Gene Watson Peer’s Quote from Ronnie Reno: March 2013

Gene Watson’s Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as ‘the singer’s singer’ – and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson’s Peers, who were contacted during 2013, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Ronnie Reno, which he submitted to this site on Tuesday 5 March 2013.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Ronnie Reno who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online ‘celebration of a Lone Star Hero’.

Ronnie Reno



Ronnie Reno
This quote was submitted on Tuesday 5 March 2013.

‘Thanks for the email and for the warm conversation about Gene Watson.

I have been a friend of Gene’s for many years and consider him in the very elite club of singers and tellers of song.

Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 - Monday 24 April 2006)

Bonnie Owens
(Tuesday 1 October 1929 – Monday 24 April 2006)

I remember when we became aware of Gene.

It was Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 – Monday 24 April 2006) that made us listen and realise what Gene was doing with his style and voice.

Bonnie always was a great judge of singers as you know.  She could pick the great ones and Gene was one of hers and my all-time favourite singers.

Gene is also a wonderful person and cares about people’s feeling and what they take away from his delivery of his songs and singing.

Please pass this along to his many fans and I am truly in the club of admirers of the great Gene Watson’

Thank you, Ronnie Reno, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Ronnie Reno…

Ronnie Reno

Ronnie Reno was born on Sunday 28 September 1947 in Buffalo, South Carolina and is the eldest son of bluegrass music legend Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984); Ronnie began his career professionally when he was eight years old.

Often standing on a milk carton in order to reach the microphone, the young Ronnie Reno played mandolin and guitar with his father on-stage.

After working with The Don Reno Band for almost ten years, Ronnie Reno opted to join The Osborne Brothers, another bluegrass music band.

Working with The Osborne Brothers for four years, the group released five albums during that time.

The Osborne Brothers (Sonny Osborne & Bobby Osborne): 'Up To Date and Down To Earth' (Decca Records, 1969)

In July 1969, The Osborne Brothers – Sonny Osborne (Friday 29 October 1937 – Sunday 24 October 2021) and Bobby Osborne (Monday 7 December 1931 – Tuesday 27 June 2023) – saw the release of ‘Up To Date and Down To Earth’ (Decca Records, 1969).

Personnel involved in the recording of The Osborne Brothers’ ‘Up To Date and Down To Earth’ (Decca Records, 1969) included the following:

Sonny Osborne (Friday 29 October 1937 – Sunday 24 October 2021) (vocal, banjo, Dobro)
Bobby Osborne (Monday 7 December 1931 – Tuesday 27 June 2023) (vocal, mandolin)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001), Leon Rhodes (Thursday 10 March 1932 – Saturday 9 December 2017), Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) and Dale Sledd (guitar)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Ronnie Blackwell (bass)
Ronnie Reno (bass, vocals)
Willie Ackerman and Jerry Carrigan (drums)
Jimmy Buchanan (fiddle)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano, organ)

One of the included tracks on The Osborne Brothers’ ‘Up To Date and Down To Earth’ (Decca Records, 1969) was ‘Will You Visit Me On Sundays’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022).

The Osborne Brothers (Sonny Osborne & Bobby Osborne): 'Ru-Be-Eee' (Decca Records, 1970)

In June 1970, The Osborne Brothers – Sonny Osborne (Friday 29 October 1937 – Sunday 24 October 2021) and Bobby Osborne (Monday 7 December 1931 – Tuesday 27 June 2023) – saw the release of ‘Ru-Be-Eee’ (Decca Records, 1970).

Personnel involved in the recording of The Osborne Brothers’ ‘Ru-Be-Eee’ (Decca Records, 1970) included the following:

Sonny Osborne (Friday 29 October 1937 – Sunday 24 October 2021) (vocal, banjo)
Bobby Osborne (Monday 7 December 1931 – Tuesday 27 June 2023) (vocal, mandolin)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001), Leon Rhodes (Thursday 10 March 1932 – Saturday 9 December 2017) and Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar)
Dale Sledd (guitar, vocals)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Ronnie Reno (bass, vocals)
Willie Ackerman (drums)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)

Some of the tracks included on The Osborne Brothers’ ‘Ru-Be-Eee’ (Decca Records, 1970) were the following:

‘Let Me Be The First To Know’, which was written by Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003) and Doyle Wilburn (Monday 7 July 1930 – Saturday 16 October 1982)
‘Fightin’ Side of Me’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘World of Forgotten People’, which was written by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022)
‘Somebody’s Back In Town’, which was written by Loretta Lynn (Thursday 14 April 1932 – Tuesday 4 October 2022), Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 – Monday 24 November 2003) and Doyle Wilburn (Monday 7 July 1930 – Saturday 16 October 1982)
‘Put It Off Until Tomorrow’, which was written by Dolly Parton and Billy Earl Owens (Saturday 28 September 1935 – Wednesday 7 April 2021)

The Osborne Brothers (Sonny Osborne & Bobby Osborne): 'The Osborne Brothers' (Decca Records, 1971)

In March 1971, The Osborne Brothers – Sonny Osborne (Friday 29 October 1937 – Sunday 24 October 2021) and Bobby Osborne (Monday 7 December 1931 – Tuesday 27 June 2023) – saw the release of ‘The Osborne Brothers’ (Decca Records, 1971).

Personnel involved in the recording of The Osborne Brothers’ ‘The Osborne Brothers’ (Decca Records, 1971) included the following:

Sonny Osborne (Friday 29 October 1937 – Sunday 24 October 2021) (vocal, banjo)
Bobby Osborne (Monday 7 December 1931 – Tuesday 27 June 2023) (vocal, mandolin)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar, Dobro)
Leon Rhodes (Thursday 10 March 1932 – Saturday 9 December 2017) (electric guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar)
Dale Sledd (guitar, vocal)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) (steel guitar)
Floyd Chance and Ronnie Reno (bass)
Willie Ackerman (drums)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)

Some of the tracks on The Osborne Brothers’ ‘The Osborne Brothers’ (Decca Records, 1971) included the following:

‘My Old Kentucky Home (Turpentine & Dandelion Wine)’ (written by Randy Newman)
‘My Sweet Love Ain’t Around’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
‘When The Grass Grows Over Me’, which was written by Don Chapel (1931 – Sunday 6 December 2015)
‘My Heart Would Know’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)
‘Tennessee Stud’, which was written by James Corbitt Morris (known professionally as Jimmy Driftwood / Jimmie Driftwood) (20 June 1907 – Sunday 12 July 1998)
‘Kaw-liga’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953) and Fred Rose (24 August 1898 – Wednesday 1 December 1954)

The Osborne Brothers (Sonny Osborne & Bobby Osborne): 'Country Roads' (Decca Records, 1971)

In December 1971, The Osborne Brothers – Sonny Osborne (Friday 29 October 1937 – Sunday 24 October 2021) and Bobby Osborne (Monday 7 December 1931 – Tuesday 27 June 2023) – saw the release of ‘Country Roads’ (Decca Records, 1971).

Personnel involved in the recording of The Osborne Brothers’ ‘Country Roads’ (Decca Records, 1971) included the following:

Sonny Osborne (Friday 29 October 1937 – Sunday 24 October 2021) (vocal, banjo)
Bobby Osborne (Monday 7 December 1931 – Tuesday 27 June 2023) (vocal, mandolin)
Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 – Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar, Dobro)
Leon Rhodes (Thursday 10 March 1932 – Saturday 9 December 2017) (electric guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar)
Dale Sledd (guitar, vocal)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) and Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 – Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Floyd Chance, Ronnie Reno, Ray Kirkland and Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) (bass)
Willie Ackerman (drums)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Charlie McCoy (trumpet)

Some of the tracks on The Osborne Brothers’ ‘Country Roads’ (Decca Records, 1971) included the following:

‘Shelly’s Winter Love’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Take Me Home Country Roads’, which was written by John Denver (Friday 31 December 1943 – Sunday 12 October 1997), Bill Danoff and Taffy Nivert
‘Pain of Loving You’, which was written by Dolly Parton and Porter Wagoner (Friday 12 August 1927 – Sunday 28 October 2007)
‘Tomorrow Never Comes’, which was written by Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 – Thursday 6 September 1984) and Johnny Bond
‘Beneath Still Waters’, which was written by Dallas Frazier (Friday 27 October 1939 – Friday 14 January 2022)

The Osborne Brothers (Sonny Osborne & Bobby Osborne): 'Bobby and Sonny' (Decca Records, 1972)

In June 1972, The Osborne Brothers – Sonny Osborne (Friday 29 October 1937 – Sunday 24 October 2021) and Bobby Osborne (Monday 7 December 1931 – Tuesday 27 June 2023) – saw the release of ‘Bobby and Sonny’ (Decca Records, 1972).

Personnel involved in the recording of The Osborne Brothers’ ‘Bobby and Sonny’ (Decca Records, 1972) included the following:

Bobby Osborne (Monday 7 December 1931 – Tuesday 27 June 2023) (vocal, mandolin)
Sonny Osborne (Friday 29 October 1937 – Sunday 24 October 2021)
Leon Rhodes (Thursday 10 March 1932 – Saturday 9 December 2017) (electric guitar)
Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022) (guitar)
Dale Sledd (guitar, vocals)
Harald ‘Hal’ Rugg (Tuesday 21 July 1936 – Tuesday 9 August 2005) and Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 – Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Dennis Digby (bass)
Ronnie Reno (bass, vocals)
Willie Ackerman (drums)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)

Some of the tracks on The Osborne Brothers’ ‘Bobby and Sonny’ (Decca Records, 1972) included the following:

‘Ballad of Forty Dollars’, which was written by Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021)
‘I Wonder Why You Said Goodbye’, which was written by Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 – Thursday 6 September 1984)
‘Stand Beside Me, Behind Me’, which was written by Paul Craft (Friday 12 August 1938 – Saturday 18 October 2014)
‘I Washed My Face In The Morning Dew’, which was written by Tom T. Hall (Monday 25 May 1936 – Friday 20 August 2021)
‘Love’s Gonna Live Here’, which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006)
‘Today I Started Loving You Again’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 – Monday 24 April 2006)

Ronnie Reno’s first big break came in 1973 with his working relationship with country music legend, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016).

Opening many of Merle Haggard‘s shows, Ronne Reno would then support Merle Haggard(Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) as a backing musician.

Ronnie Reno appeared on a number of Merle Haggard‘s classic country music albums released throughout the 1970s and 1980s.

Merle Haggard: 'Christmas Present (Something Old, Something New)' (Capitol Records, 1973)

In November 1973, Merle Haggard(Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of ‘Christmas Present (Something Old, Something New)’ (Capitol Records, 1973), which included the following tracks:

‘If We Make It Through December’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) (No.1 for four weeks in December 1973 and January 1974) / this track also reached No.28 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1973

‘Santa Claus & Popcorn’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘Bobby Wants A Puppy Dog For Christmas’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘Daddy Won’t Be Home Again For Christmas’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘Grandma’s Homemade Christmas Card’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘White Christmas’, which was written by Irving Berlin (11 May 1888 – Friday 22 September 1989)

‘Silver Bells’, which was written by Jay Livingston (28 March 1915 – Wednesday 17 October 2001) and Raymond Bernard Evans (4 February 1915 – Thursday 15 February 2007)

‘Winter Wonderland’ (written by Felix Bernard and Richard B. Smith)

‘Silent Night’, which was written by Joseph Mohr (11 December 1792 – 4 December 1848) and Franz Xaver Gruber (25 November 1787 – 7 June 1863)

‘Jingle Bells’ (written by James Lord Pierpont)

Personnel involved in the recording of Merle Haggard‘s ‘Christmas Present (Something Old, Something New)’ (Capitol Records, 1973) included the following:

Merle Haggard(Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) (vocals, guitar)
Roy Nichols (Friday 21 October 1932 – Tuesday 3 July 2001) (guitar, harmonica)
Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 – Wednesday 1 July 2015), Bobby Wayne, Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004), Marcy Nichols, Ray Edenton (Wednesday 3 November 1926 – Wednesday 21 September 2022), Jerry Shooks and Jimmy Capps (Thursday 25 May 1939 – Monday 1 June 2020) (guitar)
Norman Hamlet (pedal steel guitar, Dobro)
Dennis Hromek, Joe Zinkan, Ronnie Reno and Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 – Monday 29 December 2014) (bass)
Biff Adam and William Harris (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano, organ)
Jerry Whitehurst and Mark Yeary (Saturday 9 February 1952 – Friday 17 January 2020) (piano)
Farrell Morris (percussion)
Bill Puett (horns)

Merle Haggard: 'If We Make It Through December' (Capitol Records, 1974)

In February 1974, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of ‘If We Make It Through December’ (Capitol Records, 1974), which included the following tracks:

‘If We Make It Through December’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) (No.1 for four weeks in December 1973 and January 1974 / this track also reached No.28 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1973

‘Love & Honor’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘To Each His Own’, which was written by Jay Livingston (28 March 1915 – Wednesday 17 October 2001) and Raymond Bernard Evans (4 February 1915 – Thursday 15 February 2007)


‘You’re The Only Girl In The Game’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010) and Glenn W. Martin (Thursday 30 June 1932 – Sunday 12 May 2019)


‘I’m An Old Old Man Tryin’ To Live While I Can’, which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 – Saturday 19 July 1975)


‘Come On into My Arms’ (written by Marcia Nichols)


‘Better Off When I was Hungry’, which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004)


‘I’ll Break Out Again Tonight’, which was written by Arthur Leo ‘Doodle’ Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 – Monday 4 October 1999) and Sanger D. ‘Whitey’ Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 – Saturday 12 January 2019)


‘This Cold War With You’, which was written by Floyd Tillman (Tuesday 8 December 1914 – Friday 22 August 2003)


‘Uncle Lem’, which was written by Glenn W. Martin (Thursday 30 June 1932 – Sunday 12 May 2019)


‘There’s Just One Way’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Kenny Seratt (Saturday 20 October 1934 – Wednesday 26 August 2015)

Personnel involved in the recording of Merle Haggard‘s ‘If We Make It Through December’ (Capitol Records, 1974) included the following:

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) (vocals, guitar)
Roy Nichols (Friday 21 October 1932 – Tuesday 3 July 2001) (guitar, harmonica)
Tommy Collins (Sunday 28 September 1930 – Tuesday 14 March 2000), Bobby Wayne, Dave Kirby(Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004), Marcy Nichols and Ronnie Reno (guitar)
Norman Hamlet (pedal steel guitar, Dobro)
Dennis Hromek, Joe Zinkan and Johnny Meeks (bass)
Biff Adam (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) and Bill Woods (fiddle)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano, organ)
Billy Liebert and Mark Yeary (Saturday 9 February 1952 – Friday 17 January 2020) (piano)
Bill Puett (horns)

Merle Haggard: 'Merle Haggard: His 30th Album' (Capitol Records, 1974)

In August 1974, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of ‘Merle Haggard: His 30th Album’ (Capitol Records, 1974), which included the following tracks:

‘Old Man From The Mountain’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) (No.1 for one week in August 1974)

‘Things Aren’t Funny Anymore’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) (No.1 for one week in May 1974)

‘White Man Singin’ The Blues’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘Traveling’ (written by Ronnie Reno and Tiny Moore)


‘Girl Who Made Me Laugh’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Roy Nichols (Friday 21 October 1932 – Tuesday 3 July 2001)

‘Honky Tonk Night Time Man’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘Holding Things Together’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) / this track featured Ronnie Reno and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 – Monday 24 April 2006) as supporting vocalists

‘Seashores of Old Mexico’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘Don’t Give Up On Me’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘King Without A Queen’, which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 – Tuesday 13 May 1975), John Wills and Martha Dean Moore


‘It Don’t Bother Me’, which was written by Mark Yeary (Saturday 9 February 1952 – Friday 17 January 2020)

Personnel involved in the recording of Merle Haggard‘s ‘Merle Haggard: His 30th Album’ (Capitol Records, 1974) included the following:

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) (vocals, guitar)
Roy Nichols (Friday 21 October 1932 – Tuesday 3 July 2001) (guitar, harmonica)
James Burton, Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004) and Ronnie Reno (guitar)
Norman Hamlet (pedal steel guitar, Dobro)
Chuck Berghofer and Johnny Meeks (bass)
Biff Adam (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Tiny Moore (mandolin)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano, organ)
Glen Hardin and Mark Yeary (Saturday 9 February 1952 – Friday 17 January 2020) (piano)
Bill Puett (horns)

Johnny Cash: 'Junkie and The Juicehead Minus Me' (Columbia Records, 1974)

In September 1974, Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 – Friday 12 September 2003) saw the release of ‘Junkie & The Juicehead Minus Me’ (Columbia Records, 1974); the album featured Ronnie Reno on bass.

Merle Haggard: 'Keep Movin' On' (Capitol Records, 1975)
Dolly Parton: 'All I Can Do' (RCA Records, 1976)
Dolly Parton: 'The Bargain Store' (RCA Records, 1975)

In April 1975, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of ‘Keep Movin’ On’ (Capitol Records, 1975), which included the following tracks:

‘Movin’ On’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) (No.1 for one week in July 1975) / this track was a full-length version of a song which Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) recorded as the theme song to the television series, ‘Movin’ On’

‘Life’s Like Poetry’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
/ this track was also recorded by Dolly Parton, who included it on ‘All I Can Do’ (RCA Records, 1976)

‘I’ve Got A Darlin’ (For A Wife)’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Ronnie Reno

‘These Mem’ries We’re Making Tonight’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘You’ll Always Be Special To Me’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘September In Miami’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘Always Wanting You’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
(No.1 for two weeks in April 1975)

‘Kentucky Gambler’ (written by Dolly Parton)
(No.1 for one week in January 1975) / the original version of this track was recorded by Dolly Parton, who included it on ‘The Bargain Store’ (RCA Records, 1975), an album which also included a cover of Merle Haggard‘s ‘You’ll Always Be Special To Me’

‘Here In Frisco’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘I’ve Got A Yearning’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘Man’s Gotta Give Up A Lot’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

Personnel involved in the recording of Merle Haggard‘s ‘Keep Movin’ On’ (Capitol Records, 1975) included the following:

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) (vocals, guitar)
Roy Nichols (Friday 21 October 1932 – Tuesday 3 July 2001) (guitar, harmonica)
Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004) and Ronnie Reno (guitar)
Norman Hamlet (pedal steel guitar, Dobro)
Chuck Berghofer, Johnny Meeks, Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) and James Tittle (bass)
Biff Adam (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Tiny Moore (mandolin)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano, organ)
Mark Yeary (Saturday 9 February 1952 – Friday 17 January 2020) (piano)
Don Merkham (saxophone)

Ronnie Reno: 'For The First Time' (MCA Records, 1975)

It was also in 1975 when Ronnie Reno saw the release of his first album, ‘For The First Time’ (MCA Records, 1975), which included the following tracks:

‘September In Miami’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘The Wintering Kind’
‘A Hard Day’s Night’
‘Goodbye Is Just Another Word’
‘I’m A Loser’
‘Lonely Lovin’ You’
‘Trying Not To Love You’
‘Last Time I Saw Louisiana’
‘Union Station’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
‘I’m Blue, I’m Lonesome’

Merle Haggard: 'It's All in The Movies' (Capitol Records, 1976)

In February 1976, Merle Haggard(Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of ‘It’s All In The Movies’ (Capitol Records, 1976), which included the following tracks:

‘It’s All In The Movies’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) (No.1 for one week in November 1975)

‘Nothing’s Worse Than Losing’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)


‘After Loving You’, which was written by Merle Haggard(Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016), Ronnie Reno and Leona Williams


‘Stingeree’ (written by Charles Singleton and Larry Coleman)


‘I Know An Ending When It Comes’, which was written by Hank Cochran(Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010)


‘This Is The Song We Sing’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)


‘Living With The Shades Pulled Down’, which was written by Merle Haggard(Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)


‘Hag’s Dixie Blues, No.2’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)


‘Let’s Stop Pretending’, which was written by Merle Haggard(Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)


‘Cotton Patch Blues’, which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 – Tuesday 13 May 1975) and Billy Joe Moore


‘The Seeker’ (written by Dolly Parton)

Personnel involved in the recording of Merle Haggard‘s ‘It’s All in The Movies’ (Capitol Records, 1976) included the following:

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
Roy Nichols (Friday 21 October 1932 – Tuesday 3 July 2001) (guitar, harmonica)
Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004), Bobby Wayne, Marcy Nichols, Ronnie Reno and Estel Shamblin (guitar)
Norman Hamlet (steel guitar, Dobro)
Tiny Moore (mandolin)
Dennis Hromek, Joseph Zinkan, Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) and James Tittle (bass)
Biff Adams (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Glen D. Hardin, Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Mark Yeary (Saturday 9 February 1952 – Friday 17 January 2020) (piano)
Don Merkham (sax)
William Puett (horns)
Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 – Monday 24 April 2006) (vocals)

Merle Haggard: 'My Love Affair With Trains' (Capitol Records, 1976)

In July 1976, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of ‘My Love Affair With Trains’ (Capitol Records, 1976), which included the following tracks:

‘My Love Affair With Trains’ (written by Dolly Parton)

‘Union Station’ (written by Ronnie Reno)


‘Here Comes The Freedom Train’ (written by Stephen H. Lemberg)
/ this track reached No.10 on the Billboard country music singles chart in July 1976

‘So Long Train Whistle’, which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004) and Lew Quadling


‘Silver Ghost’ (written by Sterling Whipple)


‘No More Trains To Ride’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)


‘Coming & The Going of The Trains’, which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 – Wednesday 1 July 2015)


‘I Won’t Give Up My Train’, which was written by Mark Yeary (Saturday 9 February 1952 – Friday 17 January 2020)


‘Where Have All The Hoboes Gone’, which was written by Dave Kirby(Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004) and Danny Morrison


‘Railroad Lady’, which was written by Jimmy Buffett and Jerry Jeff Walker (Monday 16 March 1942 – Friday 24 October 2020)


‘Hobo’, which was written by Dave Kirby(Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004) and Glenn W. Martin (Thursday 30 June 1932 – Sunday 12 May 2019)

Personnel involved in the recording of Merle Haggard‘s ‘My Love Affair With Trains’ (Capitol Records, 1976) included the following:

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
Roy Nichols (Friday 21 October 1932 – Tuesday 3 July 2001), Ronnie Reno, Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004) and Estel Shamblin (guitar)
Norman Hamlet (steel guitar, Dobro)
Tiny Moore (mandolin)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021), Johnny Meeks and James Tittle (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 – Thursday 21 August 2008) and Biff Adam (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) and Mark Yeary (Saturday 9 February 1952 – Friday 17 January 2020) (keyboards)
Don Merkham (sax)

Merle Haggard: 'The Roots of My Raising' (Capitol Records, 1976)

In November 1976, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of ‘The Roots of My Raising’ (Capitol Records, 1976), which included the following tracks:

‘The Roots of My Raising’, which was written by Tommy Collins (Sunday 28 September 1930 – Tuesday 14 March 2000) (No.1 for one week in March 1976)

‘What Have You Got Planned Tonight, Diana’, which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004)
(No.1 for one week in November 1976)

‘The Waltz You Saved For Me’ (written by Gus Kahn, Wayne King and Emil Flindt)


‘Walk On The Outside’, which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004) and Chuck Howard


‘Gambling Polka Dot Blues’, which was written by Jimmie Rodgers (8 September 1897 – Friday 26 May 1933) and Roy E. Hall


‘Cherokee Maiden’, which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 – Thursday 23 March 2006)
(No.1 for one week in November 1976)

‘Am I Standing In Your Way’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘Colorado’, which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004)


‘I Never Go Around Mirrors’, which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 – Saturday 19 July 1975) and Sanger D. ‘Whitey’ Shafer (Wednesday 24 October 1934 – Saturday 12 January 2019)


‘Mississippi Delta Blues’, which was written by Jimmie Rodgers (8 September 1897 – Friday 26 May 1933) and Jack Neville

Personnel involved in the recording of Merle Haggard‘s ‘The Roots of My Raising’ (Capitol Records, 1976) included the following:

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
Roy Nichols (Friday 21 October 1932 – Tuesday 3 July 2001), Bobby Wayne, Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004), Ronnie Reno and Estel Shamblin (guitar)
Norman Hamlet (steel guitar, Dobro)
Tiny Moore (mandolin)
Dennis Hromek and James Tittle (bass)
Biff Adam (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Glen D. Hardin, Mark Yeary (Saturday 9 February 1952 – Friday 17 January 2020) and Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022) (piano)
Don Merkham (sax)

Merle Haggard: 'Ramblin' Fever' (MCA Records, 1977)

In May 1977, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of ‘Ramblin’ Fever’ (MCA Records, 1977), which included the following tracks:

‘Ramblin’ Fever’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘When My Blue Moon Turns To Gold Again’ (written by Wiley Walker and Gene Sullivan)


‘Ghost Story’ (written by Joe Allen)


‘Set Me Free’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)


‘Love Somebody To Death’, which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 – Wednesday 1 July 2015) and Glenn W. Martin (Thursday 30 June 1932 – Sunday 12 May 2019)


‘If We’re Not Back In Love By Monday’, which was written by Glenn W. Martin (Thursday 30 June 1932 – Sunday 12 May 2019) and Sonny Throckmorton


‘I Think It’s Gone Forever’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Leona Williams

‘Ain’t Your Memory Got No Pride At All’, which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 – Wednesday 1 July 2015), Royce D. Porter (Saturday 1 April 1939 – Thursday 31 May 2018) and Bucky Jones


‘My Love For You’ (written by Jeannie Seely)


‘Last Letter’, which was written by Rex Griffin (Monday 12 August 1912 – Sunday 11 October 1959)

Merle Haggard‘s ‘Ramblin’ Fever’ (MCA Records, 1977), which featured Ronnie Reno on guitar, was produced by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010) and Kenneth F. ‘Ken’ Nelson (19 January 1911 – Sunday 6 January 2008).

Merle Haggard: 'A Working Man Can't Get Nowhere Today' (Capitol Records, 1977)

In September 1977, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of ‘A Working Man Can’t Get Nowhere Today’ (Capitol Records, 1977).

Although Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) had moved from Capitol Records to MCA Records, Capitol Records created the ‘A Working Man Can’t Get Nowhere Today’ (Capitol Records, 1977) release, from tracks which had been previously recorded between April 1971 and November 1975.

Merle Haggard‘s ‘A Working Man Can’t Get Nowhere Today’ (Capitol Records, 1977) included the following tracks:

‘A Working Man Can’t Get Nowhere Today’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘Making Believe’, which was written by Jimmy Work (Saturday 29 March 1924 – Saturday 22 December 2018)


‘Blues Stay Away From Me’, which was written by Lionel Alton Delmore (Tuesday 19 March 1940 – Monday 20 May 2002), Rabon Delmore, Henry Glover and Wayne Raney


‘Got A Letter From My Kid’ (written by Alex Kramer, Joan Whitney and Hy Zaret)


‘When My Last Song Is Sung’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘Moanin’ The Blues’, which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 – Thursday 1 January 1953)


‘Goodbye Lefty’, which was written by
Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘Blues For Dixie’ (written by O. W. Mayo)


‘Running Kind’, which was written by
 Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

‘I’m A White Boy’, which was written by
 Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

Personnel involved in the recording of Merle Haggard‘s ‘A Working Man Can’t Get Nowhere Today’ (Capitol Records, 1977) included the following:

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
Roy Nichols (Friday 21 October 1932 – Tuesday 3 July 2001), Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 – Saturday 17 April 2004), Ronnie Reno, Al Bruneau and Tommy Collins (Sunday 28 September 1930 – Tuesday 14 March 2000) (guitar)
Norman Hamlet (steel guitar, Dobro)
Tiny Moore (mandolin)
James Tittle (bass guitar)
Bob Moore (Wednesday 30 November 1932 – Wednesday 22 September 2021) and Dennis Hromek (bass)
Biff Adam (drums)
Johnny Gimble (Sunday 30 May 1926 – Saturday 9 May 2015) (fiddle)
Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins (Tuesday 18 January 1938 – Sunday 30 January 2022), Mark Yeary (Saturday 9 February 1952 – Friday 17 January 2020) and Glenn D. Hardin (piano)
Don Merkham (sax)

Conway Twitty: 'Conway' (MCA Records, 1978)

In October 1978, Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993) saw the release of ‘Conway’ (MCA Records, 1978); the album included Ronnie Reno’s ‘Boogie Grass Band’, which reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978.

Mickey Gilley: 'Mickey Gilley' (Epic Records, 1979)

Mickey Gilley (Monday 9 March 1936 – Saturday 7 May 2022) recorded Ronnie Reno’s ‘Thousand Times’ (co-written with Wayne C. Thompson) and included the track on ‘Mickey Gilley’ (Epic Records, 1979).

Billy 'Crash' Craddock: 'Crash Craddock' (Capitol Records, 1981)

In February 1981, Billy ‘Crash’ Craddock saw the release of ‘Crash Craddock’ (Capitol Records, 1981), which included Ronnie Reno’s ‘Leave Your Love A-Smokin’ (co-written with Wayne C. Thompson).

In the late 1980s, Ronnie Reno teamed up with his younger brothers, Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno, and formed The Reno Brothers.

The Reno Brothers (Ronnie Reno, Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno): 'The Reno Brothers' (Step One Records, 1988)

In 1988, The Reno Brothers (Ronnie Reno, Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno) saw the release of ‘The Reno Brothers’ (Step One Records, 1988); the album, which was produced by Ray Pennington (Friday 22 December 1933 – Wednesday 7 October 2020) and engineered by Kevin McManus, included the following tracks:

‘Midnight Lovers Express’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
‘Stealing Love’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
‘1 Year, 2 Months, 11 Days’, which was written by Ronnie Reno and Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015)
‘Picking On The Strings’ (arranged by The Reno Brothers)
‘Love Will Never Be The Same’, which was written by Ronnie Reno and Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015)
‘Walking On New Grass’, which was written by Ray Pennington (Friday 22 December 1933 – Wednesday 7 October 2020)
‘Lay Your Heartache Down’ (written by Bobby Springfield)
‘Yonder Comes A Freight Train’, which was written by Ray Pennington (Friday 22 December 1933 – Wednesday 7 October 2020)
‘Morning Memories’ (written by Ronnie Underwood and Mel Holt)
‘Southern Bound’, which was written by Ray Pennington (Friday 22 December 1933 – Wednesday 7 October 2020)
‘Top of The Mountain’ (written by Mel Holt)
‘Boogie Grass Band’ (written by Ronnie Reno)

Personnel involved in the recording of The Reno Brothers’ ‘The Reno Brothers’ (Step One Records, 1988) included the following:

Jimmy Capps (Thursday 25 May 1939 – Monday 1 June 2020) (acoustic guitar)
Ronnie Reno (acoustic guitar, vocals)
Don Wayne Reno (banjo, acoustic guitar, vocals)
David Smith (bass guitar)
John Catchings (cello)
Joe Roden (drums)
Gene Chrisman (drums, handclaps)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Dale Reno (mandolin, vocals)
Thomas B. Keels (piano)
Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 – Wednesday 29 July 2015) (steel guitar)
Buddy Spicher (viola)
Dennis Wilson (additional vocals)

Willie Nelson: 'A Horse Called Music' (Columbia Records, 1989)

In 1989, Willie Nelson saw the release of ‘A Horse Called Music’ (Columbia Records, 1989); the album included Willie Nelson’s last No.1 Billboard country music hit single, ‘Nothing I Can Do About It Now’ (written by Beth Nielsen Chapman), which was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in September 1989.

Willie Nelson’s ‘A Horse Called Music’ (Columbia Records, 1989), which featured Ronnie Reno on mandola, also included ‘There You Are’ (written by Kye Fleming and Mike Reid) (No.8 in late 1989), along with ‘If I Were A Painting’ (written by Skip Ewing and Don Sampson).

Ronnie Reno & The Reno Brothers (Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno): 'Kentucky Gold' (Webco Records / Pinecastle Records, 1992)

In March 1992, Ronnie Reno & The Reno Brothers (Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno) saw the release of ‘Kentucky Gold’ (Webco Records / Pinecastle Records, 1992), which included the following tracks:

‘Kentucky Gold’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015) and Ronnie Reno
‘Country Boy Rock & Roll’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)
‘All That’s Worth Remembering’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015) and Ronnie Reno
‘Rollin’ Down The Cumberland’ (written by Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno)
‘My Dixieland & Dixie Too’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
‘Hello, Jesus’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015) and Ronnie Reno
‘California Blue Moon’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015) and Ronnie Reno
‘Reno’s 2nd Ride’ (written by Don Wayne Reno)
‘Jesus Will Save Your Soul’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)
‘The Letter’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015)
‘Long Gone’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)

Ronnie Reno & The Reno Brothers (Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno): 'Acoustic Celebration' (Webco Records / Pinecastle Records, 1994)

In 1994, Ronnie Reno & The Reno Brothers (Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno) saw the release of ‘Acoustic Celebration’ (Webco Records / Pinecastle Records, 1994), which included the following tracks:

‘Reno’s Theme Song (Reno’s Old Time Music Festival)’ (written by Ronnie Reno, Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno)
‘Mr. Coachman’, which was written by Ronnie Reno, Dale Reno, Don Wayne Reno and Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015)
‘Homemade Love’ (written by Ronnie Reno, Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno)
‘Saturday Night Jam’ (written by Ronnie Reno, Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno)
‘I Love You’, which was written by Ronnie Reno, Dale Reno, Don Wayne Reno and Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘The Thrill of The Chase’ (written by Ronnie Reno, Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno)
‘The Last Frontier’ (written by Don Wayne Reno)
‘Unity’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015)
‘Mama Tried’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Sail On The Wind’ (written by Ronnie Reno, Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno)
‘Top of The Mountain’ (written by Dale Reno)
‘Lonesome Hearted Blues’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)
‘Catch Up On A Love Affair’ (written by Ronnie Reno, Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno)

Ronnie Reno & The Reno Brothers (Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno): 'Swing West' (Pinecastle Records, 1995)

In 1995, Ronnie Reno & The Reno Brothers (Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno) saw the release of ‘Swing West’ (Pinecastle Records, 1995), which included the following tracks:

‘Time Changes Everything’, which was written by Tommy Duncan (Wednesday 11 January 1911 – Tuesday 25 July 1967) and Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 – Tuesday 13 May 1975)
‘I’m So Dog Gone Used To Lovin’ You’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015) and Mel Tillis (Monday 8 August 1932 – Sunday 19 November 2017)
‘California Blues’, which was written by Jimmie Rodgers (8 September 1897 – Friday 26 May 1933) and Sonny Terry
‘San Antonio Rose’, which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 – Tuesday 13 May 1975)
‘Yes Sir, That’s My Baby’ (written by Walter Donaldson and Gus Kahn)
‘Love Slips Away’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Ronnie Reno
‘Oklahoma Hills’, which was written by Jack Guthrie (Saturday 13 November 1915 – Thursday 15 January 1948) and Woody Guthrie (Sunday 14 July 1912 – Tuesday 3 October 1967)
‘I Love Your Memory’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015) and Ronnie Reno
‘Will You Be Loving Another Man?’, which was written by Lester Flatt (Friday 19 June 1914 – Friday 11 May 1979) and Bill Monroe (Wednesday 13 September 1911 – Monday 9 September 1996)
‘Slim Pickins’ (written by Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno)
‘Pretending’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)
‘Love Don’t Care’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015) and Ronnie Reno

Ronnie Reno & The Reno Brothers (Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno): 'Drawing From The Well' (Pinecastle Records, 1996)

In 1996, Ronnie Reno & The Reno Brothers (Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno) saw the release of ‘Drawing From The Well’ (Pinecastle Records, 1996), which included the following tracks:

‘Cruel Love’, which was written by Red Smiley (Sunday 17 May 1925 – Sunday 2 January 1972)

‘No Longer A Sweetheart of Mine’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)
/ this track featured Suzanne Cox (lead vocal) and Sidney Cox (baritone vocal)

‘Unwanted Love’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)
/ this track featured Ronnie Bowman (lead vocal)

‘Please Remember That I Love You’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)
/ this track featured Russell Moore (lead vocal) and Ray Deaton (tenor vocal)

‘Banjo Riff’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)

‘There’s Another Baby’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)
/ this track featured Ronnie McCoury (lead vocal, mandolin)

‘A Pretty Wreath For Mother’s Grave’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)

‘Maybe You Will Change Your Mind’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984) and Red Smiley (Sunday 17 May 1925 – Sunday 2 January 1972)
/ this track featured Russell Moore (lead vocal) and Ray Deaton (tenor vocal)

‘Talk of The Town’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)
/ this track featured Ronnie Bowman (lead vocal)

‘Trail of Sorrow’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)
/ this track featured David Parmley (lead vocal)

‘Charlotte Breakdown’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)

‘I’m Using My Bible For A Roadmap’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984) and Charles Schroeder / this track featured Suzanne Cox (lead vocal) and Sidney Cox (baritone vocal)

In 1997, The Reno Brothers (Ronnie Reno, Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno) were nominated for an International Bluegrass Music Association Award.

Ronnie Reno & The Reno Brothers (Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno): 'Three Part Harmony' (Pinecastle Records, 1998)

On Wednesday 25 February 1998, Ronnie Reno & The Reno Brothers (Dale Reno and Don Wayne Reno) saw the release of ‘Three Part Harmony’ (Pinecastle Records, 1998), which included the following tracks:

‘Midnight Lover’s Express’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
‘Hard To Survive’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
‘Blue Ridge Side of Blue’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
‘Crosstie Junction’ (written by Don Wayne Reno)
‘Kentucky Serenade’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015) and Ronnie Reno
‘Serious Love’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015) and Ronnie Reno
‘Drake’s Creek Reel’ (written by Dale Reno)
‘Movie Time Blues’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015) and Ronnie Reno

‘Let In The Guiding Light’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)
/ this track featured Robin Smith

‘Somewhere Tonight’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)
‘Tarnation’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)
‘Always Late (With Your Kisses)’, which was written by Blackie Crawford and Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 – Saturday 19 July 1975)

Ronnie Reno & New Tradition: 'Portfolio' (Shell Point Records, 2002)

On Tuesday 15 October 2002, Ronnie Reno & New Tradition saw the release of ‘Portfolio’ (Shell Point Records, 2002), which included the following tracks:

‘I’m Using My Bible For A Roadmap’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984) and Charles Schroeder
‘I Know You’re Married, But I Love You Still’, which was written by Mack Magaha (1929 – Friday 15 August 2003) and Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)
‘Highway of Love’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
‘September In Miami’, which was written by Merle Haggard(Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Freight Train Boogie’ (written by Jim Scott)
‘Listening To The Rain’ (written by Don Devaney)
‘Traveling’ (written by Tiny Moore and Ronnie Reno)
‘Boogie Grass Band’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
‘Sweetheart Slayer’, which was written by Wayne Carson(Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015) and Ronnie Reno
‘American Trilogy’, which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 – Sunday 29 September 2002)
‘Kneel Down’ (written by Carlton Haney)
‘I Need That Shoulder (After All)’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015) and Ronnie Reno
‘Pain of Loving You’, which was written by Dolly Parton and Porter Wagoner (Friday 12 August 1927 – Sunday 28 October 2007)

Ronnie Reno & New Tradition: 'Ronnie Reno & New Tradition: In Concert' (Shell Point Records, 2004)

On Tuesday 5 October 2004, Ronnie Reno & New Tradition saw the release of ‘Ronnie Reno & New Tradition: In Concert’ (Shell Point Records, 2004), which included the following tracks:

‘Drifting With The Tide’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984) and Arthur Lee ‘Red’ Smiley (Sunday 17 May 1925 – Sunday 2 January 1972)
‘Mr. Coachman’, which was written by Ronnie Reno and Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015)
‘T For Texas’
Hard To Survive’ (written by Ronnie Reno)

‘Mandolina’ (written by 
Herschel Sizemore) / this track featured Herschel Sizemore

‘High On A Hilltop’, which was written by 
Tommy Collins (Sunday 28 September 1930 – Tuesday 14 March 2000)
‘I Wouldn’t Change You if I Could’, which was written by James ‘Arthur Q. Smith’ Pritchett (11 December 1909 – Thursday 21 March 1963)
Love, Please Come Home’ (written by Leon Jackson)
Talk of The Town’, which was written by Don Reno (Monday 21 February 1927 – Tuesday 16 October 1984)
Nine Pound Hammer’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
Kentucky Gold’, which was written by Ronnie Reno and Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015)
‘Bully of The Town’

At the time of the acquisition of this Gene Watson ‘Peer’s Quote’, in March 2013, Ronnie Reno was heading The Reno Tradition, an act which encapsulated some of the greatest sounds and moments of traditional bluegrass music.

Ronnie Reno’s life in music has seen his wide-ranging accomplishments earn him any number of honours.

Ronnie Reno created, produced and starred in his own cable television show, ‘Reno’s Old Time Music Festival’, which could be seen in twenty-eight million households and earned a nomination for the prestigious Cable Ace Award for ‘Best Musical Series’.

Ronnie Reno received the ‘Distinguished Achievement Award’ from the International Bluegrass Music Association (IBMA) and also served on the board of directors of The International Bluegrass Music Museum in Owensboro, Kentucky and The Kentucky Centre for Traditional Music at Morehead State University.

Today, Ronnie Reno & The New Tradition continue to travel and take bluegrass music to fans everywhere; they carry the tradition forward to audiences with a wonderful balance of integrity and entertainment value.

Ronnie Reno: 'Lessons Learned' (Rural Rhythm Records, 2015)

On Tuesday 17 March 2015, Ronnie Reno & The New Tradition – Mike Scott (banjo), Heath Van Winkle (bass), John Maberry (mandolin) and Steve Day (fiddle) – saw the release of ‘Lessons Learned’ (Rural Rhythm Records, 2015), which included the following tracks:

‘Lower Than Lonesome’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
‘Lessons Learned’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
‘I Think of You’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
‘Sweet Rosa Lee’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
‘Deep Part of Your Heart’ (written by Ronnie Reno)

‘Reno’s Mando Magic’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
/ this track was an instrumental

‘Trail of Sorrow’ (written by Ronnie Reno) / Reno & Smiley

‘All That’s Worth Remembering’, which was written by Ronnie Reno and Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015)
‘Our Last Good-Bye’ (written by Ronnie Reno)
‘Bad News At Home’ (written by Ronnie Reno)

Always Late (With Your Kisses)’, which was written by Blackie Crawford and Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 – Saturday 19 July 1975) / this track featured guest vocals from David Frizzell

Personnel involved in the recording of Ronnie Reno & The New Tradition’s ‘Lessons Learned’ (Rural Rhythm Records, 2015), included the following:

Ronnie Reno (vocals)
Mike Scott (banjo)
Heath Van Winkle (bass)
John Maberry (mandolin)
Steve Day (fiddle)
Heath Van Winkle and Sonya Isaacs (harmony vocals)
David Frizzell (guest vocals)

The Malpass Brothers: 'Lonely Street' (Billy Jam Records / Orchard / Malpass Records, 2023)

The Malpass Brothers (Christopher Malpass and Taylor Dunn) recorded Ronnie Reno’s ‘Love Slips Away’, which was co-written with Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016), and included the track on ‘Lonely Street’ (Billy Jam Records / Orchard / Malpass Records, 2023).



Ronnie Reno

‚ÄĘ Visit Ronnie Reno’s official site at ronniereno.com