Gene Watson Peer’s Quote from Scott Joss: October 2021

Gene Watson’s Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as ‘the singer’s singer’ – and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson’s Peers, who were contacted during 2021, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Scott Joss, which he submitted to this site on Saturday 30 October 2021.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to Scott Joss who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online ‘celebration of a Lone Star Hero’.

Scott Joss



Scott Joss
This quote was submitted on Saturday 30 October 2021.

‘I am a big Gene Watson fan!

A true representative of real country music!’

Thank you, Scott Joss, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Scott Joss…

Scott Joss

Scott Joss was born on Tuesday 1 May 1962 in Long Beach, California.

Scott Joss’ early musical memories include marching around the dining room table with his Dad, trying to produce a recognisable melody on their harmonicas.  Scott Joss had a little student-sized gut string guitar, soon took a group guitar class, learned a few chords, then worked for hours on melodies like ‘Greensleeves’ and ‘Yesterday’.

In 1970, Scott Joss’ family moved to Redding, California.

The musical ‘aha’ moment did not come for Scott Joss until 1972 in Redding, California when a legendary local fiddle player, known now as Jana Jae, decided to see if she could get kids in the local elementary schools interested in ‘old time fiddling’.  Scott Joss said ‘She made the rounds to all the schools…just her and her fiddle.  When Jana came to Bonneyville Elementary School, all the kids, from first to sixth grade, were asked to gather in the ‘multi purpose gym’ for an assembly.  They all sat on the floor in a big circle around this beautiful lady holding a fiddle.  She smiled and began to play…and life, for little Scotty, was never the same.  I remember she played ‘Soldier’s Joy’, ‘Blue Valley Waltz’ and then ‘Orange Blossom Special’…and that was it!  My parents rented me a 3/4 size fiddle and my life was changed forever’

Billie 'Tiny' Moore (Wednesday 12 May 1920 - Tuesday 15 December 1987)

The fiddle then became the driving force in Scott Joss’ life.  1972 started a long run of State and National fiddle contests, culminating in a three year run as California State Men’s Champion fiddler, and a fourth place win at the National contest in Weiser, ID and a meeting with Billie ‘Tiny’ Moore (Wednesday 12 May 1920 – Tuesday 15 December 1987), a long time fiddle player and mandolinist for Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016), who told Merle about ‘this kid from Redding’, who might have potential.

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)

This led to Scott Joss’ first road trip with the great Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) in 1981, with the first show being in New York City at Carnegie Hall.  Not quite prepared for the ‘big time’, after a three week tour, Merle sent Scott back to Redding with the promise to keep an eye on him, which he did.

After seven years of honky tonk barroom work on America’s West Coast, Scott Joss got a call, in 1988, from Pete Anderson, the producer and guitar player with Dwight Yoakam, asking if Scott Joss would like the fiddle/mandolin/accoustic guitar/harmony vocal gig with Dwight Yoakam.  That started a fifteen year run, between 1988 and 2003, of live shows, television and studio recordings with yet another of California’s country music legendary singer/songwriters.

Dwight Yoakam: 'Buenas Noches From A Lonely Room' (Reprise Records, 1988)
Buck Owens: 'Ain't It Amazing, Gracie' (Capitol Records, 1973)

On Tuesday 2 August 1988, Dwight Yoakam saw the release of ‘Buenas Noches From A Lonely Room’ (Reprise Records, 1988), which was produced by Pete Anderson, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Streets of Bakersfield’, which was written by Homer Joy (Thursday 12 April 1945 – Tuesday 11 September 2012) (No.1 for one week in October 1988) / this track, which was a duet with Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006), was originally recorded by Buck Owens, who included it on ‘Ain’t It Amazing, Gracie’ (Capitol Records, 1973)

‘I Sang Dixie’ (written by Dwight Yoakam) (No.1 for One week in February / March 1989)

‘I Got You’ (written by Dwight Yoakam) (No.5, 1989)

‘Buenas Noches From A Lonely Room (She Wore Red Dresses)’ (written by Dwight Yoakam) (No.46, 1989)

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Buenas Noches From A Lonely Room’ (Reprise Records, 1988) also included the following tracks:

‘One More Name’ (Dwight Yoakam)
‘What I Don’t Know’ (Dwight Yoakam)

Johnny Cash: 'Johnny Cash Sings The Songs That Made Him Famous' (Sun Records, 1958)

‘Home of The Blues’, which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 – Friday 12 September 2003), Glenn Douglas Tubb (Saturday 29 June 1935 – Saturday 22 May 2021) and Lillie McAlpine / the original version of this track was recorded by Johnny Cash, who included it on ‘Johnny Cash Sings The Songs That Made Him Famous’ (Sun Records, 1958); Johnny Cash’s version of the track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1957, and No.88 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1957

‘I Hear You Knockin’, which was written by 
Joseph Denton ‘Jay’ Miller (Friday 5 May 1922 – Saturday 23 March 1996)
‘Floyd County’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)

Hank Locklin: 'Send Me The Pillow You Dream On & Other Great Country Hits' (RCA Victor Records, 1967)

‘Send Me The Pillow’ That You Dream On’, which was written by Hank Locklin (Friday 15 February 1918 – Sunday 8 March 2009) / the original version of this track was recorded by Hank Locklin, whose version reached No.7 on the Billboard C&W Best Sellers Chart in 1958, No.5 on the Billboard Most Played C&W by Jockeys Chart in 1958, No.77 on the Billboard Top 100 Sides Chart in 1958, and No.4 on the Dutch Singles Chart in The Netherlands in 1958; a re-recording of the track was subsequently included on Hank Locklin’s ‘Send Me The Pillow You Dream On & Other Great Country Hits’ (RCA Victor Records, 1967)

‘Hold On To God’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)

Personnel involved in the recording of Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Buenas Noches From A Lonely Room’ (Reprise Records, 1988), which was produced by Pete Anderson, and included the following:

Dwight Yoakam (lead vocals, acoustic guitar, percussion)
Pete Anderson (acoustic guitar, electric guitar, six-string bass guitar, background vocals, percussion; mandolin on ‘Send Me The Pillow’)
Thomas Rexton ‘Tom’ Brumley (Wednesday 11 December 1935 – Tuesday 3 February 2009) (pedal steel guitar)
Al Perkins (Dobro)
Taras Prodaniuk (bass guitar)
Dusty Wakeman (six-string bass guitar on ‘Hold On To God’, percussion)
Jeff Donavan (drums)
Don Reed (fiddle)
Skip Edwards (piano)
Scott Joss (mandolin)
Flaco Jiménez (accordion)
Maria McKee (background vocals on ‘Send Me The Pillow You Dream On’)
Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006) (duet vocals on ‘Streets of Bakersfield’)
The Lonesome Strangers (Jeff Rymes and Randy Weeks) (background vocals on ‘Hold On To God’)
Jim Lauderdale (background vocals)
Brantley Kearns (background vocals on ‘What I Don’t Know’)

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Buenas Noches From A Lonely Room’ (Reprise Records, 1988) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988, No.68 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1988, No.17 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1988, No.47 on the Canadian Albums Chart in 1988, No.37 on the RIANZ New Zealand Albums Chart in 1988, and No.37 on the Swedish Albums Chart in 1988.

Dwight Yoakam: 'If There Was A Way' (Reprise Records, 1990)

On Tuesday 30 October 1990, Dwight Yoakam saw the release of ‘If There Was A Way’ (Reprise Records, 1990), which was produced by Pete Anderson, and included six tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Turn It On, Turn It Up, Turn Me Loose’ (written by Kostas and Wayland Patton) (No.11, 1990) / this track also reached No.5 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1990

‘You’re The One’ (written by Dwight Yoakam) (No.5, 1991) / this track also reached No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1991

‘Nothing’s Changed Here’ (written by Dwight Yoakam and Kostas) (No.15, 1991) / this track also reached No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1991

‘It Only Hurts When I Cry’, which was written by Dwight Yoakam and Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 – Sunday 25 October 1992) (No.7, 1992) / this track also reached No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1992

‘The Heart That You Own’ (written by Dwight Yoakam) (No.18, 1992) / this track also reached No.13 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1992

‘Send A Message To My Heart’ (written by Kostas and Kathy Louvin) (No.47, 1992) / this track, which was a duet with Patty Loveless, also reached No.30 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1992

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘If There Was A Way’ (Reprise Records, 1990) also included the following tracks:

‘The Distance Between You & Me’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Takes A Lot To Rock You’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Sad, Sad Music’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Since I Started Drinkin’ Again’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘If There Was A Way’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘I Don’t Need It Done’ (written by John Sieger)
‘Dangerous Man’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
Let’s Work Together’ (written by Wilbert Harrison)

Personnel involved in the recording of Dwight Yoakam’s ‘If There Was A Way’ (Reprise Records, 1990) included the following:

Pete Anderson (electric guitar, acoustic guitar, baritone guitar)
Thomas Rexton ‘Tom’ Brumley (Wednesday 11 December 1935 – Tuesday 3 February 2009) (steel guitar)
Lenny Castro (percussion)
Chuck Domanico (acoustic bass)
Jeff Donavan (drums)
Skip Edwards (keyboards)
Tommy Funderburk, Jim Lauderdale, Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 – Sunday 25 October 1992), Amy Ray and Emily Saliers (background vocals)
Scott Joss (fiddle, mandolin)
Patty Loveless (duet vocals on ‘Send A Message To My Heart’)
Tim O’Brien (mandolin, background vocals)
Dean Parks (acoustic guitar)
Al Perkins (banjo, Dobro, steel guitar, lap steel guitar)
Taras Prodaniuk (bass guitar, six-string bass guitar)
Don Reed (fiddle)
Bill Ross (strings)
Dwight Yoakam (lead vocals, acoustic guitar)

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘If There Was A Way’ (Reprise Records, 1990) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1990, and No.96 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1990.

Dwight Yoakam: 'This Time' (Reprise Records, 1993)

On Tuesday 23 March 1993, Dwight Yoakam saw the release of ‘This Time’ (Reprise Records, 1993), which was produced by Pete Anderson, and included five tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Ain’t That Lonely Yet’ (written by Kostas and James House) (No.2, 1993) / this track also reached No.101 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1993, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1993

‘A Thousand Miles From Nowhere’ (written by Dwight Yoakam) (No.2, 1993) / this track also reached No.3 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1993

‘Fast As You’ (written by Dwight Yoakam) (No.2, 1993) / this track also reached No.70 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1993, and No.5 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1993

‘Try Not To Look So Pretty’ () (No.14, 1994) / this track also reached No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1994

‘Pocket of A Clown’ (written by Dwight Yoakam) (No.22, 1994) / this track also reached No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1994

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘This Time’ (Reprise Records, 1993) also included the following tracks:

‘Home For Sale’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘This Time’ (written by Dwight Yoakam and Kostas)
‘Two Doors Down’ (written by Dwight Yoakam and Kostas)
‘King of Fools’ (written by Dwight Yoakam and Kostas)
‘Wild Ride’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Lonesome Roads’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)

Personnel involved in the recording of Dwight Yoakam’s ‘This Time’ (Reprise Records, 1993) included the following:

Beth Andersen, Tommy Funderburk, Jim Haas, Carl Jackson and Jim Lauderdale (background vocals)
Pete Anderson (electric guitar)
Chuck Domanico (upright bass)
Jeff Donavan (drums)
Skip Edwards (keyboards)
Scott Humphrey (programming)
Scott Joss and Don Reed (fiddle)
Dean Parks (acoustic guitar)
Al Perkins (Dobro, lap steel guitar, pedal steel guitar)
Taras Prodaniuk (bass guitar)
Dwight Yoakam (lead vocals, background vocals, acoustic guitar)
Paul Buckmaster (strings conducted and arranged)
Suzy Katayama (strings contraction)

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘This Time’ (Reprise Records, 1993) reached No.19 on the Canadian RPM Albums Chart in 1993, No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1993, No.25 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1993, and No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1993.

Dwight Yoakam: 'Gone' (Reprise Records, 1995)

On Tuesday 31 October 1995, Dwight Yoakam saw the release of ‘Gone’ (Reprise Records, 1995), which was produced by Pete Anderson, and included four tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Nothing’ (written by Dwight Yoakam and Kostas) (No.20, 1995) / this track also reached No.20 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1995

‘Gone (That’ll Be Me)’ (written by Dwight Yoakam) (No.51, 1996) / this track also reached No.43 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1996

‘Sorry You Asked?’ (written by Dwight Yoakam) (No.59, 1996) / this track also reached No.73 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1996

‘Heart of Stone’ (written by Dwight Yoakam and Kostas) / this track did not chart on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart, but it did reach No.90 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1996

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Gone’ (Reprise Records, 1995) also included the following tracks:

‘Near You’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Don’t Be Sad’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Never Hold You’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘This Much I Know’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Baby Why Not’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘One More Night’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)

Personnel involved in the recording of Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Gone’ (Reprise Records, 1995) included the following:

Murray Adler (string contractor)
Beth Anderson, Maxi Anderson, John Batdorf, Anthony Crawford, Jim Haas, Carl Jackson, Jim Lauderdale, Tommy Funderburk, The Rembrandts (Phillip Solem and Danny Wilde), Carmen Twillie, Joy Lynn White and Danny Wilde (background vocals)
Pete Anderson (electric guitar, electric sitar, harmonica, hand claps)
James E. Bond Jr.(string arranger & conductor)
Thomas Rexton ‘Tom’ Brumley (Wednesday 11 December 1935 – Tuesday 3 February 2009) (lap steel guitar, pedal steel guitar)
Jim Christie (drums)
Skip Edwards (keyboards, organ, piano, accordion)
Scott Joss (fiddle)
Steve ‘Gonna Get A RIV’ Moore and Gary ‘Double Dub’ White (hand claps)
Dean Parks (acoustic guitar)
Lon Price (tenor saxophone)
Taras Prodaniuk (bass guitar)
Greg Smith (baritone saxophone)
‘Tempo’ (percussion)
Lee Thornburg (horn arrangements)
Dusty Wakeman (six-string bass guitar, hand claps)
Dwight Yoakam (lead vocals, background vocals, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, hand claps)

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Gone’ (Reprise Records, 1995) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1995, No.30 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1995, No.17 on the Australian ARIA Chart in 1995, No.5 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1995, and No.42 on the Canadian Albums Chart in 1995.

Scott Joss: 'Souvenirs' (Little Dog Records, 1996)

In 1996, Scott Joss saw the release of ‘Souvenirs’ (Little Dog Records, 1996), which included the following tracks:

‘Doin’ Time In Bakersfield’ (written by Jim Lauderdale)
‘Mary Got A Baby’
‘I Never Got Anywhere With You’
‘She’s So Lonely’
‘Workin’ Girl’
‘Home Before Dark’
‘Souvenirs’
‘One of The Lonely’
‘Stay Out of My Arms’ (written by Jim Lauderdale)
‘My Baby’s Gone’
‘Country King of The Blues’

In 1996, Scott Joss’ ‘Souvenirs’ (Little Dog Records, 1996) reached No.7 on Gavin’s Americana Chart.

Dwight Yoakam: 'Under The Covers' (Reprise Records, 1997)

On Tuesday 15 July 1997, Dwight Yoakam saw the release of ‘Under The Covers’ (Reprise Records, 1997), which was produced by Pete Anderson, and included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Claudette’, which was written by Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 – Tuesday 6 December 1988) (No.47, 1997) / this track also reached No.44 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1997

‘Baby Don’t Go’, which was written by Salvatore Phillip ‘Sonny’ Bono (Saturday 16 February 1935 – Monday 5 January 1998) / this track, which was a duet with Sheryl Crow, did not chart on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart (in 1997) or the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart (in 1997)

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Under The Covers’ (Reprise Records, 1997) also included the following tracks:

‘Train In Vain’, which was written by Mick Jones and John Graham Mellor (Joe Strummer) (Thursday 21 August 1952 – Sunday 22 December 2002)
‘Tired of Waiting For You’ (written by Ray Davies)
‘Good Time Charlie’s Got The Blues’ (written by Danny O’Keefe)
‘Playboy’, which was written by Robert Bateman, Brian Holland, Gladys Catherine Horton (Wednesday 30 May 1945 – Wednesday 26 January 2011) and William ‘Mickey’ Stevenson
‘Wichita Lineman’ (written by Jimmy Webb)
‘Here Comes The Night’, which was written by Bertrand Russell Berns (Friday 8 November 1929 – Saturday 30 December 1967)
‘The Last Time’ (written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards)
‘Things We Said Today’, which was written by John Lennon (Wednesday 9 October 1940 – Monday 8 December 1980) and Paul McCartney
‘North To Alaska’ (written by Mike Phillips)
‘T For Texas’, which was written by Jimmie Rodgers (Monday 18 September 1933 – Monday 18 January 2021)

Personnel involved in the recording of Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Under The Covers’ (Reprise Records, 1997) included the following:

Dwight Yoakam (lead vocals, guitar, percussion)
Alex Acuña (percussion)
Beth Andersen, Anthony Crawford, Tommy Funderburk, Lonesome Strangers, Jeff Rymes and Randy Weeks (background vocals)
Pete Anderson (guitar, 6-string bass, mandolin, background vocals)
Thomas Rexton ‘Tom’ Brumley (Wednesday 11 December 1935 – Tuesday 3 February 2009) (pedal steel guitar, lap steel guitar)
Jim Christie (drums)
Sheryl Crow (duet vocals, background vocals on ‘Baby Don’t Go’)
Chuck Domanico (upright bass)
Skip Edwards (piano, organ, accordion, keyboards)
Ralph Forbes (drum programming)
Eric Jorgensen and Nick Lane (trombone)
Scott Joss (fiddle, mandolin)
Dean Parks (guitar)
Lon Price and Greg Smith (saxophone)
Taras Prodaniuk (bass, upright bass)
Ralph Stanley (Friday 25 February 1927 – Thursday 23 June 2016) (banjo, vocals)
Chris Tedesco and Lee Thornburg (trumpet)

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Under The Covers’ (Reprise Records, 1997) reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1997, No.92 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1997, No.74 on the Australian ARIA Chart in 1997, No.8 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1997, and No.84 on the Canadian Albums Chart in 1997.

Dwight Yoakam: 'Come On Christmas' (Reprise Records, 1997)

On Tuesday 26 August 1997, Dwight Yoakam saw the release of ‘Come On Christmas’ (Reprise Records, 1997), which was produced by Pete Anderson, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Santa Claus Is Back In Town’, which was written by Jerome ‘Jerry’ Leiber (Tuesday 25 April 1933 – Monday 22 August 2011) and Mike Stoller (No.60, 1997)

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Come On Christmas’ (Reprise Records, 1997) also included the following tracks:

‘Come On Christmas’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Run Run Rudolph’, which was written by Marvin Brodie and John David Marks (10 November 1909 – Tuesday 3 September 1985)

‘Silver Bells’, which was written by Ray Evans and Jay Livingston (28 March 1915 – Wednesday 17 October 2001) / this track was a duet with Beth Andersen

‘I’ll Be Home For Christmas’, which was written by Kim Gannon, Walter Kent and Buck Ram (Thursday 21 November 1907 – Tuesday 1 January 1991)
‘Silent Night’, which was written by Franz Xaver Gruber (25 November 1787 – 7 June 1863) and Joseph Mohr (11 December 1792 – 4 December 1848)
‘The Christmas Song’, which was written by Mel TormĂ© (Sunday 13 September 1925 – Saturday 5 June 1999) and Robert Wells (Sunday 15 October 1922 – Monday 28 September 1998)
‘Away In A Manger’ (Public Domain)
‘Here Comes Santa Claus’, which was written by Gene Autry (Sunday 29 September 1907 – Friday 2 October 1998) and Oakley Haldeman
‘Santa Can’t Stay’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)

Personnel involved in the recording of Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Come On Christmas’ (Reprise Records, 1997) included the following:

Beth Anderson (duet vocals on ‘Silver Bells’)
Pete Anderson (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Jim Christie and Davey Crockett (drums)
Skip Edwards (accordion, keyboards, organ, piano)
Tommy Funderburk, Jim Lauderdale and Ricky Skaggs (background vocals)
Scott Joss (fiddle, mandolin)
Brantley Kearns (fiddle)
John Pierce and Taras Prodaniuk (bass)
Marty Rifkin (Dobro)
Eddy Shaver (Wednesday 20 June 1962 – Sunday 31 December 2000) (electric guitar)
Beverly Dahlke-Smith (clarinet, flute, tenor saxophone)
Greg Smith (alto saxophone, baritone saxophone)
Lee Thornburg (horn arrangements, trombone, trumpet)
Dwight Yoakam (autoharp, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, lead vocals)

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Come On Christmas’ (Reprise Records, 1997) reached No.32 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1997.

Dwight Yoakam: 'A Long Way Home' (Reprise Records, 1998)

On Tuesday 9 June 1998, Dwight Yoakam saw the release of ‘A Long Way Home’ (Reprise Records, 1998), which was produced by Pete Anderson, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘Things Change’ (written by Dwight Yoakam) (No.17, 1998) / this track also reached No.99 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1998, and No.23 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1998

‘These Arms’ (written by Dwight Yoakam) (No.57, 1998) / this track also reached No.79 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1998

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘A Long Way Home’ (Reprise Records, 1998) also included the following tracks:

‘Same Fool’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘The Curse’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Yet To Succeed’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘I Wouldn’t Put It Past Me’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘That’s Okay’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Only Want You More’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘I’ll Just Take These’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘A Long Way Home’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Listen’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Traveler’s Lantern’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
Maybe You Like It, Maybe You Don’t’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)

Personnel involved in the recording of Dwight Yoakam’s ‘A Long Way Home’ (Reprise Records, 1998) included the following:

Dwight Yoakam (lead vocals, acoustic guitar)
Beth Andersen, Tommy Funderburk, Carl Jackson, Jim Lauderdale and Bonnie Bramlett Sheridan (background vocals)
Pete Anderson (hand claps, finger snaps, electric guitar, lap steel guitar, acoustic guitar)
Jim Christie (drums)
Chuck Domanico (upright bass)
Skip Edwards (keyboards, piano, Hammond B-3 organ, Wurlitzer)
Scott Joss (fiddle)
Dean Parks (acoustic guitar)
Taras Prodaniuk (bass guitar)
Marty Rifkin (Dobro, pedal steel guitar)
Ralph Stanley (Friday 25 February 1927 – Thursday 23 June 2016) (banjo, background vocals)
‘Tempo’ (percussion)
Murray Adler and Jimmy Boyd (strings conducting)

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘A Long Way Home’ (Reprise Records, 1998) reached No.67 on the Canadian RPM Albums Chart in 1998, No.12 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1998, No.60 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1998, and No.11 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1998.

Scott Joss: 'A New Reason To Care' (Little Dog Records, 2000)

In 2000, Scott Joss saw the release of ‘A New Reason To Care’ (Little Dog Records, 2000), which included the following tracks:

‘I Don’t Mean Maybe’
‘Daddy’s Honky Tonk’
‘Even If You Have To Lie’
‘Free At Last’
‘If I Were You’
‘Lonely Sounds’
‘A New Reason To Care’
‘Rose In The Snow’
‘Without Making A Sound’
‘You’re The Reason’

Dwight Yoakam: 'Tomorrow's Sounds Today' (Reprise Records, 2000)

On Tuesday 31 October 2000, Dwight Yoakam saw the release of ‘Tomorrow’s Sounds Today’ (Reprise Records, 2000), which was produced by Pete Anderson, and included three tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘What Do You Know About Love’ (written by Dwight Yoakam) (No.26, 2000)

‘I Want You To Want Me’ (written by Rick Nielsen) (No.49, 2001) / this track

‘I Was There’, which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006) / this track, which was a duet with Buck Owens, was released as a single in 2001, but it did not chart

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Tomorrow’s Sounds Today’ (Reprise Records, 2000) also included the following tracks:

‘Love Caught Up To Me’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Time Spent Missing You’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Free To Go’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘A Promise You Can’t Keep’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘A Place To Cry’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘The Sad Side of Town’, which was written by Dwight Yoakam and Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006)
‘Dreams of Clay’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘For Love’s Sake’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘The Heartaches Are Free’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘A World of Blue’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)

‘Alright, I’m Wrong’ (written by Pete Anderson and Cisco) / this track was a duet with Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006)

‘I Was There’, which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006)
 / this track was a duet with Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006)

Personnel involved in the recording of Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Tomorrow’s Sounds Today’ (Reprise Records, 2000) included the following:

Pete Anderson (electric guitar, baritone guitar, percussion)
Al Bonhomme (acoustic guitar)
Jim Christie (drums)
Jonathan Clark and Jim Lauderdale (background vocals)
Skip Edwards (keyboards)
Chris Hillman (mandolin)
Flaco Jiménez (accordion)
Scott Joss and Don Reed (fiddle)
Gary Morse (steel guitar, lap steel guitar)
Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 – Saturday 25 March 2006) (duet vocals on ‘Alright, I’m Wrong’ and ‘I Was There’)
Taras Prodaniuk (bass guitar)
Dwight Yoakam (lead vocals, acoustic guitar)

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Tomorrow’s Sounds Today’ (Reprise Records, 2000) reached No.28 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 2000, No.68 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2000, and No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2000.

Dwight Yoakam: 'South of Heaven, West of Hell (Reprise Records, 2001)

On Tuesday 2 October 2001, Dwight Yoakam saw the release of ‘South of Heaven, West of Hell (Reprise Records, 2001), the soundtrack album to the motion picture of the same name in which he starred, co-wrote and directed.

Dwight Yoakam portrayed a lawman in the early 1900s in the ‘wild west’ of the Arizona Territory.  Half of the tracks on the album are country music tracks, while the other tracks are short snippets of straight dialog scenes from the film itself.  There are many well-known co-stars in the movie, including Peter Fonda (Friday 23 February 1940 – Friday 16 August 2019), Bridget Fonda, Paul Reubens, Billy Bob Thornton, Warren Zevon (Friday 24 January 1947 – Sunday 7 September 2003) and Vince Vaughn.

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘South of Heaven, West of Hell (Reprise Records, 2001), which was also his only album for Warner Bros. Records after leaving Reprise Records, included the following tracks:

‘Words’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)

‘Old Friend’ / this track was performed by Joe Unger

‘Who At The Door Is Standing’ (written by M.B.C. Slade and A.B. Everett)
/ this track was a duet with Bekka Bramlett

‘Good Afternoon’
/ this track was performed by Vince Vaughn and Dwight Yoakam

‘Tears For Two’ (written by Dwight Yoakam and Holly Lamar)

‘[Ma’am’ / this track was performed by Audrey Lowe and Luke Askew

‘The Darkest Hour’ (traditional)

‘When You Was Shot’ / this track was performed by Natalie Canerday and Otto Felix (Thursday 31 December 1942 – Saturday 13 December 2008)

‘The First Thing Smokin’ (written by Dwight Yoakam and Billy Gibbons)

‘How Long Was It?’ / this track was performed by Terry McIlvaine and Billy Bob Thornton

‘What’s Left of Me’ (written by Dwight Yoakam and Mick Jagger)

‘All Anybody Can Do’ / this track was performed by Bridget Fonda

‘Somewhere’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)

‘A Lotta Good People’ / this track was performed by Bo Hopkins

‘The Last Surrender’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)

‘Show ‘Em Your Badge’ / this track was performed by Dwight Yoakam, Joe Unger and Terry McIlvaine

‘No Future In Sight’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)

‘Existence’ / this track was performed by Vince Vaughn and Dwight Yoakam

‘It Is Well With My Soul’ (written by Horatio Spafford and Philip Bliss)

‘Words’ (written by Dwight Yoakam) / this track, which was an instrumental, was performed by Lee Thornburg

Personnel involved in the recording of Dwight Yoakam’s ‘South of Heaven, West of Hell (Reprise Records, 2001) included the following:

John Acosta (cello)
Pete Anderson (banjo, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, baritone guitar, mandolin, percussion, piano)
Chris Bleth (bass clarinet, oboe, violin)
Bekka Bramlett, Jonathan Clark, Otto Felix (Thursday 31 December 1942 – Saturday 13 December 2008), Billy Bob Thornton and Vince Vaughn (background vocals)
Jim Christie (drums)
Skip Edwards (keyboards)
Tim Goodwin (classical guitar)
Scott Joss (fiddle)
Jim Lathem (string arrangements)
Gary Morse (lap steel guitar, pedal steel guitar)
John Noreyko (tuba)
Taras Prodaniuk (bass guitar)
Lee Thornburg (trombone, trumpet, horn arrangements)
David Woodford (saxophone)
Dwight Yoakam (Dobro, acoustic guitar, lead vocals)

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘South of Heaven, West of Hell (Reprise Records, 2001) reached No.59 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2001.

Dwight Yoakam: 'Population Me' (Audium Records, 2003)

On Tuesday 24 June 2003, Dwight Yoakam saw the release of ‘Population Me’ (Audium Records, 2003), which was produced by Pete Anderson, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘The Back of Your Hand’ (written by Gregg Lee Henry) No.52, 2003)

‘The Late Great Golden State’ (written by Mike Stinson) No.52, 2003)

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Population Me’ (Audium Records, 2003) also included the following tracks:

‘No Such Thing’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Fair To Midland’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘An Exception To The Rule’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Population Me’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Stayin’ Up Late (Thinkin’ About It)’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)
‘Trains & Boats & Planes’, which was written by Burt Bacharach (Saturday 12 May 1928 – Wednesday 8 February 2023) and
Hal David (Wednesday 25 May 1921 – Saturday 1 September 2012)

‘If Teardrops Were Diamonds’ (written by Dwight Yoakam) / this track was a duet with Willie Nelson

‘I’d Avoid Me Too’ (written by Dwight Yoakam)

Personnel involved in the recording of Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Population Me’ (Audium Records, 2003) included the following:

Pete Anderson (acoustic guitar, electric guitar, mandolin, percussion, string arrangements)
Al Bonhomme (acoustic guitar)
Jonathan Clark, Tommy Funderburk and Timothy B. Schmit (background vocals)
Skip Edwards (keyboards, string arrangements)
Bob Glaub (bass guitar)
Don Heffington (drums)
Scott Joss and Gabe Witcher (fiddle)
Gary Morse (banjo, Dobro, pedal steel guitar)
Willie Nelson (duet vocals on ‘If Teardrops Were Diamonds’)
Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 – Wednesday 28 March 2012) (banjo)
Kevin Sepriano (handclapping)
Lee Thornburg (trumpet, trombone)
Dwight Yoakam (acoustic guitar, lead vocals)

Dwight Yoakam’s ‘Population Me’ (Audium Records, 2003) reached No.75 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2003, No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2003, and No.3 on the Billboard Independent Albums Chart in 2003.

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)

In 2003, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016), once again, brought Scott Joss back to The Strangers, which began a kind of ‘pick up where we left off’ chapter in Scott’s life, and a chance for Scott to ‘give back’ to one of his biggest musical heroes.  Scott Joss played fiddle, mandolin and acoustic guitar with The Strangers until Merle Haggard‘s passing in 2016, one of the greatest honours of Scott’s musical life.

Merle Haggard: 'Like Never Before' (Hag Records, 2003)

On Tuesday 23 September 2003Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of ‘Like Never Before’ (Hag Records, 2003), which was produced by Merle Haggard and Lou Bradley, and included the following tracks:

‘Haggard (Like I’ve Never Been Before)’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Doug Colosio
‘That’s The News’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

Garbage Man’

‘Reno Blues (Philadelphia Lawyer)’
/ this track featured guest vocals from Willie Nelson

‘The Downside’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Because of Your Eyes’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Lonesome Day’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Doug Colosio
‘I Dreamed You Didn’t Love Me’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Yellow Ribbons’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘I Hate To See It Go’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Return To San Francisco’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)

Personnel involved in the recording of Merle Haggard‘s ‘Like Never Before’ (Hag Records, 2003) included the following:

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Willie Nelson (vocals, guitar)
Doug Colosio (keyboards)
Norm Hamlet (pedal steel guitar)
Andy Kaulkin (piano)
Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 – Wednesday 1 July 2015), Norman Stevens and Clint Strong (guitar)
Don Markham (saxophone, trumpet)
Mike Martin (harmonica)
Kevin Williams (bass)
Jeff Ingraham and Kenny Malone (Thursday 4 August 1938 – Thursday 26 August 2021) (drums)
Scott Joss (fiddle, guitar, background vocals)
Theresa Lane Haggard (background vocals)

Merle Haggard: 'I Wish I Was Santa Claus' (Smith Music Group Records, 2004)

On Tuesday 26 October 2004Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of ‘I Wish I Was Santa Claus’ (Smith Music Group Records, 2004), which was produced by Merle Haggard and Lou Bradley, and included the following tracks:

‘El Niño’ (written by Moore and Willie Nelson)
‘I Wish I Were Santa Claus’ (written by McDonald)
‘Christmas In Cabo San Lucas’ (written by Doug Colosio, Dyer, Joss and Williams)
‘White Christmas’, which was written by Irving Berlin (11 May 1888 – Friday 22 September 1989)
‘Jingle Bells’ (written by James Lord Pierpont)
‘Santa Claus Is Coming To Town’, which was written by John Frederick Coots and James Lamont ‘Haven’ Gillespie (6 February 1888 – Friday 14 March 1975)
‘Blue Christmas’ (written by Billy Hayes and Jay Johnson)
‘I’ll Be Home For Christmas’, which was written by Kent Gannon, James Gannon and Buck Ram (Thursday 21 November 1907 – Tuesday 1 January 1991)
‘Santa Claus & Popcorn’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer’, which was written by Johnny Marks (Wednesday 10 November 1909 – Tuesday 3 September 1985)
‘Silver Bells’ (written by Ray Evans and Jay Livingston)

‘If We Make It Through December’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
/ the original version of this track was included on Merle Haggard‘s ‘If We Make It Through December’ (Capitol Records, 1974), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for four weeks in December 1973 / January 1974)

Personnel involved in the recording of Merle Haggard‘s ‘I Wish I Was Santa Claus’ (Smith Music Group Records, 2004), included the following:

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) (vocals, guitar)
April Anderson and Theresa Lane Haggard (background vocals)
Johnnie Barber (drums)
Doug Colosio (piano, background vocals)
Scott Joss (fiddle, guitar, background vocals)
Abe Manuel Jr., Joe Manuel and Randy Mason (guitar)
Don Markham (horn, trumpet, background vocals)
Norman Stevens (guitar, background vocals)
Kevin Williams (bass, background vocals)

Merle Haggard: 'Chicago Wind' (Capitol Records, 2005)

On Tuesday 25 October 2005Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of ‘Chicago Wind’ (Capitol Records, 2005), which was produced by Mike Post and Jimmy Bowen, and included the following tracks:

‘Chicago Wind’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Where’s All The Freedom’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘White Man Singin’ The Blues’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Leavin’s Not The Only Way To Go’, which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 – Sunday 25 October 1992)
‘What I’ve Been Meaning To Say’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Mexico’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Honky Tonk Man’, which was written by Dewayne L. Blackwell (Thursday 17 September 1936 – Sunday 23 May 2021)
‘America First’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘It Always Will Be’ (written by Willie Nelson)
‘I Still Can’t Say Goodbye’ (written by Robert Blinn and James Moore)
‘Some of Us Fly’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) / this track was a duet with Toby Keith

Personnel involved in the recording of Merle Haggard‘s ‘Chicago Wind’ (Capitol Records, 2005) included the following:

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) (vocals, guitar)
Thom Bresh and Biff Watson (acoustic guitar)
Doug Colosio (keyboards)
Shannon Forrest and John ‘4 Daddman’ Robinson (drums)
Scott Joss (fiddle, mandolin)
Leland Sklar and Michael Rhodes (bass)
Don Markham (trumpet)
Brent Mason and Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (electric guitar)
Alti Ovarsson (piano)
Herb Pedersen (banjo, background vocals)
Mike Post (guitar, Fender Rhodes, Wurlitzer)
Billy Joe Walker Jr. (Friday 29 February 1952 – Tuesday 25 July 2017) (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Gabe Witcher (fiddle)

Merle Haggard‘s ‘Chicago Wind’ (Capitol Records, 2005) reached No.54 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2005.

Merle Haggard: 'I Am What I Am' (Vanguard Records, 2010)

On Tuesday 20 April 2010Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of ‘I Am What I Am’ (Vanguard Records, 2010), which was produced by Lou Bradley and Merle Haggard, and included the following tracks:

‘I’ve Seen It Go Away’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Pretty When It’s New’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Oil Tanker Train’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Live & Love Always’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘The Road To My Heart’, which was written by Freddy Powers (Tuesday 13 October 1931 – Tuesday 21 June 2016)
‘How Did You Find Me Here’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Theresa Lane Haggard)
‘We’re Falling In Love Again’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Bad Actor’, which was written by Doug Colosio, John Scott G., Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Scott Joss
‘Down At The End of The Road’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Stranger In The City’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Mexican Bands’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘I Am What I Am’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) / this track was only released on amazon.com, despite having received positive reviews as a song which stands out with a heavy bass line and social-critical lyrics

Personnel involved in the recording of Merle Haggard‘s ‘I Am What I Am’ (Vanguard Records, 2010), included the following:

Merle Haggard (fiddle, guitar, lead vocals, background vocals)
Theresa Lane Haggard (lead vocals, background vocals)
Ben Haggard (drums, guitar, soloist, background vocals)
Clair ‘Biff’ Adam (Thursday 25 June 1936 – Saturday 7 March 2020) (bass guitar, drums)
Gary Church (trombone)
Doug Colosio (piano)
Norm Hamlet (steel guitar)
Tim Howard (guitar, soloist)
Rob Ickes (Dobro)
Scott Joss (fiddle, guitar, background vocals)
Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 – Wednesday 1 July 2015) (guitar)
Don Markham (trumpet)
George Receli (drums, percussion, background vocals)
Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (guitar)

Merle Haggard‘s ‘I Am What I Am’ (Vanguard Records, 2010) reached No.18 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2010, No.77 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2010, and No.11 on the Billboard Independent Albums Chart in 2010.

Merle Haggard: 'Working in Tennessee' (Vanguard Records, 2011)

On Tuesday 4 October 2011Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of ‘Working In Tennessee’ (Vanguard Records, 2011), which was produced by Lou Bradley and Merle Haggard, and included the following tracks:

‘Working In Tennessee’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Down On The Houseboat’, which was written by Doug ColosioMerle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Theresa Lane Haggard
‘Cocaine Blues’ (written by T.J. Arnall)
‘What I Hate’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Sometimes I Dream’, which was written by Jenessa Haggard and Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Under The Bridge’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Theresa Lane Haggard
‘Too Much Boogie Woogie’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
‘Truck Driver’s Blues’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Tim Howard
‘Laugh It Off’, which was written by Doug ColosioMerle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Theresa Lane Haggard

‘Working Man Blues’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
 / this track featured guest vocals from Ben Haggard and Willie Nelson

‘Jackson’, which was written by Jerome ‘Jerry’ Leiber (Tuesday 25 April 1933 – Monday 22 August 2011) and Billy Ed Wheeler
 / this track featured guest vocals from Theresa Lane Haggard

Personnel involved in the recording of Merle Haggard‘s ‘Working in Tennessee’ (Vanguard Records, 2011) included the following:

Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016), Willie Nelson and Ben Haggard (vocals, guitar)
Clair ‘Biff’ Adam (Thursday 25 June 1936 – Saturday 7 March 2020), Gene Chrisman and Jeff Ingraham (drums)
George Receli (drums, percussion)
Doug Colosio (keyboards, piano)
Theresa Lane Haggard (background vocals)
David Hood and Kevin Williams (bass)
Tim Howard (drums, guitar)
Rob Ickes (Dobro, pedal steel guitar, slide guitar)
Scott Joss (banjo, fiddle, guitar, background vocals)
Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 – Wednesday 1 July 2015) and Reggie Young (Saturday 12 December 1936 – Thursday 17 January 2019) (guitar)
Joe Manuel (Dobro)
Don Markham (saxophone)
Bobby Wood (piano)

Merle Haggard‘s ‘Working In Tennessee’ (Vanguard Records, 2011), which was his final studio album, reached No.30 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2011, No.155 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2011, and No.25 on the Billboard Independent Albums Chart in 2011.

Following the passing of Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016), Scott Joss took a year off, in order to regroup and see what might be next.

Kris Kristofferson

A call came in 2017 asking if he could do a few shows with the great Kris Kristofferson, along with a few of the ‘alumni’ from The Strangers, which led to an ongoing musical relationship on the road.

Scott Joss: 'How Far To Jordan' (Miracle Mile Records, 2018)

Kris Kristofferson even contributed two vocal tracks on Scott Joss’ ‘How Far To Jordan’ (Miracle Mile Records, 2018), and graciously agreed to perform at the 2020 National Fiddler Hall of Fame celebration, at which Scott Joss was being inducted.  Scott Joss stated: ‘There are countless people that should be mentioned, thanked or recognised for their contributions to my musical life.  Let me say, my life would not be what it is without all of you, past and present.  I couldn’t dream anything better than this!’

In 2018, Scott Joss saw the release of ‘How Far To Jordan’ (Miracle Mile Records, 2018), which included the following tracks:

‘Back Playing Honky Tonks Again’
‘Don’t Be Fooled’

‘Footlights’ / this track featured guest vocals from Kris Kristofferson

‘She Might Make It Through The Night’

‘How Far To Jordan’ / this track featured guest vocals from Kris Kristofferson

‘Let Time Slow Down To A Crawl’
‘Wouldn’t That Be Something’
‘Yesterday’s & Used To Be’s’
‘You’re On The Road To My Heart’
‘Living In Hell With You’
‘Until We Love Again’

The National Fiddler Hall of Fame

In 2020, Scott Joss was inducted into The National Fiddler Hall of Fame.



Scott Joss

• Visit Scott Joss’ official site at scottjoss.net
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