Gene Watson Peer’s Quote from T.G. Sheppard: April 2013

Gene Watson’s Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as ‘the singer’s singer’ – and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson’s Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2013, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from T.G. Sheppard, which he submitted to this site on Tuesday 23 April 2013.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to T.G. Sheppard who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online ‘celebration of a Lone Star Hero’.

Gene Watson and TG Sheppard

T.G. Sheppard
This quote was submitted on Tuesday 23 April 2013.

‘Gene Watson is not only one of country music’s greatest singers, he is one of the most kind and down to earth people that I have ever had the pleasure to work the stage with’

Thank you, T.G. Sheppard, for your support of Gene Watson.



About T.G. Sheppard…

TG Sheppard

T.G. Sheppard has always had an unstoppable passion for music.  This passion, along with twenty No.1 Billboard country music hit singles and being ranked No.81 among all artists in country music, has made T.G. Sheppard one of the most popular live performers on tour today.

It’s only natural with a show chock full of chart topping hit singles, such as ‘Last Cheaters Waltz’, ‘I Loved ‘Em Everyone’, ‘Do You Wanna Go To Heaven’ and ‘Party Time’, that T.G. Sheppard has developed a reputation as a solid performer who delivers exactly what audiences want.

All this and more, combined with a steadfast dedication to entertainment, has truly made T.G. Sheppard one of the great legendary figures in country music.


T.G. Sheppard was born Billy Neal Browder in Humboldt, Tennessee on Thursday 20 July 1944.

T.G. Sheppard knew early in his life that music was more than a hobby.

T.G. Sheppard left his home in Humboldt, Tennessee at the age of fifteen, journeying to Memphis to begin his career in earnest.

Working in various bands, T.G. Sheppard began to develop his stage skills, learning how to put his own touch on the myriad of songs required to survive on the club and party circuit.

Using the name Brian Stacy, he released his first record, ‘High School Days’, which caused a few ripples on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1966.  The resulting acclaim brought him gigs as an opening act for some of the biggest acts in America, including The Animals, Jan & Dean and The Beach Boys.

The fledgling star veered off his musical course in 1965, reverting to his given name of Bill Browder and getting into the record promotion business.  In a short time, his passion for music, now redirected to furthering the careers of others, made him one of the industry’s most successful record promoters.


In 1974, T.G. Sheppard found a song that would change his life forever.  His astute ability to pick a hit song and promote it had paid off for numerous artists, yet T.G. Sheppard kept thinking of his own musical aspirations.

T.G. Sheppard knew Bobby David’s composition ‘Devil In The Bottle’ was destined to be a hit, yet had no success in pitching the tune.

After being turned down by eight record labels in eighteen months, T.G. Sheppard decided to record the song himself.

Heading to Nashville, T.G. Sheppard was signed to Melodyland Records, a subsidiary record company of Motown Records, the mammoth R&B record label that was trying to establish a presence in country music.

When he released ‘Devil In The Bottle’ (written by Bobby David) as T.G. Sheppard, he soon realised which of the two jobs would get his undivided attention.


T.G. Sheppard: 'T.G. Sheppard' (Melodyland Records, 1975)

In May 1975, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of his self-titled debut album, ‘T.G. Sheppard’ (Melodyland Records, 1975), which was produced by Jack Gilmer, Bill Browder and Ray Ruff, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Devil In The Bottle’ (written by Bobby David) (No.1 for one week in February 1975) / this track, which featured back-up vocals from Janie Fricke, also reached No.54 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1974, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1974

‘Tryin’ To Beat The Morning Home’ (written by Red Williams, T.G. Sheppard and Elroy Kahanek)
(Elroy Kahanek was a disk jockey and technician at WMC in Memphis) (No.1 for one week in June / July 1975) / this track also reached No.95 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1975, and No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1975

‘Another Woman’ (written by Dann Penn and Buzz Cason
(No.14, 1975) / this track also reached No.17 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1975

T.G. Sheppard’s self-titled debut album, ‘T.G. Sheppard’ (Melodyland Records, 1975), also included the following tracks:

‘Callin’ You Again’
‘Who’s Julie’
‘I’ll Be Satisfied’
‘Country Country Club’
‘I Lived It Up’
‘Rollin’ With The Flow’
‘I Can’t Help Myself’

T.G. Sheppard’s self-titled debut album, ‘T.G. Sheppard’ (Melodyland Records, 1975), reached No.12 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.


T.G. Sheppard: 'Motels & Memories' (Melodyland Records, 1976)

In March 1976, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘Motels & Memories’ (Melodyland Records, 1976), which was produced by Jack Gilmer, Bill Browder and Ray Ruff, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Motels & Memories’ (written by Ron Birmann and Donald Miller) (No.7, 1976)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Motels & Memories’ (Melodyland Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

‘Cowboy In The Rain’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015)
‘Little Brown Paper Nag Blues’, which was written by Rory Bourke, Eugene David Dobbins (Monday 19 March 1934 – Sunday 23 November 2008) and Johnny Wilson
‘Hot Lips’ (written by G. Tomsco)
‘Pigskin Charade’ (written by J. Hayes and Donald Miller)
‘It Could’ve Been Nashville’ (written by B. Anthony and B. Morrison)
‘We Just Live Here (We Don’t Love Here Anymore)’ (written by Red Williams and Elroy Kahanek)
‘Wednesday Night Poker’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015) and Donald Miller
‘Shame’ (written by Elroy Kahanek, G. Hancock and D. Brady)
‘Solitary Man’ (written by Neil Diamond)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Motels & Memories’ (Melodyland Records, 1976) reached No.28 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.


T.G. Sheppard: 'Solitary Man' (Hitsville Records, 1976)

In September 1976, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘Solitary Man’ (Hitsville Records, 1976), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Solitary Man’ (written by Neil Diamond) (No.14, 1976)

‘Show Me A Man’ (written by Sterling Whipple)
(No.8, 1976)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Solitary Man’ (Hitsville Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

‘Devil In The Bottle’ (written by Bobby David)
‘Oh, Pretty Woman’, which was written by Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 – Tuesday 6 December 1988) and B. Dees
‘Motels & Memories’ (written by D. Miller and R. Birmann)
‘Another Woman’ (written by Dan Penn and Buzz Cason)
‘Show Me A Man’ (written by Sterling Whipple)
‘I’ll Always Remember That Song’ (written by C. Daniels)
‘We Just Live Here (We Don’t Love Here Anymore)’ (written by Red Williams and Elroy Kahanek)
‘Shame’ (written by Elroy Kahanek, D. Brady and G. Hancock)
‘Tryin To Beat The Morning Home’ (written by Red Williams, T.G. Sheppard and Elroy Kahanek)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Solitary Man’ (Hitsville Records, 1976) reached No.16 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.


While promoting records for Stax Records, RCA Records and later, his own independent company, Umbrella Promotions, T.G. Sheppard formed a close personal and professional relationship with Elvis Presley (Tuesday 8 January 1935 – Tuesday 16 August 1977).

The legendary performer appreciated T.G. Sheppard’s unique style and personality.  As a token of their friendship, Elvis Presley (Tuesday 8 January 1935 – Tuesday 16 August 1977) gave T.G. Sheppard his first tour bus in 1976, helping to provide him with the confidence to give up the promotion business and hit the road full time.

During his first year on the road, T.G. Sheppard scored numerous hit singles with the Motown imprints of Melodyland Records and Hitsville Records.

Named ‘Best New Male Artist’ in 1976 by Cash Box, T.G. Sheppard signed with Warner Bros. Records when Motown decided to get out of country music.

T.G. Sheppard’s career then skyrocketed as he scored ten consecutive No.1 singles on the Billboard country music singles chart, including such classics as ‘Only One You’, ‘Party Time’ and ‘War Is Hell (On The Homefront)’.  In 1982, following this impressive ‘debut’, T.G. Sheppard was honoured as Music City News’ ‘Most Promising Male Vocalist’.


In 1977, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘May I Spend Every New Years With You’, a non-album track, which reached No.37 on the Billboard country music singles chart.


T.G. Sheppard: 'T.G.' (Warner Bros. Records, 1978)

In January 1978, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘T.G.’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1978), which was produced by Buddy Killen (Sunday 13 November 1932 – Wednesday 1 November 2006), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Lovin’ On’ (No.20, 1977)

‘Mr. D.J.’ (written by Gil Francis and B. House)
(No.13, 1977)

‘Don’t Ever Say Goodbye’ (written by Dempsey)
(No.13, 1978)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘T.G.’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

‘Baby’s Gettin’ Around’, which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 – Wednesday 9 March 2016)
‘Where Do We Go (When We’ve Gone All The Way)’, which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 – Monday 20 July 2015)
‘She Pretended We Were Married (While I Pretended She Was You)’ (written by Daniel)
‘Nothing To Do But Lie’, which was written by Sterling Whipple and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)
‘Easy To Love (So Hard To Leave)’ (written by Miller and Bissman)
‘Jenny, Don’t Worry ‘Bout The Kid’, which was written by Sterling Whipple and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)
‘I’ve Been So Wrong For So Long’, which was written by Bud Reneau and Hal Bynum (Saturday 29 September 1934 – Thursday 2 June 2022)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘T.G.’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1978) reached No.42 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.


T.G. Sheppard: 'Daylight' (Warner Bros. Records, 1978)

In December 1978, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘Daylight’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1978), which was produced by Buddy Killen (Sunday 13 November 1932 – Wednesday 1 November 2006), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘When Can We Do This Again’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Sonny Throckmorton (No.5, 1978)

‘Daylight’ (written by Robert John Jones and Mike Kosser)
(No.7, 1978)

‘Happy Together’, which was written by Alan Lee Gordon (Saturday 22 April 1944 – Saturday 22 November 2008) and Garry Bonner
(No.8, 1978)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Daylight’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

‘Let’s Keep It That Way’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Rafe Van Hoy
‘She Believes In Me’ (written by Steve Gibb)
‘Never Ending Crowded Circle’ (written by Roger Murrah and Scott Andrews)
‘I’d Like To See Jesus (On The Midnight Special)’ (written by Robert E. Seay and Dorval Lynn Smith)
‘That’s All She Wrote’ (written by Jerry Fuller)
‘Lovin’ You, Lovin’ Me’ (written by Sonny Throckmorton)
‘What Would I Do Without My Music’ (written by Harry Middlebrooks and Bruce Bellland)


T.G. Sheppard: '3/4 Lonely' (Warner Bros. Records, 1979)

In July 1979, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘3/4 Lonely’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1979), which was produced by Buddy Killen (Sunday 13 November 1932 – Wednesday 1 November 2006), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘You Feel Good All Over’ (written by Sonny Throckmorton) (No.4, 1979)

‘Last Cheater’s Waltz’ (written by Sonny Throckmorton)
 (No.1 for two weeks in October 1979)

In 1978, Sonny Throckmorton saw the release of his debut album, ‘Last Cheater’s Waltz’ (Mercury Records, 1978), which included his version of ‘Last Cheater’s Waltz’, which reached No.47 on the Billboard country music singles chart in March 1979.

‘I’ll Be Coming Back For More’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Sterling Whipple
(No.1 for two weeks in January / February 1980)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘3/4 Lonely’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

‘I Wish That I Could Hurt That Way Again’, which was written by Rafe Van Hoy, Don Cook and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)
‘My Ship’s Comin’ In’ (written by Bobby Braddock and Rafe Van Hoy)
‘You Look Like Love’, which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 – Wednesday 1 July 2015)
‘I Came Home To Make Love To You’ (written by Kieran Kane)
‘You Do It To Me Every Time’, which was written by Rafe Van Hoy, Don Cook and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)
‘It’s Only Love’ (written by Rafe Van Hoy and Deborah Allen)
‘(She Wanted To Live) Faster Than I Could Dream’, which was written by Alan Rhody and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘3/4 Lonely’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1979) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1979.


T.G. Sheppard: 'Smooth Sailing' (Warner Bros. Records, 1980)

In June 1980, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘Smooth Sailing’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1980), which was produced by Buddy Killen (Sunday 13 November 1932 – Wednesday 1 November 2006), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Smooth Sailing’, which was written by Sonny Throckmorton and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)(No.6, 1980)

‘Do You Wanna Go To Heaven’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Bucky Jones
 (No.1 for one week in October 1980)

‘I Feel Like Loving You Again’ (written by Bobby Braddock and 
Sonny Throckmorton) (No.1 for one week in January / February 1981)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Smooth Sailing’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

‘If I Never Saw The Light of Day Again’, which was written by Jamie O’Hara (Friday 18 August 1950 – Thursday 7 January 2021)
‘I Could Never Dream The Way You Feel’ (written by Kieran Kane)
‘How Far Our Love Goes’, which was written by Jan Crutchfield (Saturday 26 February 1938 – Thursday 1 November 2012), Buddy Killen (Sunday 13 November 1932 – Wednesday 1 November 2006) and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)
‘My Mind’s Already Home’ (written by Chris Dodson and Sonny Throckmorton)
‘Do It Again’ (written by Rafe Van Hoy, Deborah Allen and Roy Culbertson)
‘Don’t Touch Me’, which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 – Thursday 15 July 2010)
‘Let The Little Bird Fly’, which was written by Buddy Killen (Sunday 13 November 1932 – Wednesday 1 November 2006) and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Smooth Sailing’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1980) reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.


T.G. Sheppard: 'I Love 'Em All' (Warner Bros. Records, 1981)
Gene Watson: 'Sometimes I Get Lucky' (MCA Records, 1983)

In March 1981, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘I Love ‘Em All’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1981), which was produced by Buddy Killen (Sunday 13 November 1932 – Wednesday 1 November 2006), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘I Loved ‘Em Every One’ (written by Phil Sampson) (No.1 for one week in May 1981) / this track also reached No.37 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1981

‘Party Time’ (written by Bruce Channel)
(No.1 for one week in October 1981)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘I Love ‘Em All’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1981) also included the following tracks:

‘We Belong In Love Tonight’ (written by Mark Paden)
‘What’s Forever For’ (written by Rafe Van Hoy)
‘Silence On The Line’ (written by Sterling Whipple)
‘Touch Me All Over Again’, which was written by Jamie O’Hara¬†(Friday 18 August 1950 – Thursday 7 January 2021)

‘You Waltzed Yourself Right Into My Life’ (written by Ron Moore)
/ this track was also recorded by Gene Watson, who included it on ‘Sometimes I Get Lucky‘ (MCA Records, 1983)

‘Face The Night Alone’, which was written by Don Cook and¬†Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)

‘Troubled Waters’ (written by Rick Carnes and Chip Hardy)
‘State of Our Union’ (written by Jim Rushing and Chip Hardy)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘I Love ‘Em All’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1981) reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1981, and No.119 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1981.


T.G. Sheppard: 'Finally' (Warner Bros. Records, 1982)

In March 1982, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘Finally’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1982), which was produced by Buddy Killen (Sunday 13 November 1932 – Wednesday 1 November 2006), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Only One You’ (written by Bucky Jones and Michael Garvin) (No.1 for one week in February 1982) / this track, which also reached No.68 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1982, featured Judy Rodman on background vocals, and ace record producer, Larry Butler (Thursday 26 March 1942 – Friday 20 January 2012), on piano

‘Finally’ (written by Gary Chapman)
(No.1 for one week in June 1982) / this track also reached No.58 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1982

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Finally’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

‘Crazy In The Dark’, which was written by Troy Seals and Edward F. Setser (1945 – Monday 27 January 2020)
‘Wasn’t It A Short Forever’ (written by Michael W. Smith and Alice Keister)
‘All My Cloudy Days Are Gone’ (written by Alan Rhody)
‘In Another Minute’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Michael Kosser
‘We’re Walkin’ On Thin Ice’ (written by Hilary Kanter)
‘You’re The First To Last (This Long)’ (written by Bucky Jones, Michael Garvin and Ron Hellard)
‘She’s Got Everything It Takes (To Make Me Stay)’ (written by Kevin Welch and Mark Paden)
‘I Wish You Could Have Turned My Head (& Left My Heart Alone)’ (written by Sonny Throckmorton)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Finally’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1982) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982, and No.152 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1982.


T.G. Sheppard: 'Perfect Stranger' (Warner Bros. Records, 1982)

In September 1982, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘Perfect Stranger’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1982), which was produced by Buddy Killen (Sunday 13 November 1932 – Wednesday 1 November 2006), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘War Is Hell (On The Homefront Too)’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016), Dan Wilson and Bucky Jones (No.1 for one week in November 1982)

‘Faking Love’ (written by Bobby Braddock and Matraca Berg)
(No.1 for one week in February 1983) / this track was a duet with Karen Brooks

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Perfect Stranger’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

‘Back In Your Arms’ (written by Tim Archer, Eric Ernest N. Baker and Joe Huffman)
‘Reno & Me’ (written by Kevin Welch and John Hadley)
‘The Sun’s Gonna Shine On Me’ (written by Ron Moore and T.G. Sheppard)
‘Where Did We Go Right’ (written by Richard Grossman)
‘A Pretty Diamond Ring’, which was written by Glenn W. Martin (Thursday 30 June 1932 – Sunday 12 May 2019)
‘Spare Hearts’ (written by Chris Waters and Tom Shapiro)
‘Gonna Keep On Tryin’ (written by Sterling Whipple and Mike Rhoda)
‘Close Brush With Life’ (written by Larry Gatlin)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Perfect Stranger’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1982) reached No.29 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.


T.G. Sheppard: 'T.G. Sheppard's Greatest Hits' (Warner Bros. Records, 1983)

In May 1983, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of his first ‘Greatest Hits’ collection, ‘T.G. Sheppard’s Greatest Hits’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1983), which included the following tracks:

‘I Loved ‘Em Every One’ (written by Phil Sampson) (No.1 for one week in May 1981) / this track also reached No.37 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1981

‘Party Time’ (written by Bruce Channel)
(No.1 for one week in October 1981)

‘Finally’ (written by Gary Chapman)
(No.1 for one week in June 1982) / this track also reached No.58 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1982

‘War Is Hell (On The Homefront Too)’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016), Dan Wilson and Bucky Jones 
(No.1 for one week in November 1982)

‘Without You’, which was written by Peter William Ham (Sunday 27 April 1947 – Thursday 24 April 1975) and Thomas Evans (Thursday 5 June 1947 – Saturday 19 November 1983)
(No.12, 1984) / the original version of this track, which was the only new recording on this collection, was recorded by Harry Nilsson (Sunday 15 June 1941 – Saturday 15 January 1994) in 1972; Harry Nilsson’s version of ‘Without You’ was No.1 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music chart for four weeks in 1972

‘You Feel Good All Over’ (written by Sonny Throckmorton)
(No.4, 1979)

‘Last Cheater’s Waltz’ (written by Sonny Throckmorton)
 (No.1 for two weeks in October 1979)

‘I’ll Be Coming Back For More’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Sterling Whipple
(No.1 for two weeks in January / February 1980)

‘Do You Wanna Go To Heaven’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Bucky Jones
 (No.1 for one week in October 1980)

‘Only One You’ (written by Bucky Jones and Michael Garvin)
(No.1 for one week in February 1982) / this track, which also reached No.68 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1982, featured Judy Rodman on background vocals and ace record producer Larry Butler on piano

T.G. Sheppard’s first ‘Greatest Hits’ collection, ‘T.G. Sheppard’s Greatest Hits’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1983), reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country albums Chart in 1983, and No.189 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1983.


T.G. Sheppard: 'Slow Burn' (Warner Bros. Records, 1983)

In October 1983, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘Slow Burn’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1983), which was produced by Jim Ed Norman, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Slow Burn’, which was written by¬†Tommy Rocco and Charlie Black (Wednesday 23 November 1949 – Friday 23 April 2021)¬†(No.1 for one week in January 1984)

‘Make My Day’, which was written by Dewayne L. Blackwell (Thursday 17 September 1936 – Sunday 23 May 2021)
¬†(No.12, 1984) / this track, which featured guest vocals from Clint Eastwood, was inspired by a line from the Clint Eastwood movie, ‘Sudden Impact’ (Warner Bros., 1983)

‘Somewhere Down The Line’ (written by¬†Casey Kelly and Lewis Anderson)
(No.3, 1984)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Slow Burn’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1983) also included the following tracks:

‘Don’t Fight The Night’ (written by Bucky Jones, Chris Waters and Tom Shapiro)
‘She Put The Sad In All His Songs’, which was written by Mac McAnally and Robert Byrne (Saturday 10 July 1954 – Monday 27 June 2005)
‘Baby, I’m A Want You’ (written by David Gates)
‘Blank Check (On My Love)’ (written by Michael Garvin and Bucky Jones)
‘Arthur & Alice’ (written by Bobby Braddock)
‘How Lucky We Are’ (written by Bucky Jones, Ron Moore and Marty Parker)
‘First Things First’ (written by Rafe Van Hoy and Don Cook)
‘It’s A Bad Night For Good Girls’ (written by Mitch Johnson and Harry Shannon)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Slow Burn’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1983) reached No.17 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.


T.G. Sheppard: 'One Owner Heart' (Warner Bros. Records, 1984)
Judy Collins: 'Home Again' (Elektra Records, 1984)

In August 1984, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘One Owner Heart’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1984), which was produced by Jim Ed Norman, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Home Again’, which was written by Gerry Goffin (Saturday 11 February 1939 – Thursday 19 June 2014) and Michael William Masser (Monday 24 March 1941 – Thursday 9 July 2015) (No.57, 1984) / this track, which was a duet with Judy Collins, was also included on Judy Collins’ ‘Home Again’ (Elektra Records, 1984)

‘One Owner Heart’ (written by Walt Aldridge, Mac McAnally and Tom Brasfield) (No.4, 1984)

‘You’re Going Out of My Mind’, which was written by Wayland D. Holyfield (Sunday 15 March 1942 – Monday 6 May 2024) and John McBee
(No.3, 1984)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘One Owner Heart’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

‘Everybody Loves A Sad Song’ (written by Michael Garvin, Bucky Jones and Tom Shapiro)
‘Looking Out For No.1’ (written by Michael Garvin and Tom Shapiro)
‘Love Burning Down’ (written by Ron Moore and Doug Hauseman)
‘I Can’t Help But Love You’ (written by Jerry Gillespie and Stan Webb)
‘Later On’ (written by Bobby Arvon)
‘In My Dreams’ (written by Troy Seals and Dean Pitchford)
‘I Could Get Used To This’ (written by Doug Gilmore, Bobby Springfield and Jane Mariash)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘One Owner Heart’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1984) reached No.26 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.


T.G. Sheppard: 'T.G. Sheppard's Greatest Hits 2' (Warner Bros. Records, 1985)

In 1985, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘T.G. Sheppard’s Greatest Hits 2’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1985), which included the following tracks:

‘Slow Burn’, which was written by Tommy Rocco and Charlie Black (Wednesday 23 November 1949 – Friday 23 April 2021) (No.1 for one week in January 1984)

‘One Owner Heart’ (written by Walt Aldridge, Mac McAnally and Tom Brasfield)
(No.4, 1984)

‘Faking Love’ (written by Bobby Braddock and Matraca Berg)
(No.1 for one week in February 1983) / this track was a duet with Karen Brooks

‘Make My Day’, which was written by Dewayne L. Blackwell (Thursday 17 September 1936 – Sunday 23 May 2021)
 (No.12, 1984) / this track, which featured guest vocals from Clint Eastwood, was inspired by a line from the Clint Eastwood movie, ‘Sudden Impact’ (Warner Bros., 1983)

‘Somewhere Down The Line’ (written by Casey Kelly
and Lewis Anderson) (No.3, 1984)

‘Devil In The Bottle’ (written by Bobby David)
(No.1 for one week in February 1975) / this track, which featured back-up vocals from Janie Fricke, also reached No.54 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1974, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1974

‘Tryin’ To Beat The Morning Home’ (written by Red Williams, T.G. Sheppard and Elroy Kahanek)
(Elroy Kahanek was a disk jockey and technician at WMC in Memphis) (No.1 for one week in June / July 1975) / this track also reached No.95 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1975, and No.2 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1975

‘Show Me A Man’ (written by Sterling Whipple) (No.8, 1976)

‘I Feel Like Loving You Again’ (written by Bobby Braddock and 
Sonny Throckmorton) (No.1 for one week in January / February 1981)

‘Smooth Sailing’, which was written by Sonny Throckmorton and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016)
(No.6, 1980)


T.G. Sheppard: 'T.G.' (Warner Bros. Records, 1985)
T.G. Sheppard: 'One Owner Heart' (Warner Bros. Records, 1984)

In May 1985, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘T.G.’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1985), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘You’re Going Out of My Mind’, which was written by Wayland D. Holyfield (Sunday 15 March 1942 – Monday 6 May 2024) and John McBee (No.10, 1985) / this track, which also reached No.8 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1985, was originally intended to be included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘One Owner Heart’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1984)¬†

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘T.G.’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1985) also included the following tracks:

‘I Could Get Used To This’ (written by Doug Gilmore, Bobby Springfield and Jane Mariash)
‘Love, Ten Feet Away’, which was written by Troy Seals, Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 – Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 – Sunday 11 January 2004)
‘A Little Less Blue’ (written by Wayne Newton and Michael Spriggs)
‘Heat Lightning’ (written by Tom Campbell and Donny Lowery)
‘Shot Down In Hot Blood’ (written by Ron Hellard, Bucky Jones and Tom Shapiro)
‘Love Made A Liar Out of Me’ (written by Michael Garvin, Chris Waters and Tom Shapiro)
‘Fade Away’ (written by Ron Hellard and Alan Rhody)
‘Hard To Get’ (written by Billy Earl McClelland and Tommt Talton)
‘Those Eyes’ (written by Don Henry)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘T.G.’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1985) reached No.54 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.


T.G. Sheppard: 'Livin' On The Edge' (Columbia Records, 1985)
T.G. Sheppard: 'It Still Rains in Memphis' (Columbia Records, 1986)
T.G. Sheppard: 'One For The Money' ('1ne 4 The $') (Columbia Records, 1987)
T.G. Sheppard: 'Crossroads' (Columbia Records, 1989)

It was also in 1985 when T.G. Sheppard signed a recording contract with Columbia Records, where he saw the release of four albums for the label; ‘Livin’ On The Edge’ (Columbia Records, 1985), ‘It Still Rains In Memphis’ (Columbia Records, 1986), ‘One For The Money’ (Columbia Records, 1987) and ‘Crossroads’ (Columbia Records, 1989).


T.G. Sheppard: 'Livin' On The Edge' (Columbia Records, 1985)

In May 1985, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘Livin’ On The Edge’ (Columbia Records, 1985), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Fooled Around & Fell In Love’ (written by Elvin Richard Bishop) (No.21, 1985)

‘Doncha?’ (written by Walt Aldridge)
(No.8, 1985)

‘In Over My Heart’ (written by Walt Aldridge, Tom Brasfield and James Rutledge)
(No.9, 1985)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Livin’ On The Edge’ (Columbia Records, 1985) also included the following tracks:

‘Crazy In The Heart’ (written by Billy Henderson and Bob Garferick)
‘Like A Time Bomb’ (written by Roger Murrah)
‘Love It Out On Me’ (written by L. Angelle and S. Salyer)
‘You’re Mine Tonight’ (written by Rafe Van Hoy)
‘A Great Work of Art’ (written by Billy Lawson, Bob Garferick and Wayne Counts)
‘Hunger For You’ (written by J. Hooker and R. Smith)
‘Banging My Heart Against The Wall’ (written by Walt Aldridge)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Livin’ On The Edge’ (Columbia Records, 1985) reached No.26 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.


T.G. Sheppard: 'It Still Rains in Memphis' (Columbia Records, 1986)

In May 1986, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘It Still Rains In Memphis’ (Columbia Records, 1986), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Strong Heart’, which was written by Tommy Rocco, Charlie Black (Wednesday 23 November 1949 – Friday 23 April 2021) and Austin Roberts (No.1 for one week in August 1986)

‘Half Past Forever (‘Til I’m Blue In The Heart)’, which was written by Robert Byrne (Saturday 10 July 1954 – Monday 27 June 2005) and Tom Brasfield
 (No.2, 1986)

‘You’re My First Lady’ (written by Mac McAnally)
(No.2, 1987)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘It Still Rains In Memphis’ (Columbia Records, 1986) also included the following tracks:

‘It Still Rains In Memphis’ (written by Naomi Martin and Mike Reid)
‘Love Is On A Fade’, which was written by Stephen Allen Davis (Tuesday 4 October 1949 – Monday 26 December 2022) and Dennis Morgan
‘Paintin’ The Town Blue’ (written by Bob Garfrerick, Don Parsons and Steven Dale Jones)
‘The Bad Thing About Good Love’ (written by Walt Aldridge, Billy Henderson and Waylon Caylor)
‘Movin’ & Shakin’ On Business Street’ (written by Roger Murrah and Steve Dean)
‘She Don’t Think Much of Me Anymore’ (written by Mike McGuire, Bud McGuire and Billy Maddox)
‘What You Gonna Do About Her’ (written by Mac McAnally, Gary Baker and Quentin Powers)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘It Still Rains In Memphis’ (Columbia Records, 1986) reached No.26 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1986.


T.G. Sheppard: 'One For The Money' ('1ne 4 The $') (Columbia Records, 1987)

In September 1987, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘One For The Money’ (Columbia Records, 1987), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘One For The Money’, which was written by Buck Moore and Mentor Williams (Tuesday 11 June 1946 – Wednesday 16 November 2016) (No.2, 1987)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘One For The Money’ (Columbia Records, 1987) also included the following tracks:

‘Changes’ (written by Billy Henderson and Billy Maddox)
‘One of Those Days’ (written by Mac McAnally and T.G. Sheppard)
‘Come To Me’ (written by Vince Gill and Don Schlitz)
‘Everybody Loved Us’, which was written by Mac McAnally and Robert Byrne (Saturday 10 July 1954 – Monday 27 June 2005)
‘Let’s Do It Again’, which was written by Earl Bud Lee,¬†Dewayne L. Blackwell (Thursday 17 September 1936 – Sunday 23 May 2021) and Herb McCullough (Thursday 18 May 1944 ‚Äď Tuesday 5 May 2015)
‘Echoes In My Heart’ (written by Anathalee Sandlin, Debi Cochran and Will Robinson)
‘Walk of Life’ (written by Mark Knopfler)
‘So Much For Love’, which was written by¬†Robert Byrne (Saturday 10 July 1954 – Monday 27 June 2005) and Will Robinson
‘Some Bridges Never Burn’, which was written by Keith Stegall and Wayland D. Holyfield (Sunday 15 March 1942 – Monday 6 May 2024)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘One For The Money’ (Columbia Records, 1987) reached No.47 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1987.


T.G. Sheppard: 'T.G. Sheppard's Biggest Hits' (Columbia Records, 1988)

In 1988, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘T.G. Sheppard’s Biggest Hits’ (Columbia Records, 1988), which included the following tracks:

‘Fooled Around & Fell In Love’ (written by Elvin Richard Bishop) (No.21, 1985)

‘You’re My First Lady’ (written by Lyman Corbitt ‘Mac’ McAnally Jr.)
(No.2, 1987)

‘In Over My Heart’ (written by Walt Aldridge, Tom Brasfield and James Rutledge)
(No.9, 1985)

‘Half Past Forever (‘Til I’m Blue In The Heart)’, which was written by Robert Byrne (Saturday 10 July 1954 – Monday 27 June 2005) and Tom Brasfield
 (No.2, 1986)

‘Doncha?’ (written by Walt Aldridge)
(No.8, 1985)

‘One For The Money’, which was written by Buck Moore and Mentor Williams (Tuesday 11 June 1946 – Wednesday 16 November 2016)
 (No.2, 1987)

‘Strong Heart’, which was written by Tommy Rocco, Charlie Black (Wednesday 23 November 1949 – Friday 23 April 2021) and Austin Roberts
 (No.1 for one week in August 1986)

‘A Great Work of Art’ (written by Billy Lawson, Bob Garferick and Wayne Counts) / this track was originally included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Livin’ On The Edge’ (Columbia Records, 1985), and was not released as a single

‘Crazy In The Heart’ (written by Billy Henderson and Bob Garferick)
/ this track was originally included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Livin’ On The Edge’ (Columbia Records, 1985), and was not released as a single

‘Changes’ (written by Billy Henderson and Billy Maddox) / this track was originally included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘One For The Money’ (Columbia Records, 1987), and was not released as a single


T.G. Sheppard also made a name for himself as an astute businessman.

In 1988, T.G. Sheppard opened his private residence in the Great Smoky Mountains as a bed and breakfast.  The 160-year-old log home, built high atop Moon Mountain, was an instant success and is still a popular tourist destination, although T.G. Sheppard no longer owns the property.

The popular performer, who learned first-hand the kind of entertainment experience fans craved, was one of the original investors in the highly popular chain of country nightclubs, Guitars & Cadillacs.  The clubs, located throughout the Midwest, serve as showcase venues for many emerging country music singers, as well as some of the format’s biggest stars.


T.G. Sheppard also served as the national spokesperson for the Folgers’ NASCAR racing team for eight years.  During a six-year span, he served as host and performer on ‘Folgers’ Wakin’ Up Country Tour’, which headlined throughout North America.


T.G. Sheppard: 'Crossroads' (Columbia Records, 1989)

In 1989, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘Crossroads’ (Columbia Records, 1989), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

‘Don’t Say It With Diamonds (Say It With Love)’ (written by Michael Garvin and Randy Boudreaux) (No.48, 1988)

‘You Still Do’ (written by Casey Kelly and Lonnie Wilson)
(No.14, 1989)

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Crossroads’ (Columbia Records, 1989) also included the following tracks:

‘Nothing To It’, which was written by Bud McGuire and Peter James McCann (Saturday 6 March 1948 – Thursday 26 January 2023)
‘I Know All About Her’ (written by Bobby D. Reed)
‘The Invitation’ (written by Don Henry and Debbie Franco)
‘She Didn’t Break My Heart’ (written by Tim Menzies and Tony Haselden)
‘While I’m Here’ (written by Rory Bourke and Mike Reid)
‘Just As Long’ (written by Don Schlitz and Gary Scruggs)
‘Something Worth Waiting For’ (written by Lonnie Wilson, Johnny Neel and John Wesley Ryles)
‘There’s A Lot of Heart In This Old Heart of Mine’ (written by Bucky Jones, Michael Garvin and Tom Shapiro)


By 1990, country music traditionalists had changed the course of the format and T.G. Sheppard found himself wondering how he fitted into the new mold.

T.G. Sheppard chose to withdraw from recording at this time and instead concentrated on his live performances, touching audiences night after night with his tried-and-true repertoire of hits, delivered with non-stop energy and the same excitement he felt as a teenager.


In 1991, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘Born In A High Wind’, a non-album track, which reached No.63 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart.

It was also in 1991 when T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘It’s One A.M. (Do You Know Where Your Memories Are)’, a non-album track, which did not chart on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart.


T.G. Sheppard: 'T.G. Sheppard's All Time Greatest Hits' (Warner Bros. Records, 1991)

In March 1991, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘T.G. Sheppard’s All Time Greatest Hits’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1991), which included the following tracks:

‘Party Time’ (written by Bruce Channel) (No.1 for one week in October 1981)

‘War Is Hell (On The Homefront Too)’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016), Dan Wilson and Bucky Jones 
(No.1 for one week in November 1982)

‘Last Cheater’s Waltz’ (written by Sonny Throckmorton)
 (No.1 for two weeks in October 1979)

‘Do You Wanna Go To Heaven’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Bucky Jones
 (No.1 for one week in October 1980)

‘Somewhere Down The Line’ (written by Casey Kelly
and Lewis Anderson) (No.3, 1984)

‘Slow Burn’, which was written by Tommy Rocco and Charlie Black (Wednesday 23 November 1949 – Friday 23 April 2021)
(No.1 for one week in January 1984)

‘I Loved ‘Em Every One’ (written by Phil Sampson)
(No.1 for one week in May 1981) / this track also reached No.37 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1981

‘Smooth Sailing’, which was written by Sonny Throckmorton and Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) 
(No.6, 1980)

‘Faking Love’ (written by Bobby Braddock and Matraca Berg)
(No.1 for one week in February 1983) / this track was a duet with Karen Brooks

‘Only One You’ (written by Bucky Jones and Michael Garvin)
(No.1 for one week in February 1982) / this track, which also reached No.68 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1982, featured Judy Rodman on background vocals, and ace record producer, Larry Butler (Thursday 26 March 1942 – Friday 20 January 2012), on piano

‘I’ll Be Coming Back For More’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Sterling Whipple
(No.1 for two weeks in January / February 1980)

‘Finally’ (written by Gary Chapman)
(No.1 for one week in June 1982) / this track also reached No.58 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1982


T.G. Sheppard: 'Best of T.G. Sheppard' (Curb Records, 1992)

In March 1992, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘Best of T.G. Sheppard’ (Curb Records, 1992), which included one track, which was released as a single on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

‘(Everything I Do) I Do It For You’ (written by Bryan Adams, Michael Kamen and Robert John ‘Mutt’ Lange) / this track was released as a single in 1992, but it did not chart

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Best of T.G. Sheppard’ (Curb Records, 1992) also included the following tracks:

‘Last Cheater’s Waltz’ (written by Sonny Throckmorton) (No.1 for two weeks in October 1979)

‘Devil In The Bottle’ (written by Bobby David)
(No.1 for one week in February 1975) / this track, which featured back-up vocals from Janie Fricke, also reached No.54 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1974, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1974

‘War Is Hell (On The Homefront Too)’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016), Dan Wilson and Bucky Jones 
(No.1 for one week in November 1982)

‘I Loved ‘Em Every One’ (written by Phil Sampson)
(No.1 for one week in May 1981) / this track also reached No.37 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1981

‘Do You Wanna Go To Heaven’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Bucky Jones
 (No.1 for one week in October 1980)

‘Only One You’ (written by Bucky Jones and Michael Garvin)
(No.1 for one week in February 1982) / this track, which also reached No.68 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1982, featured Judy Rodman on background vocals and ace record producer Larry Butler on piano

‘Party Time’ (written by Bruce Channel)
(No.1 for one week in October 1981)

‘Slow Burn’, which was written by Tommy Rocco and Charlie Black (Wednesday 23 November 1949 – Friday 23 April 2021)
(No.1 for one week in January 1984)

‘I’ll Be Coming Back For More’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Sterling Whipple
(No.1 for two weeks in January / February 1980)

‘Make My Day’, which was written by Dewayne L. Blackwell (Thursday 17 September 1936 – Sunday 23 May 2021)
 (No.12, 1984) / this track, which featured guest vocals from Clint Eastwood, was inspired by a line from the Clint Eastwood movie, ‘Sudden Impact’ (Warner Bros., 1983)

‘Mr. D.J.’
(No.13, 1977)


In 1995, T.G. Sheppard took a two-year hiatus from the road in order to perform exclusively for eight months a year at T.G. Sheppard’s Theatre in The Smokies, a state-of-the-art theatre in the heart of the Great Smoky Mountains.

For the first time in T.G. Sheppard’s musical career, he enjoyed the luxury of going home every night after a show.


However, the wanderlust of a road musician was inescapable, as T.G. Sheppard returned to the road in 1997.


Charity work is a crucial part of T.G. Sheppard’s career.  Throughout any particular year, T.G. Sheppard works with many of the United States’ top charitable organisations, including Cerebral Palsy, Inc., St. Jude Children’s Hospital, The Alzheimer’s Association, The United Way and ChildHelp USA.


T.G. Sheppard: 'Nothin' On But The Radio' (Outwest Records, 1997)

On Tuesday 18 November 1997, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘Nothin’ On But The Radio’ (Outwest Records, 1997), which included the following tracks:

‘She’s Gettin’ The Rock’
‘Nothin’ On But The Radio’
‘Whatever You’re Looking For, You’re Lookin’ At’
‘You Can’t Take It With You When You Go’
‘All Over Town’ (written by Tommy Barnes)
‘I Bring Her Flowers (Every Day)’
‘Ghost Town’ (written by Walt Aldridge)
‘(There Ain’t Nothin’) Like A Coupe DeVille’ (written by Elroy Kahanek and Swain Schaefer)
‘Another Cup of Coffee’ (written by Mike Rutherford)
‘It Still Rains In Memphis’ (written by Naomi Martin and Mike Reid)
‘Long Cool Woman (In A Black Dress)’ (written by Allan Clarke, Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway)
‘It’s All Over Now’ (written by 
Mac McAnally)


T.G. Sheppard: 'T.G. Sheppard: Live At Billy Bob's Texas' (Smith Music Group, 2002)

In June 2002, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘T.G. Sheppard: Live At Billy Bob’s Texas’ (Smith Music Group, 2002), which included the following tracks:

‘I Loved ‘Em Every One’ (written by Phil Sampson) / the original version of this track was included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘I Love ‘Em All’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1981), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in May 1981), and No.37 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1981

‘Slow Burn’, which was written by Tommy Rocco and Charlie Black (Wednesday 23 November 1949 – Friday 23 April 2021)
 / the original version of this track was included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Slow Burn’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1983), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in January 1984

‘Last Cheater’s Waltz’ (written by Sonny Throckmorton)
 / the original version of this track was included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘3/4 Lonely’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1979), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in October 1979

‘Do You Wanna Go To Heaven’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016) and Bucky Jones
 / the original version of this track was included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Smooth Sailing’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1980), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in October 1980

‘Only One You’ (written by Bucky Jones and Michael Garvin) 
/ the original version of this track, which was included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Finally’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1982), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in February 1982, featured Judy Rodman on background vocals and ace record producer Larry Butler on piano

‘Devil In The Bottle’ (written by Bobby David)
 / the original version of this track was included on T.G. Sheppard’s self-titled debut album, ‘T.G. Sheppard’ (Melodyland Records, 1975), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in February 1975 / this track, which featured back-up vocals from Janie Fricke, also reached No.54 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1974, and No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1974

‘War Is Hell (On The Homefront Too)’, which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 – Sunday 30 October 2016), Dan Wilson and Bucky Jones
 / the original version of this track was included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Perfect Stranger’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1982), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in November 1982

‘Fooled Around & Fell In Love’ (written by Elvin Richard Bishop)
 / the original version of this track was included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Livin’ On The Edge’ (Columbia Records, 1985), and reached No.21 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1985

‘You Feel Good All Over’ (written by Sonny Throckmorton)
/ the original version of this track was included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘3/4 Lonely’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1979), and reached No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in 1979

‘Whatever You’re Lookin’ For (You’re Lookin’ At)’
 / the original version of this track was included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Nothin’ On But The Radio’ (Outwest Records, 1997), and was not released as a single

‘I Feel Like Loving You Again’ (written by Bobby Braddock and 
Sonny Throckmorton) / the original version of this track was included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Smooth Sailing’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1980), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for for one week in January / February 1981

‘One For The Money’, which was written by Buck Moore and Mentor Williams (Tuesday 11 June 1946 – Wednesday 16 November 2016)
 / the original version of this track was included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘One For The Money’ (Columbia Records, 1987), and reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1987

‘Party Time’ (written by Bruce Channel)
/ the original version of this track was included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘I Love ‘Em All’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1981), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in October 1981

‘Finally’ (written by Gary Chapman)
 / the original version of this track was included on T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Finally’ (Warner Bros. Records, 1982), and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in June 1982, and reached No.58 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1982


Kelly Lang¬†recorded T.G. Sheppard’s¬†‘When We Loved Here’ (co-written with Kelly Lang) and included the track on her debut album, ‘It‚Äôs About Time’ (Destiny Row Records, 2004).


T.G. Sheppard: 'Timeless: Classic Love Songs' (Aspirion Records, 2004)

On Tuesday 26 October 2004, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘Timeless: Classic Love Songs’ (Aspirion Records, 2004), which included the following tracks:

‘Everybody Loves Somebody’ (written by Sam Coslow, Ken Lane and Irving Taylor)
‘All The Way’ (written by Sammy Cahn and James Van Heusen)
‘The Very Thought of You’ (written by Ray Noble)
‘At Last’, which was written by Jay Booker and Jack Keller (Wednesday 11 November 1936 – Friday 1 April 2005)
‘Just the Way You Look Tonight’ (written by 
Dorothy Fields and Jerome Kern)
I Left My Heart In San Francisco’ (written by George Cory and Douglas Cross)
When I Fall In Love’ (written by Edward Heyman and Victor Young)
I Want To Be Around’ (written by Johnny Mercer)
Smile’, which was written by Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin KBE (16 April 1889 – Sunday 25 December 1977), Geoffrey Claremont Parsons (7 January 1910 – Tuesday 22 December 1987), James Phillips and John Turner
Misty Blue’
It’s Impossible’
Fly Me To The Moon’ (written by Bart Howard)
As Time Goes By’ (written byHerman Hupfeld)
Wonderful World’ (written byGeorge David Weiss)


T.G. Sheppard: 'Because You Love Me' (Mansion Entertainment / Mansion  Records, 2012)

On Tuesday 13 March 2012, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘Because You Love Me’ (Mansion Entertainment / Mansion Records, 2012), which included the following tracks:

‘I Surrender All’
‘Sweet Hour of Prayer’
‘Mary, Did You Know’ (written by Lee Rufus Greene III and Mark Alan Lowry)
‘His Eye Is On The Sparrow’
‘Because You Love Me’ (written by Kostas and John Scott Sherrill)
‘Amen’
‘Blessed Assurance’
‘Softly & Tenderly’
‘O, Happy Day’
‘In The Garden’
‘The Old Rugged Cross’

‘Just A Closer Walk’
‘Precious Memories’
‘The Lord’s Prayer’


T.G. Sheppard & Kelly Lang: 'Iconic Duets' (Time Life Music, 2014)

On Tuesday 4 March 2014, T.G. Sheppard & Kelly Lang saw the release of ”Iconic Duets (Time Life Music, 2014), which included the following tracks:

‘Jackson’, which was written by Jerome ‘Jerry’ Leiber (Tuesday 25 April 1933 – Monday 22 August 2011) and Billy Edd Wheeler
‘Every Time Two Fools Collide’ (written by Janice Dyer and Jeffrey Tweel)
‘Islands In The Stream’, which was written by Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb, CBE (Thursday 22 December 1949 – Sunday 12 January 2003) and Robin Gibb, CBE (Thursday 22 December 1949 – Sunday 20 May 2012)
‘Lonely On Lake Shasta’ (written by Kelly Lang, Lorrie Morgan and Mark Oliverius)

‘I Got You Babe’, which was written by Salvatore Phillip ‘Sonny’ Bono (Saturday 16 February 1935 – Monday 5 January 1998)
‘You’re the Reason God Made Oklahoma’ (written by Larry Collins and James Sanford Pinkard)
‘After The Fire Is Gone’, which was written by L.E. White (1930 – Tuesday 7 September 2004)
‘Golden Ring’ (written by
 Bobby Braddock and Rafe Van Hoy)
‘Just You & I’ (written by Frank J. Myers)
‘You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’, which was written by Barry Mann, Phil Spector (Tuesday 26 December 1939 – Saturday 16 January 2021) and Cynthia Weil (Friday 18 October 1940 – Thursday 1 June 2023)


T.G Sheppard: 'T.G. Sheppard: Duets With The Legends of Country Music' (Cleopatra / Goldenlane, 2015)

On Friday 30 October 2015, T.G Sheppard saw the release of ‘T.G. Sheppard: Duets With The Legends of Country Music’ (Cleopatra / Goldenlane, 2015), which included the following tracks:

‘Down On My Knees’ (written by Kelly Lang) / this track featured guest vocals from The Oak Ridge Boys

‘The Killer’ (written by Kelly Lang, T.G. Sheppard and Bobby Tomberlin)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Jerry Lee Lewis (Sunday 29 September 1935 – Friday 28 October 2022)

‘Why Me Lord’ (written by Kris Kristofferson)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 – Saturday 5 June 1993)

‘Song Man’, which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 – Wednesday 6 April 2016)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Merle Haggard

‘Fifteen Rounds With Jose Cuervo’, which was written by Tommy Curry, Dennis Knutson (1949 – Saturday 1 September 2018) and Kostas
/ this track featured guest vocals from Delbert McClinton

‘The Next One’ (written by Kelly Lang, Lorrie Morgan and Mark Oliverius)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Lorrie Morgan

‘100% Chance of Pain’ (written by Kelly Lang and T.G. Sheppard)
/ this track featured guest vocals from BJ Thomas (Friday 7 August 1942 – Saturday 29 May 2021) and Jimmy Fortune

‘It‚Äôs A Man Thing’ (written by Kelly Lang and Frank Solesby)
/ this track featured guest vocals from George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 – Friday 26 April 2013)

‘Wine To Remember & Whiskey To Forget’ (written by Tommy Riggs and Tony Toliver)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Mickey Gilley (Monday 9 March 1936 – Saturday 7 May 2022)

‘Dead Girl Walking’ (written by Kelly Lang)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Kelly Lang

‘In Texas’, which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 – Friday 22 December 2006)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Willie Nelson

‘Have You Ever Loved A Woman?’ (written by Michael Kamen and Robert John ‘Mutt’ Lange)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Englebert Humperdinck

‘I‚Äôm Not Going Anywhere’ (written by Kelly Lang)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Crystal Gayle

‘If You Knew’ (written by Kelly Lang, Lorrie Morgan, Mark Oliverius and T.G. Sheppard)
/ this track featured guest vocals from Ricky Skaggs & The Whites


T.G. Sheppard: 'Midnight In Memphis' (Leopard Entertainment, 2019)

On Friday 20 September 2019, T.G. Sheppard saw the release of ‘Midnight In Memphis’ (Leopard Entertainment, 2019), which included one track, which was released as a single on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

‘I Wanna Live Like Elvis’ (written by Billy Davis, Chip Davis and Doug Graham) / this track was released as a single in 2019, but it did not chart

T.G. Sheppard’s ‘Midnight In Memphis’ (Leopard Entertainment, 2019) also included the following tracks:

‘Black Coffee’ (written by Wally Montgomery and Even Stevens)
‘We Hours’ (written by Bruce Birch and Wally Montgomery)
‘Addicted To You’ (written by Kelly Lang)
‘Say Hello To Heaven’ (written by Buddy Hyatt)
‘I’m A Song’ (written by Bruce Birch and Gary Nicholson)
‘I Was Losing You’ (written by Bruce Birch)
‘Good Man’ (written by Kelly Lang)
‘Thanks To You’ (written by Bruce Birch)
‘100% Chance of Pain’
‘Midnight In Memphis’ (written by Barry Gibb)
‘Sober’ (written by Kelly Lang, Jacky Dawn Valeras and Breann Young)
‘The Day Elvis Died’ (written by Cindy Morgan and Frank Myers)


Gene Watson and TG Sheppard

‚ÄĘ Visit T.G. Sheppard’s official site at tgsheppard.com
‚ÄĘ Read Kelly Lang‘s ‘Peer’s Quote’ about Gene Watson