘Spirit of A Boy, Wisdom of A Man’ (written by Glen Burtnik and Trey Bruce)
(No.2, 1999) / this track was also recorded by Mark Collie, who included it on ‘Tennessee Plates’ (Giant Records, 1995)

‘Stranger In My Mirror’, which was written by Skip Ewing and Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016)
(No.16, 1999)

Randy Travis’ ‘You & You Alone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1998) also included the following tracks:

‘Only Worse’, which was written by John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 – Thursday 1 February 2001) and Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 – Saturday 27 December 1997) / this track was best known for playing in the background of a diner in the 2000 comedy film, ‘Road Trip’

‘One Word Song’, which was written by John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 – Thursday 1 February 2001) and Max T. Barnes


‘I Did My Part’ (written by Don Schlitz and Billy Livsey)
/ this track featured background vocals from Patrick (Wayne) Swayze (Monday 18 August 1952 – Monday 14 September 2009)

‘A Horse Called Music’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015)
/ the original version of this track was recorded by Willie Nelson, who included it on ‘A Horse Called Music’ (Columbia Records, 1989)

‘I’m Still Here, You’re Still Gone’ (written by Ralph Murphy and Kevin Brandt)


‘Easy To Love You’ (written by Deanna Bryant and Danny Orton)


‘You & You Alone’ (written by Melba Montgomery, Leslie Satcher and Tim Ryan Rouillier)

‘Satisfied Mind’ (written by Tony Arata)
/ this track was also recorded by Hal Ketchum (Thursday 9 April 1953 – Monday 23 November 2020), who included it on ‘The Hits’ (MCG / Curb Records, 1996)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘You & You Alone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1998) included the following:

Eddie Bayers, Paul Leim and Lonnie Wilson (drums)
Larry Beiard and Larry Byrom (acoustic guitar)
Mike Brignardello, Michael Rhodes (Wednesday 16 September 1953 – Saturday 4 March 2023) and Glenn Worf (bass guitar)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Paul Franklin and Sonny Garrish (steel guitar, Dobro)
Vince Gill, Alison Krauss, Melba MontgomeryJohn Wesley Ryles, Leslie Satcher, Curtis Wright and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle, mandolin)
Jeff King (electric guitar)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Brent Mason (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Steve Nathan (keyboards, piano, Hammond B-3 organ)
Matt Rollings (piano, Hammond B-3 organ)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Patrick (Wayne) Swayze (Monday 18 August 1952 – Monday 14 September 2009) (background vocals on ‘I Did My Part’)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)
Dan Tyminski (background vocals, vibraphone)

Randy Travis’ ‘You & You Alone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1998) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1998, and No.49 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1998.


On Tuesday 22 September 1998, Columbia Records released ‘A Tribute To Tradition’ (Columbia Records, 1998), a various artists collection, which was dedicated to traditional country music, and included the following tracks:

‘Stand By Your Man’, which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998)
/ this track was performed by The Chicks

‘Mama Tried’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
/ this track was performed by Randy Travis

‘Wine, Women & Song’ (written by Betty Sue Perry)
/ this track was performed by Patty Loveless

‘I Never Go Around Mirrors’, which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 – Saturday 19 July 1975) and Sanger D. ‘Whitey’ Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 – Saturday 12 January 2019)
 / this track was performed by Trace Adkins

‘Oh, Lonesome Me’, which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 – Monday 17 November 2003)
/ this track was performed by Mary Chapin Carpenter

‘Behind Closed Doors’, which was written by Kenny O’Dell (born Kenneth Gist Jr.) (Wednesday 21 June 1944 – Monday 27 March 2018)
 / this track was performed by Joe Diffie (Sunday 28 December 1958 – Sunday 29 March 2020) / this track reached No.64 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1998 based on unsolicited airplay

‘She’s Actin’ Single (I’m Drinkin’ Doubles)’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015)
/ this track was performed by Wade Hayes

‘Til I Can Make It On My Own’, which was written by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 – Saturday 31 July 2010), Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998)
/ this track was performed by Martina McBride

‘Cold, Cold Heart’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
/ this track was performed by Collin Raye

‘The Three Bells’ (written by Bert Reisfeld and Jean Villard)
/ this track was performed by Alison Krauss

‘City Lights’ (written by Bill Anderson)
/ this track was performed by Rick Trevino

‘Honky Tonk Heroes (Like Me)’, which was written by Billy Joe Shaver (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Wednesday 28 October 2020)
 / this track was performed by Joe Diffie (Sunday 28 December 1958 – Sunday 29 March 2020) and Collin Raye

‘Gone Out of My Mind’, which was written by Eugene David Dobbins (Monday 19 March 1934 – Sunday 23 November 2008), Mike Huffman and Bob Morrison
 / this track was performed by Doug Stone

‘Same Old Train’ (written by Chris Austin and Greg Barnhill)
/ this track, which was performed by Clint Black, Joe Diffie (Sunday 28 December 1958 – Sunday 29 March 2020), Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016), Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, Patty Loveless, Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 – Wednesday 28 March 2012), Ricky Skaggs, Marty Stuart and Randy Travis, reached No.59 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1998, and won the 1999 Grammy Award for ‘Best Country Collaboration With Vocals’ for all the artists involved


Randy Travis: 'A Man Ain't Made of Stone' (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1999)

On Tuesday 21 September 1999, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘A Man Ain’t Made of Stone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1999), which was produced by Byron Gallimore, James Stroud and Randy Travis, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘A Man Ain’t Made of Stone’ (written by Gary Burr, Robin Lerner and Franne Golde) (No.16, 1999)

‘Where Can I Surrender’ (written by Rock Killough)
(No.48, 2000)

‘A Little Left of Center’ (written by Billy Henderson and Steven Dale Jones)
(No.54, 2000)

‘I’ll Be Right Here Loving You’ (written by Jeffrey Steele and T.W. Hale)
(No.68, 2000) / this track was also recorded by Rhett Akins, who included it on ‘What Livin’s All About’ (MCA Nashville Records, 1998)

Randy Travis’ ‘A Man Ain’t Made of Stone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1999) also included the following tracks:

‘A Little Bitty Crack In Her Heart’ (written by Shawn Camp and Jim Rushing) / this track was also recorded by Sammy Kershaw, who included it on ‘Politics, Religion & Her’ (Mercury Records, 1996)

‘The Family Bible & The Farmer’s Almanac’ (written by Bob Regan and Lee Thomas Miller)


‘A Heartache In The Works’ (written by Chet Biggers and Melba Montgomery)


‘No Reason To Change’, which was written by Troy Seals and Mentor Williams (Tuesday 11 June 1946 – Wednesday 16 November 2016)


‘Once You’ve Heard The Truth’ (written by Leslie Satcher and Chuck Jones)


‘In A Heart Like Mine’ (written by Skip Ewing and Donny Kees)


‘Day One’, which was written by Jimmy Yeary and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004)


‘Thirteen Mile Goodbye’ (written by Gary Burr and Gerry House)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘A Man Ain’t Made of Stone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1999) included the following:

Michael Black, Carol Chase, Tabitha Fair, John Wesley Ryles, Lisa Silver, Russell Terrell, Cindy Richardson-Walker and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Mike Brignardello (bass guitar)
Paul Franklin and Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle, mandolin)
Paul Leim (drums)
Jerry McPherson, Brent Mason and Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Matt Rollings and Gary Smith (keyboards, piano)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)
Biff Watson (acoustic guitar)

Randy Travis’ ‘A Man Ain’t Made of Stone’ (DreamWorks Records Nashville, 1999) reached No.15 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1999, No.130 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1999, and No.11 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1999.


Randy Travis: 'Inspirational Journey' (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2000)

On Tuesday 24 October 2000, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Inspirational Journey’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2000), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘Baptism’ (written by Mickey Cates) (No.75, 2000) / this track, which was a duet with Kenny Chesney, was also included on Kenny Chesney’s ‘Everywhere We Go’ ( Records, 1999), but is featured on ‘Inspirational Journey’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2000) as a solo by Randy Travis

Randy Travis’ ‘Inspirational Journey’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2000) also which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included the following tracks:

‘Shallow Water’ (written by Tom Kimmel)

‘Which Way Will You Choose?’ (written by Ron Block)


‘Doctor Jesus’ (written by Tony Stampley and Justin Bolen)
/ this track was also recorded by Ken Mellons, who included it on ‘Where Forever Begins’ (Epic Records, 1995)

‘Drive Another Nail’ (written by Marty Raybon and Michael A. Curtis)


‘See Myself In You’ (written by Tom Kimmel and Tom Prasada-Rao)


‘Feet On The Rock’ (written by Troy Seals and Buck Moore)


‘Don’t Ever Sell Your Saddle’, which was written by Kim Chadwick Tribble (Wednesday 14 November 1951 – Thursday 26 August 2021) and Bobby Whiteside


‘The Carpenter’, which was written by Randy Travis, Ron Avis (passed away on Monday 20 February 2023) and Chip Taylor
/ this track featured guest vocals from Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 – Wednesday 13 February 2002) and Jessi Colter

‘Walk With Me’ (written by Randy Travis and Les Bohan)


‘I Am Going’ (written by Randy Travis and Buck Moore)


‘Amazing Grace’, which was written by John Newton (24 July 1725 – 21 December 1807)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘Inspirational Journey’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2000) included the following:

Larry Byrom, Mark Casstevens and Fred Tackett (acoustic guitar)
Kevin Carroll, Thom Flora, Calvin Settles, Odessa Settles, Shirley Settles, Lisa Silver and Cindy Richardson-Walker (background vocals)
Jessi Colter and Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 – Wednesday 13 February 2002) (vocals on ‘The Carpenter’)
Jim Cox (keyboards)
Sonny Garrish, Doyle Grisham and Robby Turner (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
David Hungate and Glenn Worf (bass guitar)
Jason Lehning (omnichord)
Paul Leim (drums)
Chris Leuzinger, Brent Mason and Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) (electric guitar)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 – Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica, percussion)
Steve Nathan (piano)
Hank Singer (fiddle, mandolin)
Marty Stuart (mandolin)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)

Randy Travis’ ‘Inspirational Journey’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2000) reached No.34 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2000.


Paul Overstreet recorded Randy Travis’ ‘How Do I Wrap My Heart Up For Christmas’ (co-written with Paul Overstreet) and included the track on ‘Christmas, My Favourite Time of The Year’ (Scarlet Moon Records, 2001).


In 2001, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘America Will Always Stand’, a non-album track, which reached No.59 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart.


Various Artists: 'Celebration of Country' (Music For Little People & Rhino Records, 2001)

On Tuesday 7 August 2001, Music For Little People & Rhino Records released ‘Celebration of Country’ (Music For Little People & Rhino Records, 2001), a various artists compilation, which was produced by Lisa Silver; one of the included tracks was ‘The Nature of Things’ (written by Lisa Silver), which featured vocals from Randy Travis, along with Lisa Silver on fiddle and background vocals.


On Tuesday 15 October 2002, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Rise & Shine’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2002), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘Three Wooden Crosses’, which was written by Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016) and Doug Johnson (No.1 for one week in May 2003) / this track also reached No.31 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 2003

‘Pray For The Fish’ (written by Phillip Moore, Dan Murph and Ray Scott)
(No.48, 2003)

Randy Travis’ ‘Rise and Shine’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2002) also included the following tracks:

‘Raise Him Up’ (written by Robb Royer and Rivers Rutherford)

‘Rise and Shine’ (written by Randy Travis and Michael Curtis)


‘When Mama Prayed’ (written by
Paul Overstreet and Rory Lee Feek)

‘I’m Ready’, which was written by Randy Travis and Ron Avis (passed away on Monday 20 February 2023)


‘That’s Jesus’ (written by Randy Travis and Michael Curtis)


Jerusalem’s Cry’ (written by Randy Travis, Lance Dary and Pastor Matthew Hagee)


‘Keep Your Lure In The Water’ (written by Randy Travis, Michael Curtis and Pastor Jeff Perry)


‘If You Only Knew’ (written by Rob Mathes and Phil Naish)


‘Everywhere We Go’ (written by Randy Travis and Michael Curtis)


‘The Gift’ (written by Ray Scott and Philip Moore)


‘Valley of Pain’ (written by Rob Mathes and Allen Shamblin)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘Rise and Shine’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2002) included the following:

Larry Beaird, Pat Flynn and Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) (acoustic guitar)
Eric Darken and Nina Rodriguez (percussion)
Dan Dugmore, Paul Franklin and Doyle Grisham (pedal steel guitar)
Steve Gibson (electric guitar, mandolin)
Pastor Matthew Hagee, Sandra Hagee, Vicki Hampton, Wes Hightower, Christina Ketterling, Lisa Silver and Cindy Walker (background vocals)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
David Hungate (bass guitar)
John Barlow Jarvis (piano)
John Jorgenson and Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Paul Leim (drums)
Gordon Mote (keyboards)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)
String section on ‘If You Only Knew’: Carl Gorodetzky, Pamela Sixfin, Lee Larrison, David Davidson and Conni Ellisor (violins), Kris Wilkinson and Gary Vanosdale (violas), and Robert Mason (cello) / strings arranged by Bergen White

Randy Travis’ ‘Rise and Shine’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2002) reached No.73 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2002, No.1 on the Billboard Top Christian Albums Chart in 2002, and No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2002.


Randy Travis: 'Worship & Faith' (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2003)

On Tuesday 11 November 2003, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Worship & Faith’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2003), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included one track, which was released as a single on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘Above All’ (written by Paul Baloche and Lenny LeBlanc) / this track was released as a single in 2003, but it did not chart

Randy Travis’ ‘Worship & Faith’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2003) also included the following tracks:

‘He’s My Rock, My Sword, My Shield’ (traditional)
‘Farther Along’ (written by J.R. Baxter and W.B. Stevens)
‘How Great Thou Art’, which was written by Stuart Wesley Keene Hine (25 July 1899 – Tuesday 14 March 1989)
‘Just A Closer Walk With Thee’ (traditional)
‘Shall We Gather At The River?’ (written by Robert Lowry)
‘You Are Worthy of My Praise’ (written by David Ruis)
‘Love Lifted Me’ (written by James Rowe and Howard Smith)
‘Softly & Tenderly’ (written by Will L. Thompson)
‘Sweet By & By’ (written by Sanford Filmore Bennett and Joseph Philbrock Webster)
‘Blessed Assurance’ (written by Fanny J. Crosby and Phoebe Knapp)
‘I’ll Fly Away’, which was written by Albert Edward Brumley (Sunday 29 October 1905 – Tuesday 15 November 1977)
‘Turn Your Radio On’, which was written by Albert Edward Brumley (Sunday 29 October 1905 – Tuesday 15 November 1977)
‘Open The Eyes of My Heart’ (written by Paul Baloche)
‘In The Garden’, which was written by Charles Austin Miles (7 January 1868 – Sunday 10 March 1946)
‘Will The Circle Be Unbroken?’ (written by Charles Gabriel and Ada R. Habershon)
‘We Fall Down’ (written by Chris Tomlin)
‘Peace In The Valley’ (written by Rev. Thomas A. Dorsey)
‘The Unclouded Day’ (written by Josiah K. Alwood)
‘Room At The Cross For You’ (written by Ira Stanphill)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘Worship & Faith’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2003) included the following:

John Anderson, Billy Davis, Chip Davis, Pastor Matthew Hagee, Sandra Hagee, Wes Hightower, Christina Ketterling, Liana Manis, Mac Powell and Joy Lynn White (background vocals)
David Angell and David Davidson (violin)
Larry Beaird and Mark Lusk (acoustic guitar)
Dennis Crouch (upright bass)
Eric Darken (percussion, handclapping)
Nirva Dorsaint and Krystle Ochsner (soprano vocals)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro)
Craig Duncan (Hammer Dulcimer)
Jason Eskridge and Craig Watkins (tenor vocals)
Typharee Fitzgerald, Sharese ‘Reecy’ Jackson and Cynthia Matthews (alto vocals)
Larry Franklin (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (pedabro)
Tony Harrell (accordion, harmonium)
Don Hart (string arrangements)
Kirk ‘Jelly Roll’ Johnson (harmonica)
Anthony LaMarchina (cello)
Paige Lackey Martin (soprano vocals)
Brent Mason (acoustic guitar, gut string guitar, soloist)
John Mock (bodhrán, concertina, tin whistle)
Shannon Sanders (choir arrangements, tenor vocals)
Bryan Sutton (banjo, acoustic guitar, mandolin)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)
Kristin Wilkinson (viola)
Casey Wood (handclapping)

Randy Travis’ ‘Worship & Faith’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2003) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Christian Albums Chart in 2003, No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2003, and No.90 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2003.

Randy Travis’ ‘Worship & Faith’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2003) was recorded ‘live’ in concert at Orlando Calvary Assembly of God in Orlando, Florida, in July 2003.


Randy Travis: 'The Very Best of Randy Travis' (Warner Bros. Nashville Records, 2004)

On Tuesday 3 August 2004, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘The Very Best of Randy Travis’ (Warner Bros. Nashville Records, 2004), which included the following tracks:

‘Diggin’ Up Bones’, which was written by Al Gore, Paul Overstreet and Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 – Wednesday 24 August 1988) (No.1 for one week in November 1986)

‘On The Other Hand’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
(No.67, 1985) / this track, upon its re-release, was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in July / August 1986)

‘Forever & Ever, Amen’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
(No.1 for three weeks in June / July 1987)

‘Too Gone Too Long’, which was written by Gene Pistilli (Thursday 27 March 1947 – Tuesday 26 December 2017)
(No.1 for one week in March 1988)

‘I Told You So’ (written by Randy Travis)
 (No.1 for two weeks in June 1988)

‘I Won’t Need You Anymore (Always & Forever)’, which was written by Troy Seals and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004)
 (No.1 for one week in November 1987)

‘Honky Tonk Moon’ (written by Dennis O’Rourke)
(No.1 for one week in October 1988)

‘Deeper Than The Holler’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
(No.1 for one week in January / February 1989)

‘Is It Still Over’, which was written by Ken Bell and Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 – Thursday 18 December 2014)
 (No.1 for one week in May 1989)

‘It’s Just A Matter of Time’, which was written by Brook Benton (Saturday 19 September 1931 – Saturday 9 April 1988), Belford Hendricks (Tuesday 11 May 1909 – Saturday 24 September 1977) and Clyde Otis (Thursday 11 September 1924 – Tuesday 8 January 2008)
(No.1 for one week in December 1989)

‘Hard Rock Bottom of Your Heart’ (written by Hugh Prestwood)
(No.1 for four weeks in March 1990)

‘He Walked On Water’ (written by Allen Shamblin)
(No.2, 1990)

‘Heroes & Friends’ (written by Randy Travis and Don Schlitz)
(No.3, 1991)

‘Forever Together’ (written by Randy Travis and Alan Jackson)
(No.1, 1991)

‘Better Class of Losers’ (written by Randy Travis and Alan Jackson)
(No.2, 1991)

‘I’m Gonna Have A Little Talk With Jesus’ (written by Don Schlitz and Randy Travis)
/ this track, which featured guest vocals from Take 6, was an album track, which was originally included on Randy Travis’ ‘High Lonesome’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1991)

‘If I Didn’t Have You’, which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004) and Skip Ewing 
(No.1, 1992)

‘Look Heart, No Hands’, which was written by Trey Bruce and Russell Smith (Friday 17 June 1949 – Friday 12 July 2019)
(No.1 for two weeks in January 1993)

‘Whisper My Name’ (written by Trey Bruce)
(No.1, 1994)

‘Three Wooden Crosses’, which was written by Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016) and Doug Johnson
 (No.1 for one week in May 2003) / this track also reached No.31 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 2003

Randy Travis’ ‘The Very Best of Randy Travis’ (Warner Bros. Nashville Records, 2004) reached No.10 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2004, and No.80 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2004.


Randy Travis: 'Passing Through' (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2004)

On Tuesday 9 November 2004, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Passing Through’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2004), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘Four Walls’ (written by Don Rollins, Harry Stinson and D. Vincent Williams) (No.46, 2004) / this track was recorded in September 2001 at Sound Emporium in Nashville

‘Angels’ (written by Buck Moore, Troy Seals and Harvey McNalley)
(No.48, 2004) / this track was recorded in June 2004 at Cartee Day Studios in Nashville

Randy Travis’ ‘Passing Through’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2004) also included the following tracks:

‘Pick Up The Oars & Row’, which was written by Jamie O’Hara (Friday 18 August 1950 – Thursday 7 January 2021) / this track was recorded in September 2001 at Sound Emporium in Nashville

‘That Was Us’ (written by Tony Lane and Craig Wiseman)
/ this track was recorded in September 2001 at Sound Emporium in Nashville / the original version of this track was recorded by Tracy Lawrence, who included it on ‘Tracy Lawrence’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2001)

‘Running Blind’ (written by Roger D. Ferris)
/ this track was recorded in June 2004 at Cartee Day Studios in Nashville

‘My Daddy Never Was’ (written by Tony Lane)
/ this track was recorded in September 2001 at Sound Emporium in Nashville

‘A Place To Hang My Hat’ (written by Shawn CampByron Hill and Brice Long)
/ this track was recorded in June 2004 at Cartee Day Studios in Nashville

‘Right On Time’ (written by Al Anderson and Sharon Vaughn)
this track was recorded in June 2004 at Cartee Day Studios in Nashville

‘My Poor Old Heart’ (written by Shawn Camp and Gary Harrison)
/ this track was recorded in June 2004 at Cartee Day Studios in Nashville

‘I’m Your Man’ (written by Randy Travis)
/ this track was recorded in June 2004 at Cartee Day Studios in Nashville

‘Train Long Gone’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006)
 / this track was recorded in September 2001 at Sound Emporium in Nashville

‘I Can See It In Your Eyes’ (written by Randy Travis and Pastor Matthew Hagee)
/ this track was recorded in June 2004 at Cartee Day Studios in Nashville

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘Passing Through’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2004) included the following:

Al Anderson (acoustic guitar, electric guitar, soloist)
Larry Beaird and Pat Flynn (acoustic guitar)
Eric Darken (percussion)
Dan Dugmore (acoustic guitar, electric guitar, pedal steel guitar)
Larry Franklin (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (pedal steel guitar)
Steve Gibson (acoustic guitar, electric guitar, gut string guitar)
Vicki Hampton, Wes Hightower, Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006)Lisa Silver and Cindy Richardson-Walker (background vocals)
Tony Harrell (Hammond B-3 organ)
Johnny Hiland, Kyle Lehning and Brent Mason (electric guitar)
David Hungate (bass guitar, upright bass)
John Barlow Jarvis (Hammond B-3 organ, piano, electric piano, Wurlitzer)
John Jorgenson (electric guitar, slide guitar)
Viktor Krauss (upright bass)
Paul Leim (drums)
Charlie McCoy (bass harmonica, harmonica)
Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021) (drums, bells, tambourine)
Gordon Mote (piano)
Matt Rollings (Juno synthesizer, Hammond B-3 organ)
Bryan Sutton (acoustic guitar, resonator guitar)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)
Casey Wood (bass drum, tambourine)

Randy Travis’ ‘Passing Through’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2004) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Christian Albums Chart in 2004, No.23 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2004, and No.127 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2004.

In 2005, Randy Travis’ ‘Passing Through’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2004) won a Dove Award for ‘Country Album of The Year’ at the 36th GMA Dove Awards.


Randy Travis: 'Glory Train: Songs of Faith, Worship & Praise' (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2004)

On Tuesday 25 October 2005, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Glory Train: Songs of Faith, Worship & Praise’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2004), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included the following tracks:

‘This Train’ (written by Sister Rosetta Tharpe)
‘Swing Down Chariot’ (traditional)
‘Precious Memories’ (written by Sister Rosetta Tharpe)
‘Shout To The Lord’ (written by Darlene Zschech)
‘Down By The Riverside’ (written by Sister Rosetta Tharpe)
Nothing But The Blood’ (written by Robert Lowry)
‘Were You There?’ (traditional)
‘Up Above My Head (I Hear Music In The Air)’ (written by Sister Rosetta Tharpe)
‘He’s Got The Whole World In His Hands’ (traditional)
‘Heart of Worship’ (written by Matt Redman)
‘Jesus On The Main Line’ (traditional)
‘Through The Fire’ (written by Gerald Crabb)
‘Here I Am To Worship’ (written by Tim Hughes)
‘Oh, Death’ (written by Gerald Crabb)
‘Nobody Knows, Nobody Cares’ (written by Sister Rosetta Tharpe)
‘Since Jesus Came Into My Heart’ (written by Charles H. Gabriel and Rufus H. Gabriel)
‘Oh, How I Love Jesus’ (written by Frederick Whitfield)
‘Are You Washed In The Blood’ (traditional)
‘Precious Lord, Take My Hand’ (written by Thomas A. Dorsey)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘Glory Train: Songs of Faith, Worship & Praise’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2004) included the following:

Al Anderson and Larry Beaird (acoustic guitar)
The Blind Boys of Alabama, Sidney Cox, Suzanne Cox, The Crabb Family, Billy Davis, Chip Davis, Pastor Matthew Hagee, Vicki Hampton, Wes Hightower, Christina Ketterling, Lisa Silver and Cindy Richardson-Walker (background vocals)
Dennis Crouch (upright bass)
Eric Darken (bells, cajón, chimes, clay drums, cymbals, djembe, bass drum, snare drum, hand drums, jews harp, shaker, tambourine, timpani, vibraphone)
Craig Duncan (Hammer Dulcimer)
Connie Ellisor and Pam Sixfin (violin)
Larry Franklin (fiddle, mandolin)
Paul Franklin (pedabro)
Carl Gorodetzky (string contractor, violin)
Jim Grosjean and Kris Wilkinson (viola)
Tony Harrell (accordion, harmonium)
Kirk ‘Jelly Roll’ Johnson (harmonica, bass harmonica)
Randy Kohrs (Dobro)
Anthony LaMarchina (cello)
Brent Mason (acoustic guitar, gut string guitar)
Bryan Sutton (Archguitar, banjo, 12-string guitar, acoustic guitar, resonator guitar, hi-string acoustic guitar, mandolin, soloist)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)
Bergen White (string arrangements)
Casey Wood (bells, snare drum, hi-hat, tambourine)

Randy Travis’ ‘Glory Train: Songs of Faith, Worship & Praise’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2004) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Christian Albums Chart in 2005, No.28 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2005, and No.128 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2005.

In 2006, Randy Travis’ ‘Glory Train: Songs of Faith, Worship & Praise’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2004) won a Dove Award for ‘Country Album of The Year’ at the 37th GMA Dove Awards.


Daryle Singletary: 'Straight From The Heart' (Shanachie Records, 2007)

Daryle Singletary (Wednesday 10 March 1971 – Monday 12 February 2018) recorded Randy Travis’ ‘Promises’ (co-written with John Lindley) and included the track on ‘Straight From The Heart’ (Shanachie Records, 2007).


Randy Travis: 'Songs of The Season' (Word Records, 2007)

On Sunday 25 September 2007, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Songs of The Season’ (Word Records, 2007), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included the following tracks:

‘(There’s No Place Like) Home For The Holidays’ (written by Robert Allen and Al Stillman)
‘Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas’ (written by Ralph Blane and Hugh Martin)
‘O, Holy Night’ (written by Adolphe Adam and John Sullivan Dwight)
‘Go Tell It On The Mountain’ (traditional / written by John Wesley Work Jr.)
‘Labor of Love’ (written by Andrew Peterson)
‘Angels We Have Heard On High’ (public domain)
‘Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!’, which was written by Sammy Cahn (Wednesday 18 June 1913 – Friday 15 January 1993) and Jule Styne (Sunday 31 December 1905 – Tuesday 20 September 1994)
‘Away In A Manger’ (written by William J. Kirkpatrick)
‘O Little Town of Bethlehem’ (public domain)
‘Nothin’s Gonna Bring Me Down (At Christmas Time)’ (written by Pat Alger)
‘The First Noel’ (written by William J. Kirkpatrick)
‘Joy To The World’ (written by George Frideric Handel and Isaac Watts)
‘Our King’ (written by Randy Travis)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘Songs of The Season’ (Word Records, 2007) included the following:

Pat Bergeson (acoustic guitar, electric guitar, harmonica)
Dan Dugmore (Dobro, acoustic guitar, pedal steel guitar)
Larry Franklin (fiddle, mandolin)
Steve Gibson (acoustic guitar)
Carl Gorodetzky (string contractor)
Tony Harrell (Fender Rhodes, harmonium, Hammond organ)
Wes Hightower, Sherilynn Huffman, Ann McCrary, Regina McCrary, Lisa Silver and Diane Vanette (background vocals)
David Hungate (bass guitar)
Shane Keister (Hammond organ, piano, electric piano)
Keith Nicholas (cello)
Paul Leim (drums)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
The Nashville String Machine (strings)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)
Bergen White (string arrangements, conductor)
Casey Wood (bells, cymbals, Fender Rhodes, electric piano, shaker, sleigh bells, tambourine, triangle, vibraphone)

Randy Travis’ ‘Songs of The Season’ (Word Records, 2007) reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Christian Albums Chart in 2007, No.26 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2007, No.131 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2007, and No.9 on the Billboard Top Holiday Albums Chart in 2007.


Randy Travis: 'Around The Bend' (Warner Bros. Nashville Records, 2008)

On Tuesday 15 July 2008, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Around The Bend’ (Warner Bros. Nashville Records, 2008), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included three tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘Faith In You’ (written by Tom Douglas, Joe Henry and Matt Rollings) / this track was released as a single in 2008, but it did not chart

‘Dig Two Graves’ (written by Ashley Gorley and Bob Regan)
/ this track, which was released as a single in 2008, but did not chart, was nominated as ‘Best Country Song’ at the 51st Grammy Awards

‘Turn It Around’ (written by Noah Gordon and Matt Kennon)
/ this track was released as a single in 2008, but it did not chart

Randy Travis’ ‘Around The Bend’ (Warner Bros. Nashville Records, 2008) also included the following tracks:

‘Around The Bend’ (written by Tania Hancheroff, Marcus Hummon and Tia Sillers)
‘You Didn’t Have A Good Time’ (written by Kris Bergsnes, Jason Matthews and Jim McCormick)
‘Every Head Bowed’ (written by Brent Baxter and Brandon Kinney)
‘Love Is A Gamble’ (written by Hugh Prestwood)
‘Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right’ (written by Bob Dylan)

‘From Your Knees’ (written by Leslie Satcher and John Conlee)
/ this track was also recorded by John Conlee, who included it on ‘Classics’ (RCR Records, 2003)

‘Everything That I Own (Has Got A Dent)’ (written by Tony Martin and Mark Nesler)

‘Til I’m Dead & Gone’ (written by Shawn Camp, John Scott Sherrill and Sarah Siskind)

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘Around The Bend’ (Warner Bros. Nashville Records, 2008) included the following:

Dan Dugmore (pedal steel guitar)
Larry Franklin (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (fiddle, pedal steel guitar)
Carl Gorodetzky (string contractor)
Tania Hancheroff, Wes Hightower, Sherilynn Huffman, Dan Seals (Sunday 8 February 1948 – Wednesday 25 March 2009), Lisa Silver and Dianne Vanette (background vocals)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle, mandolin)
David Hungate (bass guitar)
Rob Ickes (Dobro)
Paul Leim (drums)
Brent Mason (12-string electric guitar, electric guitar)
Gordon Mote (Hammond organ, piano, Wurlitzer)
The Nashville String Machine (strings)
Steve Nathan (Hammond organ, piano, Wurlitzer)
Bryan Sutton (banjo, acoustic guitar, hi-string guitar, mandolin)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)
Bergen White (conductor, string arrangements)
Casey Wood (cymbals, shaker, tambourine)

Randy Travis’ ‘Around The Bend’ (Warner Bros. Nashville Records, 2008) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2008, and No.14 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2008.

Randy Travis’ ‘Around The Bend’ (Warner Bros. Nashville Records, 2008) won a Dove Award for ‘Country Album of The Year’ at the 40th GMA Dove Awards, and was nominated for ‘Best Country Album’ at the 51st Grammy Awards.


Randy Travis: 'I Told You So: The Ultimate Hits of Randy Travis' (Warner Bros. Nashville Records, 2009)

On Tuesday 17 March 2009, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘I Told You So: The Ultimate Hits of Randy Travis’ (Warner Bros. Nashville Records, 2009), which included the following tracks:

Disc One
‘Diggin’ Up Bones’, which was written by Al Gore, Paul Overstreet and Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 – Wednesday 24 August 1988)
(No.1 for one week in November 1986)

‘Forever & Ever, Amen’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
(No.1 for three weeks in June / July 1987)

‘I Told You So’ (written by Randy Travis)
 (No.1 for two weeks in June 1988)

‘He Walked On Water’ (written by Allen Shamblin)
(No.2, 1990)

‘Promises’ (written by John Lindley and Randy Travis)
(No.17, 1989)

‘Three Wooden Crosses’, which was written by Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016) and Doug Johnson
 (No.1 for one week in May 2003) / this track also reached No.31 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 2003

‘Deeper Than The Holler’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
(No.1 for one week in January / February 1989)

‘On The Other Hand’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
(No.67, 1985) / this track, upon its re-release, was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in July / August 1986

‘Too Gone Too Long’, which was written by Gene Pistilli (Thursday 27 March 1947 – Tuesday 26 December 2017)
(No.1 for one week in March 1988)

‘We’re Strangers Again’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Leona Williams (No.49, 1991) / this track, which was a duet with Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 – Monday 6 April 1998), was originally included on Randy Travis’ ‘Heroes & Friends’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1990)

‘Look Heart, No Hands’, which was written by Trey Bruce and Russell Smith (Friday 17 June 1949 – Friday 12 July 2019)
(No.1 for two weeks in January 1993)

‘1982’ (written by Buddy Blackmon and Vip Vipperman)
 (No.6, 1985)

‘Better Class of Losers’ (written by Randy Travis and Alan Jackson)
(No.2, 1991)

‘I Won’t Need You Anymore (Always & Forever)’, which was written by Troy Seals and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004)
 (No.1 for one week in November 1987)

‘Faith In You’ (written by Tom Douglas, Joe Henry and Matt Rollings)
/ this track was released as a single in 2008, but it did not chart

‘Love’s Alive & Well’ (written by Steve Jones and John Scott Sherrill)
/ this track was previously included on the ‘Four Walls’ EP (extended play) disc

Disc Two
‘Honky Tonk Moon’ (written by Dennis O’Rourke)
(No.1 for one week in October 1988)

‘Would I’ (written by Mark Winchester)
(No.25, 1996)

‘It’s Just A Matter of Time’, which was written by Brook Benton (Saturday 19 September 1931 – Saturday 9 April 1988), Belford Hendricks (Tuesday 11 May 1909 – Saturday 24 September 1977) and Clyde Otis (Thursday 11 September 1924 – Tuesday 8 January 2008)
(No.1 for one week in December 1989)

‘Forever Together’ (written by Randy Travis and Alan Jackson)
(No.1, 1991)

‘No Place Like Home’ (written by Paul Overstreet)
(No.2, 1986)

‘A Few Ole Country Boys’, which was written by Troy Seals and Mentor Williams (Tuesday 11 June 1946 – Wednesday 16 November 2016)
(No.8, 1990) / this track was a duet with George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013)

‘Is It Still Over’, which was written by Ken Bell and Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 – Thursday 18 December 2014)
 (No.1 for one week in May 1989)

‘Whisper My Name’ (written by Trey Bruce)
(No.1, 1994)

‘Before You Kill Us All’ (written by Max T. Barnes and Keith Follesé)
(No.2, 1994)

‘Heroes & Friends’ (written by Randy Travis and Don Schlitz)
(No.3, 1991)

‘This Is Me’ (written by Tom Shapiro and Thom McHugh)
(No.5, 1994)

‘King of The Road’, which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 – Sunday 25 October 1992)
(No.51, 1997) / Randy Travis’ version of this track was also featured on the soundtrack of the 1997 film, ‘Traveller’

‘The Box’ (written by Randy Travis and Buck Moore)
(No.8, 1995)

‘Are We In Trouble Now’ (written by Mark Knopfler)
(No.24, 1996)

‘Turn It Around’ (written by Noah Gordon and Matt Kennon)
/ this track was released as a single in 2008, but it did not chart

‘You Ain’t Right’ (written by Kelley Lovelace, Phil O’Donnell and Tim Owens)
/ this track was previously unreleased

Randy Travis’ ‘I Told You So: The Ultimate Hits of Randy Travis’ (Warner Bros. Nashville Records, 2009) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2009, and No.21 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2009.


Randy Travis: 'Three Wooden Crosses: The Inspirational Hits of Randy Travis' (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2009)

On Tuesday 17 March 2009, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Three Wooden Crosses: The Inspirational Hits of Randy Travis’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2009), which included the following tracks:

‘Three Wooden Crosses’, which was written by Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016) and Doug Johnson (No.1 for one week in May 2003) / this track also reached No.31 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 2003

‘Four Walls’ (written by Don Rollins, Harry Stinson and D. Vincent Williams)


‘Angels’ (written by Harvey McNalley, Buck Moore and Troy Seals)


‘Just A Closer Walk With Thee’
(traditional)

‘In The Garden’, which was written by Charles Austin Miles (7 January 1868 – Sunday 10 March 1946)

‘Faith In You’ (written by Tom Douglas, Joe Henry and Matt Rollings)
/ this track was released as a single in 2008, but it did not chart

‘Love Lifted Me’ (written by James Rowe and Howard Smith)

‘Blessed Assurance’ (written by Fanny J. Crosby and Phoebe Knapp)

‘Softly & Tenderly’ (written by Will L. Thompson)

‘Raise Him Up’ (written by Robb Royer and Rivers Rutherford)

‘He’s My Rock, My Sword, My Shield’
(traditional)

‘Sweet By & By’ (written by Sanford Filmore Bennett and Joseph Philbrock Webster)

‘Everywhere We Go’ (written by Randy Travis and Michael Curtis)

‘Rise and Shine’ (written by Randy Travis and Michael Curtis)

‘Were You There?’
(traditional)

‘He’s Got The Whole World In His Hands’
(traditional)

‘Shall We Gather At The River?’ (written by Robert Lowry)

‘Pray For The Fish’ (written by Phillip Moore, Dan Murph and Ray Scott)
(No.48, 2003)

‘Swing Down Sweet Chariot’
(traditional)

‘Will The Circle Be Unbroken?’ (written by Charles Gabriel and Ada R. Habershon)

Randy Travis’ ‘Three Wooden Crosses: The Inspirational Hits of Randy Travis’ (Word Records / Warner Bros. Records / Curb Records, 2009) reached No.16 on the Billboard Top Christian Albums Chart in 2009, and No.31 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2009.


Randy Travis: 'I'll Fly Away' (Warner Bros. Records, 2010)

On Tuesday 24 August 2010, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘I’ll Fly Away’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2010), which included the following tracks:

‘I’ll Fly Away’, which was written by Albert Edward Brumley (Sunday 29 October 1905 – Tuesday 15 November 1977)
‘Sweet By & By’ (written by Randy Travis)
‘Nothing But The Blood’ (written by Elisha A. Hoffman)

‘Will The Circle Be Unbroken?’
‘Jesus On The Mainline’
‘The Unclouded Day’ (written by Josiah K. Alwood)
‘Since Jesus Came Into My Heart’ (written by Rufus H. McDaniel)

‘Are You Washed In The Blood?’ (written by Elisha A. Hoffman)
‘Down By The Riverside’ (written by Sister Rosetta Tharpe)
‘Go Tell It On The Mountain’ (written by John W. Work II)

‘Shall We Gather At The River?’ (written by Randy Travis)
‘Swing Down Chariot’ (written by Rufus H. McDaniel)
‘He’s My Rock, My Sword, My Shield’ (traditional)
‘This Train’ (written by Sister Rosetta Tharpe)

‘Three Wooden Crosses’, which was written by Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 – Thursday 11 February 2016) and Doug Johnson
 (No.1 for one week in May 2003) / this track also reached No.31 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 2003


Randy Travis: '25th Anniversary Celebration' (Warner Bros. Records, 2011)
Randy Travis: 'Storms of Life' (Warner Bros. Records, 1986)

On Tuesday 7 June 2011, Randy Travis saw the release of ’25th Anniversary Celebration’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2011), which was produced by Kyle Lehning; the album, which was released to celebrate 25 years since the release of Randy Travis’ debut album, ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986), included the following tracks:

‘Everything & All’ (written by Troy Jones) / this track, which featured guest vocals from Brad Paisley, was released as a single on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2011, but it did not chart

‘A Few Ole Country Boys’, which was written by Troy Seals and Mentor Williams (Tuesday 11 June 1946 – Wednesday 16 November 2016)
 / this track featured guest vocals from Jamey Johnson / the original version of this track was included on Randy Travis’ ‘Heroes & Friends’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1990), was a duet with George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013), and reached No.8 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1990

‘Forever & Ever, Amen’ (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
 / this track featured guest vocals from
 Zac Brown Band / the original version of this track was included on Randy Travis’ ‘Always & Forever’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1987), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for three weeks in June / July 1987

‘He Walked On Water’ (written by Allen Shamblin)
(No.2, 1990) / this track featured guest vocals from Kenny Chesney / the original version of this track was included on Randy Travis’ ‘No Holdin’ Back’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1989), and reached No.2 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1990

‘T.I.M.E’ (written by Tim Menzies and Roger Springer)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Josh Turner

‘Love Looks Good On You’ (written by Hillary Lindsey and Gordie Sampson)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Kristin Chenoweth

‘Better Class of Losers’
/ ‘She’s Got The Rhythm (& I Got The Blues)’ (medley) (written by Randy Travis and Alan Jackson) / this track featured guest vocals from Alan Jackson / the original versions of these tracks were included on Randy Travis’ ‘High Lonesome’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1991) 

‘More Life’ (written by Rory Bourke and Mike Reid)
/ this track, which featured guest vocals from Don Henley, was released as a single on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2012, but it did not chart

‘Can’t Hurt A Man’ (written by Lance Miller, Brad Warren and Brett Warren)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Tim McGraw

‘Promises’ (written by John Lindley and Randy Travis)
 / this track featured guest vocals from Shelby Lynne / the original version of this track was included on Randy Travis’ ‘Old 8×10’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988), and reached No.17 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1989

‘Is It Still Over’, which was written by Ken Bell and Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 – Thursday 18 December 2014) / this track featured guest vocals from Carrie Underwood / the original version of this track was included on Randy Travis’ ‘Old 8×10’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1988), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in May 1989

‘Road To Surrender’ (written by Gary Duffey, Buffy Lawson and Angela Russell) / this track featured guest vocals from Kris Kristofferson and Willie Nelson

‘Diggin’ Up Bones’, which was written by Al Gore, Paul Overstreet and Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 – Wednesday 24 August 1988) / this track featured guest vocals from John Anderson / the original version of this track was included on Randy Travis’ ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in November 1986

‘Someone You Never Knew’ (written by Kyle Jacobs and Fred Wilhelm) / this track featured guest vocals from Eamonn McCrystal

‘Too Much’ (written by Donny Lowery and Gary Nichols) / this track featured guest vocals from James Otto

Waylon Jennings: 'Too Dumb For New York City - Too Ugly For L.A.' (Epic Records, 1992)

‘Didn’t We Shine’, which was written by Don Schlitz and Jesse Winchester (Wednesday 17 May 1944 – Friday 11 April 2014) / this track featured guest vocals from George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013), Lorrie Morgan, Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 – Monday 16 December 2013), Connie Smith, Joe Stampley and Gene Watson / this track was also recorded by Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 – Wednesday 13 February 2002), who included it on ‘Too Dumb For New York City – Too Ugly For L.A.’ (Epic Records, 1992)

‘Everything & All’ (written by Troy Jones)

Randy Travis’ ’25th Anniversary Celebration’ (Warner Bros. Records, 2011) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2011, and No.19 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2011.


Randy Travis: 'Influence Vol. 1: The Man I Am' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2013)

On Tuesday 1 October 2013, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Influence Vol. 1: The Man I Am’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2013), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included the following tracks:

‘Someday We’ll Look Back’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘Big Butter & Egg Man’ (written by Percy Venable)


‘What Have You Got Planned Tonight, Diana?’, which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004)


‘Ever Changing Woman’, which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004) and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)


‘Pennies From Heaven’, which was written by John Francis Burke (3 October 1908 – Tuesday 25 February 1964) and Arthur Johnston (10 January 1898 – Saturday 1 May 1954)


‘Thanks A Lot’, which was written by Edward Monroe ‘Eddie’ Miller (Wednesday 10 December 1919 – Monday 11 April 1977) and Don Sessions


‘Trouble In Mind’ (written by Richard M. Jones)


‘My Mary’, which was written by Jimmie Davis (11 September 1899 – Sunday 5 November 2000) and Stuart Hamblen (Tuesday 20 October 1908 – Wednesday 8 March 1989)


‘Saginaw, Michigan’ (written by Bill Anderson and Don Wayne)


‘I’m Always On A Mountain (When I Fall)’ (written by Chuck Howard)


‘You Asked Me To’, which was written by Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 – Wednesday 13 February 2002) and Billy Joe Shaver (Wednesday 16 August 1939 – Wednesday 28 October 2020)


‘Why, Baby, Why’, which was written by Darrell Edwards and George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013)


‘Tonight I’m Playin’ Possum’, which was written by Keith Gattis (Tuesday 26 May 1970 – Sunday 23 April 2023) and Randy Travis
/ this track, which was a duet with Joe Nichols, was released as a single in 2013, but it did not chart

Personnel involved in the recording of Randy Travis’ ‘Influence Vol. 1: The Man I Am’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2013) included the following:

Bill Cook (bass guitar, upright bass, background vocals)
Lance Dary and Robb Houstan (acoustic guitar, background vocals)
David Davidson, Connie Ellisor, Pam Sixfin and Alan Umstead (violin)
Joe Van Dyke (keyboards)
Steve Gibson (electric guitar, gut string guitar, mandolin)
Jim Grosjean and Kris Wilkinson (viola)
Wes Hightower, Jon Mark Ivey, Lisa Silver, Kira Small and Bergen White (background vocals)
Steve Hinson (Dobro, steel guitar)
David Johnson (fiddle)
Kyle Lehning (Wurlitzer)
Joe Manuel (acoustic guitar)
Rick Wayne Money (electric guitar, tic tac bass guitar)
Joe Nichols (duet vocals on ‘Tonight I’m Playing Possom’)
Carole Rabinowitz (cello)
Herb Shucher (drums)
Randy Travis (lead vocals)

Randy Travis’ ‘Influence Vol. 1: The Man I Am’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2013) reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2013, and No.120 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2013.


In 2014, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Gift of Love’, a non-album single, which did not chart.


Randy Travis: 'Influence Vol. 2: The Man I Am' (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2014)

On Tuesday 19 August 2014, Randy Travis saw the release of ‘Influence Vol. 2: The Man I Am’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2014), which was produced by Kyle Lehning, and included the following tracks:

‘I’m Movin’ On’, which was written by Hank Snow (Saturday 9 May 1914 – Monday 20 December 1999)

‘Set ‘Em Up, Joe’, which was written by
Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 – Tuesday 28 April 2009), Buddy Cannon, Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010) and Dean Dillon

‘Are The Good Times Really Over’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘You Nearly Lose Your Mind’, which was written by Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 – Thursday 6 September 1984)


‘There! I’ve Said It Again’, which was written by Redd Evans (6 July 1912 – Tuesday 29 August 1972) and David Mann (3 October 1916 – Friday 1 March 2002)


‘That’s The Way Love Goes’, which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 – Saturday 19 July 1975) and
Sanger D. ‘Whitey’ Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 – Saturday 12 January 2019)

‘Sunday Morning Coming Down’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)


‘Don’t Worry ‘Bout Me’, which was written by Reuben Bloom (24 April 1902 – Tuesday 30 March 1976) and Ted L. Koehler (14 July 1894 – Wednesday 17 January 1973)


‘Mind Your Own Business’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)


‘Only Daddy That’ll Walk The Line’, which was written by Jimmy Bryant (Thursday 5 March 1925 – Monday 22 September 1980)


‘For The Good Times’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)


‘California Blues’, which was written by Jimmie Rodgers (8 September 1897 – Friday 26 May 1933)


‘Tonight I’m Playin’ Possum’, which was written by Keith Gattis (Tuesday 26 May 1970 – Sunday 23 April 2023) and Randy Travis
/ this track, which was a duet with Joe Nichols, was released as a single in 2013, but it did not chart; the track was also included on Randy Travis’ ‘Influence Vol. 1: The Man I Am’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2013)

Randy Travis’ ‘Influence Vol. 2: The Man I Am’ (Warner Bros. Records Nashville, 2014) reached No.26 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2014.


Josh Williams: 'Modern Day Man' (Rounder Records, 2016)

Josh Williams recorded Randy Travis‘ ‘The Great Divide‘ (co-written with John Lindley) and included the track on ‘Modern Day Man’ (Rounder Records, 2016).


Randy Travis: 'Fool's Love Affair' (written by Charlie Monk, Milton Brown and Keith Stegall) (recorded in 1982) (produced by Kyle Lehning) (released on Wednesday 29 July 2020)

On Wednesday 29 July 2020, Randy Travis saw the release of a new single, ‘Fool’s Love Affair’, which was written by Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022), Milton Brown and Keith Stegall, which was a song with a long history.  It went all the way back to 1982, and the days before Randy Travis had a record deal.

Keith Stegall

Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022), a well-known music publisher in Nashville, believed in Randy Travis and was trying to help him find a record label who would sign him.  In the meantime, Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022) had a song he had co-written with Milton Brown and Keith Stegall, and he needed someone to demo it.

Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022) chose Randy Travis to come into the studio and record it, so that he could pitch it to other artists he thought might record it.

Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022) hadn’t used Randy Travis for any demos, but he asked him to do this one.  ‘Randy came in and did a great job, but the hit singers were staying away from traditional country music during that era.  They were looking more for crossover songs, so we didn’t find anyone to record it.  Then Randy became a big star, but the lyric didn’t exactly lend itself to a clean cut guy like him, so the song was never recorded’.

In 2010, Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022) began playing the demo on ‘Willie’s Roadhouse’, where he was a presenter for Sirius XM Radio.  Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022) started receiving emails from people asking where they could get a copy of the song.  Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022) had to tell them it wasn’t available anywhere.

‘After Randy had his stroke and we were told he probably wouldn’t ever sing again, I sent a copy to Mary (Randy Travis’ wife) and they both loved it.

Randy Travis remembered recording it, but he didn’t know who played on it or what year it was’

Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022) sent the tape to Kyle Lehning, who was Randy Travis’ producer, and asked him what he thought about it.  Kyle Lehning told Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022) that there was too much hiss on it to try to do anything with, and asked him for the multi-track, which would have been the original recording of the song.  Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022) had no idea where it was, because it had been thirty years plus since the recording had been done.

Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022) looked everywhere he thought it might be, but had no luck in finding it.  Then Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022) decided to sell his office building and move all his stuff from there to his house.

The Country Music Hall of Fame were interested in some of the things Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022) had, so they said they would catalogue everything for him.  The evening before the people from The Country Music Hall of Fame were going to pick up the items, Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022) decided to travel down memory lane one more time and began looking through boxes.

Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022) stumbled over a box and discovered ‘Fool’s Love Affair’ inside.  Charles Franklin Monk (Saturday 29 October 1938 – Monday 19 December 2022) got in touch with Kyle Lehning to whom he gave the multi-track.  Kyle Lehning took the multi-track to Reid Shippen, who had a system where he put the multi-track in a convection oven, baked the tape, and transferred it to Pro Tools.  Kyle Lehning added electric guitar, fiddle and steel guitar to the original recording.

When Mary Travis and Randy Travis heard the finished song, they loved it.  ‘Anything in Randy’s voice is music to my ears’, Mary Travis explained.  ‘Charlie’s persistence, Kyle’s work, Randy’s vocals, it was great teamwork, great persistence, and a lot of wonderful talent surfaced.  We had the easy part – all we had to do was approve it.  Randy has always loved everything Kyle does’.


Randy Travis: 'Storms of Life' (Warner Bros. Records, 1986)

On Friday 24 September 2021, the 35th anniversary edition of ‘Storms of Life’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1986) was released; the anniversary edition of the album included remastered versions of the original ten tracks, as well as three previously unreleased songs, which were labelled ‘From The Vault’.


Randy Travis

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